7 Burst results for "Tessa Mush"

"tessa mush" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:50 min | 3 months ago

"tessa mush" Discussed on KCRW

"Jessica Levinson is here. There is a race to find a covert vaccine, but it could be hampered by a monkey shortage. Monkey breeding. There's a really expensive time intensive process and animals. Rights activists have also but critical of primate research in the U. S. A conversation with author Tessa Mush bag who's new novel is called death in her hands and new music with and lift. What I think is gonna be incredible is to hear the songs that are being written. Now that we're going to hear six months from now The news is Next live from NPR News. I'm Jack Spear. The Justice Department's criminal case against former National Security advisor Michael Flynn is still alive. For now. NPR's Carrie Johnson reports. A federal appeals court has refused to force a lower court judge to dismiss the case. Michael Flynn twice pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about his contacts with the Russian ambassador than Flynn got a new lawyer and the Justice Department got a new leader, Attorney General Bill Bar. Prosecutors eventually decided to abandon the case. But Judge Emmet Sullivan wanted to wait and examine whether the Justice Department had political reasons for dropping it. The DC Circuit appeals court has now agreed, paving the way for a hearing on whether Flynn got special treatment. The appeals court says Judge Solomon might still side with the Justice Department and dismissed the prosecution, but it says it's never compelled any judge to rule a certain way on an undecided issue. Carrie Johnson NPR NEWS Washington Democratic presidential hopeful Joe Biden traveled to Pittsburgh today, where he forcefully denounced recent violence and protests against racism. But also blaming President Trump for exacerbating the divide between US citizens for being incapable of dealing with the matter by and says Trump can't stop the violence occurring in cities like Portland, Oregon, in Kenosha, Wisconsin, because quote for years he's fomented it. Biden called recent violence, looting and destruction, Lawlessness, plain and simple. Facebook is letting outside. Researchers study how its APS effect the 2020 election. NPR Shannon Bond reports, The company will recruit users of Facebook and Instagram to take part. Facebook says it wants to better understand the impact of social media on democracy that includes what rolls it saps play and polarization. How informed people are about politics and how they feel about government and voting. People who join the study may see different ads and post in their feeds or be asked to stop using Facebook and Instagram. Facebook has come under criticism for amplifying political divisions and for how its platform was used by Russian trolls to spread disinformation during the 2016 election. The company is not paying the researchers and will not have any say over what they published. The study's results are expected to be released in the second half of next year. Shannon Bond NPR News San Francisco US in Taiwan are establishing a new economic dialogue aimed a deepening ties with Taipei's NPR's John Will, which reports it comes at a time of worsening relations between the US and China. David Stillwell, the assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, says the talks will explore a range of economic issues and include sectors like semiconductors, health care and Energy, He says technology will be at the core of the dialogue. Taiwan is the United States ninth largest trade partner. The announcement is the latest in a string of steps with the Trump administration to strengthen US ties with Taiwan as it takes a harder line against China. Beijing considers the self rule Democratic Island to be a part of China and it chiefs at any international cooperation with Taiwan. John Rule, which NPR news This is NPR. At 70 for this is Casey ar W news. I'm Matt Gillom, like any health officials said that they would meet tomorrow to discuss the possible reopening of indoor shopping malls, hair salons and barbershops. Under new state guidelines. Local authorities have been hesitant to move ahead with new re openings was new reopening, fearing a repeat of spiking cases that followed an earlier easing of restrictions. County health officer, Dr Montu Davis said this afternoon that even though we are seeing cases returned to their lowest positivity rates were still seeing way too many cases indicative of widespread The county reported 1022 new cases, raising the cumulative since total since the start of the pandemic to nearly 242,000 total of 1043 people were hospitalized due to the virus as of today. LAT necks and black residents continue to be infected with the virus and die from it at disproportionate rates. Poverty also plays a considerable role. Those who live in the poorest areas of the county have a death break. That is more than four times that of those in wealthier areas of the county. Health officials announced 16 new deaths from Corona virus today, bringing the county y total to 5784. Authorities are investigating a noose that was found outside the home of a black family in Diamond Bar homeowner Lillian Rucker told Kay Cal nine. She now no longer feels welcome in her community. That is a symbol of hate to me to black.

NPR Facebook Justice Department NPR News United States Michael Flynn Taiwan Carrie Johnson Shannon Bond China Judge Emmet Sullivan Jessica Levinson Joe Biden President Trump Tessa Mush Judge Solomon DC Circuit Jack Spear Diamond Bar assistant secretary of state f
"tessa mush" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:34 min | 3 months ago

"tessa mush" Discussed on KCRW

"And can President Trump legally some the police to monitor polling places on Election Day. The legal eagle Jessica Levinson is here There is a race to find a covert vaccine, but it could be hampered by a monkey shortage. Monkey breeding is a really expensive Time intensive process and animals. Rights activists have also but a cripple of primate research in the U. S. A conversation with author of Tessa Mush Bag who's new novel is called Death in her hands and new music with ANL. If what I think is Going to be incredible is to hear the songs that are being written. Now that we're going to hear six months from now the news is next. Live from NPR News. I'm Laxmi saying Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden is taking his campaign to the key battleground state of Pennsylvania today. NPR's Windsor Johnston reports, Biden is mounting a more aggressive offense against President Trump amid ongoing protests against police brutality and racial injustice in cities across the country. Biden says his second term of President Trump will lead to more violence in American cities, Speaking in Pittsburgh bite and laid the blame on Trump, accusing him of sowing chaos. Fires were burning. We have a president who fans the flames. Rather than fighting flames, But We must not burn. We have to build Is president long ago forfeited any moral leadership in this country. Fighting also condemned the destruction and violence that at times has come along with acts of protest, he says. As president, he would support those calling for racial justice and work to unite the country. More broadly. Windsor Johnston. NPR News in Portland, Oregon State police are joining local authorities in their investigation into a deadly shooting resulting from a chaotic weekend of protests. A member of a right wing group died following a confrontation between Trump supporters and opponents. The violence set off a vitriolic exchange online between President Trump and Portland's Democratic mayor over who's to blame. The mayor of Lake Charles. Louisiana, says the destruction from Hurricane Lauren Hiss city is catastrophic and the need for immediate aid overwhelming NPR's Kirk Siegler reports, much of the city of 80,000 was devastated by the storm. Mayor Nick Hunter says Lake Charles is in crisis right now, with power and water expected to be off for weeks, and almost every house in the city is damaged. We absolutely need our American brothers and sisters. To realize that a.

President Trump president NPR News Joe Biden NPR Windsor Johnston Jessica Levinson Lake Charles Tessa Mush Nick Hunter Kirk Siegler Hurricane Lauren Portland Pittsburgh 80,000 Louisiana Pennsylvania Oregon State
"tessa mush" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"tessa mush" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"It's a fantastic show. You've got to see it's also just like even even if you can't stomach like twenty three minutes Nisa subtitled guy in a suit like talking about his the history of like some crazy dish you've never heard of just going youtube and watch the clips because the clips are like all of his weird trips. It's just amazing. It's so well done. It's really funny. It's based on a Manga also oh which I'm told his leg very popular in Japan so yes. It's it's really fun. Sounds really trippy the fact that it's well done telling me on this. It's like it's well produced deeply weird. Yes is deals that so we have to watch that just to see how closely your description matches the actual footage all right. I'm I would like to know how fair on that I would like all of our listeners to do out of into yeah. We don't know if you're watching it dawned or not might make a difference. What is your recommendation? My recommendation is a book that I read over vacation called my year of rest and relaxation Tessa Mush rush get much. I hope I did not just butcher her last name. I apologize if I did R._l.. You may have recommended this before on the podcast. Is that possible I did. I read the take right around the time of CIS. I needed something and relaxing during that theory trying time and I read it in one sitting yes I read it probably interior three days and thank you for the recommendation because I now have read it and also recommend it and when you hear a book you you hear about book titled My Year of Rest and relaxation you think is going to be something very different from what it ultimately is just as a refresher and he's you weren't listening to the podcast back when Arielle recommended it. It is a book <hes> fiction book about a young woman just recently he graduated from Columbia. She's working in gallery. She is <hes> she's in her early. Twenty s living in New York City and she is incredibly depressed and she's <hes> likely depressed from some trauma that she has gone through Inter family life but also just feeling this general sense of worthlessness in futility what's the point of everything so she decides to check out of the world <hes> by basically finding shrink that will just take out her prescription pad at you you know the smallest trigger and write her series of pharmaceutical prescriptions for her to <hes> dull her senses and just check out and sheet. That's what she does. She's determined to basically do nothing and sleep for a year and her apartment. <hes> in this plan gets more for more aggressive as time goes on she's very little interaction with the outside world with the exception of one friend and <hes> really shitty boyfriend if you'd even call him a boyfriend he's kind of less than that and for awhile when she's she's like managing to hold down a job and she's interacting with coworkers for a while but that doesn't ask for very long and the thing is that it sounds like maybe I'm probably just doing. I'm oversimplifying it but I think it speaks a lot to first of all these sentiments of feeling overwhelmed and wanting to check out in in like maybe indulging that fantasy a little bit of doing it but it's actually very deeply dark novel. It's also set in the days before nine eleven so I think that we have entered this serfaty right now. In some in some of our media where enough time has passed between <hes> September eleventh two thousand one and now we're starting to have this new kind of <hes> look at what the days before nine eleven. We're actually like you know. The consumer Internet obviously existed but like we weren't as immersed in it. We weren't as immersing social media applications are human human interactions were like fundamentally different so much actually Durham economy was different obviously but there's like so much that it was different in our modern society <hes> and and like this is an interesting glimpse at that.

Arielle youtube Nisa Japan New York City Columbia Durham twenty three minutes three days
"tessa mush" Discussed on The Upgrade by Lifehacker

The Upgrade by Lifehacker

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"tessa mush" Discussed on The Upgrade by Lifehacker

"Now it's time for the interview where we interview someone this week, we're talking to writer Tessa, mush vague. Tessa is the author of the new novel, my year of rest and relaxation as well as novel. I lean and the short story collection homesick for another world. Tessa, welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. Tell us a little bit about your writing process. Like what does the day look like when you're in the thick of writing? Probably from the outside looks really boring. I write a lot in bed and then I'll move to the desk then a walk around. I'll go back to bed with computer, do the dishes, and then I'll go back to computer might print something out my throat away a my good side and smoke a cigarette might call. Somebody might take a shower, go back to my computer. So is this like an all day process when I'm in the thick of it? Yes, it's painful to leave it and every everything that I do. That's not. It feels like a betrayal. I get pretty obsessive. What's what period is when you're in the thick of it? Like is it just when you started idea or is it when you're in the middle of it? Or what does that look like in your life? The exposition of novel always seems to flow very naturally, and it's it's in some ways the most fun because you're just meeting your book for the first time and you're sort of falling for it. But once I'm like past page, seventy five eighty getting into the grit. Of things having to make really hard decisions that are going to have an impact on the rest of the book. I mean, that's when it starts to feel like I can't screw this up. Do you feel any kind of responsibility to your characters? Don't feel responsibility to my characters. I feel responsibility to the book. Is it start to feel like a book, this thing that you feel responsibility to rather than something that you're figuring out? Probably before I even know that I'm going to write a book. I feel a responsibility. Something's coming like this book that I haven't written yet. I feel responsibility for. And do you feel like it's part of you, or do you feel like it's something that you're shepherding or coaxing, or is it separate from you? Will? I believe we are all one, so therefore it is both of me and through me. And you've written short stories too, right? Yeah, used to write a lot of short stories. When I finished my short story collection, the book came out in two thousand seventeen. Once I had done. That I had nothing to do with the publication actually was once I had written last story of the collection, I knew I was done short stories, at least in this decade. I don't think I'll write short stories again. Why not? The last story in my collection was so powerful for me. I mean, maybe the stones nuts, but it was really like as though the form or saying, don't do this anymore. This is homesick for another world. Yeah. If you do it, you'll be undoing all the work you've done. Do you enjoy writing? Yes. I love writing. I feel like it's my purpose. Sometimes I wish that I could hold it a little bit more lightly and might have more freedom to do other things, which I think would make me happy. But it's very difficult because I'm like, oh, I used to be somebody who drew and painted, and and I haven't done that in a long time. And part of it is like, no, I can't give my creative energy to anything else because of less for my writing. And I know that that makes sense in one way, but I also think that's wrong. Like if I let myself draw for an hour day, I would probably feel better now I'd probably feel more relaxed, maybe like more sensitive in a certain way. I would feel more open my magic nation would widen, but my process for writing in particularly writing novels gets really narrow. I think maybe that's because of the the novels I've written or just inherent in the the, the stories that I've been interested in. This requires a very narrow process, but I would like to, oh, got deja vu. I would like to widen my creative process a little bit in like listen to more music and go see dance and draw and play the piano again do into kind of research with your books..

Tessa writer
"tessa mush" Discussed on Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

10:56 min | 2 years ago

"tessa mush" Discussed on Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

"This is live at politics and prose a program from slate and politics, and prose bookstore in Washington DC featuring some of today's best writers and top thinkers night. All of our politics and prose are very thrilled to host Tessa mosh vague for her fourth book my year of rest and relaxation at comes closely on the heels of her past three titles twenty fourteen novella of drunken sailor called mcglew, which is soon to be released by penguin early next year, twenty fifteen and war. Tinged man Booker prize shortlisted Eileen and two thousand sixteen collection homesick for another world which collected stories originally published through outlets like the Paris review the New Yorker, the baffler and more. I'm very happy to see how this new novel has been blowing up. It feels like something that my fellow booksellers have who have loved her work from the beginning. A new was about to happen for this one because I I know we've all been waiting eagerly to tell everyone for months in advance of its release about what this book is. So callous things. I have to say about it. It's the perfect water cooler book. There are many reasons for that. There are the risks that she takes in the writing the confidence to frame the novel around decidedly sedentary character who barely leads her apartment. The really full-throttle sensation and induced lack of sensation in the book, the goal to set the novel at perhaps the most eerily pregnant moments in New York City history. And at the same time, I could praise her for unbelievable sense of humor, which is carried over an amplified from her previous books. I really think she should receive some kind of medal for creating Dr Tuttle who's in the book. The only psychiatrist to answer the phone at eleven at night on a Tuesday and every sentence of hers is very bizarre punchline. But more than any of that, I really would like to praise her for deploying those tools in a very caustic manner for a really unique card. One sense of of real soul. She's unparalleled at creating characters that are. Simultaneously at their most damaged and at their most capable of experiencing real transcendence. I was not prepared for how emotionally overwhelming this book becomes, and I was left at the end even more amazed than before by how quickly she's amassing a real collection of masterworks. So it's a mentally gratifying to see all of you here to watch a unfold this widespread love for this novel. So if you haven't already by a copy for yourself, a copy for your friends, your partial friends, your friends who are secretly your enemies and everybody, because you'll have a lot to talk about and go through together with the spoke. So without further ado, here's Tessa mush, Vic. Hi, hi. Hi, thanks, Jonathan. That was really flattering introduction. Okay. I can't believe how many people are here. I almost didn't come cause just kidding. I wanted to do. So before I start, I want I took a nap today for the first time since I was like seven years old. I wanted to. I think it was because of the weather, and I just wanted to start by reading a description of a fictional nap from my book. Actually, it's just about naps in general. Okay. At work. So this woman, I'm gonna tell you more later, but this woman also there this being videotaped. So I have to be careful, you're, you're getting the clean version of me tonight. Okay. So this woman is been working in a art gallery in Chelsea, and she's she's really into sleeping. I guess that's all you need to know for this little excerpts. And this comes like early on in the book. At work. I took our long naps in the supply closet under the stairs during my lunch breaks napping is such a childish word, but that was what I was doing. The tonality of my night's sleep was more variable generally unpredictable. But every time I lay down in that supply closet, I went straight into black emptiness, an infinite space of nothingness. I was neither scared nor elated in that space. I had no visions. I had no ideas if I had a distinct thought I would hear it in the sound of it would echo and echo until it got absorbed by the darkness and disappeared. There was no response necessary know inane conversation with myself. It was peaceful event in the closet, released a steady flow of fresh air that picked up the scent of laundry from the hotel next door. There was no work. To do nothing I had to counteract or compensate for because there was nothing at all period. And yet I was aware of the nothingness. I was awake in the sleep somehow. I felt good almost happy, but coming out of that sleep was excruciating my entire life flashed before my eyes and the worst way possible my mind refilling itself with all my lame memories. Every little thing that had brought me to where I was, I tried to remember something else a better version, a happy story maybe or just an equally lame but different life that would at least be refreshing in its digression 's, but it never worked. I was always still me. Sometimes I woke up with my face wet with tears. The only times I cried in fact where when I was pulled out of that, nothingness, when the alarm on my cell phone went off, then I. Had to trudge up the stairs, get coffee from the little kitchen and rubbed the Boogers out of my is it always took me a while to readjust to the harsh fluorescent lighting. So that's how she sleeps at work. I just wanted to read that because I, I woke up from this nap and I couldn't believe it had happened. And I was like, wait, I wrote that. So. So, okay. So you've heard a little bit from our narrator and her thoughtfulness about sleep. And I'm going to read from the first chapter of the book to introduce you a little bit to her and her project, and then a couple of the other characters. But before I do that, I, I'm I wanna say something because I gave a reading in Berkeley. I read for like twenty or twenty five minutes. And the first question in the QNA was so what is your book about? So I feel like it might be useful, and it only takes a minute to tell you that my book is about a woman in her mid twenties living in Manhattan in it's the year two thousand and the book moves into two thousand one. She for various reasons decides to take on a project which is to sleep as much as humanly or humanly possible for an entire year. And she does this because she convinces herself that if she can only sleep long enough her cells, we'll have regenerated the number of times it would take for them to have forgotten whatever trauma or memory or past had been lodged in her body or mind. So she believes that sleep is going to cleanse her of her self, which she is not too happy with and. That's all you really need to know, which seems so obvious. I mean like, yeah, it's about women who sleeps a lot and you'll, you'll see that she just does that, but other things happen in the book. Okay. So this is my year of rest and relaxation. And this is chapter one. Whenever I woke up by like my reading, we'll get funnier as I as I go forward, but you don't have to wait to laugh and will not take it. I will not take it badly if you laugh. Okay. Chapter one, whenever I woke up night or day, I shuffle through the bright marble, bright marble foyer of my building and go up the block and around the corner where there was a Bodega that never closed. I'd get to large coffees with cream and six sugars each chug the first one in the elevator on the way back up to my apartment. Then sip, the second one slowly while I watched movies and ate animal crackers and took trouser Trabzon and Ambien and nembutal until I fell asleep. Again, I lost. Of time in this way days past weeks a month. A few months went by when I thought of it. I ordered delivery from the Thai restaurant across the street or a tuna salad platter from the diner on first avenue. I'd wake up to find voice messages on my cell phone from salons or spas, confirming appointments. I booked in my sleep. I always called back to cancel, which I hated doing because I hated talking to people. Early on in this phase I had my dirty laundry picked up and clean laundry delivered once a week. It was a comfort to me to hear the torn plastic bags Russell in the draft from the living room windows. I liked catching whiffs of the fresh laundry smell while I dozed off on the sofa. But after a while it was too much trouble to gather up all the dirty clothes and stuff them in the laundry bag. And the sound of my own washer and dryer interfered with my sleep. So I just threw away my dirty underpants all the old payers reminded me of Trevor anyway, Trevor you find out is an ex, which I guess is obvious. For a while, tacky, lingerie from Victoria's Secret kept showing up in the mail. Frilly fuchsia and lime green thongs and Teddy's and baby doll nightgowns each sealed in clear plastic baggie. I stuffed the little Baggies into the closet and went commando an occasional package from Barneys, or Saks provided me with men's pajamas and other things. I couldn't remember ordering Kashmir Saux graphic t shirts, designer jeans. I took a shower once a week at most. I stopped tweeting, stopped leaching, stopped, waxing, stopped brushing my hair. No moisturizing or expel leading. No shaving I

Tessa mosh Trevor Washington Paris Tessa mush New York City Eileen Kashmir Saux Dr Tuttle Jonathan Chelsea Teddy QNA Baggies Victoria Trabzon Berkeley Manhattan Saks
"tessa mush" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"tessa mush" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"Is a joke is a throwaway to those people right right the and then we get this description of hell or the afterlife whatever you wanna call it as may be unbearable place of laughter to me it didn't sound that bad at least she's not alone what i love about it is that she practiced speech and it took four hours because it was that funny because the laugh at anything right i can't figure out whether you know when i was reading it out loud is she bragging that it took that long is she complaining there's that there's sort of two things being held simultaneously i don't quite know and then she and then she asks like is is that the same for everyone or is this laughing world of death made just for me how can i know for sure you can't ever no no no we may all have our own personal after lives in an and it's true for like the experience of life too i mean we have language and we can correctly miscommunicate sometime about the what we experience and i think that's a lot of what writers do try to do that let me try to express through language this really strange experience i'm having within myself i'm not even sure that your real you know but maybe if i talked to you and you're my witness it will feel real that's the story reminded me of the singular consciousness making the attempt to be witnessed and that is what the story is in itself i mean whether you say it's the attempt of the narrator or the the attempt of the author but i loved that it's so honest well thank you so much thank you sheila hetty is a canadian writer whose works of fiction include the collection the middle stories and the novels how should a person be and motherhood which was published earlier this year tessa mush fake story collection homesick for another world was a new york times notable book in two thousand seventeen and her third novel my year of rest and relaxation comes out this month you can download more than one hundred and thirty previous episodes if the new yorker fiction podcast or subscribe to.

writer sheila hetty tessa new york four hours
"tessa mush" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"tessa mush" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"Time the dogs laugh the trees laugh everyone laughs whether there's anything funny or not i practiced the speech on the other side before an audience of sixteen people in took four hours from beginning to end as i waited after saying each sentence for the laughter to subside here on earth it is different of course the quiet of the living is one of the great reliefs is death the same for everyone or is this laughing world a death made just for me how can i know for sure does anything i'm saying make any sense i'm self conscious about my speaking does my voice sound all right when you are dead it's difficult to carry a thought my head feels stuffed with cotton batting my eyes feel stuffed with cotton balls my ears feel plugged up with cotton it is hard to think to string meaning to meaning i did not come here to tell you i love you is that what you think i'm saying i only loved to men ever one of them wanted to marry me and the other thought my life was a joke my first boyfriend found himself a witness and i have come to declare that i found one too i one you see i won i won the best thing person can win to be seen i declared here today is the only reason i crawled into my flesh to stand here before you a joke on this stage his words no longer hurt me they make me feel so proud why did the chicken cross the road that's me i'm the chicken and i got to the other side he knew this would happen when he spoke those words how beautiful to be seen that was tessa mush fag reading my life as a joke by sheila hetty the story appeared in the new yorker in may of two thousand fifteen so what has one of the things that makes the story work is the fact that it feels even when you read it on the page it feels read aloud it feels in a way like a stand up comedy monologue or something and in fact it was written originally to be read aloud it was written for an event at i think hugo house a writer center in seattle which had a theme laugh after death and strange the strange image and sheila had he did have to fly across the country to go and read this story so what i was going to say is it's a story that you can't take literally but maybe in some ways you can take litter well one thing i love about the stories i didn't get that we were being talked to in that way until a couple of pages in where she she gestures towards why she's there to give the speech right so then i'm like oh i've been reading a speech i mean that's that's so strange about the prompt la was laugh after laugh after day yeah writing is so weird i mean that that's no that now makes this even weirder be i mean i'm just imagining being heady and like okay how do i how do i approach that prompt and start starting off with the thing that comes at the end really that asking herself if she's created this after world of ridiculous laughter what do you think of that vision of the afterlife a place where everyone just laughs constantly and also a place where you're only allowed to take this one sort of unresolved nagging saw with you well i believe that is true that's what we have to look forward to i mean i think that's why people pray and why certain people try really hard to have their first thought in in any instance of stress or ecstasy or whatever to be something good because they believed that when you die you're you're gonna die with that fought i think that's true i mean i don't think that anyone actually dies thinking like oh shit i forgot to buy toilet paper obviously i don't know nobody knows what it's like to tie but that that that after after world of ridiculous laughter i mean there was something that was like yes of course it's going to be like that of course it's going to be a world of total absurdity we're all we're human emotion our sensitivities and the drama on the heartache of course it's all disposed of everything is ridiculous everything is absurd there's something satisfying abs seen about imagining that satisfying the awful i mean yeah to go through all of this and then be stuck sitting next to the.

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