17 Burst results for "Tetracyclene"

"tetracyclene" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

07:00 min | 1 year ago

"tetracyclene" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Or to leukemia, or even syphilis and tetracycline works primarily by binding to the ribes, oems of bacterial cells, ribes, oems or sort of the cellular factories they build proteins that are needed in order for organisms to live and grow, and by binding to the Ri- Zome, tetracycline makes it difficult for the bacterium to create new proteins. It was patented in the nineteen fifties became widely used in the second half of the Twentieth Century so what? What was it doing in the bones of Nubian people who live like seventeen hundred years ago, well Arm Lago sin colleagues followed archaeological clues to identify the source of the tetracycline was beer of course beer is another one of ultimately it falls under zagged noise domain Oh. Yeah, though this is different. Because tetracyclene is not made from a fungus, it is actually an antibacterial. That is a byproduct of some bacteria. Okay, so it's a bacterial byproduct, but essentially so technically it's duplex, okay? Point to jubilee? This is looks versus jubilee. That's going to happen with your demon. Lord introducing warfare. So beer is made from fermented grain of course and the fermented grain in this ancient Nubian beer apparently contained the bacteria streptomyces, which creates tetracycline as a byproduct, but question of course were these traces of tetracycline in Nubian mummy bones. Of like a bad batch of beer, the got contaminated by accident, or were these people deliberately culturing their beer with antibiotic, producing bacteria, and so to look at a study from the American Journal of Physical Anthropology from twenty, ten of which are was one of the authors the authors examined tetracycline in skeletal remains from throughout this period, and the evidence indicates that the ancient Nubians were consuming these antibiotics on a regular basis in the authors suggest that these ancient people were intentionally producing this medicine and this links up with some evidence from other ancient. Ancient peoples nearby such as the Egyptians that sometimes apparently used beer as a treatment for conditions like gum, disease, and other types of infections in the authors even found evidence of a four year old child, whose skull contained lots of tetracycline from this beer, suggesting that the child had been fed high doses of this like antibiotic beer, perhaps in an attempt to cure illness, maybe the illness that killed him, and so the levels of tetracycline residue found in the bones of these mummies is only explicable if they were repeatedly consuming this antibiotic in their diet. And there are actually other archaeological remains that show evidence of antibiotic use in the ancient world for example samples taken from the era of skeletons from the Dock Leo ACIS in Egypt from people who live sometime in the late Roman period, also showed evidence of the same thing of tetracycline in the Diet and this consumption of tetracyclene is consistent with other evidence, showing a relatively low rate of infectious disease in Sudanese Nubia during that time period. And a lack of bone infections apparent in these remains from the basis in Egypt so. It really does look like people in ancient Africa discovered a somewhat effective form of antibiotics centuries before the discovery of penicillin and the isolation and mass production of focused anti microbial medicines now to be clear I think like a beer that had tetracycline content from from being cultured with bacteria, like this probably would not be as potent and focused ineffective as like the isolated compounds in the drugs take orally or through injection would be today right, but it would have some effect, and it appeared that it probably was somewhat effective in fighting infectious disease right, and of course they. They wouldn't know exactly what they had here, but they knew they had some sort of beer. Beer that seemed to some sort of holy liquid that that that had some sort of curative property to it exactly I mean if a fascinating discovery from the ancient world, an interesting fact tetracycline is relatively unique in that leaves clear signatures in the bones that can be discovered long after the person has died so other antibiotics don't leave these clear markers like this that make it easy for archaeologists to detect, so you have to wonder like are. Were there other cases of ancient peoples in various places in times using some kind of antibiotics, bacterial or fungal cultures to treat diseases like these ancient Nubian. People were but that we don't have evidence of. It doesn't show up in the bones like tetracycline does. Yeah, it could've just been lost to history I was reading an interesting paper from frontiers in microbiology in two thousand and ten by Reuss Domino, called a brief history of the antibiotic Era Lessons Learned and challenges for the future and Aminov points out this unique quality of tetracycline notes. Just what I was basically just saying like how easy it would be for evidence of other uses of antibiotics in the ancient world to be lost to us, though he he also mentioned that there are other anecdotes from history about cultural traditions. Traditions that show Proto antibiotic technologies in these other examples would include red soils found in Jordan that are used for treating skin infections. It's been discovered that these soils contain some antibiotic producing organisms I'd guess there are probably also some major risks in applying soil to wounds, and then also plants used in traditional Chinese medicine that actually do have some antimicrobial properties. Yeah, because one thing we have to remember the modern antibiotic effort is ultimately based in going out into the natural world in finding these weapons that already exist, and then you re using them in adapting them. For Human Madison and you know this is essentially what is going on in traditional medicines as well, and it also means that there are weapons out there that either have not been discovered at all, especially in particularly vibrant ecosystem, some of which of course, the for are threatened all the more reason to. For us to not decimate say the rain, forest, deep ocean, right but then there are also things that may have been discovered to some degree in the past, but have been forgotten well. Yeah, that that does seem possible, because despite all all this evidence of ancient sort of Proto antibiotic technologies, the worldwide rates of death from infectious disease in the periods for which we. We have data right before the invention of modern antibiotics shows that humans generally did not have effective antimicrobials in that period, so maybe some of this knowledge was lost over time all right well on that note, we're gonNA. Take our first break, but when we come back, we're going to return to the mold research, the nineteenth.

tetracycline Egypt Arm Lago American Journal of Physical A Twentieth Century leukemia Ri- Zome tetracyclene Dock Leo ACIS Reuss Domino Sudanese Nubia Africa penicillin Aminov
"tetracyclene" Discussed on Invention

Invention

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"tetracyclene" Discussed on Invention

"Or to leukemia or even syphilis and tetracycline works primarily by binding to the ribe `ISMs of bacterial cells ribes oems or sort of the cellular factories stories they build proteins that are needed in order for organisms to live and grow and by binding to the Ri- Zome tetracycline makes it difficult for the bacterium to create new proteins it was patented in the nineteen fifties and became widely used in in the second half of the Twentieth Century <hes> so what was it doing in the bones of Nubian people who live like seventeen hundred years ago well <hes> Armagh Logos and colleagues followed archaeological clues to identify the source of the tetracycline which was Bashir. <hes> of course beer is another one of <hes> ultimately it falls under Doug Moi's domain. Oh yeah though this is different because tetracycline is not made from fungus it is actually an antibacterial that is a byproduct of some bacteria arterial. Oh okay so it's a bacterial byproduct but essentially okay so technically it's duplex okay point to jubilee this jubilee versus Jubilee Right. I mean that's going to happen with your demon. Lords introducing warfare so so beer is made from fermented grain of course and the fermented grain in this ancient Nubian beer apparently contained the bacteria streptomycetes which creates tetracycline as a byproduct but a question of course. So like were these traces of tetracycline in Nubian mummy bones a sign of like a bad batch of beer. The got contaminated by accident or were these people deliberately culturing their beer with antibiotic producing bacteria and so to look at a study from the American Journal of Physical Anthropology from twenty ten of which <hes> Armagh Logos was one of the authors <hes> the authors examined tetracycline in skeletal remains from throughout this period and the evidence indicates that the ancient Nubians were consuming these antibiotics on a regular basis and the authors suggest that these ancient people were intentionally producing this medicine and this links up with some evidence from other ancient peoples nearby such as the Egyptians that sometimes apparently apparently used beer as a treatment for conditions like gum disease and other types of infections in the authors even found evidence of a four year old child whose skull contained lots of tetracycline from this beer suggesting that the child had been fed high doses of of this like antibiotic beer. Perhaps in an attempt to cure an illness. Maybe the illness that killed him and so the levels of tetracycline residue found in the bones of these mummies is only explicable if they were repeatedly consuming assuming this antibiotic in their Diet and there are actually other archaeological remains that show evidence of antibiotic use in the ancient world for example samples taken from the era of skeletons from the Dock Co.. ACIS in Egypt <hes> from people bull who lives sometime in the late Roman period also showed evidence of the same thing of tetracycline and the Diet and this consumption of tetracyclene is consistent with other evidence showing a relatively low rate of infectious disease in Sudanese. He's Nubia during that time period and a lack of bone infections apparent in these remains from the this oasis in Egypt so it really does look like people in ancient Africa discovered a somewhat effective form of antibiotics attics centuries before the discovery of penicillin and the isolation and mass production of focused anti microbial medicines now to be clear..

tetracycline Armagh Logos Egypt leukemia Doug Moi American Journal of Physical A Ri Nubia Bashir. Dock Co penicillin Africa seventeen hundred years four year
"tetracyclene" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"tetracyclene" Discussed on This Week in Science

"He's like. And then in other disease causing news. Researchers are reporting from the American society of microbiology that maybe we shouldn't use antibiotics in space. That they they studied bacteria in a micro simulated microgravity environment where they, you know, give did shear forces and other things that would simulate this microgravity, and they looked at bacteria e coli under this low shear modeled microgravity condition for a thousand generations and they used an antibiotic chloramphenicol between cycles to prevent contamination. Researchers say throw tation vessel we use in. Our study simulates microgravity, the bacteria are in continuous fall. When you're in space, gravity disappears. And this simulates that we were using chloramphenicol to sit to infect the apparatus with the result that the bacteria rapidly become resistant to chloramphenicol, so they also used they also use suffer talk subtlety in suffused rock seem Safak cenex. 'til sift FOX tean and tetracyclene and the bacteria acquired resistance to all of them the resistance to chloramphenicol and Steph Lawton persisted for over one hundred ten generations despite them being removed from low microgravity and not having antibiotics around them, basically, the bacteria get exposed to antibiotics they acquire resistance to antibiotics they keep their resistance to antibiotics, and so the researchers are saying bacteria in space will become resistant and. Might not want to use in Abayat IX all the time in space because you're going to cause resistance that you won't be able to do anything about. Because the first brush I have this is that because it that zero gravity low shear, there's also less interaction. So you have a less a modular modulus for imagining a modulus thank you unless I'm Odgen environment. So you get. You get some interaction with the antibody. And then it's allowed to be transferred to others who sufficient time for them to become resistant as opposed to all being sort of affect did effected at the same time in not having time to come up with the resistance because there's a lag time between interaction going. This This is. is. I wish there was some way around this. And so that that sort of not being exposed to it and the imagine this. I'm Oculus Maginness. What are you trying to? I don't know. It's a foreign word to me. All right. Tell me story. Tell me story about surfing. This is what we came here for all. It's all about the surfing story. So you level rise.

chloramphenicol Oculus Maginness American society of microbiolo Abayat IX Steph Lawton FOX
"tetracyclene" Discussed on On The Line with Estée Lalonde

On The Line with Estée Lalonde

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"tetracyclene" Discussed on On The Line with Estée Lalonde

"So really, you know, there's lots of different ways, you can treat it on a lot of it essentially comes down to what the main issue is whether it's readiness whether it's spokes whether it's sensitivity of whether it's flushing. So I think it was any diet worth while speaking to adult Eurodemo biters. Okay. So I have one thing that I do kind of want to bring up. So you said tetracyclene which is an antibiotic. I actually was on it when I was a teenager. And I recently went to see a nutritionist and one of the questions she said was have you ever had tetracyclene because it can be such a strong antibiotic on your guts show. So this is a common concern, and one of the things I would say about the tetracycline onto politics that we use for Rosa. So I use them equal doxycycline, and I use in low dose, and what's interesting about the tetracycline antibiotics as a high dose they have an antibacterial or an antibiotic effect, but at low dose, they have an anti inflammatory effect. So in RAs Asia using it for its anti inflammatory reasons. So you'll using at a much lower dose than you would use it the other conditions. So I think that's a much more gentle on your guts. In response. The second part of your question about tetracycline 's and the effect on the gods. Well, I don't think you should be on antibiotics for prolonged periods of time. I don't think there's an issue being on the for about three months. Four months. I think any longer than that we do need to be reassessing what we're doing an ID normally lot prescribing for longer lengths because of issues with not just messing about with a gut microbiome, but also resistance as well. So then when you do need to use them. They don't do what let's post today. Right. And what about things like birth control? Does it really help with things like acne? Yes. So certain pills almost. Friendly than others, but the combined oral contraceptive pill so the pill that contains eastern and progesterone can be helpful acne. But it does take time to work. So if you've been put on contraception for your skin, you need to give it at least two to three months to see if it's what can so that brings me to my next question from mom Oko, and she says, I tend to get hormonal breakouts on my chin and neck area. What's the best skin care for ornamental breakouts? I get that as well. And it sucks. I hate it. Yeah. And you know, the worst thing about it is actually affects most women as a result of this song, Kohl's, and that's partly because as women we have lots of home as we have eastern and progesterone, but we also have testosterone, the male hormone and testosterone, the male hormone is what drives that game and just before period is ju- all levels of eastern and progesterone drop a completely plummets, but I'll levels of testosterone stay the same throughout the month, relatively speaking. So what happens just before your period is ju- is that relatively. Speaking, you'll levels of testosterone a much higher than the levels of your female hormones, and that's what causes people to break out in the run-up to basically cycles. So in terms of what you can do what I would say is that a lot of people find the skin can be slightly more oily from ovation onwards. So in the second half of this cycle. So from day fourteen today twenty eight and that might be the time, we're really you all taking extra cash using your alpha, and you'll be two hydroxy acids and you'll skin cat to make sure that your decongesting your skin. You're getting rid of any black heads on. Also, a soon as you feel a hint of any spots coming up. It's worth while using something like two percent salicylic acid product directly onto the spoils to shrink them dying. If that doesn't help then it might be worth Bo going to see your GP, and they'll be able to give you a prescription retinoids over peroxide that you can put directly onto the spots. So basically, Utah get them as soon as they come up. Okay. And this is a completely unrelated question and. Topic?.

tetracycline antibiotics testosterone progesterone tetracycline tetracyclene RAs Asia mom Oko doxycycline Utah Bo Rosa Kohl three months Four months two percent
"tetracyclene" Discussed on After The Fact

After The Fact

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"tetracyclene" Discussed on After The Fact

"So that's going to March cross the country to why is it happening? Now, why didn't happen decades ago or was it, and we didn't know it. Well, it was happening actually and resistance to penicillin was around actually before penicillin was widely available because the bacteria do this Ailey Fleming. In fact, sir predicted this would happen in in his Nobel lecture. Fleming said resistance. Will emerge and it did. But for the first sort of sixty years of the antibiotic era, scientists and pharmaceutical companies produced a lot of new antibiotics, and so we were always able to stay ahead of the resistance. So but for decades didn't matter much because you know, we came out with different penicillins, and then we came out with Cephas Orense. And then we came out with, you know, arith- reminds in tetracyclene, and all of these new classes of antibiotics that people sort of know about and the reason we have all those and the reason we use them is because penicillin stopped working so from nineteen forty five to the mid eighties. We had lots and lots of new botox. And then the pipeline sorta went dry why it's a great question. I think there were a few things that happened one is pharmaceutical companies it it just didn't seem like that exciting or dynamic and area to be and it was thought to be kind of a solved problem. Wow. Even though it with all those development was. Happening because of a continual problem. So that's one thing. It's also true that companies in the mid eighties a number of companies into their immense credit. They've actually published on their experience spent a lot of money millions tens of millions of dollars pursuing scientific strategies that the just fail. They were using sort of some new high throughput screening, and, you know, gene, targeted strategies, and so on and they just didn't produce anything and then right around that time, the FDA which sets the standards for the clinical. Studies of the drugs really looked at the way clinical trials for about six were being done and realized there were some scientific problems. And basically said we we need a higher standard of clinical trials, and that made it that much harder perfectly good scientific reasons for doing that. But it made it that much harder to study the drugs and bring them to market and combine all of. That with the fact that the market for an antibiotic is just not that big. When you get a new antibody, you don't get nearly the revenue you got for an exciting new drug for multiple sclerosis or cancer, or or whatever all of those things combined to have companies kind of exit the field. When was the last sort of significant antibiotic put on the market? Well, we are having a couple of drugs a year come to market and in the last few years. There has been some exciting innovation and some new classes of antibiotics coming. But but not enough. How do we spark that sort of creativity in the in the pharmaceutical research world, well, there are a number of things that need to happen and can happen. One thing that that is happening which is beneficial is the the government is supporting early stage development. So. That's helpful. There are people working on other kinds of economic incentives to increase their reward one way or another when the drug comes to market. The FDA has created some some new pathways to get those to market, but they're still this kind of fundamental problem of of not being able to find new chemical structures. And this is actually that Pugh has been focusing a few years ago. We've brought together a big group of scientists from industry and academe. Yeah. And we report outlining a number of major areas. And now, we're actually tackling the first one of those which is how do you get molecules drugs into bacterial cells? So you can divide the the common bacteria that we see in hospitals into kind of two categories one, the grand positives, and they have a cell wall. And it's kinda hard to get the drug pass that cell wall. Another kind which is real. Really the big problem. We see now in the really scary area resistance are called gram negatives. And they have a double cell wall. So you can think of his back sort of medieval castles, right and the drugs are like soldiers trying to storm the castle, and in the case of these gram negatives, you have to get through one wall..

penicillin Ailey Fleming FDA government Cephas Orense arith tetracyclene Pugh sixty years
"tetracyclene" Discussed on AFP: American Family Physician Podcast

AFP: American Family Physician Podcast

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"tetracyclene" Discussed on AFP: American Family Physician Podcast

"In addition to endorsing jay ncaa the afp and acp published a guideline for patients with hypertension aged older than sixty so steve what's a family physicians supposed to do yeah it's not easy when you have conflicting guidelines but how 'bout this quote from mike munger afp president friend of the pod quote family physicians approach hypertension on an individual basis taking into account patient histories risk factors preferences and resources we will maintain making informed decision with patients while considering potential benefits and harms unquote i bet this just might come up again on the bud next we have a guideline update h pylori infection american college of gastroenterology updates their treatment recommendations all right guys let's written threesome quick facts about h pylori infection first at who should we be testing well h pylori it's more common and lower socioeconomic status page since you should be testing all patients with active a previous peptic ulcer disease patients with a history of gastric cancer or gastric lymphoma should also be routinely tested on the other hand patients with gird should not be tested and should be council that if they do have h pylori treatment is not likely to improve their symptoms remember we want to use tests that look for act of infection like the your your breath test he called antigen test or endoscopic biopsy decision to treat is pretty easy do they have a positive h pylori test treat them mom for treatment we have tripletherapy and quadruple therapy tripletherapy consists of approach on pump inhibitor clear through meyssan and neither amok cicilline or metronidazole for fourteen days quadruple therapy consists of a proton pub inhibitor this myth tetracyclene and nitro emit as all for ten to fourteen days there are more specialized antibiotic regiments that can be used if there is a high resistance pattern in your area or known resistance in your patient yet but unfortunately data about resistance patterns in the us is scarce compliance with the dragged regiment is important and can help predict treatment success to confirm success you want to stop the ppi for one to two weeks and repeat the test at least four weeks after therapy completion the keep in mind that recommendation is based on lowquality evidence so this guideline says that we should test people with peptic ulcer disease or a history of gastric cancer or gastric lymphoma to treat everyone that comes up positive with.

mike munger breath test us jay ncaa steve president metronidazole fourteen days four weeks two weeks
"tetracyclene" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"tetracyclene" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"Good genetic hand like that that's it he doesn't he doesn't have the disease that a lot of people have at age seventy and there's so much so much of what we have is genetic you just taking height guys get penalized for high girls get penalized for having wide hipster at all the things we can't control latta penalised him as a a lotta judging then not so much of the stuff we kamcontrol oftentimes right how we treat our kids william looks like that's what is why why is what let us know where animals because you see that kid thing this within your on better than you you right you're sure you're born here shorter or you again just take something like skin right acne i'd i took tetracyclene school like i like not washing my face now i was washroom been right that's right so we have describe things do it like you eat a lot of chocolate jarque late you eat a lotta chocolate what do you do take the hershey stuff the squirted straight up your asked what it in your mouth are hi i'm a chocolate because your skin you ever look at pizza we see that layer of greece that would you epa tsa of who does hold on hold my pizza i'm not the judge must be a lot of pizza that's why i see i don't eat pizza see what i have i have combination scheme with the oil e t zone but only a lotta pizza and you must because your week our guest is extremely i lot host intolerant.

greece latta hershey
"tetracyclene" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"tetracyclene" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Does for kill people and therefore should be regulated at least uh and therefore that if there are federal laws on the books then thirty general have to it in the justice department has a right to enforce those federal law wherever they are with and then he had grand with laura i gotta tell you something there are some things where i think you could go statebystate on certain issues but imagine this if you accept the argument that the federal government should not regulate drugs and their legality or or lack thereof um if you accept that premise then we're going to have fifty states that will each individually decide on heroin cocaine methamphetamine pot tetracyclene amok cicilline and every other drug out there and every single state is going to have a different set of laws because we don't have a federal framework of laws even though we know that if virginia legalize methamphetamine you know then the methamphetamine users from the state right next to you might wanna come over there and by at where they could buy it legally and take it back to the state there in which where it's not legal so they want to over eur wonder if the law of the land there yeah well i guess alava land is manslaughter or murder one or the other but it i nobody i know even the people who are probe pot believes that having that patchwork quilt of laws across the united states of america would be a good thing for anybody greg thanks very much i appreciate the call we'll be back in just a moment you're listening to the lars larson show lars larson show lori but local with tom anderson at the border exent ab dembosky in the afternoons kvnt 1020 am and ninety two point five fm a cbi media group station who would've thought the being able to distinguish between a proper now and a common now just might be the reason you write a pretty decent email that's what a good teacher does make their lessons apply to real life and for over twenty years the.

justice department federal law federal government methamphetamine murder united states america lori tom anderson heroin cocaine virginia greg lars larson cbi twenty years
"tetracyclene" Discussed on NewsRadio1620

NewsRadio1620

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"tetracyclene" Discussed on NewsRadio1620

"Had the drawing so we were i think of fifty one fifty here you are you're now actually he won the drawing and the republicans are in charge but the point i make greg is it when the states around you decide to legalize pot they they shouldn't trump on your states' rights to not legalize it because i think it gets easily applied though through in the fact that it is a public nuisance uh it it it does hurt and kill people in there or to be regulated at least uh and therefore that if there are federal laws on the books then attorney general have to it and it just respond to the right to enforce those federal law wherever you are with in then east and greg laura i gotta tell you something there are some things where i think you could go statebystate on certain issues but imagine this if you accept the argument that the federal government should not regulate drugs and their legality or or lack thereof um if you accept that premise then we're going to have fifty states that will each individually decide on heroin cocaine methamphetamine pot tetracyclene amok cicilline and every other drug out there and every single state is going to have a different set of laws because we don't have a federal framework of laws even though we know that if virginia legalize methamphetamine you know then the methamphetamine users from the state right next to you might wanna come over there and by at where they could buy it legally and take it back to the state there in which where it's not legal so they want to over eur one the law of the land there yeah well i guess la la land is manslaughter or murder one or the other but in i nobody i know even the people who are probe pot believes that having that patchwork quilt of laws across the united states of america would be a good thing for anybody greg thanks very much i appreciate the call we'll be back in just a moment you're listening to the lars larson show lars larson show.

attorney federal law greg laura federal government methamphetamine murder united states america heroin cocaine virginia la la lars larson
"tetracyclene" Discussed on Weekly Infusion

Weekly Infusion

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"tetracyclene" Discussed on Weekly Infusion

"Syphilis was called the great imitators and it would be difficult acura ukip him bouzo other doctors in the public because syphilis created a just a vast array of lesions and consumes at daya they couldn't really diagnosis at the right there was no way to really detected and it's making a resurgence oh you're number one here in southern california los angeles credulous the running back however if people are so cavalier about it because some tetracyclene her penicillin takes care of it but back then it was devastation there was a turkish closest syphilis was sort of common a diagnose chronic severe whatever illnesses and coming back yard resistant strain yes yes it's scary here so so i'm gonna go back reina but and ask you what bruce asked the the company they actually produces the pay not just the company the watchdog company but was there involved but with the whole food chain of supply in that product yeah and in worth mentioning is actually run the gals stop painting if the famed company the company that's making the paint is the company you know mining the substance and other things say they are linked complicit because in a death rice and that's you know if people stop believing these women bought the substance is to blame for these horrific gruesome painful illnesses and symptoms and death that the suffering degen not not only that the dial painting industry guy but the industry that that supplying the substance to the cosmetics the clinics the as you know all the documentation while faith as an incredibly lucrative industry to protect at all costs did you investigate how they did a cover up like that every to the retired of the colluded together it's kind of crazy.

Syphilis acura los angeles penicillin bruce food chain california
"tetracyclene" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"tetracyclene" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"He was gored in the leg by a bore and the wound became infected his doctor told him not to worry antibiotics were the cure but it wasn't that simple we tried to different tetracyclene who tried streptomycin we try and risk relies at a mock cicilline seven different antibiotics in total to no avail so we check the reports from his veterinarian to see what infections his pigs had and what antibiotics worked for them came back you know resistant resistant resistant resistant and and folly ahha there was one antibiotic at that time uh that had some effect on that disease they treated me and thank god there was this new generation drug been so that transform my life this is on what what we call economies molecular microbiologist lance prize also grew up on a farm a cattle ranch he watch first hand as a neighboring dairy went from a smallscale family operation to a high density industrialscale farm they are called concentrated animal feeding operations lance price says they are fertile breeding grounds for disease you pack them together snapped a tale in the case of pigs in a leak to feather in the case of chickens in turkey's they're they're gonna share bacteria so we've engineered a system that makes him sick rather than change that system we actually just add low doses of antibiotics to try to prevent infection price had his team at george washington university conduct large epidemiological studies of meat that is sold in grocery stores the culture the bacteria found in the meat and test to see how they react to discs saturated with antibiotics he is hunting for superbugs if they're susceptible that is not resistant to the antibiotic they will be inhibited they won't grow near the desk for when they grow right up to the disc like all of these.

lance prize turkey streptomycin george washington university
"tetracyclene" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:42 min | 4 years ago

"tetracyclene" Discussed on KELO

"Know you each what the birds eat you eat what the animals eat and and that goes into your system so if we have these genetically modified laarba the just so happens to be consumed by a wild turkey and it thanks giving you you know you have you know larba stuffing or something in your turkey the one c that's the problem everything goes into the circle of life everything affects the ecosystem the environment it affects what we eat and so of tetracyclene it's going into these mazda tetracyclene is going into the birds going into the animals it's going into you osce seconds developed other insects including gm fruit flies they're now they're ready for testing their far from being released but now they have them and they're ready to be released if anybody wants him so hey those little bugs and fly around your bananas you don't have to worry about radioactivity now you worry about what oxy techs gonna put your bananas i said that the other day about bananas being radioactive go wide liked that they are those radioactive for you we you know that right you didn't know that yeah but manas a radioactive bear that mean it's not like you know it's not like you you know they pick them in harvest them from fukushima but you know they are radioactive you know i don't know how radioactive the i mean i don't expect you to go taking a geiger counter into a safe way or into a kroger's and and just going through the bananas or clicking today at yeah i don't think so but see scientists now and because of the goahead scientists are creating other more experimental franken bugs they're they're they're going to town would you looking at well not just the fact that they are creating bugs that are you know organic k they're creating bugs the bitter drones they have dragonfly drones which were genetically engineered so that certain neurons would respond to light pulses so they can he will get the bugs to respond to blight pulse they strap micro gear her on a dragonfly headed admits the light pulse it allows them to control the dragonflys mubin so they can actually fly a dragonfly like you would a drone someone once told me about how who wasn't until we the story about how they used to take horse flies and they would freeze them entice strings to.

tetracyclene fukushima genetically modified gm franken
"tetracyclene" Discussed on KELO

KELO

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"tetracyclene" Discussed on KELO

"Backs of the killing mechanism what it is is a protein called t t a it's called tetracyclene controlled transacted readers so trent tetracyclene antibiotic so there's some evidence that thea can damage damaged lungs and brain function of mice so what does it do to humans well not much is known but oxy deck reported and they once again did the same thing monsanto did they created a science it has we sign up out of the said well there's no adverse effects are impacts that have been observed in mice are other animals but yet gene watch says big big dipper and so when we're looking at j o actually gene watches it nonprofit center for food safety and what they're doing is they're demanding and i think we should demand is well board transparency and more comprehensive testing especially when we're dealing with feeding studies i mean if you're gonna if you're going to send out these laws are gonna have the larba contaminate the food the animals by your even larbre to be eaten directly by by animals by the birds i mean when we have tetracyclene and how it disables the kill switch here we have one hundred percent of these creatures basically all over the place if one percent of these chips of these models that are that are genetically modified spread in survive what are we doing to the ecosystem that are doing an environment what does this jumanji nearing doing to us and that i think is worthy of at least halting this continued the release of.

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"tetracyclene" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:10 min | 4 years ago

"tetracyclene" Discussed on KTRH

"Could be consumed by animals and little is known about what happens with the health effects of the killing mechanism what it is is a protein called she the tae hey it's called tipped recycling controlled transacted readers so trend tetracyclene antibiotic so there's some evidence that thea can damage the lungs and brain function of mice so what does it do to humans well not much is known but oxy jack reported and they once again did the same thing monsanto did they created the size and has we sign off are they said well there is no adverse effects are impacts that have been observed in mice are other animals but yet gene watched as bay big dipper and so when we're looking at actually gene watches a nonprofit center for food safety and what they're doing is they're demanding and i think we should demand is well board transparency and more comprehensive testing especially when we're dealing with feeding studies i mean if you're going to if you're going to send out these laws or if you're going to have the lord but contaminate the food the animals my eat or evenly larvae to be even directly by by the animals by the birds i when we have tetracyclene and how it disables the kill switch here we have one hundred percent of these creatures basically all over the place if one percent of these chips of these moths that are that are genetically modified spread in survive what are we doing to the ecosystem will give you the environment what is this geo engineering doing to us and that i think is worthy of at least halting this continued the release of geo of genetically modified insects go to my mike in texas hi mike you're on ground zero huawei my lee from the rdv frontline air in texas hey buddy it.

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"tetracyclene" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:47 min | 4 years ago

"tetracyclene" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"What is is a protein called t t a it's called tetracycline controlled transacted baiters so trend tetracyclene antibiotic so there's some evidence that cga can damage the lungs and brain function of mice so what does it do to humans well not much is known but oxy tech reported and they once again did the same thing monsanto did they created a sides and has we sign up out of the way well there is no adverse effects are impacts that have been observed in mice or other animals but yet gene watch says big big vip for and so when we're looking at actually gene watches a nonprofit center for food safety and what they're doing is they're demanding and i think we should demand is well bore transparency and more comprehensive testing especially when we're dealing with feeding studies i mean if you're gonna if you're going to send out these mas or if you're gonna have the lord but contaminate the food the animals might your evenly larbre to be eaten directly by by the animals by the birds i mean when we have tetracyclene and how it disables the kill switch here we have one hundred percent of these creatures basically all over the place and if one percent of these chips of these models that are that are genetically modified spread and survive what are we doing to the ecosystem will go in an environment what does this geo engineering doing to us and that i think is worthy of at least halting this continued the release of geo of genetically modified insects go to mike in texas hi mike you're on ground zero collide big my lee from the rdv frontline air in texas hey buddy the like a very eat drink man you know a lot of people are going to be a game on the radio look over so listen to talking about the butterfly infix no things or and this is late here is the islet done era stuff i and and you know a few years ago uh south america i really an accidentally really a uh a genetically modified honey in bee an taxes we're excreting thing uh uh too the severely deficient out output honeybees vote came air took over all that you know let away so so.

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"tetracyclene" Discussed on AFP: American Family Physician Podcast

AFP: American Family Physician Podcast

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"tetracyclene" Discussed on AFP: American Family Physician Podcast

"Treatment for ngo dima is largely the same as arctic area though corticosteroids may be more commonly used so to summarize many things can cause or to carry ah but an extensive lab work up is not necessary treatment should be step wise and second generation in a his two means should be your mainstay of treatment we're going to wrap up this issue with the discussion of a practice guideline from the american academy of dermatology on acne vulgarities ira we're going to go through three key points in some extra bullet points from this article for treating acne bulgara's these fall the american academy dermatology guidelines for managing this condition here we go point one the first line treatment from mild acne vulgarities include ends up side or a topical retina wide or a combination is medications from moderate acne vulgarities a combination of benzopyrene inside with a topical antibiotic anna topical retina loyd or both can be used you can add an oral antibiotic if necessary and i said vera acne vulgarities you can have an oral antibiotic with a benzyl proxided topical antibiotic and a topical red night dokic point two topical or oral antibiotics should not be used as a motto fear of the because of the risk of developing bacterial resistance the choice of a topical agents should be based on a patient's age acne sites severity in patient preference eta addicts should then be prescribed for just the shortest amount of time necessary and you should reassess after using them for three or four months point three tetracyclene the preferred oral antibiotic doxycycline aninat cycline are more effective than tetracyclene we don't really have good data for other antibiotics outside a tetracyclene or macro leads pregnant women and children younger than hd receiver earth or maya sen and as if their my assassin and backstrom should be given to those patients who can't take tetracycline or they fail as antibiotic treatment.

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"tetracyclene" Discussed on TEDTalks Science and Medicine

TEDTalks Science and Medicine

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"tetracyclene" Discussed on TEDTalks Science and Medicine

"But with our knowledge of xlet me explain this is the bad guy eightyfifth tie some most common in vector of diseases and not just zeka but didn't get ukraineguniowest the virus and that ancient play yellow fever it's an urban mosquito and it's the female that does the dirty work she bikes to get a blood to feed her offspring males don't buy they don't even have the of parts by little company british company called oxy tech to medically modified that scuitto so that when it meets with a wild female it's eggs don't develop to adulthood let me showthis is the normal reproductive cycle actuallyczechdesignedthe mosquitoes so that when the mail mates with a while female thex don't sounds impossible let me show you just stay malik lay how they do it now this represents the nucleus of a mosquito cell in that tangle in the middle represents its genome some total of its genethe scientists added a single gene the codes for a protein represented by this orange ball that feeds back honest off to keep king out more of that protein the extra copies however go and come up the mess he does genes killing the organism that'll keep it alive in the laboratory the use the compound called tetra sites singh tetracyclene shuts had gene in allows normal development no the added another little recall so that they could study what happens and that is the the genethat'll that makes the insect glow you feel light so that when they released a figure followed sadly how far went how long it lived.

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