23 Burst results for "Thala"

Why pet pigs are more like wolves than dogs

60-Second Science

03:39 min | 7 months ago

Why pet pigs are more like wolves than dogs

"Starring John that Timmy and of course, laughing. It's a classic television trope. Timmy is fallen down a well lassie save him herself. So she runs defined help. Actually. Timmy never did fall down a well in the entire run of the TV show. But the idea that a dog could seek help from a human does have a solid basis in science in what's known as the unsolvable task experiment. A dog I learns how to open a puzzle box with a tasty treat inside. The puzzle is secretly switched for another that's impossible to solve. After becoming frustrated dogs, shift their attention away from the puzzle and onto a nearby human than back to the puzzle. The dog attempts to shift the humans attention to the puzzle as request for help human infants do the same thing. Such efforts are called Referential Communication. So of dogs behave this way, you might expect the same from their close relatives wolves. But when researchers tested wolves raised by humans, the animals just kept trying to solve the puzzle never seeking help since the dogs and wolves were all raised. The same way by the same people domestication must be responsible for the behavior. So researchers began studying domesticated creatures, other animals, species like some horses boats have been Stephen this this. There were no dieted combinations with those Paula Peres Fraga and he thala gist at. Lawrence University in Hungary. Pet Cats respond more like wolves, dogs, cats are domesticated, but they are not social like dogs and wolves pigs however are social. When big save in the wine or even like why endorse this animals lives in group on they need to communicate. We've they're gonNA specifics to be able to leave, which is why the researchers decided compare pet dogs with pet pigs. While the pigs revealed, they work capable of referential communication. They didn't actually turn to people for help. Once. The test became unsolvable. They acted more like wolves determined to find a solution on their own. The results were published in the journal Animal Cognition. Well, the medication man's is slightly to leave the days Connecticut change in the in the species from their wild relatives, and normally these genetic change has appear because of human pressure most domesticated animals, including dogs, cats, horses, goats, foxes, and so on. Show similar anatomical and physiological changes associated with domestication. But Franca says, her study shows that the domestication process can precede along different pathways in different animals and that could explain by domestication and sociality alone can't explain why dogs react the way they do when faced with an unsolvable puzzle. Fraga thinks that it could be related to their domestication history. Their domestication was different speaks has been domestic. Normally. Like mostly for being us meets resource. It was only later that we started treating some pigs as pets dogs on the other hand were treated as companion animals from almost the beginning which appears to explain their willingness to ask for help.

Timmy Paula Peres Fraga Lawrence University Stephen Hungary John Animal Cognition Franca Connecticut
Bailouts, Bitcoin, Disruption, Failures and Hope

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

09:18 min | 1 year ago

Bailouts, Bitcoin, Disruption, Failures and Hope

"As I mentioned at the top we're going to discuss three basic things. One is the growing. Bipartisan and global shutdown and bail out everything movement to is the inability of even extraordinary and unprecedented monetary policy to actually resolve these issues in a way. That seems like it'll do anything. Productive for any sort of length of time and three the revival of the system is breaking and when it does will need something new that doesn't share the same problems of being vulnerable to politically expedient overreactions narrative. That frankly is what drove. I think many of our initial interest in Bitcoin in the first place but before we get into those topics Stephanie. Can you a quick update on the virus itself and recent events? Yes so we released a show a couple of weeks ago where I think everyone is going through these waves of accepting that our lives are going to change in a big way. The situation has certainly changed since the last time we discussed it on the show we have some bonus content also from last week if you want to hear more perspectives on this but basically you know the US and other countries that were later hit by the virus pandemic are starting to finally take things more seriously. Some people are understandably concerned. Alarmed making lots of preparations for their lives to change including you know taking measures to not have contact with other people in order to avoid spreading the virus. It's come to light that this particular virus has a long incubation period. Potentially where someone can have the virus and transmitted to other people but not show any symptoms. And so of course you know. This causes a lot of concern. What if this person has it? What if this person has it? It's a scary prospect rate and so social distancing or staying out of spaces large gatherings of people restaurants bars anywhere where people gather has been the prescription as the way to stop this thing because of course if too many people get it especially older people seem very vulnerable. The hospitals will get overwhelmed. There are not enough respiratory critical care resources to take care of everybody who would potentially get sick and need critical care if this thing spreads quickly so our best hope of beating. It is to reduce contact with each other and avoid transmitting it. So that has had a number of real world effects first of all. The economy is really changing in a situation where people are staying in. Tours there not patronizing restaurants and bars. Obviously this is very hard hit. Employees of those establishments are finding themselves. Suddenly out of Work Schools Workplaces colleges other institutions are closing places where people normally gather and they're transitioning to remote learning which could have effects on Internet bandwidth. We don't really know yet. But as many schools transition to remote and has many workplaces transition to remote we could see lots of effects of that. People are staying with their families. You know we could see some sociological effects from this for some people. This is extremely psychologically burdensome to be deprived of interaction with other people or the ability to really go out and do stuff. So you know. There's a lot of anxiety and mental health issues. That could come out of this too. We've seen bailouts from government already. Basically orders to kind of enforce these quarantining measures combined with bailouts of industries that are affected by them. And we're definitely going to talk about those on the show today. I think a month ago if you said that Donald Trump would be supporting you and the European Union. Close all their borders. You'd be called crazy. Yeah and yet of the timelines available to us. That's where we're at today. Yeah we were talking about that on the show with Andrew Yang his presidential campaign. I heard a quote from him saying that. I didn't think that I would end my presidential campaign in February and then in March. We'll be doing the exact thing that I campaigned on. But here we are. I just want to point out that in a recent meeting I believe sectors treasury. Steve Said. That's what we must absolutely do is avoid using the word bailouts in any discussion of this in the public. This was leaked and one of the people present raise their hand and asked if we could instead call them freedom payments in the vein of freedom fries. We're now going to get freedom payments and yeah. The bailouts are starting two weeks ago. I tweeted that Boeing would be one of the first companies to go under and it seems like that may well be the case. Yeah you call that good job injuries. They're going to get a bailout. I but you know this is a much broader thing. But I think it's important to separates two different aspects of this so a lot of people are going to see this as the director salts of the pandemic but the truth is and we've been talking about the last ten years is that especially the US economy but many economies around the world have been an increasingly precarious condition long before this pandemic hit the US was operating at abnormally low interest rates with quantitative easing continuing. In fact if you remember we had the latest round of content. Amazing started in October Long. Before the pandemic with problems in the feds repo market and the overnight lending market the tried out because of liquidity shortages in the Thala markets. So this was an economy that already was underperforming especially for the vast majority of people and underperforming wall on a steady full drip of stimulus and low interest rates. It was by no means the healthy economy so this is the environment into which the pandemic has now creating a secondary problem. I think it is bordered to separate the issues of financial ization the monetary issues which are issues of keep credit misallocation of credit debt portfolios that are distressed and bad loans companies doing share buybacks in order to prop their shares. And all of that crap. That was happening for the past ten years and was a steady drumbeat of fake financial news and fake financial numbers. To make everything look like. It was okay. Now we're dealing with a very different problem. And the thing here is that we now have a fundamental simultaneous supply chain crisis as as productivity crisis people are going to become unemployed in very large numbers that we haven't seen before especially in some of the most affected industries. This is going to hit an already distress middle class and below much harder. And you can't stimulus your way out of demands collapse and a productivity collapse because the problem is you know even with giving people money like helicopter. Payments People are going to spend on absolute essentials like Renton utilities which is going to go right back into the pockets of very large companies and already rich real estate magnates. It's not gonNA circulates and create jobs for the people who actually need them. So we've got these two issues one. A monetary crisis and to a labor crisis now ended artificially keeps Renton food prices higher than the market wishes them to be absolutely. Yeah because it's not as if you know. Forty percent of all landlords are going to take zero dollars off of units that they can't rent versus seventy percent or seventy cents on the dollar forever unit. They could rent so you know. The unconscionable thought that perhaps Manhattan real estate would go down for year is just. We can't let that happen so I think it's worth talking about sort of the bailouts kind of the principals level right because for me a lot of the reason why I was. I think many of us were vehemently opposed to the bailout of the banking system and many of the companies during the financial crisis was it. Sure looked like they acted in ways. That were fundamentally irresponsible. And then wound up blowing themselves up and so in that sort of circumstance there was this concern and continues to be concerned of moral hazard. Where if you bail these people out his her awarding bad behavior exactly and you're doing it at the expense of the tax payers who obviously had no involvement in that did not make any of those business decisions. What's going on now is a little bit different because as centuries it's a collapse of demand right as we shut down our normal interactions as we shut down the way that kind of life works right now. That's not really the case and my point broadly is that I am also opposed to these bailouts. But I'm opposed for fundamentally different reason. Which is I don't think it's GonNa work. I think that the attempt to solve this problem using that same old tool kit is effectively. Going to make things worse and at the end of the day not actually resolve the problem in a way that anybody is hoping for.

United States Bitcoin Work Schools Workplaces Donald Trump Stephanie Boeing Renton European Union Andrew Yang Steve Director Manhattan
What do do about black knot disease on my plum trees?

Your Gardening Questions

03:48 min | 1 year ago

What do do about black knot disease on my plum trees?

"Successful growers for generations so. Tom said it's a question and Tom Wants to know. What is the best way to treat black not on a Stanley? Plumtree sit down. I don't have any good news for you You can start when you first see black like not. You can cut off alcohol at the smaller branches twigs and so on well first of all what is black. Not It is a disease of Oh boy a viral if I remember right or might be bacterial. I'm not sure which either way it gets into that whole family of plants. Okay most especially the plum types and can literally take the plant from a good looking beautiful thing down to stubs and nubs and then finally uncut flat to the ground. It is unstoppable in my my recall on reading about it and I have tried for clients in years past first of all. If you attack that disease which is due dip the pruder's or saw into alcohol then saw off several inches away from the black not back toward trunk or twigs et Cetera. And then and before you make a second cut definitely dip it again so that you don't move it from place to place. It apparently is airborne. I'm not sure all the details on it. I'd have to talk to my path a lot. Path Thala gist friends. Not Pathological friends. Path holidays okay. Careful there fred. But but in any event it gets into the tissue You the black not part is as this. I'll call it sticky. ooh comes out. It picks up the fungi that turns it black and therefore the name if I understand correctly but in any event you can Dan. If you find it as a young on a young plant out on the twigs you can remove them but be sure to dip the alcohol et Cetera in between cuts cuts. And then you just keep cutting away for the first three years or whatever and he eventually when you get tired of looking at the stubs you oh you just go ahead and take it down now. It does not seem translocate from that tree on your property to a Nutri I would not not plant in the same spot but it. It's one of those plants that I call renewable. I have had a variety of plum on property. purplish leaves beautiful the thing Ten by ten when finished growing but then when it finished growing by my soul cut it was a stem of probably three and a half or more inches in diameter. The plant was probably twelve tall. Twelve Wide Beautiful Pink Flowers purple foliage and so on but it just eventually goes away then I I would be brave enough or foolish enough whichever to go ahead and plant a second one in the near area so that I took those same attractions on but and the plant would be probably save for a number of years and then you'd have to repeat the whole process again so if you if you were to repeat it be be cautious and know that it's going going to end up dying again from the same thing but it won't be a quick death now Stanley Plum. Okay I guess is very susceptible to black. Not Now I. I don't get into the varieties of fruiting trees but Stanley do no and it is I if I remember right. It's a green leaf plant Atlanta and heavy bearing good fruit all those positive

Stanley Plum TOM Atlanta DAN
The History of Women in Science Fiction

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

05:21 min | 1 year ago

The History of Women in Science Fiction

"Science fiction has often been represented as a boys club but you have in particular studied and written extensively about history of women running science fiction if women have always been present in his own room why do people don't know about this why do we just think about the men who have written science fiction right i mean i think we we do think about women in the shocker but only like at certain periods of time right like everyone willing to admit that mary shelley is is one of the founders of the genre certainly one of the i think the first authored a write a commercially successful science fiction story and then you know you get fast forward to the nineteen seventies add a the revival of feminism an all of a sudden you at authors like her glennon joanna raw in margaret atwood and then people are like oh wow women right science fiction fiction and of course just this past year n k jemison right became the first author of of any gender race to win three she goes in award so now we see women in the john ross but there's a huge gap between like eighteen eighteen as they nineteen seventy they add i don't really understand where all the women were so i started looking around at turns out sure enough there they were there we've always had women in the sean raw on from the very beginning women constituted about fifteen percent of all science fiction producer third an we know that by the time they started doing reader's poll in the nineteen forties and fifties that women counted for at least forty percent of the readership as well an today i'm not sure where we are in readership but i know that the numbers of women science fiction have doubled so worried about thirty thirty five percent now but i think the reason that we forget that there were so many women in between shelly an a the revival of feminism in that the the growth of science fiction is because women were sometimes writing we were looking at the kinds of fiction they were writing and then we also can't find it because it didn't always get anthology eyes right it's it's really hard the early science fiction community were all magazine science fiction and add those magazines often got thrown away or they didn't laugh they weren't preserved so if you don't have access to a university with a huge science fiction collection like i do it's really hard to find these women and then you know it's exacerbated by the fact that even even if you have anthologies a lot of early anthologies were written by people who didn't necessarily include women in those anthologies for one reason or another yeah i mean it's it's interesting because obviously you have the the men who were writing in this pulp magazines same guy that didn't disappear people still about that and it's like it's just frustrating but then i mean i don't know if there's anything in it but things like james chip tree you know perhaps people don't necessarily know that that this is a pseudonym right right i i think james kept tree right that was probably a pretty well now one interesting thing i've found is that most women did not you nailed it and then most women went by willie decidedly feminine name an and usually their own name although sometimes they would also take other names like willis lorraine which is a lovely name she was born mary mod done you could see why she switched her name but really what i found is most women did not match courageous men an austin women pictures were printed printed in the magazine in the very early magazines author had catches of themselves with their draw with their with their stories so an even if somehow you missed that'd be editor were quick to correct a reader who missed took female writers from el writer but what did happen and that one very early in the shot like in the twenties and thirties right so white after universal suffrage and the first wave of feminism and i think a lot of people were really sort of on board with thinking about how the future my female as well is mel an but then in the late thirties and forties you the backlash against feminism in that time when the first science fiction anthologies are being put together and those were put together by a younger group of men who really did you find participated in that that minutes backlash rhetoric right john campbell who wore that no woman could write science fiction even though he'd been publishing in magazines women did you know he had it that's how to the male got her start in her career he told her no woman could write a story and she said yeah i bet i can write a story you'll like it so much you'll you'll back me from warren and that's exactly what happened actually but as anthology forgetting put together women we know they're anecdote on an app that that women have told that they were cut out of the magazine so luckily i've known her with one of the pioneering science fiction authors she gold lingers back and a was really popular with people's you're looking big creating space opera often she had been invited to be to include a story in one of the first big client fiction anthologies andover supposed to be a party for everyone who's gonna be on thala g and she was sick and she couldn't go so she sent her husband an editor said oh you must be likely stone he said no no that's my white i'm just here for her as a place called her and they're like oh that's very interesting and then within two weeks you had a letter saying yeah we decided to drop their story from anthology i'd really hard not to put to ensure together on that

Thirty Thirty Five Percent Fifteen Percent Forty Percent Two Weeks
50 years of Stonewall

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

08:06 min | 1 year ago

50 years of Stonewall

"Fifty years ago this week patrons of the stonewall in a gay bar in New York's Greenwich Village stood up to police who had raided the venue since then the stonewall uprising has become the most storied event in the history of the LGBT, right struggle. But there's a history that has been and continues to be both under documented and overlooked. There isn't even a consensus on exactly what transpired on the evening of the uprising itself, I wanted to find out more about what forces have shaped the documentation of LGBT history to begin I paid a visit to pick Marcus at his home in Manhattan. My name is Eric Marcus. And I am the founder and host of the making gays repot cast. And we bring LGBTQ history to life to the voices of the people who lived it, and we draw much of material material from my archive of one hundred interviews that I recorded thirty years ago for an oral history book of the same name. I knew nothing about the movement before nineteen sixty nine I thought everything began stonewall. I discovered that was wasn't the case that I was really outraged. I thought why didn't I know this history to me? And so in most ways the most interesting part of our history is the history before stonewall, and I was able to find all of these people, mostly elderly, who had been there at the very beginning of the movement in the US, and I got to record their stories, my conception of LGBTQ history, changed dramatically that I spoke with people on there wasn't much written about it at the time I started my work, and so I had ideas about people, especially in the early movement that there was some how accommodation as so that all they wanted to do as simulate and it was the perspective of the people who wrote about it writing through the lens of the nineteen eighty s. What I didn't realize what the times were like and what people were up against early in the movement, and how courageous really radical, they were in their thinking that they that they imagined a world that could be different and slowly found a way I fit into the world. And then to begin changing it, and that to me made them radicals, even though some of a lot of the activists came along later looked at them and thought of them as less than and old fashioned that somehow there, what they did didn't matter very much, given the, the history of the movement goes back so far before stonewall. What do you think explains the editor of stonewall as a kind of watershed within algae, PT, Hugh history, stonewall uprising in stonewall was indeed a watershed of the movement? It was a turning point. But there were between fifty and sixty existing organizations in nineteen sixty nine there was a, a modest national movement. What stonewall did is it? Channeled or I should say the organizing that happened in the aftermath of stonewall based on the infrastructure that existed already channel, this new energy and anger into a much larger national movement. It, it inspired it triggered the gay liberation phase of what had been called the home afoul movement. So you went from fifty to sixty organizations in nineteen sixty nine to a year later, fifteen hundred organizations across the country, and then another year later twenty five hundred organizations thousands of young people at colleges and universities were brought into the movement. It was very young movement, and the people who are involved earlier were for the most part swept away some people continued on through the next days of the movement, and they brought their experience into this new phase of the movement. In fact, the first organizing meetings that were held right after stonewall were hosted by the Mattachine society, an organization founded in nineteen fifty in Los Angeles. And the daughters of leaders in organization for lesbians, founded in nineteen fifty five so it didn't. I thought that the movement sprang whole from the uprising of the stonewall inn, I didn't know, otherwise until I did my research and discovered that. It required. Concentration organizing in hard work to get from the stall uprising to the first pride March here in New York when you're later and then to this movement, that's now grown across the country and all over the world records of LGBT life have been shaped by the same divisions influence other histories, these include splits along sexual racial and generational lines. The lesbian her story archives are a historical repository run by lesbians for lesbians. I met Maxine Wolfe, one of the archives coordinate is in the Brooklyn brownstein. Whether kept most archives that call themselves LGBT are g and t they have practically no ill. Okay or be. So part of it is that we can't rely on other people to preserve our history. If you read most history books about the gay movement. A lot of what is in. There is about men and their movement, not what lesbians would doing at the same time, and even if they're lesbians in the organization, they don't get as much visibility. So this is about making sure that lesbians are at the center of that history. Also the way that we define it is very different than most archives. We define it as being as broad as possible we don't want to create an archive that's about only about famous lesbians, which most archives, they want material from well-known members of the community, and we have that, but we also value, the idea as Joan Nestle said that any lesbian at walks in here can see an image of herself which. Means that we have the papers of lesbian prostitutes, and go, go dancers, and truck drivers and secretaries as well as having papers of people like orgy Lord, or Audrey enrich, or other well-known, lesbians, would you mind showing me around? So on the first floor we put the things that most people who are not necessarily academic, researches would want to see novels autobiographies biographies. We also have literary criticism we have and Thala geez. We have poetry books. We have poetry anthologies, my favorite thing on this floor, though is we have books from other countries. And one of my favorite books is this, which was may? It's, it's called a Dikshit airy and it's handmade by a group of Japanese lesbians who brought it here, and it has phrases in English, and then Japanese, and then Japanese and English, and you can see it's all handmade. So it has things like are you monogamous? Women's take back the night it has a Butch on the streets in between the sheets. This is all an English. And then in Japanese this, reflects the way that I think, so many lesbians feel about wanting to make sure that people remember us. And that's what this archive is about the most touching thing that happens here is to see somebody come in and see something that they were part of some lesbian will walk through the door from some other state and, you know, an older woman who will say, you know, I was part of this poetry, collective in one thousand nine hundred seventy five and I bet you know, we did this book but you probably don't have it. And then I'll say, well, let's look, and then we look and we find it and people cry, you know, women cry when they come in here and see a couple of things not just something that's there's, but a place that respect. Who they are a place that is beautiful, and that is put together and that cares about who they are. And that's very important to me. And I think to everybody who is at the archives today, LGBT history is documented move freely in extensively even ever before. But as the wheel celebrates pride this month, we would do well to remember the people whose lives anti, we're not giving the attention. They deserved for multiple twenty four in New York on Henry Sheridan.

Stonewall New York Eric Marcus Greenwich Village Manhattan Founder United States Joan Nestle Mattachine Society Maxine Wolfe Los Angeles Brooklyn Editor Audrey Thala Henry Sheridan Dikshit Hugh Thirty Years
"thala" Discussed on The Astrology Podcast

The Astrology Podcast

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"thala" Discussed on The Astrology Podcast

"Book, three of the end Thala g the length of life technique, the technique that. That, incorporates, the predominate, or in order to attempt to calculate the length of a person's life, which inches tall Gers considered to be not just possible, but a very important technique that you need it to us to some extent with clients Valluns and other astrologers at this point when they get the length of life technique, and they start talking about the predominates that tends to be when they will introduce the other forms of house division of what I call to Greb, aced forms of house division, which includes equal houses, which is a degree based form of house division, but also quadrant, house systems. So it's at this point. So Valance introduces quadrant. Houses, actually introduces the poor free house system when he starts talking about calculating the predominate or which is interesting because it's like elsewhere. This is in book, three of the unthought G. And if you back up to book too. To where he starts, using example charts uses several dozen example, charts, all using whole sign houses. But then for some reason when he gets to this specific technique of calculating the predominates, then he stops and he introduces quadrant houses for the first time. And what's interesting as he, he introduces it as if it's a concept that he wasn't otherwise using up to that point, or that required being used or being introduced because the reader, wouldn't be taking it for granted up until that point. So it's almost like it's something unique to this technique and away that he's introducing within the context of this specis specific technique is quadrant houses. So interestingly Ptolemy, does something simple or something similar where basically. In Ptolemy, most of the time in his text. He when he's just he refers to the houses in passing. And he seems to often refer to them as signs is if he's using whole sign houses, just like Mallon's is in most of the other like different topical chapters of his book, like when he when he talks about, like, children or marriage or career or what have you. He seems to refer to the, the, the houses the told houses as if they're signs, but then all the sudden just like Mallon's when he gets to the length of life technique, he introduces this other form of house division where he stops and suddenly becomes very deliberate about outlining this other approach and historically, there's actually been allotted to be it's about what system of house division told me introduced at this point, but the two modern translators who have commented on this are Robert Schmidt and James Holden. In who were to the only modern astrologer contemporary astrologers in modern times both of them have passed away in the past few years now. But the to the only people that read Greek and translated, this chapter of Ptolemy so that they could, you know, be able to say something about it. And they both said that they thought that Ptolemy was introducing equal houses at this point based on their reading of the Greek. But it was kind of a weird modified form of house of equal houses where it started five degrees above the ascendant. So it was the it's the it's it sounds weird, but it's the ancestor of, and it's the origin of the modern, like five degree rule were astrologers will say, well, if a planet is within five degrees of the cusp of house, and you interpreted as being in the next house, or interpreted, as being in both houses, or whatever. Right. You know, it's sort of varies, but that's the ancestor of this is going back to Ptolemy and in this chapter on the length of life technique, told me introduces, what seems to be equal houses, but he says that it begins or the power of the house extends five degrees before the actual starting point. So five degrees above the ascendant, again, the. Okay. So, so this is strange intimate self, and this is important in terms of the history of the house division. Go over this whole thing of it. I go through this whole thing talking about this in my chapter, because I wrote like a long chapter on house, division and forgot to.

Ptolemy Mallon Greb Valluns James Holden Robert Schmidt five degrees five degree
"thala" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"thala" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"But I talked to Regina Meredith from guy, and we're doing an expedition in may the end of vague because that farmer said he would give over one of the bones for us to do DNA testing. So we're doing an expedition they're seeing the tombs seeing the towers, which are called mood. I g and and and and covering this story because that is not the only place on the planet where they have found the bones of giants, and maybe we can start connecting some dots here in the Thala g they talk about these giants are these people. That's an amazing work that you got to keep doing that. In. Well, I'm curious. You know, it's it's, you know, I don't do ancient aliens. But it's part of it. You know, it's part of it. We can't just do foes whistle blowers. We have to make sense of the history of this planet, and you do a lot of that too with your questioning of the past. And it's it's not just now, and maybe we could project what the real history of the planet who was here who who built these monuments SU who had these esoteric kinds of of thinking we have to put it together. It's connecting the dots is what it basically is. Steve Bassett always believes that disclosures eminent coming from government. I don't know if it's gonna happen that way, how about you. Well, as I'm sitting with Jim Pederson, and he's telling me this really happened. It's documented Nick pope is written a book about it. If that's disclosure. That's as close as you're going to get all lease whistle blowers. The people dramatic. The people like Edgar Mitchell and all of them. Yeah. I mean, you honestly think that any government is going to have a stake in they've been lying. Heck, no. That it doesn't even logical. And the problem is not so much the government's that change, you know, 'cause journal gore so used to say stop blaming the government they change every four years. It's not about the government. It you've done. The interviews with 'em. Or you know, that there is a vested interest in the military industrial complex. Now the words that they're back engineer technology, and that's in my book conversations with treadle Corso that the back engineered technologies producing, you know, huge amounts of money, and you can't put the genie back in the bottle. They're using this stuff. And and they want more of it. I'm sure and you can't you can't go up against that that's economics. And that's how this planet is run. I guess we could say though, that we as a nation were lucky that we have this kind of foreign technology to try to reverse as opposed to. Some other country. Yeah. But I do think that Russia had it to do think. Russia also did some of this. And I don't know if you've talked to Paul stone hill at all, but he's a Russian scholar on Ufology. And I think that's why I think that the United States and Russia had this race the space race as because they were the other ones that knew about this at had files about this now. And I don't know if this is true. I just read this. The Chinese are planting plants on the moon on the far side. It's crazy. It's amazing. And apparently, they're growing. Apparently, they're growing. That's that's even more amazing. I don't know why we stopped going to the moon. Well, I mean you from the camp that believes that we were told to stop by them. Well, we're no different from any other species from this planet, and why weren't the other people to tell 'til to stop? I mean, I think that we could have gotten those kind of messages it depended what we wanted to do crew course expressed to me that did we did want to a night a nuclear device on the moon. I don't think that's very ethical. There's a difference between in know testing at atomic bomb on the moon and growing plants point policy with us. We're gonna hit a break. We're gonna come back and talk more. I want to get into your thoughts about the Vatican. You're very close there and want to get your take on their belief systems about extraterrestrials and what they're doing about it. We'll be back in a moment. Paula Harris with us our special guest on coast to coast AM. Never miss a detail on a show or a guest. Sign up for the coast zone Email newsletter available for free at coast to coast AM dot com. This hour on ninety three WIBC is.

Russia gore Jim Pederson Regina Meredith Steve Bassett WIBC Edgar Mitchell Nick pope Paula Harris engineer United States four years
"thala" Discussed on Double Toasted

Double Toasted

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"thala" Discussed on Double Toasted

"Yeah. Yeah. He was. Notes and everything notes ready. That's good. I know it's good for the job is doing, but it's bad for the movie. Manage sticking his hand as you looking at his notes, let me religious shit. You know, this is this is going to be a spoiler for this movie for even start. I don't know actually might not be because it wasn't wasn't very definitive. How you doing personnel? Kamar joined doing great. Here. Great glad to see Canard. Paid him to go ahead and go see this robinhood moving today. I got some shit to say. All right brother hosing night, as I came out that the two oh, really, oh, this is going to be good. Oh, damn, well, let me tell you. Hi, I'm gonna say, look, I'm not saying thank because. It's been really excited to tell somebody about this people out there being really negative about this whole thing. People at the left at this trailer for Robin Hood twenty eighteen the mocking it talking about. Do we need another one? Like, yes, we do actually personally very excited to have a new Robin Hood was really looking forward to this. Updated version of robinhood now, I don't know if there's sarcasm, but I was. House goes economic. Still like I was really looking forward to a new version the rubber now, I'm gonna be honest with you. I'm going to. I'm a man with a with an open mind. I said it was ten years that we had the really Scott, Robin Hood. And it was not good. Let's be honest. I mean, really Scott genius Bill make it, but that s a movie he just pulled out his ass and. Legend begin alleged ends with this film here. I said Robin Hood is such a great Thala. She's such a great story. Such a great legend. I grew up actually loving the legend of Robin Hood and the stories, and I said, you know, something I'm waiting for a God on his good version modern version of robinhood in we'll we're gonna find out if this is it in. I'm gonna play this trailer for you got Canard over here with pretty much a book. He's reading for this movie. That's deep. This movie reevaluate my life and get things ready. He's ready to move on. We don't watch this trend. Let me..

Robin Hood Canard Kamar Bill Scott Thala ten years
"thala" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"thala" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"So there are some episodes of tales from the crypt. When I go back and watch them now that I'm like, oh, I had no idea for instance. I had no idea that was Tim curry playing female character. Because clearly the first time I watched it. It was too scrambled for me to tell. Well in that episode. That's kind of mercy. But wow, it's amazing. The things people would will put up with in the search for for a story that they're into, you know, like the idea I always think it's funny that, you know, people watch like theater bootleg videos, like somebody will record a movie with a camcorder inside a theater and people will watch that. Yeah. This kind of look terrible. But I don't I mean people you they're hungry for it. They want that movie. And I guess you were like that too watching through through all the static and weird color variations. Yeah. That was how you got to watch it. Yeah. So today's episode for longtime listeners to your mind. This is essentially the same concept is the three creepy pasta Assode z- that I did with Christian where we would pick creepy pasta stories and sort of squeeze the science out of them. And I have to say we squeezed all the science out of creepy pasta. I don't think there's there's much left. So this feels like the next logical place to start squeezing hollering Thala. Jeez. Well, I'd say let's get right into our first selection of the day. All right. My selection here for first one is a question of fear. And this is this is one of my favorite episodes of rod Serling night gallery his horror anthology series that ran from nineteen sixty nine through nineteen Seventy-three. And then, of course, just eternally on the scifi channel during the during the nineties is this a picture of Leslie Nielsen with an eye patch in a mustache..

rod Serling Tim curry Leslie Nielsen Thala
"thala" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"thala" Discussed on WSB-AM

"In West Virginia. I'm glad you waited your turn great to have you here. Thank you. God bless you. Russia's altered to talk to you. Thank you so much. I have a comment, and then something personal share. Okay. I've listened and watch what I can of these hearings. I sit in can't help to think what if he would have appointed a woman. What would they have come up with them? Trump almost did her name is Amy Coney Barrett. And she will be next. Theoretically, it was a toss up, and it was decided to go to cavenaugh because they thought it would be easier with capital with his record that the Democrats would be loaded for bear against a woman because this the Amy Conybeare Barrett when she did her confirmation hearings for her current position on the court, Dianne Feinstein said to her the dogma is thick with you, isn't it. Meaning your Catholic religion, you're Thala systems, really deep in you dogma, Amy Coney Barrett is openly pro-life. Yeah. They would have destroyed her just like they're destroying cavenaugh. They would have found a different angle to take. But make no mistake about it. They would not have gone easy. That's see that would have pointed out the apostasy hang onto break here. Coming up Susie will get back to you right after the break, but that's the hypocrisy. They would have destroyed this woman any woman..

Amy Conybeare Barrett West Virginia Russia Dianne Feinstein Susie Thala systems Trump
"thala" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"thala" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Your smart speaker for Alexa, play twelve hundred W O AI on iheartradio. That sounds like a pretty good choice to me. Okay. Let's let's quickly go to the phones. Suzy in West Virginia. I'm glad you waited your turn great to have you here. Thank you. God bless you. Russia's older to talk to you. Thank you so much. I have a comment and then something personal to share. Okay. I've listened and watch what I can of these hearings. I sit in can't help to think what if he would've appointed a woman. What would they have come up with Dan? Trump almost did her name is Amy Coney Barrett. And she will be next. Theoretically, it was a toss up, and it was decided to go to cavenaugh because they thought it would be easier with capital with his record that the Democrats will be loaded for bear against a woman because this Amy Conybeare it when she did her confirmation hearings for her current position on the court, Dianne Feinstein said to her the dogma is thick with you, isn't it. Meaning your Catholic religion. You're Thala systems really deepen you dogma, Amy Coney Barrett is openly pro-life. Yes, they would have destroyed her just like they're destroying cavenaugh. They would have found a different angle to take. But make no mistake about it. They would not have gone easy. That's see that would have pointed out the apostasy hang on break here. Coming up Susie will get back to you. Right after the break, but that's the hypocrisy. They would've destroyed this woman any woman. Hey, it's.

Amy Coney Barrett Amy Conybeare Alexa Russia West Virginia Dianne Feinstein Suzy Susie Dan Trump Thala systems twelve hundred W
"thala" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"thala" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"On KOA NewsRadio. Okay. Let's let's quickly go to the phones. Suzy in West Virginia. I'm glad you waited your turn great to have you here. Thank you. God bless you. Russia's owner to talk to you. Thank you so much. I have a comment, and then something personal share. Okay. I listened and watch what I can of these hearings. I sit in can't help the think what if he would've appointed a woman. What would they have come up with Dan? Trump almost did her name is Amy Coney Barrett. And she will be next. Theoretically, it was a toss up, and it was decided to go to cavenaugh because they thought it would be easier with capital with his record that the Democrats would be loaded for bear against a woman because this the Amy county Barrett when she did her confirmation hearings for her current position on the court, Dianne Feinstein said to her the dogma is thick with you, isn't it. Meaning your Catholic religion, you're Thala systems, really deep in you dogma, Amy Coney Barrett is openly pro-life. Yeah. They would have destroyed her just like they're destroying cavenaugh. They would have found a different angle to take. But make no mistake about it. They would not have gone easy. That's see that would have pointed out the apartment hang on the break here. Coming up Susie will get back to you. Right after the break, but that's the hypocrisy. They would have destroyed this woman any woman. KOA? Newsradio time is twelve thirty five. You can believe in rock Tober the Rockies beating the cubs two to one. And.

Amy Coney Barrett Amy county Barrett KOA Russia Dianne Feinstein West Virginia Suzy Rockies Thala systems Dan Susie Trump cubs
"thala" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"thala" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Okay. Let's let's quickly go to the phones. Suzy in West Virginia. I'm glad you waited your turn great to have you here. Thank you. God bless you. Russia altered to talk to you. Thank you so much. I have a comment, and then something personal share. Okay. I listened and watch what I can of these hearings. I sit in can't help to think. What if he would've appointed a woman? What would they have come up with Dan? Trump almost did her name is Amy Coney Barrett. And she will be next. Theoretically, it was a toss up, and it was decided to go to cavenaugh because they thought it would be easier with capital with his record that the Democrats would be loaded for bear against a woman because this Amy Conybeare it when she did her confirmation hearings for her current position on the court, Dianne Feinstein said to her the dogma is thick with you, isn't it. Meaning your Catholic religion, you're Thala systems, really deep in you dogma, Amy Coney Barrett is openly pro-life. Yeah. They would have destroyed her just like they're destroying cavenaugh. They would have found a different angle to take. But make no mistake about it. They would not have gone easy. That's you see that would have pointed out the hang on the break here. Coming up Susie will get back to you. Right after the break, but that's the hypocrisy. They would have destroyed this woman any woman. Taking a look at.

Amy Coney Barrett Amy Conybeare West Virginia Suzy Russia Dianne Feinstein Susie Thala systems Trump Dan
Geiger, John John and US discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

Geiger, John John and US discussed on Morning Edition

"Homeland security department reports there's been a sharp jump in the arrests of unauthorized immigrant families as NPR's. John Burnett reports August set a record for adults and children illegally crossing the southwest border. The administration had hoped that its immigration crackdown from separating families to narrowing the path to asylum would discourage people from trekking to the US border. But that doesn't appear to be the case last month agents apprehended about. Twelve hundred people a day on the southwest border. That's a thirty eight percent jump in adults traveling with children a homeland security spokesman blames human smugglers for convincing immigrants to take advantage of what he calls broken US immigration laws. Thala Hindi Samiti. But at twice deported farmer named Alexander said from his home in Guatemala. Everybody knows that Trump is doing everything to kick all the immigrants out of the US. But this doesn't take away our desire

Geiger John John United States John Burnett NPR Merida New York Richard Hake Kristen Gillibrand Queens Homeland Security Department Benjamin Crump Marijuana Attorney Stephen Nelson Officer Cranston Manhattan
"thala" Discussed on R U Talkin' R.E.M. Re: ME?

R U Talkin' R.E.M. Re: ME?

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"thala" Discussed on R U Talkin' R.E.M. Re: ME?

"You can't do a best of without this. This was played all the time. Is there anything else from reckoning you would have put on there? I would have I made a different sequence orient best. I would put seven Chinese brothers said a single though. I don't know, but it was a hit as far as I. I mean, everyone's saying when I was growing. Okay. Feel like it was, what would you put on? I think these are for this sort of thing. I think these are the two songs, but if I was at another probably would be pretty persuasion. Yeah, but I think this is a fine representation that album. Yeah, and seven Chinese brothers probably wasn't wasn't hit. I don't know why everyone kind of knew where when I grew up maybe. Okay. So this is from fables. We driver eight? Yeah. This is a His hit. got to be on there. I mean, this is this is REM in a nutshell. Yeah. In your nutshell, in my this is our EM in nut sack. If that's how they marketed. That would be weird. Okay. Then. I'm not sure what you're gonna think of this choice. The second song they use from fables is life and how to live it. I think it's a great choice. It was a single. I love the song, but but I don't know what else from fables. They're from year. Oh, yeah. That's nowhere to be found on serious emission. They don't like it or something. I don't know exactly what not one of my favorites, but it's a big hit. It was a hit for them at the time. Yeah, yeah. So a little odd. That's bizarre. I would have included three from that album. What else would you? Oh, so you would have put in because it was a hit. College radio? Yeah. Okay. Next up from lifes rich pageants. We have begin the begin. It's nice hearing something else from lifes rich pageants because upon them just had fallen me. Yeah. So it's good to get two tracks. This was not a single, not mistaken was it, but I don't what else, man and fall, but that's another quite frankly, a series emission superman should have been on this, but it's a cover. So. Really knows the original. It should be on your should be on yet, but I can see why they would leave it off next up. We have fall on me obviously. Has to be on your. Yes. All right. Then we go to the tracks from document, and I think they picked the three from document that you have to put on here. You have finest works on, but not the horn mix. Absolutely not. And we also have. That's great. What if they put a best of together of their whole career and they did not include the song. I mean. Remember the the, the beastie boys and Thala. Gee, I believe they call it which was there to disc best of and they look even day had to put on fight for your right to party. And in the liner notes, they were like, we put the song on because it sucks. Ha ha. Yeah. Anyway. Yeah, we were barris by, but here it is like even if they hated it, they would have to put on. All right. And then of course, rounding out the tracks from document you have. So aside from superman and can't get there from here. Yeah, great, great. Good list from the from the IRS era I would have if they're only putting two songs from. From from license pageant I would take out. Begin began and put in super superman just because agreed even though begin the begins a better song and agreed, but superman everyone. Yes. Saying that summer I would put three songs from that and fables on their late..

barris IRS Thala Gee
"thala" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"thala" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Why? This happens, though. No one knew, but Glossop Thala gist. Whitney. Stewart has been studying the brains of patients with positive street of head trauma. His found deposits of protein called tau throughout their nervous systems and by studying animals with similar brain injuries. It looks like the initial trauma provokes the formation of tau aggregates the injury site, and these than alarmingly promote their own formation elsewhere around the brain spreading nerve pathways damaging of cell. And triggering dementia. The good news though, is that Nelson his, no, this. It might be possible to develop a way to stop it. In many of the studies of people surviving brain injury that report there is an increase in risk of Alzheimer's disease, but also getting better recognizing that in many of these cases, it's actually distinct form of dementia different to Alzheimer's disease, and it's one that we call no chronic traumatic and Cathy or c to e for short and that used to be known as Boca's dementia. Now, how long after the injury do you tend to see these manifestations? Well, patients who taught up clinically with problems often several decades after the engine. That's the problem is what's happened in that time from when they were exposed to nj to the development of dementia and what we were doing. Our studies looking at people with a shorter period of survival to try and get picture of that timeframe in between. So what did you actually do? We did two things freshly we loot material from patients hit survived a brain injury. On average about five years after new and Luke to their brains compared to normal aging brains. What we found in that was it had deep position an op normal routine in their brain, which we then on to locate in an animal model to see if we can replicate that and figure out what was happening in these patients. So what was the protein that you found there that shouldn't be? So what we found was an album uproot in the brain or abnormal form of protein innovation called tau. And actually it's a protein that would normally have an our brains to kind of hold the structure of the brain together, very important protein, but sometimes for reason to don't understand that protein can become abnormally processed abnormally folded and it's not abnormal protein that causes problems down the line..

Alzheimer's disease Glossop Thala Nelson nj Whitney Stewart Boca Luke Cathy five years
"thala" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"thala" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"If I was going to be driving it because I probably wouldn't professional mechanic, and that's where I look at the role of neurologists and psychiatrists to help us improve ourselves. But I've been really frustrated doctor fivefold usually if you go to a psychiatrist, other something wrong with your brain, and let's see if we can fix it. I'm not that I don't think there's much wrong with my brain today. I just wanna brain that's twice as fast in twice as smart and will live ten times longer than mother nature wants it to be. And it seems like whenever I ask for that, I get the response. Well, more tests are needed and like let me be the test already come on here. So where is your field. On helping us get professor x pains versus just he'll depression, which is worth doing. Obviously, that field is generally falls under the term neuro enhancement, which is very interesting because starting about ten years ago there the began sort of a public, let's say, an open discussion among brain specialists about whether this is ethical and and something that neurologists psychiatrists should do. There's a controversy but but a lot of people including there was a there was a ethical committee from one of the neurological societies that looked at this and came to the following conclusion. They said, look, it may not be the best use of physicians because traditionally the physician kinda heels and takes Thala g. and and tries to remediate it. But but just like cosmetic surgery, it's not unethical. And if a neurologist. Or psychiatrist could add a quality of life to somebody. There's there's nothing inherently wrong with that. That wasn't that wasn't a accepted by everybody did. It did provoke a lot of disagreement, but so it is a controversial thing. But his brain is interesting because it's different than every other organ because if you have a kidney right, and your kidney is is performing what it needs to do. I mean, it's clearing the toxins from your blood. You know, that's all. That's all you really. You know, that's, that's fine. I mean, there's no point in making it through to clear twice as much blood volume than you actually have in the same amount of time because it really isn't going to impact your your ability to function. But the brain, I mean, when is, when is the brain good enough, you know what I mean? It's the brain is, is, is is how a heart and soul of who we are and how we perform and what we accomplished. So so it's never, you know. There's never a parameter saying, well, this brain is, you know, it's it's serving. It's purpose because maybe normal we may. We may find that a brain is in the normal distribution, but can you ever not benefit from a brain that's performing a little better? I don't think so. What is the brains purpose? Well. I'll give you this many answer step, but but but as a segue into ketamine and the psychedelic drugs, I'll give you one of the explanations and I think and this is counterintuitive, but it's, it's been my, it's sort of a conclusion I've come to by by listening to a lot of people who've had very profound life changing experiences taking ketamine, which is a psychedelic drug and also from their experiences with other psychedelic drugs. I think the brain where the brains major functions is to filter out reality. There's, there's a, there's a reality that's out there that is a counter productive to our ability to do what we do in this world and that is to sort of advance and reproduce and to and to propagate the species. And so I think. The rate does filters out some of the the really profound appreciation of of the world. And it puts it into a categorical everyday kind of knowledge that we that we have. And I realized this because you know, I think what the psychedelic drugs to and and it's interesting that there's so many different from collage ical mechanisms. They all seem to produce very similar. Subjective profound subjective experiences were patients will come back and they will feel that they had this this profound understanding of reality that occurred under the influence, but they don't feel it was like some sort of, you know, in neabry intoxicated phenomena, they actually feel that the the curtain was lifted and they were able to appreciate the true reality reality in which we are not categorical. We are. The world does not fit into. Verbal labels and categories..

ketamine Thala g. professor ten years
"thala" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"thala" Discussed on Bookworm

"You really have gone from the kind of or the people used to cool humorous writing, you know, occasional writing the gold it in the New Yorker. I think it was Thurber and it was Benchley and now you've edited and Thala, jeez fiction, and you've kind of put on display the fact that writing is an art and. Craft for you. You disappear from scenes. The way your father used to do just walk out of the room. You go to your desk and right when you're with your family writing is part of the business of the day, and I wondered now, have they gotten used your family to you getting up in wanting out? I saw you writing mouse bed down when we were talking about it. They're a great things that occur in life and you have to have a notebook to keep track of them. I do. I do personally, and then I take the notebook calm, and then I write the next day. You know, like, you know, those guys will wear those sleeveless tank tops, but they cut them all the way down the side to the waste. I was interviewed by fellow in England, and we were talking about those and he said, oh, you mean skank tops? And I'd never heard them. Referred to as skank tops before, but it's actually the perfect word plus you never call a guy skank, but up such a perfect term and a mouse bed is such a. Such a good word for for kotex nor everything down. And then I go back to, I hotel room when my house and first thing every morning I pull out my notebook and I write it all in my diary. I guess I, I kinda start by look at the day before and I think it would it. What moment was I most alive yesterday? What did I feel most engaged? Because I think I'm like most people and then I'm living in the past or the future most of the time, but every so often I'm present and that's usually the moment when I feel alive and it is not a moment of adventure necessarily. Sometimes it's like a moment of connection with another person or sometimes it's just witnessing something. I remember one day not long, goes on an airplane, and there was this woman across the aisle, and she was using her phone. To secretly film the flight attendant who was in her cabin. And I asked the flight attendant about that later and she said, people do that all the time. They're just trying to catch his something, constantly filming us constantly. But just the look on that woman's face as she was secretly filming the flight attendant. And I would doing what I thought was so evil. Really, you see people now all the time with little cameras doing. I don't know why it bothers me. I write everything down. I don't know why it bothers me that other people have different methods for, you know, we Cording things, but it does bother me..

Thurber Cording Benchley Thala England one day
"thala" Discussed on The Film Vault

The Film Vault

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"thala" Discussed on The Film Vault

"She made it a concerted effort decision to focus more on directing over the last fifteen years than actor director in directing all sorts of things i should not direct this though this came to her in the story goes that she stumbled across upon the script that drew pearce had written called hotel artists which if you're not familiar with it it's that movie they might have seen a trailer about or heard about which is it's like a hotel slash hospital for criminals the john wick world it's very similar to that john wick universe that you and i both said was probably the best part john wake but spent any time there with the coin the coin gets you in to the rules no kelly very very similar this is a grittier darker version of that but drew pearce didn't know jodie foster heating send her the script he's still the story is what they say the qa he still doesn't understand how she got the script or maybe he does but they wouldn't say he's being they're all being cagey jeff goldblum was that craig thala to this whole thing but apparently they're out there you need give it with friend but he's made nothing but shorts which is interesting it's very interesting so she came upon it and she said you know what i wanted to make this and i wanna start it now here's the problem the star the lead is an older woman probably in her late sixties early seventies jodi not that yet from what i've seen you kind of ugly.

director pearce craig thala john wick kelly jodie foster jeff goldblum jodi fifteen years
"thala" Discussed on KWAM 990 Talk Radio

KWAM 990 Talk Radio

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"thala" Discussed on KWAM 990 Talk Radio

"Piece this may look like a japanese movie it looks like a studio ghibli film to people just happened to catch it by not like reading into it it's not it's it's chinese actually and it's a big movie in china it's a big movie overseas in asia and part of it is kind of remember the monkey king i did a couple weeks ago which is steeped in chinese mythology and for so many big fat dumb american like myself who comes and watches the movie like the monkey king i don't understand that i don't know the stories i never heard the stories of the monkey king so i i don't know anything about that but i can appreciate it for being an action movie the way it was this one similarly i do not have the cultural history to fully appreciate big fishing begonia because i as i understand this this isn't just a made up story that has relevance in fantasy and the thala g and deals with sort of the other worldly elements that that that the chinese culture has developed over thousands of years but with that said it brings you up to speed on it and a little bit it reminds me of you know like a movie like spirited away which again is japanese studio ghibli but this one is very mythical and you have all these strange characters and these strange creatures that the interact with like when the girl goes to the elders of where she lives to bring the boy back to life and and rekindle his life and she goes to basically a wizard or sorcerer and he's looks strange and he's got like a.

china asia thala g
"thala" Discussed on Still Processing

Still Processing

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"thala" Discussed on Still Processing

"Is very difficult to manage with millions of is on you and so i salute cardi b and the way she talks about her body that we should talk about sex and when i hear her tunes i'm like i need some of that i feel like it's a magical infusion of some of that confidence it's just like grafted onto me i hear her talk in a rap and i hear these songs and i'm like yo she was made for craigslist this is a woman in craigslist personals every day at relied on the record is basically subject on craig's list it just is anyway big heads love it i wanted to also read again from the same book shutout timra you're saving my life with this anthology this week pat khalifa who is a trans six radical queer elder leather dyke daddy he's submits an essay for this in thala g about sexiness and which he talks about he's has a disabled body and so he talks about sort of the things that make him feel erotic and aroused i don't know if cardi and pack leaf i've ever met but what he says here is directly to the belka leases which is her birth name's playbook and i just want to read it because this is exactly what this album is for me pat writes i'm affected like everyone else by the vision of youth and wealth that floods the information stream but i've met too many people embodies archetypes only to discover they are still insecure and full of envy for attributes they do not possess you can never be pretty thin or rich enough i feel sexy when i feel strong that strength is no simple matter of physical stamina or power it is about being on my own side and not being fooled by the haters that strength also comes from being on the side of other minorities i sent up for women people of color the disabled anybody who is getting scammed or after by a system that was set up to funnel ever more profit into the hands of people who already have way too much money it that is not the cardi b story i don't know what is.

craigslist craig pat khalifa thala g
"thala" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"thala" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"As you get so close to somebody who was legendary that it's too close and next thing you know you have more information it's one of the things tom brady and derrick jeeter and michael jordan let the ad campaign guys sort of make their image for them or the other guys silent excellence and will create them thala g with nike ads and under the giant may not have actually been interesting i don't know but i think someone that size with a drinking problem is probably an interesting story to tell on hbo yen hbo usually does very good work with this stuff i do i had a phase where i got into all of the biographies and my favorite one was andre the giants i found him fascinating it's not just because i'm a wrestling fan he was really fascinating any biography really yeah so you've seen this you've did you did you watch last night where you interested last night and i watched last night because i was in new orleans all weekend and i needed to sleep that bleep off i couldn't sleep so i did watch it it was good great but we know so much about andre the giant because we've had so many people come on the air and tell stories about andre the giant that it didn't do i didn't learn much that in already know about andre the giant so it was pretty good but i imagine if you don't know anything about andre the giant you watch the head last night it was really really excellent you know are here what anything so it was pretty good that is actually your standard it just you know listen big guy comes takes over the wrestling world he drinks a lot of areas flatulent problems they tell funny stories about his flatulence and that's it over that was the movie and it was okay.

new orleans flatulence tom brady derrick jeeter michael jordan nike andre
"thala" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"thala" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"He was angry as i am just wondering uh bitcoin but too little bitcoin since i get they asked every day out it's really slowed down uh you were at the g btc which had 35 23 has been cut in half just about fifty percent down from about five weeks ago i'm not sure the exact bitcoin price 'cause i couldn't care less but i have an idea of some of the other coins are down seventy percent and again i'm told this 1300 a fourteen of 1500 in it it's tarling than to a one big giant shamen scam a lot of these coins are just made up out of thin air just the follow and you know what have something called ripple came out is down like eighty percent and the guy you won't the ripplewood it it was worth thala or than mark zuckerberg not anymore and the fact is he can't sell or go down zero so and of course all the stocks that we were laughing at on this show and begging you that'd be new pleading with you they're all down seventy five percent with one that went from ten dollars to one hundred sixty stopped trading and it's never going to open up again every time loss sec claim and just said har wa and it there has to be a lesson.

mark zuckerberg seventy five percent seventy percent eighty percent fifty percent ten dollars five weeks