21 Burst results for "Texas Monthly"

"texas monthly" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

01:31 min | Last week

"texas monthly" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"In one discover a new podcast from our library of over 350,000 titles. Here's an I Heart radio podcast preview. This region of West Texas, known as the Permian Basin is in the midst of the biggest old boom in history. The Permian Basin is the epicenter for oil and gas production in the free world. This unprecedented production has transformed the region from a depressed desert into a land of opportunity. My name is Cristian Wallace. I was raised in the Permian Basin in a small town called Andrews. I grew up on tales of the region's legendary booms and busts. I even spent a year working as a roughneck in the whole patch after college, but I've never seen or heard of anything like this. Against all odds, the Permian Basin has become one of the most important swaths of land on earth. The boom is reshaping the world's climate economy. Even our geopolitics way are now the number one energy producer in the world. And I'm not gonna lose that wealth on Dreams on Windows. Yet if you understand this place or its people, thistles, a story of roughnecks and roustabouts of billionaire wildcatters and one of the dreamers and full on hell raisers and of average folks, just trying to get by as the world around them is turned upside down. Texas Monthly and imperative entertainment.

Permian Basin Cristian Wallace Texas Monthly West Texas producer Andrews
"texas monthly" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:18 min | Last month

"texas monthly" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Podcast preview. This region of West Texas, known as the Permian Basin is in the midst of the biggest old boom in history. The Permian Basin is the epicenter for oil and gas production in the free world. This unprecedented production has transformed the region from a depressed desert into a land of opportunity. My name is Cristian Wallace. I was raised in the Permian Basin in a small town called Andrews. I grew up on tales of the region's legendary booms and busts. I even spent a year working as a roughneck in the oil patch after college, but I've never seen or heard of anything like this. Against all odds, the Permian Basin has become one of the most important swaths of land on earth. The boom is reshaping the world's climate economy. Even our geopolitics way are now the number one energy producer in the world. And I'm not gonna lose that wealth. Dreams on windmills. Yet if you understand this place or its people, thistles, a story of roughnecks and roustabouts of billionaire wildcatters and one of the dreamers and full on hell raisers and of average folks, just trying to get by as the world around them is turned upside down. Texas Monthly and imperative entertainment. This is boom town. Listen and follow this podcast for free on the I heart radio app number one for music, radio and podcasts, all in one Out. Radio goes one on one with Bryan Adams to discuss how change is inevitable. Many things happen to me. One thing that it's been most costing about. All of it has been changed. Nothing has been the same. Nothing stayed the same and whether it be working with the same people are or not. I mean, because most of the guys that work with me have been with me the whole time, and that includes even the people in technical. In the studio and everything, but nothing stays the same. And you know anyone expects it to us is mad and needs to get their head check because it's not even if you try to keep things the same. It never will keep listening to my heart Radio form or Bryan Adams and all your favorite artists. Here's to taking.

Permian Basin Bryan Adams Cristian Wallace West Texas Texas Monthly Andrews producer
The 2020 Election, a Discussion with Democratic Strategist Mustafa Tameez

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

05:31 min | 3 months ago

The 2020 Election, a Discussion with Democratic Strategist Mustafa Tameez

"Hey everyone. This is diffuse congruence the American Muslim experience episode one, hundred, four I'm sorry and as always I'm joined by my co host Hey. Welcome back listeners I know we've been Nakanishi episodes out without much lapse, which is great on. But we wanted to have a very special show. I know we've talked a lot in the past about the election we've talked about Covid, but this is sort of the the the sort of ruminations of men Omer, who by no means experts, but this time. We are joined by a very special guest who is an expert in this field and so he is a political consultant and so omer. Why don't you tell us who we have on the show and we're super excited to welcome our guest to shout absolutely and we are T. minus twelve days from the election and honored to have most of the knees on the show. Is Outreach strategic founder and president you began his career New York using corporate clients. But after moving to Texas, he shifted to advising successful campaigns for state legislators, mayors, members of Congress in public institutions. The is a national opinion leader with over six hundred appearances on CNN and Fox News Msnbc and CBS. News. The Atlantic names as a top democratic consultant in Texas and Texas monthly person as one of the top Democrats to watch most of is the chairman of the Transportation Advocacy Group board a director of the Texas Lithium a member of the Unity National Bank board among other civic and business affiliations. He's also provide extensive consulting for the Department of Homeland Security End must've wasn't the show you'll have to educate me on the pronunciation of lithium. Texas likes you. Okay. Got It. So, welcome A. Twelve days away from the election. There's a there's a debate tonight you must be very busy. Yeah it's you know almost fifty million Americans have already voted. and as you approach selection day, you know by the time we reach election almost seventy five percent of voters have already bought it. So it election is a season more than his day and this this particular election cycle people are really taking advantage of it across the country we've seen record turnouts and so yes, all of us are are enthralled with it in our busy with an it's an exciting time. To be a voter and as a Democrat is in. I. That's the that's that's the understanding I have of your background in your take. Early voting is a good thing. Correct. Voting a whole is a good thing. I mean, I think fat I, mean Tetris. We became a majority minority state in two thousand, four, sixteen years ago But the the the representation whether it's in Congress with the State House or. At a state level is that reflective of the state's population and that's because Texas not a republican state or democratic state for years Texas has been a nonvoting sick. And as voter participation goes up. In the cycle, you're gonNA start seeing the faces and the backgrounds of those that we lack mirror more of the population of Texas and as as we see that across the country. Yeah. One of the things that we. I know at least a couple of weeks ago was kind of a new story was the governor Abbot kind of restricting where people could I think drop off mail in ballots rate I think it was sort of like Harris County, had the same number as any smaller county in West Texas somewhere. So has that has that improved any he he has made that decision in because of it. It again, it's it's an attempt to create. Chaos is an attempt to make it harder for people to vote. Right. Now the just like while we're on. The Texas Supreme Court just ruled that we can have drive thru voting in Harris County. This was a a contention and and literally just as I was getting on the court just ruled which is really important that if you make voting easier for people if you give people multiple options to vote. UC's turnout go up in this what we've seen in Harris. County. Turnouts going up everywhere around the country including Texas. But especially in Harris County because we Harris County has become a democratic counties of the last election cycle and because of that the leadership that's there. Wants to be inclusive wants to hear the voices of people that live in this county. And made many things easier including having drive thru voting like if you can drive through and do a banking transaction if you can drive through and an order the the best fast food. which we have in Texas because we are. Right. We should be able to vote. And I think that that's important. You know the this cycle I wanNA thank cove nineteen. People were given a task for covert ninety blood tests while they were in their cars. So we can do all of that white. Canton.

Texas Harris County Texas Supreme Court Consultant Omer Congress West Texas Covid Founder And President State House Canton New York Department Of Homeland CNN Harris Unity National Bank CBS Chairman Transportation Advocacy Group
"texas monthly" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

01:46 min | 3 months ago

"texas monthly" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"Radio and podcasts, All in one discover a new podcast from our library of over 350,000 titles. Here's an I Heart radio podcast preview. This region of West Texas, known as the Permian Basin is in the midst of the biggest hole boom in history. Permian Basin is the epicenter for oil and gas production in the free world. This unprecedented production has transformed the region from a depressed desert into a land of opportunity. My name is Christian Waller's. I was raised in the Permian Basin in a small town called Andrews. I grew up on tales of the region's legendary booms and busts. I even spent a year working as a roughneck in the oil patch after college, but I've never seen or heard of anything like this. Against all odds, the Permian Basin has become one of the most important Slauson land on earth boom is reshaping the world's climate economy. Even our geopolitics way are now the number one energy producing in the world. And I'm not gonna lose that well. Dreams on Windows. Yet if you understand this place or its people, this is a story of roughnecks and roustabouts, a billionaire wildcatters and one of the dreamers and full on hell raisers and of average folks, just trying to get a cz. The world around them is turned upside down. Texas Monthly and imperative energy. D'you Power endorsee Who, as you know, was married to Nisha Rivera. They have a child together. He is not responding to reports. People are saying that he's dating night. Rivera, sister they're living together. But they're living.

Permian Basin Nisha Rivera West Texas Texas Monthly Christian Waller Andrews Slauson
Nicolas Cage to Play ‘Tiger King’s’ Joe Exotic in Scripted Series

Colleen and Bradley

00:28 sec | 9 months ago

Nicolas Cage to Play ‘Tiger King’s’ Joe Exotic in Scripted Series

"Nicholas cage is set to star in a scripted series centered around Joe exotic the subject of the Netflix docu series tiger king now it's going to be eight episodes produced by imagine television and CBS television and it's going to be taken to market in the coming days that means that the production companies are looking for money and this is going to be based off of the Texas monthly article Joe exotic a jerk journey into the world of a man of gone

Nicholas Cage JOE Netflix CBS Texas Monthly
SXSW Will Go On Despite Coronavirus Concerns

The Frame

07:27 min | 11 months ago

SXSW Will Go On Despite Coronavirus Concerns

"Welcome to the frame. I'm John Horn every year. A few hundred thousand people gathered in Austin Texas for south by southwest. It's an international festival of music film and Technology but with the threat of the corona virus at hand. Some people are saying that bringing massive crowds into one place could be a very bad idea. Facebook twitter Amazon and a few other tech and media companies. Already have dropped out of the festival which starts on March thirteenth. South by southwest organizers. Say they're nevertheless moving ahead. Dan Sullivan is a writer for Texas monthly and he joins us from Austin Dan. Welcome to the show for having me so before we get into the impact of the corona virus. Let's talk a little bit about just. How big south by South West is in terms of its physical presence in Austin? How much are people's lives affected when the festival comes to town? Well it's huge. It takes over a giant chunk of the city several miles especially the downtown area but also beyond that it does have a huge impact. Let's talk about some health. Concerns from people who live in Austin and online petition calling for a total cancellation of south by southwest. West has more than forty thousand signatures. I've been to south by southwest. It's been a number of years but like any popular gathering. There are a lot of people in a lot of lines it can be getting into a movie can be getting into a club getting into a restaurant. You are very much cheek to jowl with a lot of your fellow festival guests and I guess that's something that a lot of people might be concerned about. It's not just that you're inside venue with a lot of people. But they're massive crowds basically wherever you go on all the streets and a lot of public spaces. Yeah that is a very real part of the concern is that it's just going to put a lot of people in close quarters. The festival did talk today about potentially encouraging people to be further physically apart from each other whether that means capping the capacity at venues or starting a standing in line protocol. I don't know specifically but it's something that seemed to be aware of the head of twitter. Jack Dorsey was scheduled to speak but he's since cancelled. Because of the company's concerns about the corona virus in fact twitter said in a statement that it was cancelling all quote non critical business travel and events unquote. Who else has bowed out so far. We've seen twitter facebook Amazon Amazon Entertainment Amazon studios when out today. Tick Tock went out today. A measurable which usually has a pretty sizeable south by South West presence. Cancel yesterday. There's probably more to. We're talking with Texas monthly writer. Dan Solomon about south by southwest and concerns over the corona virus. I WanNa talk a little bit about the economic impact of south by southwest. Obviously there are a lot of hotels and restaurants that benefit but it seems from your own reporting. There are a lot of smaller businesses. That really rely on south by Southwest Festival didn't happen they'd be in a big amount of trouble. Yeah that's absolutely true. One thing that it's kind of hard to break apart is south by southwest rise with the rise of Austin Austin city of that is rapidly growing population and that growth has coincided with the rise of south by southwest. And so you've seen a lot of people and a lot of businesses that factor south by South West heavily into their business models. So you've got caterers. Who opened up operations because they knew that every march they could pay a third of their monthly bills. Off of one week I talked to all sorts of people who have jobs that you wouldn't think of as a south by southwest thing carpenters and pedicab drivers and people who rent Porta potties. And all of those people really do count on South by southwest as a huge part of their annual income. I think it's also important to note that south by southwest can be an important launching point for musical acts and for movies right now. I think there's about one hundred world premiere films including new movies from Judd Appetito. There's a documentary. About the Beastie Boys New King Arthur movie with Patel. I'm wondering in terms of its impact in the conversation about art and artists. How important would you say south by southwest has become? It's huge. I mean especially. The film festival has been growing every year and people like John. Appetite Tau like if he can't premier his movie at South by southwest any other film festival in the world would be happy to have him but there are a lot of people who get a benefit from small filmmakers independent filmmakers short filmmakers who get a benefit from premiering their phone at the same festival judd appetite out of festival with the prestige of south by southwest. And that would be. It'd be really difficult for people who are counting on that premiere to make connections to launch their careers to lose it as far as musicians. Go The festival itself doesn't pay very well but there are all of these events. Historically that happened around the festival often paid for by companies like Amazon and facebook and twitter. Who Get pretty good paychecks? And you'll see bands who wrote their entire tours around going south by South West so they can play. Fourteen shows in Austin that week including official showcase and without that economy happening it really does have a huge disruptive effect on a lot of Art Creativity. That's at the core of the festival the organizers of MIB TV which was set for later this month in France just cancelled that annual television convention. I'm wondering if you have any idea of what the organizers of south by southwest are trying to wrestle with now what is the balance they're trying to strike? I mean. I think that they do have a real concern. Certainly the city of Austin has a real concern if it makes more sense to have everything under the control of south by southwest which can at least institute hand washing protocols and recommended safe distances and have some authority over the people who who come to town for the festival versus just having sort of a chaos festival because all of those bands who booked their tors to Austin. Most of them are hand to Mouth. Starts Musicians. Who CAN'T AFFORD TO CANCEL? Literally they already took time off of work. They're going to be coming anyway. You know people who aren't traveling on badges people who are just coming to south by South West to have a good time a lot of them are still gonna come so I think that a big part of the concern right now is. Is it more useful for south by South West to continue to have control over what happens in Austin or is it more useful to just say everybody stay home? This isn't a safe place to be. And I think that they're legitimately struggling with that. And I'm sure there are also struggling with some very real financial considerations it will be hard to me bound from cancelling something that they've worked on all year. I think that there's a real resistance to that. Just because this is all they do south by southwest project of another organization. They put on this festival for ten days in March and having to cancel it just days before it's supposed to begin. It's supposed to start a week from Friday. I think that's something that they're just resistant to do. Because they've been working on it for a year then Solomon is a writer for Texas monthly. He joined us from Austin Dan. Thanks so much for coming on the

South West Austin Texas Texas Monthly Twitter Austin Dan Amazon Writer Austin Austin Southwest Facebook John Horn Dan Solomon Jack Dorsey West Dan Sullivan Solomon Porta Potties Judd Appetito France
"texas monthly" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"texas monthly" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"The past two decades from twenty five dollars eighty one cents in nineteen ninety six to ninety one dollars eighty six cents now that far outpaced inflation over the same period artist blame piracy for eroding music sales today's acts have to rely on concerts to make money just a couple of nights on stage can make a top part is more money than they get from a year of album sales Jimmy Canavese CBS news how often you wash your face the study says maybe should stop for awhile skin doctors. they were using too much so the over use of synthetic oils and harsh chemicals found in things like face wash body wash and shampoo is are actually doing more harm than good dermatologists say the nation's over cleaning habit is responsible for the rise and exit month rosacea psoriasis and even acne they say do what you can to keep the good bacteria on your face a life and your skin's acidity balance back Piper CBS news. they are the best cities to live in America but you might not have heard of a lot of them twenty four seven wall St checked out data from the census beer on the F. B. I. into the sources to come up with this list of the top fifty places to live in the US the top city in the country is a suburb that surrounded on all sides by the city of Houston west university place as a median income of two hundred forty three thousand dollars and expenses are about five percent lower than the national average Beverly hills finished in second place the only the Texas city in the top fifty is University Park and number six overall unemployment rate of only one point eight percent they say it has a very low crime rates as well Texas monthly has added a new character to its list of editors as of the middle of this month Texas monthly has but taco editor Jose were lots from Dallas gets the job they call him a taco authority and he has a blog called the taco trail so he becomes the first time our first full time taco editor anywhere really in the country says give give a writing about all kinds of Mexican food across the state he says that we're lucky to live in a place that's Mexico used to have tacos are in our DNA says they're just as much as hours as they are Mexico's or Californians are California is. persons bed it's a sacred place it's also the best place to find and generate new ideas. new research from Microsoft is found a lot of ideas the best ideas we come up with happen right when we're about to fall asleep or when we would just wake up or in the middle of the night how many people have you seen that said the idea came to me in a dream. fifty four K. around needs time to check your money in stocks gaining Beijing has announced a range of US products that will be exempted from twenty five percent extra terrace put in place.

two hundred forty three thousa twenty five dollars twenty five percent ninety one dollars eight percent fifty four K five percent two decades
Texans are Hopping Mad about Sale of Whataburger

Business Wars Daily

05:32 min | 1 year ago

Texans are Hopping Mad about Sale of Whataburger

"The business wars daily is brought to you by Staples work is changing, but Staples is changing right along with it. The new Staples delivers solutions to help your team be more connected productive, and inspired. Learn more at Staples dot com slash change. From wondering, I'm David Brown and this business daily. Happy Friday, one and all sometimes success backfires on you. That might be the case with water burger cult favorite burger chain. Founded in Corpus Christi Texas back in nineteen fifty founder, Harmon Dobson's vision was to offer a made to order, five inch burger huge time that would prompt diners to exclaim, what a burger it worked in spades over the last sixty nine years. The chain grew in two thousand one the Texas legislature named water burger a Texas treasure today. There are more than eight hundred watt burgers in ten states with annual sales of more than two billion dollars. But until this month, it remained family owned on June fourteenth Dobson's announce they sold a controlling interest to merchant Bank in Chicago which intends to further expand, what a burger, but here's where the chains vary status as Tex. Sys- treasure hurts Texans are livid in Austin, a fan posted a sign saying, dear Chicago. If you hurt her kill you an Instagram post showing a picture of the sign got more than sixteen thousand likes and comments like, don't Chicago, my water burger and naturally dough mess with Texas. They warned the new owners to keep their hands off the menu, the burger recipe the catch up and even the mustard. Many commenters asked why the family didn't sell to an investor in Texas, y'all when you build a company with a following his rabbit as water burgers will change in ownership and expansion is a very tricky thing. Indeed, the company needs to maintain its identity, even as it scales up beyond the difficulty of family succession after three generations. What a burger may feel the need to expand to compete with its rivals. Arguably, its biggest rival is every hamburger chains biggest McDonald's, but suggest any what a burger loving Texan. The McDonald's has anything in common. With their favorite burger place and you may get run out of state. So who poses the biggest problem for what a burger one possibility dare I say it is Irvine, California based in and out burger, which Texas monthly reports has as big a cult following in California, as water burger does at home in and out recently expanded into the Lone Star state horrifying Texans who are already unhappy with an influx of Californians into the state much less their hamburgers, the seventy year old west coast chain, though, does pose a threat to what a burger at home prompting taste tests, competitions in columns about who's burgers, really best. Spoiler alert here, despite lauding in an out withdrew worthy compliments, Texas. Monthly's blind taste testers ruled what water burger to be best hands down. Well over its seven decades in existence. Family owned in and out burger has been expanding even more cautiously than what a burger it has some three hundred locations compared to what a burgers, eight hundred but recently crossed, not just the Texas State line, but also Colorado's where it plans to open fifty new stores. Both companies face competition from other fast rising chains to shake shack five guys in smash burger could give either one or both a run for their money. So where will what a burger go next and we'll Texans ever forgive them. Chicago's. And obvious guests as is the mid west in general, and at least one, a communist familiar with what a burgers, new owner speculates that it plans, an expansion nationally along the lines of McDonald's and Burger King, but not to worry, Texas. He says they'll keep what makes water burger, whatever and just help spread Texas culture across the country. Now that's the way to play it. And that might just take the sting out of this deal for disappointed, Texas. From wondering this business daily. This week's episodes were written edited and produced by lane apples in brand, the Sutherland, this week's editor our executive producers, marshal Louis created by non Lopez. More wondering I'm David Brown a we'll see next week. Business wars. Daily is brought to you by Staples. The world of work is changing faster than ever before a week ago open floor plans were in. Now, they're out the pace of our evolving work lives can feel overwhelming. But Staples can help not the old stables, but a new Staples that delivers solutions to help your team be more connected productive, and inspired work may be constantly changing. But Staples is changing right along with it to support you. Learn more at Staples dot com slash change.

Burger King Corpus Christi Texas Staples Texas Staples Dot Chicago Texas Legislature Harmon Dobson Mcdonald David Brown Instagram Austin California Irvine Colorado Merchant Bank Founder Sutherland Marshal Louis
"texas monthly" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"texas monthly" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Were to pick the three things obviously, I've been there many times in your food is amazing. But, but as you know, there are some businesses that make amazing food and don't get discovered before they have to close down. Right. The Bill before the revenues come in, if you were to pick the three most important things in order of what blue, I know that Texas monthly listing was one of, what would you say were those three? Well, number one was taking advantage of media is trying to be good at that. It's free. I got to learn how to use it and to stay accurate and I'm probably not the best at it, but I just kept doing it and people respond to people walk in almost every day with, with their phone and show. You picture on Instagram I want this. And so it's a powerful tool that, that kind of trickle along. It's a little bit like word of mouth. On steroids. And so that'd be number one. Number two was Michael berry radio show back in the spring pointy Bank. It was twenty sixteen was that Super Bowl year or twenty seventeen I forget six hundred fifteen maybe even I don't remember what, what you're the Super Bowl because pants had been picking to Papas barbecue, and there was a big fuss about that vice president Pence. You had people calling recommending where in and ended up on that list. And that's where I discovered you. That's correct. I have bunch of people. Gosh, I did not ask you that question. Scott for you to say our show. I'm not. I. But the truth is. Hold on. Hold on. I remember people were sending suggestions for barbecue restaurants. And I kept seeing the name chocolate come across Tejas chocolate, and I thought, well, that's the we're and I had a vision in my mind of what your place look like in painted this picture in my mind and it doesn't look anything like what I expected it. But I had this kind of willy Wonka chocolate factory mind said, and then the side at this little desk, may be, you know, little like a to go order, you could get you could order some barbecue, and that's sort of what was I totally. Well, that was a hell of a show. And we came out and try to after that, okay? This turn into a good day, and what number would be that Texas monthly well number, the Texas monthly releasing their top fifty list. Clinton US in the top ten that I mean, I never saw anything like it, literally, they made that announcement on her social media on Monday before the magazine was even printed and Tuesday morning, we by ten o'clock, we had a line down to the mailbox we've never seen anything like that. Let me ask you a question. I know you don't want to answer but beyond. All right. The kind of person who comes in to try your barbecue after Texas monthly put you on a list like that. Is that person different than the person who says, oh, good? We have a new barbecue restaurant and Tombo. Yeah. They really are. It's barbecue or a special breed. It's like a cult following it's you know it's a culture and how we saw the first time, you know, we'd never really sold a whole lot of pork ribs and right after Texas monthly came out, we were still on a rib so fast. Make a head stand because these people were coming in for the Texas trinity experience brisket ribs and sausage. And, you know, a whole different barbecue consumer, they ordered sometimes you can tell about the way somebody orders barbecue. How much they know about barbecue. Right. And we saw all that, you know, people start coming in order, you know, protest would be order moist outside cut in a pit natural no deal. With somebody knows what they're doing. The also a lot of chicken. We don't feel it goes in waves read. It's not not a whole lot. I sometimes feel like we probably do a better job to Modine that, but. Is the best thing on our menu. And so when friends of mine, come, they never order chicken now is, as you said, the Texas trinity and I will go and get a piece of chicken. I'm dark meat guide, most people like white meat, but I will bring them one of each and I'll say, just try this and tell me what you think and without fail. They say, wow, that was that's my favorite thing. But I noticed that people don't come in and order a lot of chicken. And, and it's the thing I'm proudest of on our menu. It just surprises me that people don't when they're eating chicken. They do fry. Do you do Turkey breath? I tell you what, I think it is on chicken Beal interrupt you. But I think a lot of people have gone to barbecue restaurants in the past and gotten chicken over smoking overdraft. Yes. Turned off. So they've been ruined. We got to fix it, and you had the right pick for a great fit. And that thing Andre Schmidt, our pit master raves about that. He just loved never cooked on anything like it do Turkey breast. Yes, we do. We just started Turkey breast this week and my response, they were insistent that. I try it the final one and I said, I tasted it and I said, what's amazing about the fact that I love that is. I don't like Turkey breast my wife. I think the best Turkey breast. I've eaten in Houston as they make an amazing Turkey breast. But I'm pretty proud of ours. We use Dan Passerini spices. And it took a little while to get the ratios, right? But is delicious. You sell a lot of Turkey breast. We do pretty well with it. We really we feel more Turkey chicken and brisket your number one seller. Oh, yeah. I mean, we're Texas briskets number one by far our, our second seller. Probably right now is actually pork valley, really. Or or we started making about a year ago killary hanging like onside. Yeah, we make here. Well, what time get in, in the morning? Typically getting around five sometimes during the week now I gotta boarding Pitman sleep in a little bit. So I've kind of back that up to sometime between six and seven Saturday. I have early shift. I get here about quarter five on Saturdays do you like that? You like being in early. Saturday's my day, I have the whole building myself until about eight thirty or nine kitchen, crew starts rolling. And I joined the, the solitude. Is over the years, I've asked chefs and pitmasters and restaurant owners who are themselves the first one into their joint specially smaller places, and they love the solitude of being there, but getting their coffee getting their system set up and it sounded like way you described it. That was the same. First thing I pick up on is the home of our walking cooler in the quiet room and it's a, soothing sound and the coffee firecracker and all that stuff. But I'll sit on center block and watching fire and just really enjoy. That moment. I have an emotional attachment to our original walk in cooler. It was only cooler that was on site. When we took over the property is a rang haggle cooler, and we had no air conditioning. You know, we were outside at the time and we were building out the inside with no air conditioning, anywhere. And so when I would give people a tour of the property, we would stop for ten minutes, and go in. And break. Oh man. It would feel so good. And we'd have our conversation. But I'll never forget. I sat Wayne tubes into walk in cooler for about thirty minutes and talked about south Louisiana because it was only place that could that could cool it off. Scott can you hold just one minute. Yeah. They don't need you around there. Anyway, they can run the place without you hold on that Scott.

Texas Texas monthly Scott Turkey Andre Schmidt willy Wonka Michael berry Tombo Modine vice president Clinton Dan Passerini Wayne Pence Pitman Houston south Louisiana thirty minutes
"texas monthly" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"texas monthly" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"So we always really. Overshoot, and then see what works. Best split comedy more difficult than other kinds of comedy. I don't know. I don't really do other guys. I don't know it all seems hard to meet comedies. You know? It's listen, it's not hard work in the sense. That work is hard. I mean, it's still performing it's cushy in. It's it's fun to do. You know, it's a lot of like thinking doing and trying and experimenting. So it's it's actually to get to a place of comedy that people sort of shrug off. Actually, it's a pretty. Arduous journey. Did you think it was weird going back to the daily show for a second that lots and lots of people would get their actual direct news from the daily show? We literally fake news joke about that. Right. I mean, I think that it's not true. I think that people say that a lot. But that it's not really strictly accurate. I think that if you didn't have some comprehension of what was going on. If you didn't have some understanding of the news of the day. I don't think you would find these shows very funny or engaging. I think you've come to it with more knowledge than you think you have. And so it's really just a different way to analyze the news. I mean, I think there were following the techniques of journalism, and we have journalists working for us. Certainly. I do why do why do you have journalists because being being accurate is very important. I think it's it's very important to us. We work very hard. We fact check constantly but explained that because part of what you're doing in comedy. Is exaggeration and a little bit making things up, right and embellishing. So explain to people why it is. Then it's okay to make out that Mitch McConnell has another Mitch McConnell living in his Chen. Like that's made up. It is. I hope it's made up, but we want to be clear about the stories that we're telling their if there is a Mitch McConnell, and he has a chip in that he has a trend that has another. Also, you have your journalists. They they fact check that. Yes. Okay. I think I understand. Hey, sorry for the interruption. But I have some exciting news about a new podcast. I really want to tell you about is from Texas monthly magazine and pineapple.

Mitch McConnell Texas monthly magazine
"texas monthly" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"texas monthly" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"That i was going to need a little further education or some other direction so actually the first thing i did is get an internship at texas monthly and worked there for then went on to work as a as a paid i don't even know what was paid employees i guess at texas monthly for about a year in applied to law school during that time my father always argued law school education was something i'd never be sorry about and it was actually the best liberal education you could get do you agree with that now actually you know i'm gonna frayed at the time that was kill every bit of creativity in me you know that would somehow learning to think logically would dampen my ability to be creative and i don't think that's true at all see you finish law school do you work in the law profession before hotel san jose i did indeed so i went straight from law school to the da's office in manhattan and work there for three and a half years or so and then move back to austin and worked at the general's office so is a trial lawyer and again something i'll never be sorry about a made amazing friends that i'm still in touch with on a regular basis from from tex thread to occasional reunions but it also taught me how to think in a way that has served me really well in business and in just in the world it teaches you former brigger i think to be a trial lawyer to understand all the facts of any situation and jen to put it together so understanding the facts than of your situation at the time if i contrast contest right word sounds to judgy if i look if i look at your path side by side with the paths of other former lawyers i know which are many right maybe there they say i don't wanna do law but i'm going to do management consulting i don't wanna do law i'm going to start a company with my friend or go to business school there aren't many who say i don't want to do law i'm going to buy a hotel that's that's full of drug addicts and prostitutes and so on so why that particular choice how did that how did that come to pass i think partially the serendipity i was in the right place at the right time on the right st appealed about it to you because i mean for a lot of people that would be it would have the it would have a repellent effect attrac well if you think about it come from the da's office and a lot of the work i did was with a lot of the same i don't know exactly where that concentric circle is but a lot of the people i dealt with in new york and in the criminal justice system that whether it was from a police ride along or just looking at the stories of people every day down out or in with in trouble or you know with when things get cross one way or the other and their lives was not something new for me that way i wasn't scared of the you know junkies in hookers and you know like i said again there are a lot of really good people there but we're at a at a moment they're just really clear in the dock yes part of the reason why yeah it's going to get a lot of that's right but there are a lot of people hustling whether it'd be a good hustler bad hustle and i'm a big believer in hustling but there is some i got there's some pretty good griffin's in there as well but so it wasn't unfamiliar milieu for me but i always was interested in design it's something that i had always enjoyed and my one of my brothers was worked for icf international contract furnishings kind of like nole and was i wish i knew no no no like knows a business that makes some that probably started in mid century there was known for florence knoll and may issued a lot of classic furniture that you would see and like me vandross did steph or noel or got okay design he was in design i should say and so it's a world that i was always fascinated by and there was really not this clear path it was i.

texas monthly
"texas monthly" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"texas monthly" Discussed on KQED Radio

"For texas monthly magazine mike welcome to our thanks bob who was charles moore charge charles was an enlightened progressive minister long before that was a hip thing to be in superconservative east texas even back in nineteen fifty four he was preaching for example that brown v board of education was a good thing which is just nuts in east texas in nineteen fifty four and he caught a lot of flack for it and he spent a lot of time fighting for people who were disenfranchised fighting for poor people he was personally welcoming gays to his church here in south austin he went on a hunger strike to try to make this a real issue for the methodist church and alternately the methodist church made a few begrudging changes but nothing really big although eventually i mean the methods church like all churches has slowly been breaking down some of these walls and charles's peers believed that he had a lot to do with that in any event by the time he poured gasoline on himself and set himself a flame in that empty parking lot he was deeply disappointed man and his suicide notes specified why he was making the ultimate sacrifice he actually titled it grants lean repent of your racism he spoke of all the people who had been lynched there and set on fire and he said that his sacrifice he was going to join them in their martyrdom and to give his body to be burned here is some tape from a documentary called man on fire a film that's rank from your texas monthly piece majority of like the black people in this town they're not gonna go to grind they're not gonna go to grains slain there aren't going to hang out and grains lean they don't have any friends from lane and they're just like they're still reckless the claim there you know lynch people there they don't like you they're chase you town they're gonna try to fight i mean like literally like it's taboo i remember one one time we had to drag me and the next day ago says the josse all those monkeys walking around on their hind loss and things like that you hear it every day probably heard the n word every day at school however.

bob charles texas austin methodist church texas monthly magazine charles moore superconservative east texas brown lynch
"texas monthly" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"texas monthly" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Road about charles moore for texas monthly magazine mike welcome to rtm thanks bob who was charles moore charles was an enlightened progressive minister long before that was a hip thing to be in superconservative east texas even back in nineteen fifty four he was preaching for example that brown v board of education was a good thing which is just nuts in east texas in nineteen fifty four and he caught a lot of flack for it and he spent a lot of time fighting for people who were disenfranchised fighting for poor people he was personally welcoming gays to his church here in south austin he went on a hunger strike to try to make this a real issue for the methodist church and ultimately the methodist church made a few begrudging changes but nothing really big although eventually i mean the methods church like all churches has slowly been breaking down some of these walls and charles's peers believed that he had a lot to do with that in any event by the time he poured gasoline on himself and set himself a flame in that empty parking lot he was deeply disappointed man and his suicide note specified why he was making the ultimate sacrifice he actually titled it grants lean repent of your racism he spoke of all the people who had been lynched there and and set on fire and he said that his sacrifice he was going to join them in their martyrdom and to give his body to be burned here is some tape from a documentary called man on fire a film that's ranked from your texas monthly piece for majority of like the black people in this town they're not gonna go grains lean they're not going to go to grains slain they're not going to hang out and grains lean they don't have any friends from grind lane and they're just like they're still restless the clan there you know lynch people there they don't like you they're chase town they're going to try to fight you i mean like literally like it's taboo i remember one time we had to track me and the next day ago says the josse all those monkeys walking around on their online last night and things like that you'd hear it every day probably heard the n word every day at school however moore's accusations that grant.

texas austin methodist church charles moore texas monthly magazine charles moore charles superconservative east texas brown lynch moore
"texas monthly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"texas monthly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For texas monthly magazine mike welcome to our tm thanks bob who was charles moore charles charles was an enlightened progressive minister long before that was a hip thing to be in superconservative east texas even back in nineteen fifty four he was preaching for example that brown v board of education was a good thing which is just nuts in east texas in nineteen fifty four and he caught a lot of flack for it and he spent a lot of time fighting for people who were disenfranchised fighting for poor people he was personally welcoming gays to his church here in south austin he went on a hunger strike to try to make this a real issue for the methodist church and ultimately the methodist church made a few begrudging changes but nothing really big although eventually i mean the methods church like all churches has slowly been breaking down some of these walls and charles's peers believed that he had a lot to do with that in any event by the time he poured gasoline on himself and set himself aflame in that empty parking lot he was deeply disappointed man and his suicide note specified why he was making the ultimate sacrifice he actually titled at grants lean repent of your racism he spoke of all the people who had been lynched there and set on fire and he said that his sacrifice he was going to join them in their martyrdom and to give his body to be burned here is some tape from a documentary called man on fire a film that sprang from your texas monthly piece majority of like the black people in this town they're not gonna they're not gonna go to green lane they're not going to hang out and grains lean they don't have any friends from grants lane and they're just like they're still race with the clan there you know lynch people there they don't like you chase you of town they're going to try to fight you i mean like literally like it's like taboo i remember one one time we had a track me and the next day ago says all those monkeys walking around on their hind legs last not and things like that you'd hear every day i probably heard the word every day at school however moore's accusations that.

texas austin methodist church texas monthly magazine charles moore charles charles superconservative east texas brown lynch
"texas monthly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"texas monthly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Charles moore for texas monthly magazine mike welcome to tm thanks bob who was charles moore charles charles was an enlightened progressive minister long before that was a hip thing to be in superconservative east texas even back in nineteen fifty four he was preaching for example that brown v board of education was a good thing which is just nuts in east texas in nineteen fifty four and he caught a lot of flack for it and he spent a lot of time fighting for people who were disenfranchised fighting for poor people he was personally welcoming gays to his church here in south austin he went on a hunger strike to try to make this a real issue for the methodist church and ultimately the methodist church made a few begrudging changes but nothing really big although eventually i mean the methods church like all churches has slowly been breaking down some of these walls and charles's peers believed that he had a lot to do with that in any event by the time he poured gasoline on himself and set himself a flame in that empty parking lot he was deeply disappointed man and his suicide note specified why he was making the ultimate sacrifice he actually titled at granz lean repent of your racism he spoke of all the people who had been lynched there and and set on fire and he said that his sacrifice he was going to join them in their martyrdom and to give his body to be burned here is some tape from a documentary called man on fire a film that's rank from your texas monthly piece for majority of like the black people in this town they're not gonna go to grind they're not going to go to grains lean they're not going to hang out and they don't have any friends from grants lane and they're just like they're still rice with the clan lynch people there they don't like you they're into town they're going to try to fight you i mean like literally like it's taboo i remember one time we had a track meet and the next day ago says the josse all those monkeys walking around on their hind legs whilst not and then things like that you'd hear it every day probably heard the n word every day at school however moore's accusations that grant selene.

Charles moore texas austin methodist church lynch texas monthly magazine charles charles superconservative east texas brown
"texas monthly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"texas monthly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For texas monthly magazine mike welcome to our tm thanks bob who was charles moore char charles was an enlightened progressive minister long before that was a hip thing to be in superconservative east texas even back in nineteen fifty four he was preaching for example that brown v board of education was a good thing which is just nuts in east texas in nineteen fifty four and he caught a lot of flack for it and he spent a lot of time fighting for people who were this franchised fighting for poor people he was personally welcoming gays to his church here in south austin he went on a hunger strike to try to make this a real issue for the methodist church and ultimately the methodist church made a few begrudging changes but nothing really big although eventually i mean the methods church like all churches has slowly been breaking down some of these walls and charles's peers believed that he had a lot to do with that in any event by the time he poured gasoline on himself and set himself a flame in that empty parking lot he was deeply disappointed man and his suicide notes specified why he was making the ultimate sacrifice he actually titled at grants lean repent of your racism he spoke of all the people who had been lynched there and and set on fire and he said that his sacrifice he was going to join them in their martyrdom and to give his body to be burned here is some tape from a documentary called man on fire a film that sprang from your texas monthly piece majority of like the black people in this town they're not gonna grants lane they're not gonna go to grains lean they're not going to hang out and grains lean they don't have any friends from grains lane and they're just like they're still ranks with the clan there you know lynch people there they don't like you they're in town they're going to try to fight you i mean like literally like it's like taboo i remember one ones we had a track meet and the next day ago says all those monkeys walking around on their han legs last night and things like that you'd hear it every day probably heard the n word every day that's full however moore's accusations that grants.

char charles texas austin methodist church texas monthly magazine charles moore superconservative east texas brown lynch
"texas monthly" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

The Tony Kornheiser Show

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"texas monthly" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

"Now this is sir douglas quinn said doug saw the lake does psalm is a songchol she was about a move this is all guy radio for the day is if some larisa so how she walked right up to the and said hey boy what's your name there's still for no reason other than i knew you would songkold men to see no other again you were close she said you'd get it one noted to only took him to as soon as start playing small he resentment been able to playing they met tune in so life we there was nothing significant musically the that happened this day in history now that we've have place that this and it's just one of the stage for a group ever at apparently this was called the number one texas song caused by texas monthly magazine texas group yeah they were texas group and to see nosa california town yes and i guess augee myers is the guy playing the keyboard when he says or a come on all game that's not a really complex to but it's great so i i have to look up give a foam marketing of can look up whether for tomorrow tell me what the weather in dc you trust the weather app yeah just tell me what the weather dis going to be at nine in the morning and to make a decision on the spot i think i'd like to play golf tomorrow thick your weekends here have been sold taraoke misery they've been so ninety and full clouds fortysix i can play in forty six is supposed to be windy no i'm going to go outline agreement i'm i'm going to play if you could wait 'til about two pm i can't i have pti i can't i can take off the podcast because because on on selection sunday we're adding podcast is what we do it as best we on to get to gary williams because i don't know the gary knows that he has to be here but we're going to do a special ghetto shouldn't sunday's a great idea and and that will go out that night so that's a podcast for the i'm swapping out one for another i mean i think is that reasonable that i.

doug augee myers golf sir douglas quinn texas texas monthly magazine california gary williams
"texas monthly" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"texas monthly" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Would do and this data later on the best and secondly daca under obama did not provide citizenship i'd for the life of me i do not understand daca was just a work permit there's no citizenship whatsoever why would republicans be galloping to the left to barack obama atheist border security they got gives to get something up and you only have fifty one votes mark my words if republican majorities in congress pass citizenship for millions of people an amnesty i think it is quite likely we will lose both houses of congress and speaker nancy pelosi you're president trump dang that's what he said right there what he said him i am i dunno anna them yeah i now and get it up and down you know what i think i think that he still wants to be president you think he's gonna as primary well i don't you know i hate to say that out loud 'cause i know this anger hugh why does the eu would be as huge fail yeah that i don't i i wouldn't put it past them i just wouldn't yeah he's an ambitious guy he is he is he he's like an eagle you now that ted cruz like he is he just will he swoops iin their their surprises everybody i wouldn't put it past him i just get you know he's on the cover of i think it was the cover of texas monthly 'cause i get texas monthly magazine an an and he is i just wouldn't i he would do this i really think he would do it again i think that's a terrible terrible i i know you do but there are a lot of people who love him what if you're a lot of people love that he is taking such a hard stand that yeah but as we now see nothing is getting done yeah and i think what brian kilmeade the point that he tried to make at the very end of that is you need fifty one votes and you are not going to have them unless we give on something and i think that's exactly what trump was trying to do just offer a path to citizenship not just blanket amnesty but only if we get a wall only if we get rid.

obama daca congress nancy pelosi president eu ted cruz brian kilmeade hugh texas texas monthly magazine
"texas monthly" Discussed on 105.3 The Fan

105.3 The Fan

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"texas monthly" Discussed on 105.3 The Fan

"About a don't be masterpiece gay and see style right here on 105 3 love affair back here on the teensy matthew fees are its answering the question the we've been asking about football for the longest time now texas monthly given i don't know if you subscribe to texas monthly anymore i do not all right colby are you big texas monthly reader they have a story from a west ferguson this is actually this is a from the december the december issue of brother named turn please tell me he does i don't know his is history uh but his the the story says the texas high school students are moving away from football now you probably think that's ridiculous what are you talking about there's no possible way that the people and taxes are ever gonna banned in football you're probably right they probably won't abandon it altogether but right now right now is a a moment where it's kind of eta in a dip the the of mount of people between two thousand and two thousand sixteen the sports participation rate mrs sports rough fell off by one quarter celebs in football villabhai quarter last year just under eleven sinn of high schoolers and the state a hundred and sixty seven thousand students played uil sanction football and sixman football in texas all that is a drop from two thousand when the number stood at fourteen and a half percent so that's a what three and a half percent drop from you know in the last sixteen years of pretty sizeable um and the the trend seems to to have gotten younger and younger there is a the tete central texas pop warner youth football league is down all over the place five years ago there were forty teams in the league for central texas pop order today there are only eighteen teams now that still lie that still want to kids but that you're losing what 30 teams 32 team at air that's a that's a massive group of kids and think about this for a second those kids are the ones.

football colby texas texas monthly texas high school sixteen years one quarter five years
"texas monthly" Discussed on The Forward with Lance Armstrong

The Forward with Lance Armstrong

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"texas monthly" Discussed on The Forward with Lance Armstrong

"A journalist like herself a publication like texas monthly and a piece that so well researched and we'll detailed but that doesn't just happen so that's up to you i was going to make a point to with regard to the degree to which people are able to move on what their lives in a positive way you know again we all talk about and see we've all interact with michael morton and you know how he does seem to be this this very well adjusted man who has been able to go on with his life but one thing that is distinguishable about his case and some of the others and that's many people don't have the benefit to and that is they have been declared actually and sent there are countless other defendants out there who may be have had their convictions overturned and their released from prison on bond but they are still going about their lives with their cases never having been retried are and sort of this limbo land layer term actual innocence is an actual legal turned that right that's right and just to define it as i understand it it means that no reasonable juror would would convict them but there are other people they're out there who have had their convictions overturned prosecutors may be to trump at determined not to retry them but they don't have that benefit of actually having their name cleared so that makes their lives obviously very challenging a very difficult when carry mexico get out of prison he wasn't he moves to dallas.

texas monthly michael morton mexico dallas
"texas monthly" Discussed on The Forward with Lance Armstrong

The Forward with Lance Armstrong

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"texas monthly" Discussed on The Forward with Lance Armstrong

"But yeah i should so bumps steers is will texas monthly is that's right because of our listeners or not from texas or from austin texas monthly's kinda of the coolest most influential magazine and the state and actually nationwide has been for a while longtime my friend evans smith was editor for a long time us just still a door but every year they give the bumps steer to the somebody that just does done something incredibly stupid in and they did but they do like hundreds of bumps tears they're just sort of footnotes for people that do science park i thought i was the the covered bumpster i think i i feel i feel like you're even competitive about tom see really if they're going to name all the losers he wants to be the biggest loser yeah i mean come on then on glenn yet losing yeah yeah i'll truly the first place loser i don't believe that lets you know in in i love your story and i love it because you know i moved austin thirty years ago and when i moved here like a a you probably got your you got your before me obviously obviously but he was a small town like it fell it was truly weird what what they really was in it it was weird just talking about that last night i mean the growth is just explosive yup i mean it's a different playing but places like you know what i moved you're a move just off lamar there was no traffic on lamar and moped was nobody even on pack which is the the highway that runs just on the west side of town but places like south i south congress north burn it road you wouldn't go down there no yeah it was super dicey on south congress which is for people that are now we don't know austin well it's just south of downtown right across the river in very close yeah it was there is a whole thing i think it happened in a lot of cities where when the highway went in first of all i 35 for us and then mo pack on the west side there was a lot of.

texas austin texas monthly evans smith editor tom glenn lamar texas monthly austin austin thirty years