21 Burst results for "Tesha mitchell"

On the trail of COVID-19 misinformation

Science Friction

06:03 min | Last month

On the trail of COVID-19 misinformation

"Hi. An tesha Mitchell welcome to science fiction. You are about to mate to people who have really felt the fault lines of covid nineteen in their families. But in the way you might imagine. A mother, he told me I've been on the Victorian government website and the coronavirus testing is boosted a son. That's when my father said Australian scientists have now found out that sunlight is quite effective in preventing nineteen fiction confronting two pieces of medical misinformation. When it comes to medical misinformation, that term is actually really knew what we're used to as snake oil quackery, the waves of misinformation misleading content conspiracy content. It's really everywhere in a way that's really shocking. ABC's technology reporter investigative journalist Ariel Bogle joins us. Now she's been tracking the spread of health information since this pandemic began some of its mono-, some of it easy flat out dangerous and aerial imagine the spink kind of like wrestling with the arms of an octopus. It's really out there. I've seen dodgy posts and videos about carbon nineteen everywhere, and when we put a call out on ABC News website for examples. We received hundreds of tips and that's we're investigating here in click sick this a three part series on where health misinformation comes from, and it's impacting our lives. We're going to start with a single social media post then aerial and the team going digging and found what's out. There is really confusing papal testing their relationships including this woman. We'll call her lucy she lives a life on the move. Yeah Gypsy had. For more than two years Lucy's been travelling around Australia with a small dog picks the angel in a Pink Caravan. I couldn't afford to rent a house at any of the places places near where my children live, which ones album winds up in Byron Bay. So then I was like our will all to stick to being in the caravan and and that way I can float between my children but early in the pandemic in Queensland and interstate travel bans kept her apart from the son and daughter. So when restrictions as FA- caravan parks in Victoria I really wanted to just come and see my son that was that was migraine lot and I just bugged out acquaintance. When she arrived in Melbourne, she heads straight for his sons share house. There's been a dramatic escalation in the efforts to control a spiking corona virus cases in. Victoria in Melbourne. Getting grim as the number of covid nineteen cases, Russula, large parts of Melbourne now in danger of being put into lockdown. So I, only really got to see my son. A COUPLE OF TIMES BECAUSE? I want it to be careful because I didn't know you know how well they were self-isolating and protecting themselves. Busey was more worried than most about being infected with the coronavirus as you're going to hear Ya when Melbourne look like it was heading for a second wave of covid nineteen she bio just before the city went into second lockdown she was staying in a caravan park in country Victoria when she got some bad news on he got really sick really really sick about a week after I left Melbourne a son was on the fine couldn't get out of bed aching alive. You know coughing and I was really nervous I was like honey I really think you should get tested. It wasn't clear what it was, but his son saying it's probably not covid earned. It's probably just a bad flu and I was like, yeah. But for my sake, just to reassure your Mama I'd really appreciate it. If you go get tested because if you get tested and it's negative than I, know at least I'm okay and then he said something that really took her by surprise his words on the phone were I've been on the Victorian government website and the coronavirus testing is boosted. Lucy was really worried about him, but she was also especially worried for Oregon Health I've got to autoimmune diseases and the worst being rheumatoid arthritis, which affects all the joints causes stiffness and sometimes I can't walk. So Lucy takes powerful medication, which also suppresses her immune system's ability to protect itself from infections. My immune system does not function well. Well doesn't really function at all. But I do tend to pick out coughs and colds and sniffles sore throats if I just around people. I live as a total recluse on my iron but that's what I have to do to to stay healthy. And this means contain is a big threat to. Lucy. So at this point, lucy son was feeling really sick and they was a risk he might have covid nineteen though it seems he wasn't eager to take testify doubt. It's important to say that Lucy son didn't want to be part of the story. Sorry. These impressions only. But this was a time when Victorian health authorities wanted everyone even with modest symptoms to get tested to help contain the pandemic Lucy didn't know what to do so I said well. What makes you think that it's crap and he said, well, I've been reading on the government website and it says the tests that they give you. Is just the test corona viruses in general, not specific to. Sarah's To the one that causes covid nineteen then her sunset Lucy a screen shot of a website he'd seen on facebook and it was from CDC Dot Gov Had the link at the top and pretty said what he'd said. But it had like highlights across the words and a big Red Maka pen round

Lucy Melbourne Victoria Abc News Mitchell Pink Caravan Byron Bay FLU ABC Australia Ariel Bogle Migraine Reporter Facebook CDC Queensland
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

03:59 min | 2 months ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"I, it's the Tesha Mitchell with sides friction in non sixty nine, the first old woman scientific expedition landed in. The women wanted to collect the Ryan samples before being by hadn't been allowed to. So when they touched down on the OSCE continent, guess what one of the first questions was that they got asked WHETHER THEY BROUGHT LIPSTICK To guys such a symbol of what's happening on the planet. They must sustainable proposition. We have these women at the latest title. Half a century. Later, the leadership is documentary screening at BC's Melwood. In International, Film Festival or myth directed by illegal it follows seventy six women in science on this Lee unusual twenty day mission on a sheet to Antarctica called homeward bound, and they're not there to collect scientific samples. They are there to collect courage to share war stories to face Damon. And Plan to get. Even. Though we're on the ship and it was all about supporting each other. I never told anyone even in Matt Environments. Console happen. Pretty disappointed. assigned. What unfolds in this film is powerful emotional full of some very interesting tension and had two stomach controversy myth sixty eight and a half is all digital disease. If you're in Australia, you can catch the. On the festival website until August, the twenty third and in national. Science Week. As part of the myth talks program joining me three of the dakotas stars foon homes. He's with the author Really Institute for Environmental. Research and also the homeward bound program Dr Sam. Grover. HEADS UP THE SOIL atmosphere anthroposophy lab at Rit, university and some Chow in Beijing is founder of wild band. You can find a long video of this conversation on the festival whipsawed. Thank you. Natasha great to be here. Thanks for having it's been. The trip. In this film was imagined into being five Fabian detonator, who is this larger than life character a well known USTRALIAN CEO a corporate late ship kind of Guru. She's a rough and tough talker as she's an extraordinary presence in the film. What'd she think women in science needed her ladyship import the mantra that she uses these that Mother Nature needs her daughters. But what what is driving her to send over seventy women off to anti TOPGA Fabian met with? Senior women in Tasmania working in leadership in Antarctic Science. and. Just. One of them made a comment that the only way to really progress in leadership in Antarctic science with if you had to be ID. And although it was sorta sad as a Beta joke, it also wasn't really. And Fabian really took that to heart and she really thought about that and. When Heim and literally had this dream of taking hold of women tactic air and building will and skills in medicine affect the planet later ship. Because today, the world is so. Complicated and complex we have signed many wicked problems. That are out there right now right across the globe and the only way we're really going to resolve those is when we bring the best minds to those issues. and. When we have multiple perspectives looking at dicey, she's. And Fabian really well.

Fabian OSCE Tesha Mitchell Really Institute for Environme Ryan Matt Environments founder Damon Heim BC Beijing Dr Sam Grover Lee Natasha Antarctica Australia Tasmania USTRALIAN Rit
Medical misinformation, COVID-19, Big Data and Black Lives Matter

Science Friction

08:04 min | 3 months ago

Medical misinformation, COVID-19, Big Data and Black Lives Matter

"Welcome to science fiction on medical misinformation, big data and black lives matter in this time of pandemic is in the months since these based of a virus heat. My two guests have occupied all of those worlds all at once. The TESHA Mitchell with you and joining me at two superstars of the world of digital epidemiology. They are mining digital data from all sorts of unusual sources, some very familiar to you to help us. Make sense of things dot Miami. Gender is a computational epidemiologist at Harvard, medical school and Boston. Hospitals Computational Health Informatics Program Adam Dan is associate professor in Biomedical Informatics and Digital Health at the University of Sydney. Etem part of your work as you suggested, investigates have health misinformation sporades on social media platforms in online forums, hell potent. has this pandemic being in terms of appendix of misinformation as well I? kind of feel like appendix Storms I'll take of misinformation for for a few reasons. Really I mean I just the sheer volume of of information that's being generated imposs- on. This some quite interesting studies have been done in computational social science to show that as we increase the volume of information that exposed to the influx throughout timelines, and makes it hotter and hotter for us to be able to discern what's actually credible, and so we're more likely to pass on less credible information to our friends and family and people paper now social networks, which makes it much easier to spread misinformation. And just as an example in a weeping collecting tweets about things like vaccines, all sorts of stuff for a long time, and says the first case where we were completely unable to collect all of the tweets that were related to of the pandemic. You know just attempting to collect it. We constantly ran into all of our API limits. We're unable to do all the stuff that we wanted to do so this absolute flood of information all the time, so there's too much data to work with yeah. Yeah and that makes it really hard for people to discern what's actually high quality information? What's credible information so that they tend to pass on things that may not be credible at all, but this two hundred reasons that I think that this has been kind of the perfect storm uptake of misinformation. You know there's a lot of politicization. When she mentioned already in a for example, it was reasonably obvious to those of us who looked at quality of clinical studies around the drug hydroxy chloroquine. that it was unlikely to be useful on the pandemic that it was some serious flaws in the way, the evidence was being discussed and the the way the study's being done, but when things became politicized around the drug, they quickly became sort of entrenched in the partisan communities that exist online and becomes much much hotter to to use elements to change people's attitudes on something has become politicized I. Think the other reason why is that? We had seen what I think. People become more susceptible to being affected by misinformation and letting it affect the way they make decisions in their behaviors when they're more concerned when anxious when I have a loss of control. In a feelings of uncertainty and loss of control are associated with conspiracy beliefs and. The fact we have is invisible threat that his CO. MAINTAIN A book. Such big differences in the way governments are responding stoneleigh created in Iraq kind of environment from certain feelings. Of Powerlessness, yeah, I mean. A global pandemic is the ultimate loss of control. Isn't it and it's tricky to know. Who attuned to in terms of expertise because science and medicine. Rising to Cape Up with all the variables with the very basics of this virus. Yeah, look absolutely right, and you know we have this kind of environment where there's just too much information making positive for us to tell the difference between what's credible and what isn't we've got strong. Citation makes hard to change people's attitudes, but evidence and we're in this situation. People find misinformation more salient, and then we'll likely to kind of absorb it, and then let it affect decision making, and it's been a really interesting to watch, but it's also sort of a ended a lot of the work that we try and do to study misinformation Maya Atom. maxine interesting observation there that. Misinformation, during this pandemic hasn't just sprung from conspiracy, theories or wellness theorists are wellness gurus. It's coming also from. At least science from scientists during this pandemic to an extent, because research is being done in a record time to try and chase down this corona virus, early results are being shared before they are robustly peer reviewed on so-called preprinted service for all to see. The media is picking up those papers before really they've been properly vetted by scientific colleagues, so it's an interesting phenomenon, isn't it? It is at is definitely an unprecedented time for the development of new scientific discovery and I think that one of the things that's very challenging. Science by design is meant to reinvent itself with every passing day. What we know today should not be what we knew yesterday. It should be better more refined more credible, and I think that because that entire process is not public in a way that it perhaps was not before or at least was not given the attention by the public that it is being given now I think that that definitely influences the way that a lot of early findings are now being interpreted and I think that even early findings that were credible and are now being. Not necessarily questioned, but are being overtaken by newer better science for scientists. This feels like part of the scientific process,

Associate Professor In Biomedi Hospitals Computational Health Mitchell Miami University Of Sydney Boston Cape Up Harvard Iraq Chloroquine. Adam Dan
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

07:42 min | 8 months ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an ABC podcast. Aikido got You Butterfly Net Enhancement. Gravity Heaven and what she step. We're right next to the Bank of Torrens River on Ghani country in the heart of Adelaide plays. Don't fall in the torrents. Those of you that are not South. Straighten off a good ribbon polling today on the white out feeling very sorry. Try and start wipers water Do into the podcast of last week. Show if you've arrived at the dorms late because we're on camp here on science friction and it's going well. Everyone's getting on. This is the C. Syros Aboriginal Summa School for Excellence in technology and science and I'm living in with the nearly forty indigenous students from across the strategy here from Perth to the Torres Strait. They've come from far and wide and it's great to have you with us to on the Tesha Mitchell. You've caught an enormous something or dragonfly. It's huge thing. It was just innocent. Thought Maybe we could Kate Me Swan and then if we get any more or less just Alana line Patched candidate the University of Adelaide so working on parasitic wasps. My mission is to teach a bit more of an appreciation awareness of what's around which these kids have embraced wholeheartedly fishnet Connor Looking. It's camouflaged really. Yeah so as part of ABC's walking together. I'm bringing you powerful personal stories from three generations of indigenous. Australians today on racism in classrooms on triumphantly pushing past the low expectations others can have foyer and are knowing who you Would Hi this is a Science Camp Theresa? Let's get some of that good stuff at by the reba without insect. Nate's I love it because when I was little I used to do this in the backyard. I'll just for the fun of it. Like we did. Ones and lacked playful the bugs and stuff and Done things we went touches. The real big because that's scary. This is year eleven student Catherine. She's from Queensland. I've always had a interest in biodiversity because when I was lying about it in school I just found it fascinating the way things like adapted to the surroundings and how strong Some animals off. But do you think you might study in Uni? I definitely want medicine like the medicine. Science and even in science medicine side of it because on surf fascinated about the way humans like animals too but mostly humans alphabrain the actual workings about nerves and our nervous system and everything. I just find it so fascinating to fix people with your knowledge of that. It's just it's mind blowing to me. If you're ever original or Torres Strait islander you make up about three percent over strides population but just under two percent of all students enrolled at university are indigenous. That's growing by around half of a said over the last decade or side when it comes to Unical says in the natural and physical sciences. It and engineering. Less than one percent of students are indigenous for first year medicine. That's around two point. Four percent and of course completion rights alarm but this camp is about helping to change that. It's about road tasting university. Simon names macaroni. I'm an epidemiologist with. Csiro food and nutrition and things are about to get very real for the students right now. We're talking about their activities for the rest of the week and in particular their inquiry which is quite a lot of pressure for them. They'll need to spend a lot of their time thinking about the question that they want to investigate for the next few days and then they'll have to be ready to present it by next week. You asking them to do scientific experiment in two days scientific inquiry. That might be an experiment but it might be some other activities but yet in today's Yep they'll spend a lot of the allison a day. Doing it will be under a lot of pressure but based on previous years they do a great job so they've got to collect data definitely have to collect data they'd go to interpret data and they'll go to present it all of the precious situations for them so the pressure is on from pretty much all mice now not quite a couple of days. I think they'll feel it from tomorrow morning. Hitler research can be conceded. A A dirty word Saith West head is a young research scientist irregular mentor on these caves. He comes from Alaba Coal. And we're edgy. Country in these half miles research was something that was done on. Aboriginal people not with Aboriginal people and certainly not let by aboriginal people but as we get more aboriginal academics in high positions within the academy. This is where we can start to see a change of the culture so we need young people. All of the students present curious and inquisitive mind and from my perspective. That's all you need to be a scientist. The rest is just learning the specific language to answer the specific questions that you come up with and that's just a process. Anybody can do that. We really made more indigenous people in science. We've got so much work today. But we need more indigenous people everywhere. It's hard to access education for aboriginal people and are stolen papal. It's hard to walk to welds of wanting to preserve your own culture and sense of identity. Sometimes studying integrate main sacrificing culture identity and sometimes staying strong culture means sacrificing education. Perhaps no one knows these more than an ano education later. I made it a gathering by the five page of the Wheelchair Boarding House. Where all staying at Miami's Ruben and direct for education does P. Y. Yeah we didn't on almost for you know all the people it's our language and then another language as we had last week students from the remote traditional lands of the unindo people in South Australia. Come stay here. We'll check to go to high school in Adelaide. Now looking at you know dairies. To Wolves do peak will come together. You know the wisden world is really important that are now people need to get educated through sure school to get a job and money travel around you know speak language English and understand where there was an will come from and why why we see really important pulled in you know kids to university by his crowd. I need to build than me on the stand with coming from and you're not educated to vision. It's a big thing you know.

Torres Strait Adelaide ABC C. Syros Aboriginal Summa Scho Torrens River University of Adelaide Kate Me Swan Tesha Mitchell Csiro Connor Queensland Miami Wheelchair Boarding House Nate Alaba Coal research scientist Alana line Unical scientist
Racism at the school gate and education reclaimed (Part 2)

Science Friction

07:37 min | 8 months ago

Racism at the school gate and education reclaimed (Part 2)

"Aikido got You Butterfly Net Enhancement. Gravity Heaven and what she step. We're right next to the Bank of Torrens River on Ghani country in the heart of Adelaide plays. Don't fall in the torrents. Those of you that are not South. Straighten off a good ribbon polling today on the white out feeling very sorry. Try and start wipers water Do into the podcast of last week. Show if you've arrived at the dorms late because we're on camp here on science friction and it's going well. Everyone's getting on. This is the C. Syros Aboriginal Summa School for Excellence in technology and science and I'm living in with the nearly forty indigenous students from across the strategy here from Perth to the Torres Strait. They've come from far and wide and it's great to have you with us to on the Tesha Mitchell. You've caught an enormous something or dragonfly. It's huge thing. It was just innocent. Thought Maybe we could Kate Me Swan and then if we get any more or less just Alana line Patched candidate the University of Adelaide so working on parasitic wasps. My mission is to teach a bit more of an appreciation awareness of what's around which these kids have embraced wholeheartedly fishnet Connor Looking. It's camouflaged really. Yeah so as part of ABC's walking together. I'm bringing you powerful personal stories from three generations of indigenous. Australians today on racism in classrooms on triumphantly pushing past the low expectations others can have foyer and are knowing who you Would Hi this is a Science Camp Theresa? Let's get some of that good stuff at by the reba without insect. Nate's I love it because when I was little I used to do this in the backyard. I'll just for the fun of it. Like we did. Ones and lacked playful the bugs and stuff and Done things we went touches. The real big because that's scary. This is year eleven student Catherine. She's from Queensland. I've always had a interest in biodiversity because when I was lying about it in school I just found it fascinating the way things like adapted to the surroundings and how strong Some animals off. But do you think you might study in Uni? I definitely want medicine like the medicine. Science and even in science medicine side of it because on surf fascinated about the way humans like animals too but mostly humans alphabrain the actual workings about nerves and our nervous system and everything. I just find it so fascinating to fix people with your knowledge of that. It's just it's mind blowing to me. If you're ever original or Torres Strait islander you make up about three percent over strides population but just under two percent of all students enrolled at university are indigenous. That's growing by around half of a said over the last decade or side when it comes to Unical says in the natural and physical sciences. It and engineering. Less than one percent of students are indigenous for first year medicine. That's around two point. Four percent and of course completion rights alarm but this camp is about helping to change that. It's about road tasting university. Simon names macaroni. I'm an epidemiologist with. Csiro food and nutrition and things are about to get very real for the students right now. We're talking about their activities for the rest of the week and in particular their inquiry which is quite a lot of pressure for them. They'll need to spend a lot of their time thinking about the question that they want to investigate for the next few days and then they'll have to be ready to present it by next week. You asking them to do scientific experiment in two days scientific inquiry. That might be an experiment but it might be some other activities but yet in today's Yep they'll spend a lot of the allison a day. Doing it will be under a lot of pressure but based on previous years they do a great job so they've got to collect data definitely have to collect data they'd go to interpret data and they'll go to present it all of the precious situations for them so the pressure is on from pretty much all mice now not quite a couple of days. I think they'll feel it from tomorrow morning. Hitler research can be conceded. A A dirty word Saith West head is a young research scientist irregular mentor on these caves. He comes from Alaba Coal. And we're edgy. Country in these half miles research was something that was done on. Aboriginal people not with Aboriginal people and certainly not let by aboriginal people but as we get more aboriginal academics in high positions within the academy. This is where we can start to see a change of the culture so we need young people. All of the students present curious and inquisitive mind and from my perspective. That's all you need to be a scientist. The rest is just learning the specific language to answer the specific questions that you come up with and that's just a process. Anybody can do that. We really made more indigenous people in science. We've got so much work today. But we need more indigenous people everywhere. It's hard to access education for aboriginal people and are stolen papal. It's hard to walk to welds of wanting to preserve your own culture and sense of identity. Sometimes studying integrate main sacrificing culture identity and sometimes staying strong culture means sacrificing education. Perhaps no one knows these more than an ano education later. I made it a gathering by the five page of the Wheelchair Boarding House. Where all staying at Miami's Ruben and direct for education does P. Y. Yeah we didn't on almost for you know all the people it's our language and then another language as we had last week students from the remote traditional lands of the unindo people in South Australia. Come stay here. We'll check to go to high school in Adelaide. Now looking at you know dairies. To Wolves do peak will come together. You know the wisden world is really important that are now people need to get educated through sure school to get a job and money travel around you know speak language English and understand where there was an will come from and why why we see really important pulled in you know kids to university by his crowd. I need to build than me on the stand with coming from and you're not educated to vision. It's a big thing you know for

Torres Strait Adelaide C. Syros Aboriginal Summa Scho Torrens River University Of Adelaide Kate Me Swan Tesha Mitchell Csiro ABC Connor Queensland Wheelchair Boarding House Miami Nate Alaba Coal Research Scientist Alana Line Unical Scientist
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

04:20 min | 8 months ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"And they stay to protect their assets and a very committed to remaining. Ken Accuse that a better understanding of the seven different types of evacuee could lead to more effective emergency messaging. That's tailor-made to your particular evacuation tied. The emergency services. Still push hard on. You should leave leave early. It's safer to leave early. Which is absolutely true but the act types works suggests that the emergency services can better target and communicate with people at that stage at the stage of influencing their preparation and planning by identifying their particular interests that beliefs the likely responses. And really recognizing that saying. We know that this is how you feel. These are your motivators. This is perhaps what you can do to better prepare. So it's really saying we understand you. Had you identify the people because I mean I guess that's the trick like had you know ahead of time if someone's going to be a threat denier or worried waiver it's a great question the cf? I in in Victoria is actually being doing work for a couple of years now since we identified the targets in the post season surveys. They've talked to other two thousand people in Victoria and identified the archetype so they're looking at their programs and how people respond to their programs using that data. I've recently finished a large project under the safer together program which recommended that we actually develop an online tool to allow practitioners or householders themselves to establish their archetype. So that's work to be done but yeah hopefully be done on their way to the main evacuation center in Basements Bay will flatmate mobile reception for the first time since the crisis kicked off earlier that morning so we stopped him suddenly making a lot of calls and messages. And the so my mom straightaway and it was bad because it cut out a sin as a cold and all I got through his mom saying you'RE K. Thank God and mazing mom and cut up. And that's like my mom was just thinking some kind of panicked final phone call don't will was able to call it back soon. After and gave a brief update before continuing onto the main evacuation center. Once they arrived they found well equipped and not too crowded. They had the Red Cross disaster welfare and it was a really sex bought and so we had some food and there was some beautiful moments there because I was sitting next to someone and they said have you into the briefing said. Oh no no but I heard this Blah Blah and I said oh. Where do you live? And then they said we're on Lilly pilly as a same and then they said their address sent here actually three houses up for me. It's quite funny. You can know your immediate neighbors but after this we started knowing the Hull Street. So that was quite lovely. So willingly slap may bunket down for the night. I decided to stay in my car that not my flatmate winning these ten. I think it was about ten o'clock at night brushing my teeth and I had this moment. I thought Shit. He's my knees. Haven't even had a drink today in the past at ten o'clock because I was so exhausted and then it's there wasn't my car news. Eight laughing going. I can't believe this. This is just ridiculous. Thank you so much. We'll Hawk for sharing your story so generously with Joel and to inspector Ben Shepard from the hardworking New South Wales Rural Fire Service. Dr King's drawn and photographer Alex Coppell for his audio of the fires. He's instagram sought by the way is really something to behold on the tesha Mitchell. Talk to me on twitter at Natasha. Mitchell and you can catch Joe Werner producer of today's science fiction and the sum of pots. Podcast over on twitter at Joe were in until next week..

Alex Coppell twitter Victoria Joe Werner Ken Lilly pilly Dr King Basements Bay tesha Mitchell Red Cross Mitchell New South Wales Rural Fire Ser Ben Shepard producer Natasha Joel
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

11:10 min | 9 months ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"Would develop seriously folks called meaty was working with retinue runs and now he's traveling dwelled with a piece called self so it's collaboration with team is just not Nathan Thompson. Another other researchers where he used his on sales used a PS technology which bisky took his skin cells made them into stem cells into nerve cells. GRUDEN F- sales over in a rare Felix roads that are connected to use a phonetic synthesizer display. Live with musician. Jim We traditions. So all of this is to say that here. We've been exploring during those questions of what does it mean to have things at least perceived to be responsive this Andy. I kind of stepped back from that because I treat me out. Oh yeah ask me. Alex sounds like in the logic of that project is. It's okay to torture and organize. His lungs is made from your own stem cells. Yeah that was one of the ideas that the it's like he doesn't I want to subject anyone else so we would subject on neurons into it and it's very likely that the response we got from the neurons does nothing coherent. Teach them screaming. It's like get me the fuck out of you. That's right. How would you know you need to learn their language so I love the fact that something free to add though? This is a good start. This is rich conversation conversation. But how would you describe as a poet. Your relationship to science is it is science your muse or yeah. That's a fascinating thing. I grew up with two people on my wall to start with one hand Solo. The other was called Sagan and and I a lot of teenage boys came into my room when I was a teenager and just walked straight out of that room so aw I was absolutely passionately in love with science and in high school was sort of discouraged from going down that route so I went down to not route but it just kept. I kept calling me and calling me and I find that in some ways they are completely different they have different framework sometimes and then others. They're so oh similar with without science you with both test you compute you. Guess you observe you connect. There's so many different ways that they come together and I would just love reading about science like I can't help it and I tended towards looking it physics and quantum physics and astrophysics so I looked outside of myself a bit of Hans Solo the Solo being that mercenary in in the Star Wars Saga. who was a bit of a head and you had a hand blocks to buy side? He his foreign pants and a wookey. Paul Sagan had big lapels and a gorgeous voice but he broke down science and science communication in a way that I can understand. He's COSMO's series. Just thought this is going to be my life somehow and I couldn't believe that it came to that and I always feel lacking on how you feel Baba but without a science degree. There's always that sense of insecurity when I'm looking at science but I can't help it. It's something I feel completely passionate. But after all those years of rating in you know more than any science degree would have given. You can promise you that and I'll just WANNA come back. Though to. That teacher was at a teacher. It was a scientist show but they thinking you of all people you truly in awe and passionate about physics. Well it's really funny. Those Myers Briggs test which. I'm sure there's a lot of scientists scientists who'd say that perhaps these aren't exactly scientific. They all came up with should be a scientist or an artist but to be fair to the science teacher. We were breaking breaking chickens in half and I've been a vegetarian since twelve so it was about biology and I was really backing off that and to be truthful I didn't know I didn't have the confidence to to go into science because I think if I was doing Dada Day after day after day I would have filed. I need chaos and creativity but I didn't realize you can get that in science But I just didn't know if I have nine. That physics was an option. I would have done that then. It's never too late no as you've proved RN. You're working at such a fascinating frontier. They as much going on now. In the life sciences I just did a series of programs on Synthetic Balaji which is a saint essentially using engineering principles to engineers synthetic life in all sorts of ways shapes and forms. which is you know has fabulous possibilities bility's but also fabulous concerns about what might happen if we create an organism that is then released into a population? What what happens? So you're working at such a frightening exciting excellent frontier-free aren't you think so. People are trying to make from scratch quick so they're basically trying to put together different types of chemicals to create something that would express Lifelike behavior in one of the most advanced. Groups are doing the Abasing acing Zurich in Switzerland and they realize in some stage that they would never be able to know if the successful or not so the employed philosopher to tell them if the work is going to work or not because the question of flies to realize was a philosophical question rather than a scientific one and so I think this is an ex extreme thing especially when we move now towards this idea of applying engineering logic. Living Systems engineers are not really philosophers to put it lightly. Well it's this idea. The two of engineering evolution to pick up Baba was describing to us. So do you see your role as being that philosopher North think artist of a very different role artists pointing the finger at places where we think philosophers to go so so we are. We are doctor carries the goal in the coal mine. Because you you know philosophers would rarely enter delib and what we do. And do the modal redevelopment seem to kind of get as many people involved not saying that this is the only model you can do is where we get artists to come and work in the lab experience into most physiological experiential. Way What it means to do those kinds of things. What are they learning? What are they doing? Give us a visceral sense because it this visceral. It's very visceral so but it ranges so we see yourself as a research lab. The deals with questions of life from the To ecological we seem to come focus. Focus mainly around the kind of the cell and tissue level and the idea of manipulating living cells and tissues. We also often go to the origin. So we are harvesting the cells ourselves. Yes we usually would win an animal sacrifice. For scientific experiment we would take the company buy products With and we are very much so when when I show oh my work I I often show us for some blood and guts and show death and show everything which relates to the idea of life and consequences of what does it mean to engage with life in such a mentor. We identify areas that need more cultural scrutiny driven by you know represent poets and philosophers and social scientists and geographers and whatever other people who have an interesting life but never have direct experience of engaging life that happens in labs all over the world by scientists and engineers should be doing more. Ah themselves to or are they too close to their work to understand the social ethical consequences some scientists are really good at doing that in the life sciences most of the scientists coming and because they are curious and end up acting as kind of utilitarian lead monkeys in the life sciences so much a scientist but the hyperbolic all around a life science is generating also many unrealistic expectations about the utility indication of. What's coming up in and outs of really genuine concern of sci-fi uh-huh really concerned about those unfulfilled promises? And how can probably trust is being eroded with things like the genome project and crazy promises that were delivered lever with it. There's a lot of a lot of bad sites going on then. Bed is a strange word. What is good sides? I mean there's a scientific methodology but how do you. How do he's describe what bedside sees on the other hand there's a little bad science sane and again that's a value judgement? I mean I get something out of everything that I participate in zoos but there is there is sort of bed out sometimes when you get on a high horse about something. Isn't this just anything that Sti- I identity for telling you all looking at things quite simply and just surface level and what are in saying about moral and ethical works by science and art sometimes people just push things for the sake of pushing it in. That's not interesting. So and also it's subjective objective objective. What what I think's bad you might not think spared but I think there's bad all over the world Especially akin to science are. It's just sitting the science spice. It's very easy to get to go. Oh Wow wow look at that an artist doubling with scientific knowledge. ooh But then war attempt to diagnosis. What you're talking about a good Canadian Margaret Atwood was asked so is there is writing for expressing your emotions and she said no writing is not for expressing your motions ratings for evoking emotions in other people and I think great art really understands that and takes it to his as far as it can as a technique take and a lot of people that decide? I'm going to communicate. Science with art are more interested in the science than the art. They're just like these are important. Ideas has let's try to get them to people by putting window-dressing on it fails as art so I think the intention to have it work as a as a performance or and as a work of art having the design process be taken as seriously as any other genre of art and it's also about science. That's when it works really well but if it's if you think your message is what makes it worthwhile. That's kind of narcissistic master. Batory even as well but Ralph until my students if you have an interesting story to tell it doesn't really matter what technology used to tell it and that's right that's riding any kind of riding if you just want to hear yourself then Pepsi something else fantastic. Can I please get you thank Oren Katz Baba Brinkman and Alicia sometimes sometimes joining me from the Quantum Woods Festival biological artist Professor Oren Katz Rapper. Baba Brinkman and poet Alicia sometimes thanks to co produce. Jane Lee Sound Engineers David Lemay and Christie Miltiades and quantum festival directors John McCready and Sharon Flynn Dell from riding South Wales and writing W. A. on the Tesha Mitchell on twitter at Natasha Mitchell. Catchy next time by you've been listening to an A._B._C.. podcast discover more great A._B._C.. podcasts live radio and exclusives on the A._B._C. Listen APP..

Oren Katz Baba Brinkman scientist Alex Paul Sagan Nathan Thompson bisky Andy Jim Zurich Switzerland Synthetic Balaji COSMO Margaret Atwood Myers Briggs Quantum Woods Festival Professor Oren Katz Alicia
The radical experimenters: a rapper, a poet, and a biological artist

Science Friction

09:21 min | 9 months ago

The radical experimenters: a rapper, a poet, and a biological artist

"The first three minutes of the universe doesn't expansion simultaneously Teini Asli everywhere not zero second but close the first hundred of a second hotter than the hottest star blew hot bruting rooting halt. The nor Smith Says Earth was not found or heaven above but in a yawning gap. That was grasp but no way there were no vikings kings. No Vanilla no lampshades but there was Lego like for life in the first three minutes of the universe everything started added to come together. ferment began to develop lips to form the word poem. one-star dreamed of turning away and now they're just so it could have time. I'm to shape clay. The universe became a rogue gallery of Jigsaw fighting for space and in quiet moments. Mango juice squeezed from the heavens and sparkled like Shaq suits. There was the first spoonful of the CARTWHEEL GALAXY N G C one. Three six five with its. Jim Like bots spiraled wills sentence hyperion Jupiter's moons pulsars born cramping the styles of the middle. I molecules began collecting just so that the wood Po Quaid could be part of this missing in the first three minutes of the universe. Atoms rose dancing and just like the poet. Rumi said they were dancing like madmen. Happy on miserable and they just kept on dancing lover. Melvin poet and performer Alicia. Sometimes there with her pace the first three minutes of the universe and Tesha Mitchell joining you for science friction. We're at this end of the universe you are about to in Canada. I eight poetry cosmos a biological artist who grows organisms as living artworks and a rat performer. Whose lyrics ricks pulse site with? Science Professor Oren Katz is co-founder of the Tissue Culture and art project and director of the University of Western. Australia's influential art. Science lab symbiotic. Baba Brinkman is a new york-based rep performer and playwright whose awesome Rep God's to science audits range from climate change to consciousness and Alicia sometimes is most recent show. Particle wave gathered audiences under planetarium dimes times. These three creative experiment is pushing the elastic boundaries of both at n science and shared a stage at the quantum words festival in Perth. Recently cently he's Aleisha reflecting on those first three minutes. What we want to do when we passion about and scientists connect with an audience? And I I have that problem I'm full of hyperbole and scientists aren't and I love that about them and they care about the mess they care about the facts and I hear all that and I read all that and then I'm just like oh his blitz. He's some poetry so I remember Reading Steven Weinberg's book the first three minutes of the universe and it's full of great fact so this was my interpretation mango juice squeezing from the heavens technically correct Richt by the way the physicists would disagree in that universe buddies taking a obviously a poetic license. But that's what I as a poet what I can never find the right words and the reason the movie dirty dancing connected so well with me. Is that moment. That one of the main characters is carrying a watermelon win and she goes up to Patrick swayze who she likes and says. I carried a watermelon. And that's all she can say and that is what I am like so often. I can't find the exact words and I love that about science that they can find words really matter and in a scientific communication or scientific paper hyper words mean everything but I love as a poet. I can sort of pie around with that and Taika Pot. Isn't it interesting that you draw contrast because as I often think when I'm reading your work that infect poetry and science scherer conciseness and brevity of language precision each word gets placed with intent. And yet your thinking of the relationship is quite contrasted. I totally understand what you're saying. And Brevity is so true and as a poet and I'm sure poets in the audience. They can understand this. Every word matters this and carries it's white but the thing is how do you communicate dark matter. Or how do you communicate Nebula something in biology or does I mean I can never find the right words. I love in contact. A film inspired by. Carl Sagan's book by the same. I'm Nice Cellular pinup boy. I'm so glad it was there. I didn't know you were gonNA talk about him. When demon haunted world is such an important political inspiring because well the Jodi foster character Elliott Airway says when she's thrust into space they should have center poet and finally why Korea I get to go in space so maybe on Amazon or something? I'll get to go just to ago. Mango juice everywhere. Do you feel like you could take sides. Or is that that's not your raisin for you all the Wanda I'm about to wonder in storytelling. I do understand that sometimes the failure of can you just beautifying science and that is somehow not enough and and that's why I love what so many people do is they take it apart in question and what aren was hanging is just so incredible what they do but I yes yeah so just like the storytelling and I really need to communicate it to audiences so they can just take away a little bit of wondering their pocket full of wonder. Hey John Adams Americans said you never learn if you have a poet in your pocket. I just loved that I said what are you trying to do with. I've seen your show particle wave. which takes you inside a planetarium? Describe it for people but also what you're hoping to do with that piece it's musical visual Poetic Extravaganza yes. I loved canvas of the Planetarium Dome and from when I was young and a lot of you would feel feel the Siamese diaby lie back. And you've got this gorgeous. Almost three sixty canvas above you and so I wanted to use that canvas to sell tell held. The story of gravitational waves got to work with a lot of scientists and I recorded a lot of scientists and I want the general public to coming and have a sense of awe four so it mixes poetry music visuals just to tell the story from general relativity some black holes look lookit to kill an and just sort of pint pitcher and I want people to come out and say well I might go read up on that but I had a science instinct come in an eighteen year old. He said that she walked in wanting to do chemistry and came out wanting to do gravitational wave astronomy. And I'm like my works done. That's enough poet delicious. Sometimes there when you think about rap song lyrics what comes to mind politics. Maybe six drugs love last year. American crime and punishment. Absolutely what about science though not really well here as Baba Brinkman canadian-born and and married to a neuroscientist at some point these graduate in comparatively chat court the science bug big time and he's now a renowned science communicate through he's rap gods to things like climate change evolution human nature religion and culture my first rap theater popularisation project CHAUCER's Canterbury Tales and a An evolutionary biologists in England saw that and he said good job. Now do you think you could do for Darwin. What you did for Chaucer and the first time I was introduced to do a performance which was at the Darwin Bicentennial Mark Pailin? The biologist introduced me by saying. Don't worry I checked his lyrics. You're about to witness the first ever rap performance. That's peer reviewed house like peer reviewed rap. That's the best idea ever confession. Spend my whole life perplexed. By Religiousness Front doorstep debating with Jehovah Witnesses I was a teenaged empirical thinker a spiritual seeker obsessed with rap. I considered it liberal research. This was the medium the Daca thinking speaking flipping ridiculous speech over beats like every weekend weekend my CD collection became my personal gospel. I wasn't apostle I think part of it was an unexpected side effect of doing science. This communication rap projects and that side effect was that I became way more gangster rapper

Baba Brinkman Alicia Vikings Teini Asli Shaq Rumi Smith Patrick Swayze Steven Weinberg Po Quaid Planetarium Dome Carl Sagan Canada Australia Tesha Mitchell Taika Pot Perth JIM
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

10:33 min | 9 months ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"Job. He knows the terrain also he thought I knew what mostly obviously was going to happen. But I was pretty surprised by the Catheter. That was a pretty amazing unexpected experience. This is having a catheter. Putting your era so so that you can wait. You had no idea what to expect that people explain things to and you may listen you. You will not know very interesting. And what wasn't like really uncomfortable in the way the whole time and very difficult to go for a walk and one of the greatest moments was having taken out and I remember one fellow in this group I describing where we got together to be given some information before we went into the operation he described it as is better than six having taken that. I thought. That's that's pretty weird. Everyone laughed at us. Probably sweet sweet relief but back to that operating Feta where the silencing didn't stop for Rob even. When he went under the knife he was about to become the subject of his own ongoing experiments? I'm very interested in surgery research. I love the technology policy that underpins surgical procedures. The robot is an engineering fate. Is the DAVINCI robot here. I've been doing some research research with other colleagues looking at the way you blow up the abdomen. So the robot can work within that operating space. All if you're doing a standard leprous copier Ceja Ceja. These are working space. So you can get around the organs and make sure that not damaging any services etc most of gravitated to using carbon dioxide. That's the safest and it comes out of a gas bottle cold dry it's clean and it's really right because it doesn't interact with some of the procedures which actually generate sparks and of course if you use oxygen he'd blow it very badly and indeed. There are examples where where that that gas comes out of the bottle like an Arctic blast. It dries all the services within the abdomen. And I've been doing research for some time trying to modify that one of the approaches. You add water today carbon dioxide sterile water and you warm coming up. So you humidifier it provide waterside. I dry the services and we've known for a long time that you can dry services into damage to the cells if missiles out very damaged they D- Laminate they come away from the services. And if you've got to surfaces with his eliminated sales they stick together. And you get a Deja. Those damaged services are fertile ground. Jim Sells to grow on. So I've been doing this kind of work for some time in mice in eggs moss us and more recently pigs and I showed this work today and I said I'd prefer not to use one of the devices which is involved in what's called insulation blowing up the abdomen showing the data. It's very it's published in its it sound peer-reviewed and he said I didn't appreciate how much was going on there. And he just listened to the data. It was an extraordinary thing really. We know that rob had been doing this work predominantly in colorectal cancers but some of the work really high quality signs Enzi was doing and publishing in these journals making people sit up around the world and go you know we needed. We think about the big picture. The patient's asleep we use fancy technology to cut the tumor. But there are these incremental things that happen. Around the periphery so I like that. Bring him bring his own science into his own experience but it does affect how we do. Everything insurgents have healthy and robust eggos. This declan Murphy. So you being politely requested to consider modifying defying technique a bio quite higher power on the matter actually but You know Lifelong learning is really important. Part of Of everything we do in life but but no more so in in someone who's a cancer specialist and even looking at my surgical logbook operations. I did when I was training in surgery. That just don't exist now especially in breast cancer when I was you know we all did training in all sorts of surgery on my wow. I looked at all these patients. We operated on doing mastectomies and think well I'm sure ninety percent of those women if they were Being diagnosed today and managed it they would not be having a mistake to me. they'd be having targeted molecular profiling. Because you're going to get your hormone status they'd have a targeted targeted therapy that have Radiotherapy and a lumpectomy and so we don't mind therefore constantly challenging ourselves or being challenged about what's best practice is but it is really important to have good evidence to inform changes in practice and that's why on that little example when rob shortstop went up that high quality evidence. It's not just high fancy a change GONNA use. Is this thing instead of that thing. And the other aspect of his science background coming into it he said. I want a photograph He said a photo in the operating tater when the prostate comes as as you know like when you catch a fish so. His niece was charged with a soon as we'd extracted the pro. The prostate held it up in front of the camera and in front of my face. He wanted this this trophy photo of his prostate. What did you do with that? Don't tell me on the mantelpiece family fighters Now it's not anywhere special. The surgery was a success. Rob Easing the clean. Air and other things have changed to. What's changed in your body buddy? I'm aware of it. I look after maybe even better than I did before I've had my continents I are not back to complete fleet Sexual function but it's it. Psychiatry of this is to help but I'm in a good hit spice and I'd probably in a bit of head space now than I was before I went to surgery and the reason is I had a bit of time off and I got to reflect and put a bit more attention on enjoying the good things around NBA. I wasn't because I was going to die. I wasn't thinking that I was thinking. What an enormous privilege it is to get through a series is operation out the other side? Still being able to work still be able to do all the things that I care about. And I've much greg clarity about how great it is to be alive and one thing that has happened this year. Which is being quite funny are discovered the weekend has to Dyson it? And and daren't going into the lab breach Ainley on the weekend how is having prostate cancer. Changed your work as a cancer research scientist what it's done is it's it's made me much. More impatient about getting clinical trials moved along. I am very focused on things which will change. Patient patients outcomes. Now everything you do in partnership is going to be better than doing by yourself. And that's what I've got out of it. I'm one of the lucky ones but it was because because my GP blocks needs have could JP. And I need to go and see them and keep an eye on the health because having a high. PSI level doesn't mean when you have prostate cancer. It doesn't mean that you'll guide to have to have any procedure bit. It's one saints and all it's pretty easy to you can monitor it an Iva time time you'll jp will direct you in the right way to whether you need a specialist or were they you'll find to go on as as normal Enforcing very many men still will face of death from prostate cancer. Many listeners out there will be a all too aware of it but thankfully of all the main diagnosed prostate cancer nowadays the vast majority will survive their cancer and indeed very many of them will not even need treatment for their cancer. But please you know get out there and find out about it. In the first place get into the GP and of course while you're there you know this is my own tail when I was getting my psa checked my gp very good as well said yes. Sure can lou check your PSA okay l.. Let's check their blood pressure and the cholesterol and there what about you. BMI and has the mental health. You know exactly Yeah No. PSA great cholesterol. Not so good. Actually but again Ed. So there's an important message for us man you know I'm in my late forties and get out there and know your numbers actually Great Hash Tag. That runs in Canada aimed at men. It's run by the the Ice Hockey Group there and they WANNA message to men who like ice hockey. It's like forty here playing off the fact that they know the statistics of of their favorite player their favorite team. But do they know their blood pressure at do cholesterol. And so it's I like that idea that we as men out there listening. We should know your numbers you know. Don't be obsessed necessarily but please don't be blind to the affect your cholesterol is seven or European level is twenty and your dad died of prostate cancer. You know you're in a special box that you should know your numbers and know your risk. Think it's good to remind ourselves ourselves constantly. What a humbling privilege? It is to be allowed to do this type of work. And that's not just doing surgery which I think is incredibly humbling experience to be allowed to to do but you know for for a patient to commit to your GP practice and say. I'm happy for you to examine my chest and listen to my my heart and then prescribe me some powerful medications. I'm going to go down and take them. It is an enormous responsibility being allowed to advise a fellow person at on that and to take the extent of making holes into people and taking out loans of the body. I just every single day. What a privilege and it's humbling and it's not just saying that it's something we say all the time to our youngsters getting through? Don't forget what I don't WanNa Hump humbling pleasure privileges to be allowed to do this type of work. Never never forget it. Well the sage and and the scientist and the robot and the robot lovely the heavy on the show. Thank you so much for joining me and good luck. Congratulations absolute pleasure. Thank you so much insight and generosity. Thanks for your openness. This cancer scientists Professor Randy and euro oncologist Professor Declan Murphy. Both with the pay to McCallum Kansas Inter in Melbourne on the Tesha Mitchell sides. Science friction is a radio show on radio national a podcast which usually has a little more inish and website which is where you can catch up with me and the program program. I'll catch you next week. Thank you this week to send. Engineer Chrissy Miltiades do have a great one. You've been listening to to an A._B._C.. podcast discover more great A._B._C.. podcasts live radio and exclusives on the A._B._C. Listen APP..

prostate cancer Rob Professor Declan Murphy Ceja Ceja scientist Deja Radiotherapy NBA Canada Melbourne Jim Sells research scientist McCallum Kansas Inter WanNa Hump Chrissy Miltiades Ainley Enzi greg
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

09:54 min | 9 months ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an ABC podcast Sir. Science Fiction Hey on the Tesha Mitchell. Welcome search this week. The pursuit of a Predator as a reporter. You you get all kinds of of little suggestions. Tips complaints yes. And you can't deal with them all. This one intrigued me. I had started to hear about similar complaints and sort of once. You hear enough of of them. The signal adds up. You think. Maybe there's a story here. What was I seeing? What what the clues that? That major smell a rash. I was a researcher myself. I was a faculty librarian at my university and I did a research probably starting five six years ago I I was always looking for publishing opportunities. I started getting letters and I started to receive these emails. Sort of saying extremely nice. Nice things to me that basically said call for Paper Journal Editors Wanting Me To submit my manuscript to their journal and they had lots of grammatical errors in addition to that one in the emails and then generally speaking editor. I don't say very nice things about you and they don't typically they don't write to you and ask you to submit a manuscript. Will you ever tempted to submit. No no I mean I'm a clinical epidemiology in some of these journals were literally from Soil Science Right. Why would somebody from soil science be asking me and saying Nice things about me? They wouldn't no me from anywhere he's smell. I did maybe several but that rash or several thousand rats via now well and truly on the loose predatory publishes and the predatory journals have become a mega industry global in reach ending ending destructive potential. In fact you're going to hear from someone who believes that this industry represents the biggest threat to science since the inquisition Shen the. US Federal Court recently ordered one of the biggest of these companies to pay up over fifty million US dollars. Only international headquartered voted in Hyderabad in India but also operating in the US claims to publish hundreds of scientific and medical journals. It was found to employ deceptive business practices essentially entrapping scientists to other publishing their journals or participate in conferences. So does the ruling site. bye-bye predatory publishes. Well let's see if Any of that money actually moves anywhere. It's not clear with a mix ex-group will cough up that fifty million dollars which is an estimate of how much the company made from customers over a six-year period or whether it will appeal. We sent a list list of questions to its representatives but yet to receive a reply but it is nice clear message to all the Sake Journal. Publishers of the world that they're being watched touched and there could be consequences. John Bohannon a science journalist and now director of science at an artificial intelligence startup in San Fran called primer. They didn't basically slipping under the radar and using American Canadian and European banks to move money millions of dollars of money from elicit gains. So this court ruling basically makes extremely inconvenient to do now. Joan was asked to present evidence in the case brought against the annex group by the US Federal Trade Commission because he'd had an unusually Hansa with the publisher so mix was one of hundreds of publishers offers. That I tested in sting operation. I wrote some computer code to generate thousands of very bad scientific papers. And what happened next these kind of legendary in science circles back in two thousand twelve John was reporting for the Journal. Science and the expression expression predatory journals wasn't in common news There was a guy named Jeffrey. You who was probably the only person around making a big stink about this and trying to actually Shine a light on it. It was very very bold effort. He had something called feels list or at least it became known as beal's list. My name is Jeffrey Bill. And I'm a retired academic librarian from the University of Colorado Denver professor. Beal beal's blacklist fame and a climb and Notaro He was the first to coin. The phrase predatory journals the Journal. Publishers hated being malysz because it stigmatizes them and meant that their income was decreased. Most of the predatory publishers are predatory not only in their publishing but in just the way they operate in general and they would use the heckler's actors veto. They would call the library director and complain about me and they would try to annoy people at my university as much as possible in order to manipulate those people at the university to make me stop the list so that their complaints would stop. I also received several threats of legal action including think it was in twenty twelve international threatened to sue me for one billion dollars one billion dollars. It was just a threat what I learned from it is that you can basically basically pay an attorney five hundred dollars in all right a threatening letter so they they did that but they never followed through with. It was never introduced in any court personal consequences consequences for Jeffrey of running. That black least were immense. And I'll come back to that. One estimate suggests that there are at least eight thousand predatory journals. This is just one publisher of many. But Jeffrey Bill provocatively calls it. The Evil Empire of Predatory Publishing I stand Dan by that statement and what they do is. They've really hurt a lot of people. You know the scholarly publishing system works on the honor system and people operate in good faith but oh mix international has has totally broken all that down. They use a lot of spamming to solicit article manuscripts from researchers they have journal titles that match the titles of respected journals. Usually one word off enough to confuse people that might be the respected journal in the `field they will at People's names to their editorial boards without the person's permission people from top universities top researchers in the field and they'll use their identity to promote the journal and when the person finds out about it and ask them to remove their name. They don't remove it they just leave it there because they're operating operating from foreign country. There's really nothing you can do about it and especially prey on young researchers in emerging researchers researchers who don't speak English as their first language it's not just scientists from developing countries that are targeted although that easing acknowledged problem clinical epidemiologist. David Mo- assays the crosses reaches into some of America's most delayed institutions including Harvard in an analysis that we did where we looked at a close to two thousand thousand articles published in Predator journals. We found that actually the most frequent corresponding authors were from what we would call first. World countries countries would lots of money and lots of resources that is troubling very very troubling because it suggests that at these institutions authors may not Be Aware of predatory journals and we need to obviously ramp up some educational activities. People think that they're sending the manuscript to a legitimate respected journal. When it's really just a phony dough mix international journal and then they quickly accept the paper without any peer review and then send them an invoice and at that point the authors realized that something is wrong because There was really no peer reviewed done yet. The papers accepted and they have this two thousand dollars invoice that comes through email and the olmecs demanding payment. Most of them asked to withdraw the paper when they realized that they've been duped. But then oh mix says has you can't withdraw your paper unless you pay US withdrawal fee. An often than olmecs will publish the article quickly and one of their journals and then and they can't submit it anywhere else. Because that would be duplicate submission it would be publishing the same article twice. which is something not supposed to do that? Nothing about predatory regionals. He's what he's supposed to happening science as John Bowen discovered when he sent them a taste. Yes yeah so I just wanted some data. It's frustrating to have such an enticing story of you know bad actors that Potentially Ricky and millions of ill gotten dollars dollars and not get some data to find out if it's true so we appear stay in molecular biology from Oxford oppy slave. He plotted an experiment which was pretty straightforward. And the idea in a nutshell is if I submit a really and I mean truly bad scientific paper to your journal title and you accept it with no sign of any peer review and you ask me for money then you're you're a fake journal publisher. Yeah John Wanted to test how easy it was to get published in a predatory journal it can usually take many months years even to get a pipe into a reputable scientific journal. And even then it's not a given. That's partly because of what's called Peer Review essential to the scientific process. So you do an experiment. You brought it up reporting your results. Submitted to a journal and then it gets pulled to shreds.

the Journal publisher Jeffrey Bill Peer Review Paper Journal US Beal beal Sake Journal researcher Tesha Mitchell director ABC reporter international journal US Federal Trade Commission John Bohannon John Wanted University of Colorado San Fran John
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

15:02 min | 10 months ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an ABC podcast. Sir Welcome to science frictions some Thomas as and I'm the Tesha Mitchell. Happy Twenty twenty. Well on its way now. This show started with a tweet. I'm considering writing a pace case about my experience being raised in an anti science anti medicines sexist community how there is a whole generation of women coming into adulthood with these beliefs and why escaped that toxic culture. Would you rated if I did. It was just that single passing tweet and it caught. My attention turns out. It was by a twenty one year old woman in Oregon Cole. Sarah Olson she works in a bookshop reviews popular science books for her blog. Read More Walk Science and so in this episode of Science Fiction. You've got a mate. Sarah Olson. I we're going to talk about faith challenged and finding science. It's in trump's America. I started reading on the origin of species just as a basis of some kind of foundation to start understanding understanding. This idea that I hadn't been allowed to learn and then I started to study the Big Bang and I wanted to understand. How did the universe come into existence? If there wasn't a god to snap his fingers and have it be there. Sarah Olson grew up in intensely conservative Christian.

Sarah Olson Twenty twenty Science Fiction Tesha Mitchell ABC Thomas trump Oregon America
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

02:38 min | 11 months ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an ABC podcast. Hey welcome this. asides sides friction on the Tesha Mitchell. You know it's been a modern mantra of sorts that greed is good survival of the fittest even our biology elegy gets cast as selfish as in the selfish gene the ID obeying selfishness and competition Somehow in night in all of us in in all species that it's essential to ask survival into our evolution but you know is it really is selfishness the natural way of things so it's journalists so a cane is joining us on the show this week. hazo welcome Hey Natasha yes. I stumbled across his bizarre story of a man who developed an obsession in with altruism and how it came to exist he even came up with a mathematical equation for love but as we'll hear he ended up paying being the ultimate price. Along the way. We'll meet some pioneering. Scientists have challenged the dogma. That competition is king. The whole Western world took an individualistic swing at about the same time in the twentieth century. Certainly economics think of homework onomic because the the rational actor model the idea that everything selfish at the end of the day and that our task is to interpret varieties of selfishness. Chen says it's nice behaviors didn't exist. You still had individuals helping each other but now the way to understand that was basically it was all being manipulated by selfish genes. It's a very difficult dog but to break because it's logic seems to be pretty strong and yet increasingly we are finding and more and more evidence in nature that that's not the case and that in fact the philosophy of the Celtics gene which seemed to us like like very hard nosed science light the more reflection of the Cultural Moors of the day you know of the logic of markets translated into nature rather than just a naive description of what happens in nature. It's difficult to feel feel comfortable in nature. If that's what you feel is going on all around you if you go outside and go for a walk in the park or go on a hike do you feel like you're in hostile territory or do you feel like you're.

Tesha Mitchell ABC Celtics Cultural Moors Chen
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"So welcome to science friction with this week is all about and the first cartoons up and guys and the Beatles guy what is that I am not touching. This is not in my job description. I'm used to these little dry pellets. I'm not the sorry. It's not happening on that yet. We are so going there folks. We're talking the Tobu's the psychology and the science of excretion the Tesha Mitchell with children's author James Foley who is the Creator and illustrator of the Super Popular S. TINCA INC graphic novels dungs. Zillah and guest renaults starring Selley. Tinca.

James Foley Zillah Beatles Tesha Mitchell TINCA INC
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

11:52 min | 1 year ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an ABC podcast. I'm up in a free country. I probably would not have become a scientist. It's not because I not interested in science. I've always been tricked by these most fundamental questions of nature. But I've also been tweaked by the governance of human beings. And that very young age growing up in China realized all the other career paths, I aspire to they were not possible because of the political conditions in China. I couldn't be John Lewis without a free press a politician without democratic elections or lawyer without a rule of law as science became the only profession within my interests. And that is accessible to me that I could pursue without compromise. The personal ease getting political onsides friction today. Welcome to the show on the Tesha Mitchell with a passionate story of the pursuit of freedom, and of science and human rights. Particle physicist. Dr.

China ABC John Lewis Tesha Mitchell physicist scientist
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

16:12 min | 1 year ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an ABC podcast. Welcome to sides friction on the Tesha Mitchell, and with great news show has won the science and medicine category. At this is strident podcast award. We are so thrilled about that. And thank you for listening. So in today's episode ease genomic science to want a striking story of the Shawqi gate when you do a genetic history tests, and the problems earned in your DNA there in the science. Oh man. So I want you to make mercury to buy. Oh my gosh. So she's an American Palestinian, cartoonist illustrator leaving in Brooklyn, New York. And when she started to draw well, it kind of helped his stop making sense of the world. When I was younger, all they wanted to do was draw as for more Fiqh fantasy characters who were exploring some fantasy world adventuring. Trying to figure out the meaning of war. Yeah. You matz. I she was an intense keyed us. I relate to that. I'm not even joking. That was my first comic when I was like thirteen or fourteen trying to figure out the meaning of war. Yes, the whole flood, it was really hard core. Was trying to figure out the world. Her family stories. We're helping figure out a self my family. So my Palestinian side of the family were originally from.

Tesha Mitchell ABC Shawqi gate Brooklyn New York
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an ABC podcast. This is friction culture and science with extra spas welcomes. The Tesha Mitchell here this week with a controversy that just will not be put to bed distinguish language of fan form language after we are the negativity, and I am can you guess who this is. How is it that find language international? I think of wild wiry watt hair and doc penetrating is he's arguably one of the greatest original thinkers of all time and certainly in science. Four if a out. And clarity of concepts. After I got them Mutuel relation and debt. Correspondent to censor with eat. It's Dan Stein. Yes. And this week the first ever photo of a black hole gave us yet further evidence. He was right. He predicted the behavior of black holes and their immense gravitational pull through his general theory of relativity, which visualized gravity is warping of the fabric of the universe or space time around objects, but heavy heard of a woman called Malaysia Malaysia marriage on Stein to Baber size. She was he's first wife and a promising scientist in the making in her own right when they met and fell in love. Now this being a vocal malivert fan club in recent years. It says she was fundamental to Albert's early scientific success. Even a key collaborator on his theories. And that. Her legacy was hidden. Well, a brand new investigation strongly contests this climb and over the next to episodes. I'm gonna drilling to that evidence. To let you decide buckle up. maters just to know the truth. I can Stein is portrayed as degrade hero of science and entertain is seen as a God. And you don't touch the man for some people is just like attacking the Cohen that the bible, you don't touch things. We try not to make up stories, and this story appears to be largely a hopeful story people hoped. It was true they wished it was true. But it doesn't seem to be true. She helped in a great measure that I'm fine became what he became. I have serious doubts that he would have got where he is. If he did not have her supporters. He needed someone to discuss them. He needed someone to calculate them, compare them. So she left us a genius. That's her gift to the world. It's important that the truth be told when stories are based on very unreliable evidence. When you start to examine the sources the stories just don't hold out. And those stories that Malaya's mathematical abilities rivaled on stones that she co-authored on stones early research that they worked late into the not to give blazing trial for quantum physics. Malivert, and what's relationship really on the time to be understood at all in the nineteen ninety s when early litters between them were found in a family Bank in California, very little material evidence remained, then and physicist. Dr polling Gagnon believes they could be a reason for that to people where really adamant that this story would not come out about these were Helen Ducasse, the personal secretary of Albert Einstein and these fan two Netam both of them became they were the executors of his estate, and these people were adamant that disturbed will not come. Pulling is a particle physicist. Now retied in Jimmy she spent much of her career investigating doc meta at the European laboratory of particle physics soon and at Indiana University. She's taken up Malaya's Kohl's and explains that even Elba full story was withheld for loan time. The first biographies came out more than twenty years after the death of Albert Einstein. The reason was that what not end, for example, would not allow anything in writing on less. He would be right himself. The everything that was in the possession of Albert Einstein was cleaned up. It has to do with the fact that auto Neten after the death of mill of marriage and Stein in one thousand nine hundred forty eight or two net and came to Surrey to her apartment to search department and probably took everything that he could find of scientific merit. So. These people made every effort to clean up what was there and to erase any trace of miliver market Stein? Now, whether that's the case, oh, not reminds I've into conjecture, but it's indisputable that Malaysia was a mystery very few people had heard Malaysia Einstein. She was known to be his first wife. She was the mother of his sons, but typically no one paid much attention to the wife and not much was known about her professor Ruth Lewin Sime in Sacramento who tried as a chemist and is a noted historian of science, especially of women in science. She wrote a biography of Lisa Montana, a famous German physicist of Malaysia and Oba generation in the nineteen eighties. Some of the love letters between Einstein and Malaysia where published by the people who publish the Einstein papers. So lucky to found Krisha who is my equal. You're so sweet will how kiss August nineteen hundred without you at lack self confidence shin for work and enjoyment in without you. My life is no nine thousand nine hundred sweetheart adjust received your second very measurably also came forward to working on our new papers proud, I will be to have a little PHD for sweet lie remain, Odin ary person. I feel alone with everyone else except. All

Albert Einstein Dan Stein physicist Malaya Malaysia ABC Tesha Mitchell scientist Indiana University Cohen Lisa Montana Krisha Dr polling Gagnon Malivert Surrey Ruth Lewin Sime Jimmy Helen Ducasse Elba
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an ABC podcast. Earner? Hello. This is science fiction on the Tesha Mitchell. In the Handmaid's tile, Margaret, Atwood has a totalitarian theocracy called Gilead where pregnancy gets outsourced forcibly and violently to the last remaining food are women cold hand mates. How was up within dumb? There. We healed. I know this is difficult for you. But you have done something extraordinarily you promised me. Take care of this. We'll hear on science fiction. I want you to imagine a different world. Is it easy? One way. Pregnancy ease outsourced, but to technology not Handmaid's. His mercy. She had tried one on ones years ago should wanted to understand what it felt like to wear one. But more than that as well. The appeal of it. The voice of character called Eva in novel called the growing season. It imagine 's a hypothetical future where babies could be growing inside a woman's body, but outside of the human body altogether in an artificial portable baby patch, it was before all the different textures were available though. There was a range of colors bright yellow should requested fluorescent like one of those tropical fish. Hello. Welcome to future uterus mini series, where I'm taking a wombs view of the future of reproduction. This is the equivalent of six months that told her as they let her strap it on over t shirt in the early days the full life. Doctors had helped people position it over the shoulders snug on the belly. But they realized it was making people nervous much better to do it yourself. They decided then you can see how easy it is. How versatile? How safe? Over the next few shows extraordinary, stories and extraordinary sites. You'll made a Swedish woman who received one of the world's first ever uterus transplants. The latest story will blow your mind who donated they uterus to what would the risks. Did it work thirteen children have been born now using this pioneering procedure, but it is raw with scientific and ethical challenges. Also, we're gonna look at tribalising efforts to construct an artificial womb that could help tiny precariously premature babies survive and thrive. What does it actually type to build a wound that works just like a real one? But look I'm kicking it all off with pure science fiction. The text Joe was almost butter soft, but padded and it slipped into place so easily it terrified her. Instead, she should've gone for a deep red like the color of the inside to remind yourself of what it really was to make sure she didn't slip quietly into feeling at ease with it. Even though there was no baby inside the trial pout. She was wearing. She knew she could let herself relax Ellen sage week is physicist and a bio engineer tuned, novelist. And she wants you to try on a baby patch for solids. The pouch it self is fluid filled. Flexible, warm, pouched, you strap on almost like a sort of rucksack, I suppose, but it sits around your front sits on your belly exactly where pregnant belly would be, and you strap it on your shoulders and vowed your back, so it's very comfortable and secure on you, and you can carry it like that you can feel the baby kicking through the membranes of it. You can stroke, it, you can you can sing to your baby and things like that there were various adapters. So that you can talk to through a special adapter, and it's fed with nutrients, the nutrients can be specially designed for your genetic makeup. So you can feel incredibly close to the baby and a different times to the book. We see people wearing it and kinda stroking cuddling it and feeling really predict protective of their child inside. So it's it's a very personal tactile experience for the parents. They can be shared by men and women it can be shed with all the family members. If you won't in my society. It's quite rare. At it's presented as being much healthier for the baby for the fetus as well. It's almost become a designer autumn hasn't it? It's almost aficionados is baby. You can choose for example, different different styles different covers different textures for it. There have been photos in the press of celebrities wearing these pouches and having twins wearing matching pouches and things like that. It's become really trendy for the kids wearing these pouches. We don't have babies and yet, but but wearing them and trying them on his own come like having the latest smartphone.

Atwood Joe Tesha Mitchell ABC Margaret Ellen physicist engineer six months
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"Else. It's not no have device the outcome of. If you so tonight as since fought for life, really it was hard. To get the dog noses was it gave some sort of relief to know that we had lift Knowstone unto and that we'd realize that we had done everything possible to solve it for him. In victorian. We can't change anything. We just gratified. Turn impact the clinicians joins us in the fought. Missus Segreta phone. To help us along the way, you can particu you can draw them everywhere. So nothing happens or nothing. You know? And you get buy mosquito. Some believable in meeting this goal in America. He was doing what every human being wants to do. Right. He was trying to find love. He was trying to live his life. He was trying to explore the world. He was trying to get on with it, despite the incredibly bad hand that he had been dealt and he was in the presence of that radical self expression when this third incredibly rafting happened to him. You just you conscript that? Robie died in March twenty seventeen and my thanks to Greg Vivian sharing. He's in this story, so generously with us and also to doctors, Dan, swan, Andrew Duggan's and professes, Martha Wilson joy to racy. They will really affected by Roby and he's family's plot. And we're very came to share the story with you on the Tesha Mitchell. Sons friction is produced by myself Emory, Tico, San engineer, John Jacobs. You can follow me on Twitter. I'd love to hear from you. At Natasha Mitchell on high nixed up another unbelievable story from culture and science on science fiction, a controversial psychological experiment that crossed Eilon big time and the Guinea peaks that would just little kids. That's the Los boys bisciotti chain. You've been listening to an ABC podcast. Discover more great ABC podcasts. Live radio and exclusives. On the IB say listen up.

Robie Missus Segreta John Jacobs Roby ABC Tesha Mitchell Natasha Mitchell Martha Wilson Eilon Greg Vivian Andrew Duggan Twitter America Los Guinea engineer Emory Tico Dan
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on The Science Show

"And sometimes we gave the impression that we've really made a lot of progress, and I'm not. So that's always true. There's one that our love metro Japan rose who's been on the sign show last year talking. About the importance of gravity is being one of the great puzzles, but also sticking his nose right up at string theory, actually well nonsense. I'm a huge fan of Roger Penrose because he says the things that other people are thinking but wearing say, and he has this incredible legacy in his work and his gravity collapse interpretation where he says will, you know, things if they're in two places at once which quantum theory says they are they're mass must be into place at once. So they're affecting space time in two different ways at once. And so maybe it's just a reaction of space time that collapses these things into one. And I think his makes sense in some ways we haven't been up to test it yet. But we're developing the technology to be able to do that. And I think Penrose is interpretation. In fact, it might not even be an interpretation it's much more of a kind of scientific hypothesis. I think that might be the one that turns out to be closer to the truth, shall we say, we'll let you have it the whole universe and everything plus the sixteenth century the astrologer by Michael Brooks. Bob. Boggling the mind in so many ways and you'll find another version of that adventure in Tesha Mitchell's marvelous science friction to pound whenever you like next week on the sign show is birdsong music that thrilling exploration by Hollis Taylor of bird, jazz an acapella work to minister stopped funding production today by David Fisher. And marked on. I'm Robin Williams..

Roger Penrose Japan Tesha Mitchell Robin Williams Hollis Taylor Michael Brooks David Fisher Bob
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on The Science Show

"And he thinks it contains the keys to understanding the universe. His domestic life is chaos. A nightmarish and his intellectual life is soaring above the heavens. I don't know how he managed to handle all in one brain one of the delicious parts of the way, you write this is you keep us on tenterhooks. What's true? And what isn't more than one author seems to be having us on and making it up was true or not? When I talk about his biography, and the things that went on in his life almost all of it is true. And then I admit the end of the sometimes my sources are reliable, and I have to go back and think about some of the things I've written and where they come from. And it was quite a journey. I'm quite honest about it in the book making the history of some of this mainly twentieth. Century physics part of the book, we go from the story in the sixteenth century through to everyone from four to Rutherford plank. You name it. You've got all of the stars. There was that hard to do. All did you just bright as a came? I wrote it as it came. Because I wanted to talk about these things when I was writing I very much felt I was writing full him glorious other people reading, but really it was for him. And I wanted to say to him that he was trying to understand the structure of the universe and how everything worked four hundred years ago, and I wanted to get across we. We have a different story that we're telling now, but there's new actual coherence to that story when we're looking at quantum physics, the micro-structural the universe. How everything hangs together? We didn't really have a good understanding of it. And we have interpretations of quantum theory, which totally contradict each other. And you can choose which one you want to follow. So you might choose the Copenhagen interpretation where nothing exists until it's measured. Although nobody ever defines what measured activity means or you can choose the many wills hypothesis where every possible thing happens all in a different universe. And there's lots of other ones there's one called super determinism where everything is one giant cosmic conspiracy. And we think we have free will any way you explain quantum physics is actually we have free will. And we're all puppets of the universe, bats. So Jerome was starting to understand the universe. And we're still trying to understand the universe. And sometimes we gave the impression that we've really made a lot of progress, and I'm not. So that's always true. There's one that in love metro Japan rose who's been on the sign show last year talking. About the importance of gravity is being one of the great puzzles, but also sticking his nose right up at string theory, actually well nonsense. I'm a huge fan of Roger Penrose because he says the things that other people are thinking but wearing say, and he has this incredible legacy in his work and his gravity collapse interpretation where he says will, you know, things if they're in two places at once which quantum theory says they are they're mass must be into place at once. So they're affecting space time in two different ways at once. And so maybe it's just a reaction of space time that collapses these things into one. And I think his makes sense in some ways we haven't been up to test it yet. But we're developing the technology to be able to do that. And I think Penrose is interpretation. In fact, it might not even be an interpretation it's much more of a kind of scientific hypothesis. I think that might be the one that turns out to be closer to the truth, shall we say, we'll let you have it the whole universe and everything plus the sixteenth century these strategy by Michael Brooks, Bob. Alling the mind in so many ways and you'll find another version of that adventure in Tesha Mitchell's marvelous science friction to pound whenever you like next week on the sign show is birdsong music that thrilling exploration by Hollis Taylor of bird, jazz an acapella work to minister stopped funding production today by David Fisher. And marked on. I'm Robin Williams..

Roger Penrose Rutherford plank Japan Robin Williams Tesha Mitchell Copenhagen Jerome Hollis Taylor Michael Brooks David Fisher Bob four hundred years
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"Hey. Tesha Mitchell joining you this week for another science friction live from the floor of the Melbourne museum. So we're told that learning maths and science matters a whole heap for the careers of the future and not just for those who go on and become scientists or mathematicians all sorts of jobs. I mean, Netflix even employs mathematical minds as days, it's part of the history of knowledge. It's pot of mankind's like appreciation for the wealth. But it's also very part of the inquiry process pot of what really drives us to be this way. What really drives us to live in the well this way, and I think that's just really cool. You don't have to go on to become a Nobel laureate or a racer or a science teacher. But you do need to have in the win the world around you so studying science and Mets not only raises your awareness of the world around you. But also gets you to think in an open way, you use your critical thinking skills easier problem solving skills, and it takes a lot of hard work as well. I think maybe a bit of the work ethic aspect in combination with the creativity. I'm expected to exhibit Mamie just realize that science is something that is not only beautiful that is not only useful. But it's also something that is fundamentally a pot of us. And yet so many kids more and more than a running a mile from science and math subjects at school. Something's really going astray. What exactly and can we stem the tide? The if Betty Chung speaking there, who's finishing you twelve at the Methodist ladies college, she's founder of the Victorian student science scored which links up Hough school students around science events. You also heard from Sola banish alone time science teacher, president of the science teaches association, Victoria, and director of quantum Victoria, which develop a whole lot of science programs for school students imitators across Victoria. Also on the show is Eddie. Woo. Who's causing a big stir? We've he's Chubu channel. He was a top ten finalist in last year's global teacher prize, and is author of a new book wonderful world of maths. He's hit Mets teacher at cherry brook technology high school in Weston CBI. Paid a coke kill has taught in schools from rural Maryvale to Frank Ston to Brunei he's founding principle of the John Monash science school Victoria's first specialist science high school and was principal of the year in the state in two thousand sixteen. When you started out you loved history and English at school, not maths. Thank mats. He didn't feel about good Abed was definitely humanities buff. And I still I still love stories and characters and and the tension when you try to work out what's happening in a mystery. But when I looked at mass, it was sort of characterize myself this way, all those sills adults that I now race through as I could see them as a student memorize them for just enough time to get through that damn put a number in get a number out cross my fingers, really hot. And the monks were good enough that I could say, yeah, I can do but do not have much of a fundamental grasp of why are we learning calculus? I can draw an in Jerusalem, really neatly. But I don't really know what the point of it is. And for me. There was a very rich lack of appreciation of what was crafted. Why did fractions lead to algebra which led to treat an almond tree which led to? There was actually a story on that. I was told us at all. I mean, I say that a lot I'm now wondering if I was told and I just didn't listen lesson. Just like everyone else. But for me that watershed moment was to be able to get to university with the full intent to become an English and history and to say to find out actually that there was this critical shortage of mathematics and science. Teachers particularly physics, and this is what it was like fifteen years ago. It's still true today. And I had a professor push me and say, this is this is where there's need would you consider going this direction rather than that? And so that was kind of what sent me done this rabbit hole. Pay to-. What is this conversation matter for you? And how would you respond to the third annual who says amid gonna use these why do I need to learn about maths what do logo rhythms have to do with anything?.

cherry brook technology high s John Monash science school Vic Frank Ston Betty Chung Netflix Melbourne museum Tesha Mitchell Victoria Mets Hough school Mamie Eddie Weston CBI Brunei professor Abed president Methodist ladies college director