24 Burst results for "Tesha Mitchell"

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

03:50 min | Last month

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an abc podcast. Welcome to science friction today. It's lucy story though. Lucy isn't here. And if she was she would have spoken to you. In screeches squeaks and grunts and pant hoots. Now if you don't know what a parenthood is let me just say it goes a little bit like you all get one thought. I bled shimon radio. Look lucy the deed. Learn to use rudiments of american sign language. Isil as you'll hear she might have gestured to you. In simple single words or occasionally she put them into pairs and triplets like like luck kind of poetry and writing poetry. Since i was a kid. I think i write when we first poems in e three and had a primary school teacher who told me that it was okay and i thought oh the lead to write poetry. So i did. What was the pace of poetry about in grade three. It's not it was about walking through the bush and listening to kookaburras. And i rhymed the word bush with short i said walking through the bush listening to the store and i thought it was very profound. Doesn't hold up today. That you gotta start somewhere. Benjamin dodds powered by not primary schoolteacher by day and science. Fan boy big time. His latest book of verse is called airplane back banana blanket and it's inspired by one of the most curious social experiments of the twentieth century. On the tesha mitchell. And this is the story of a team called lucy. It's one from our archive one. That listeners really loved and warning. There are some sexual references in this program with starting in non sixty four when little. Lucy is just two days old cradling in her mob azzam's so lucy was essentially taken from her mother at the roadside zoo in in florida which apparently was quite a common thing to find in florida. Traveling down the highway. And there were these places you'd pull off and you'd go and have a look around and you'd say all sorts of exotic animals but yes. Lucy was taken by jane temelin and she was flown back to oklahoma in a basset and the other passengers on the flight assumed that she was john's daughter in exchange for a daughter. Jane tantalum offered a coke such sweetness tickles. The tom and mosques defense claim that allowed bob and main goal to pull from fortress. On's something pink and red somewhere above alabama passengers node. Congratulations to a mother. Tending covid bassinet hashing gentle reassurance to a child she calls new jersey so she was taken us two days after she was born before she'd been wayne ineffectually was stolen from the of him she was. She definitely was she was. She was taken from a mother who was drugged and key is to obtain the subject before it knows what he's early enough to avoid the compromising risk it. It's brief mother. Timing is critical to ensure integrity of so unique opportunity. Just how chimpanzee can penn troglodyte bay when raised among us in modern homes or his team essence baked in at what truths can be gleaned when we rear another clean slate as we do our own..

oklahoma jane temelin two days florida twentieth century alabama Benjamin today john Lucy single words one thought first poems Jane tantalum lucy triplets e three one Isil three
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

01:54 min | Last month

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"Today. It's lucy story though. Lucy isn't here. And if she was she would have spoken to you. In screeches squeaks and grunts and pant hoots. Now if you don't know what a parenthood is let me just say it goes a little bit like you all get one thought. I bled shimon radio. Look lucy the deed. Learn to use rudiments of american sign language. Isil as you'll hear she might have gestured to you. In simple single words or occasionally she put them into pairs and triplets like like luck kind of poetry and writing poetry. Since i was a kid. I think i write when we first poems in e three and had a primary school teacher who told me that it was okay and i thought oh the lead to write poetry. So i did. What was the pace of poetry about in grade three. It's not it was about walking through the bush and listening to kookaburras. And i rhymed the word bush with short i said walking through the bush listening to the store and i thought it was very profound. Doesn't hold up today. That you gotta start somewhere. Benjamin dodds powered by not primary schoolteacher by day and science. Fan boy big time. His latest book of verse is called airplane back banana blanket and it's inspired by one of the most curious social experiments of the twentieth century. On the tesha mitchell. And this is the story of a team called lucy. It's one from our archive one. That listeners really loved and warning. There are some sexual references in this program with starting in non sixty four when little. Lucy is just two days old cradling in her mob

oklahoma jane temelin two days florida twentieth century alabama Benjamin today john Lucy single words one thought first poems Jane tantalum lucy triplets e three one Isil three
Lucy's Story, the Chimp, the Poet

Science Friction

01:54 min | Last month

Lucy's Story, the Chimp, the Poet

"Today. It's lucy story though. Lucy isn't here. And if she was she would have spoken to you. In screeches squeaks and grunts and pant hoots. Now if you don't know what a parenthood is let me just say it goes a little bit like you all get one thought. I bled shimon radio. Look lucy the deed. Learn to use rudiments of american sign language. Isil as you'll hear she might have gestured to you. In simple single words or occasionally she put them into pairs and triplets like like luck kind of poetry and writing poetry. Since i was a kid. I think i write when we first poems in e three and had a primary school teacher who told me that it was okay and i thought oh the lead to write poetry. So i did. What was the pace of poetry about in grade three. It's not it was about walking through the bush and listening to kookaburras. And i rhymed the word bush with short i said walking through the bush listening to the store and i thought it was very profound. Doesn't hold up today. That you gotta start somewhere. Benjamin dodds powered by not primary schoolteacher by day and science. Fan boy big time. His latest book of verse is called airplane back banana blanket and it's inspired by one of the most curious social experiments of the twentieth century. On the tesha mitchell. And this is the story of a team called lucy. It's one from our archive one. That listeners really loved and warning. There are some sexual references in this program with starting in non sixty four when little. Lucy is just two days old cradling in her mob

Shimon Bush Lucy Benjamin Dodds Tesha Mitchell
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

02:21 min | 3 months ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"Scenes from wuhan in china and the tesha mitchell joining you for science fiction. Welcome videos emerge on social media of authorities using increasingly drastic measures. I remember when this chilling footage i vs four corners program last february. A woman in a pink tracksuit is being dragged kicking and screaming from an apartment block by police in black suits. And what now. Six back then a bit over twelve months ago. It was hard to believe this heavy handed response to a virus. We knew almost nothing about around. China residents post scenes claiming officials a welding. The doors of apartment buildings shot so people can't get out even as infectious disease. Specialist started to sound alarm bells outside of china. Most countries were slow to act. Some seem to be in denial preferring to feed conspiracy theories about the origins of the virus. But not the country you'll hear about on science friction today and it might surprise you to hear what country that ease. Shocking news breaks that the man who would i warned. The outbreak has died of coronavirus. We've known that if a country as serious as china today that be careful. It wasn't their website the magnitude of the problem the speed of the problem and the spread of the virus so we took action because we knew that was the level of travel with having tourists coming here. We were at risk so every country should have done that as early as january last year. Rwanda stop plane. Distant for china pediatrician and global health. Later dr onions been guajillo is rwanda's former minister of health. And we start screening all the beeper entering in rhonda for covid sign and take the information in case. There were fine coveyed a positive during their stay in runner so that we can do easily contact tracing

china tesha mitchell China last february january last year rwanda today jeanmarie east african hundreds of thousands of death over twelve months ago Rwanda four corners wuhan guajillo rhonda Six
this African COVID success is a big wake-up call for the West

Science Friction

02:21 min | 3 months ago

this African COVID success is a big wake-up call for the West

"Scenes from wuhan in china and the tesha mitchell joining you for science fiction. Welcome videos emerge on social media of authorities using increasingly drastic measures. I remember when this chilling footage i vs four corners program last february. A woman in a pink tracksuit is being dragged kicking and screaming from an apartment block by police in black suits. And what now. Six back then a bit over twelve months ago. It was hard to believe this heavy handed response to a virus. We knew almost nothing about around. China residents post scenes claiming officials a welding. The doors of apartment buildings shot so people can't get out even as infectious disease. Specialist started to sound alarm bells outside of china. Most countries were slow to act. Some seem to be in denial preferring to feed conspiracy theories about the origins of the virus. But not the country you'll hear about on science friction today and it might surprise you to hear what country that ease. Shocking news breaks that the man who would i warned. The outbreak has died of coronavirus. We've known that if a country as serious as china today that be careful. It wasn't their website the magnitude of the problem the speed of the problem and the spread of the virus so we took action because we knew that was the level of travel with having tourists coming here. We were at risk so every country should have done that as early as january last year. Rwanda stop plane. Distant for china pediatrician and global health. Later dr onions been guajillo is rwanda's former minister of health. And we start screening all the beeper entering in rhonda for covid sign and take the information in case. There were fine coveyed a positive during their stay in runner so that we can do easily contact tracing

Tesha Mitchell China Wuhan Infectious Disease Rwanda Dr Onions Rhonda
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

05:46 min | 3 months ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"This beautiful closing same in telling quantum physicists color ravelli's bestseller the order of time where he reflects on beethoven's mississippi lameness. The song of the violin. He writes is pure beauty. Pure disparition pure joy. We are suspended holding our breath. Feeling mysteriously this must be the source of meaning that this is the source of time. It's very color ravelli. These intellectual free spirit with radical routes and a passion for poetry and literature art and science. The whole rich smorgasbord. Caller was recently named one of foreign policy. Magazine's one hundred most influential global fingers. He works in italy. France canada trying to understand the deep mystery of how gravity works at the quantum level. He writes popular opinionated columns in italian newspapers and popular sites books that have really struck a chord with fans worldwide amongst them seven brief listens on physics. And he's two new books. Are there places in the world where rules are less important than kindness and out this month. Ease helgoland color joins you an eye on science fiction from canada this week on the tesha mitchell and we started out by reflecting on the way in which this pandemic as tiny virus with a will spread is challenging the hubris faces but then we got bigger or a bigger. Thank you for having me. I love how you describe. We humans as being the species of little creatures living on marginal planet of peripheral star in one of billions of galaxies in the cosmos a senior in an essay that you've written about the astronomer copernicus and he's he's a revolutionary challenge that with and so us with was center of the universe. But somehow i it seems to me that we leave with these pre copernican prejudice that certainly at the level of the ego. At least we do. Yeah as a spacey's we still cast ourselves at the center of the universe. And i wonder if you think if we didn't do that if we sensed that we would just an arbitrary player on an arbitrary planets round by hundred million galaxies. Do you think we would position. Different eggo formerly yes. The fact that we are obviously irrelevant on the larger scale of the universe. It doesn't mean that we have no meaning. It doesn't mean that we care about is meaningless we are. We're certainly nothing right. Our son is one out of two billion stars in our galaxy is nothing in our galaxy. One out of probably a billion billion golics's in in the world just creating team prepared killing. Someone is actually candid that right in the last decades it was realized that it was many more than what we saw today. So so we're even smaller than we thought we were more inconsequential. That's something we scanned by that. But that's not the trolley deal of us that make what we care about important for us. Thinks are important for us just because what we are. I love the woman i love. Not because she's universe because she's the woman i love that and so it's for for us. We are important for ourselves. I find it to if i give me. Serenity doesn't give me anguish it sort of relaxing to know that we do our best. We share what we can love what we can. And that's and we appreciate the this life. Yes your initial university studies in the classics i think and then and then onto physics and then onto a phd in meaning to the world of of quantum theory and quantum gravity. Bit on curious to know what that classical training brought to your physicists. Self from early on because all have read do who have raised. You know that you have a great passion for poetry and literature and physics sees is part of all that fear sciences. It's a complex center price that requires the collaboration of different people in different kind of minds. And i have appreciated a scientist which are extremely technical. Or which have an extremely analytical. Mind that just going to details and split the the arguments over and over again find the little truck. I'm not particularly doing good and doing calculations or going into details. But i think that science also needs People who look the things from from a larger perspective and and see where the the two problems where the good directions and full. That's a nation which is not strictly scientific. I think it's it's it's so important to look into Into the great scientist of the past the many of them had an extraordinarily wide culture. So i think they were. The over specialization of modern education does all how help from the middle sized to go ahead. Let's just physics. Tolstoy in biology and medicine in In in other scientists. I believe that. I don't like science teaching completely focus on solving little problems. You know you have a ball. Rolling down a slope but the speed How long does he go and come on. This is so boring is interesting. What isn't is understanding. What is the structure. We're using for understanding the wall. What is a force. What does it mean to have an energy.

canada italy hundred million galaxies two billion stars tesha mitchell today Caller One one hundred two new books this week seven brief listens this month France canada mississippi lameness one of billions of galaxies italian a last decades billion billion golics
A Conversation With Carlo Rovelli On quantum physics

Science Friction

05:46 min | 3 months ago

A Conversation With Carlo Rovelli On quantum physics

"This beautiful closing same in telling quantum physicists color ravelli's bestseller the order of time where he reflects on beethoven's mississippi lameness. The song of the violin. He writes is pure beauty. Pure disparition pure joy. We are suspended holding our breath. Feeling mysteriously this must be the source of meaning that this is the source of time. It's very color ravelli. These intellectual free spirit with radical routes and a passion for poetry and literature art and science. The whole rich smorgasbord. Caller was recently named one of foreign policy. Magazine's one hundred most influential global fingers. He works in italy. France canada trying to understand the deep mystery of how gravity works at the quantum level. He writes popular opinionated columns in italian newspapers and popular sites books that have really struck a chord with fans worldwide amongst them seven brief listens on physics. And he's two new books. Are there places in the world where rules are less important than kindness and out this month. Ease helgoland color joins you an eye on science fiction from canada this week on the tesha mitchell and we started out by reflecting on the way in which this pandemic as tiny virus with a will spread is challenging the hubris faces but then we got bigger or a bigger. Thank you for having me. I love how you describe. We humans as being the species of little creatures living on marginal planet of peripheral star in one of billions of galaxies in the cosmos a senior in an essay that you've written about the astronomer copernicus and he's he's a revolutionary challenge that with and so us with was center of the universe. But somehow i it seems to me that we leave with these pre copernican prejudice that certainly at the level of the ego. At least we do. Yeah as a spacey's we still cast ourselves at the center of the universe. And i wonder if you think if we didn't do that if we sensed that we would just an arbitrary player on an arbitrary planets round by hundred million galaxies. Do you think we would position. Different eggo formerly yes. The fact that we are obviously irrelevant on the larger scale of the universe. It doesn't mean that we have no meaning. It doesn't mean that we care about is meaningless we are. We're certainly nothing right. Our son is one out of two billion stars in our galaxy is nothing in our galaxy. One out of probably a billion billion golics's in in the world just creating team prepared killing. Someone is actually candid that right in the last decades it was realized that it was many more than what we saw today. So so we're even smaller than we thought we were more inconsequential. That's something we scanned by that. But that's not the trolley deal of us that make what we care about important for us. Thinks are important for us just because what we are. I love the woman i love. Not because she's universe because she's the woman i love that and so it's for for us. We are important for ourselves. I find it to if i give me. Serenity doesn't give me anguish it sort of relaxing to know that we do our best. We share what we can love what we can. And that's and we appreciate the this life. Yes your initial university studies in the classics i think and then and then onto physics and then onto a phd in meaning to the world of of quantum theory and quantum gravity. Bit on curious to know what that classical training brought to your physicists. Self from early on because all have read do who have raised. You know that you have a great passion for poetry and literature and physics sees is part of all that fear sciences. It's a complex center price that requires the collaboration of different people in different kind of minds. And i have appreciated a scientist which are extremely technical. Or which have an extremely analytical. Mind that just going to details and split the the arguments over and over again find the little truck. I'm not particularly doing good and doing calculations or going into details. But i think that science also needs People who look the things from from a larger perspective and and see where the the two problems where the good directions and full. That's a nation which is not strictly scientific. I think it's it's it's so important to look into Into the great scientist of the past the many of them had an extraordinarily wide culture. So i think they were. The over specialization of modern education does all how help from the middle sized to go ahead. Let's just physics. Tolstoy in biology and medicine in In in other scientists. I believe that. I don't like science teaching completely focus on solving little problems. You know you have a ball. Rolling down a slope but the speed How long does he go and come on. This is so boring is interesting. What isn't is understanding. What is the structure. We're using for understanding the wall. What is a force. What does it mean to have an energy.

Ravelli Tesha Mitchell Canada Beethoven Mississippi Italy France Tolstoy
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

08:02 min | 4 months ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an abc podcast today. On science fiction we are dancing. With damon's our understanding of of sciences is one that it removes the demons. The demons disappear imaginary creatures science actually tells us what is real and what is not real. The dame's we're talking about. He and not gods ghosts. Goblins these demons Science lovers we think of science as completely different from the reaction of the fantastical imaginary but it is still the of the fantastic and the imaginary that drives we forward. Today is an american historian of science and technology. Dr humana canales's this was the project she really wanted to do. Ever seen two masters and phd at harvard but she needed to get to other solid history of physics books under her belt. I before she let herself go there because demons. That sounds like magic talk and scientists don't have much time for that or do they. Because in fact everywhere human looked across the history of science i was struct at how they very frequently used the word demon when they were thinking about possible holzer of their theory that they didn't understand. And how these demons pushed signs forward how they motivated research. How scientists wanted to bring these teams to live how they created experiments in order to know if they were real or not so. This is the demon character as a kind of placeholder for things for phenomena that scientists can't yet explain dr canales. New book is called bedeviled a shadow history of demons in science and she joins us on science fiction today. I'm the tesha mitchell. I was so surprised that by following these teams i was actually able to follow the the history of the development of science throughout the centuries and they appeared at the moment of some of the most important transformations to no logical transformation scientific discoveries and they actually gave a name to these steam and they gave it the last name of the scientist who first came up with those speculations or those theories so i wanted to take that seriously. They were not the same as the demons of religion so that the dean of religion were considered to be real and these demons are always considered to be madge inari but to my surprise. It's the fact that they were considered to be imaginary. That drove the scientific research forward and that made scientists tried to create them and test them. And in fact when you started looking you found them everywhere in the history of science religious with demons would imaginary that would imagination for you. This is fundamentally about the power of imagination in the doing it. S and again in we tend to think the way that most historians signs have thought about the imagination that it's a different reality but when you go deep into the details and you go and figure out what it is the time to really have in their mind walter experiments world. They're doing observations. You notice that you can't really set it. Apart divide and that the machination does become real it is a powerful force. And i don't think we have the language or the tools to understand exactly how the imagination becomes real But it does it absolutely does and and what you demonstrate is these damon's kind of fundamental to the wine which scientists test out ideas test out the impossible you experiment make the the impossible. The apparently impossible possible. Let's dig on the detail. Because you're history. Starts with the philosophy descartes back in sixteen forty one and in fact he was kind of fundamental in heralding an age of reason partly as it turns out with the help of a demon. So who or. What was descartes damon. Because he was accused of heresy at the time for proposing it yes absolutely and the first demon have of signs actually appeared at the moment were signed started and where we have a card as the founder of modern logic and modern rationality. And if you read the card spoke. It's very bizarre. The first first meditations because he says things that are very simple you know. He says things like well a circle circumference around a point. You're like okay kind of a new. The two plus three equals five. A triangle is made of three angles connected together but the recent became very important because they're the foundation of modern language. Precisely the things that one cannot doubt and the reason why he was proposing. These things is because he had this fear that there might exist a demon and and again in two hundred nine might exist who could hijack our censorial impressions takeover reality in front of you and install it on an alternative reality. So he was. Okay well if this happened and it might happen given what we know of the natural world around us. How can we fend ourselves from that. The answer modern logic. Can you give us a question on the issue. Not gonna give you can you. Can you are fake news stay. He nominated his. Damon is kind of manipulating. Trickster distorting our sense of reality tricking out senses and in some sense he's message then feels as relevant today with the whole flood of conspiratorial thinking. Around the pandemic pretend news facebook fakery middling with less appeal is so contemporary. It feels like absolutely and the demon appeared on the seventeenth century his extremely relevant today because they're both objects of fear but also objects of desire and again you look back at the broad history of how we go from you know the oculus rift or video games or cinema television right now obviously the internet and fake news and then bring it back to the beginning of theater at the beginning of literature and declared himself was very very fearful of the power of books and novels and ask he thought about this team. He was thinking of meager disadvantages. Quixote and how he hot himself was led astray because he read too many books about nine and to a world of illusions. I can't help but thinking that donald trump is somehow die. Cuts ultimate demon daemon and yes. He's the patron saint of spin doctors and media manipulators the aspect of desire and wanting to become and make this demon into reality has driven the development of ever better Virtual reality technologies and means of spreading lies At the same time that we've become better at creating the opposite the critical thinking tools in order to try to detect those lies and and we see that happening already at the time of day card by.

donald trump facebook today two seventeenth century five Today three tesha mitchell first meditations three angles first two hundred nine humana two masters first demon dr canales american both objects many books
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

07:33 min | 7 months ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"This on the tesha mitchell and this week or on across. Abc radio national. It's the big twenty. All shows have been taking you on a wild ride through the wild century sofa. Check out the irs homepage for hates of great listening with joining you today for the quiz. Show the big twenty two teams. Scientists paid with science journals by have oil been neurons. They have slaughtered in their memory chips. They are plugged into the matrix and on team number one we have science writer and presenter extraordinary bernie hobbs then he has just lift the abc and our team in fact this month after over two decades of glorious mischief. Welcome congratulations saints. Tests are really wish on oil. Now your teammate is physicist in quantum computing. Aficionado professor been bouclette from the australian national university. Welcome been by tame nine place. We are the hearing houses on. I am to taking a theme. he did. I not say that. I am impervious to bribes. Not even wombats. This impervious is displaying tendencies towards favoritism and apps the random allocation of points. That are undeserved at any time looking for some sort of subconscious benefit. Here bannon bernie gives you buzzer on number two. It's team kid poop. That's right channel bell smith. Bribes city shameless absolutely shameless. Wanna welcome bell back to australia. She's recently survived two weeks doing push in a hotel in quarantine after months with the bony. Scott's in glasgow sounds pretty. Pushups belts me team poops course one bets pu pets evolutionary biologist and author of the book six jeans and rock and roll all the important things in life for visceral brooks is with us from the university of new south wales. Welcome three here thrash. What's hiba Hold you passes people. We are reflecting on twenty years of science. This is a big task. Have set for you. It has been a warping and transformative two decades. Get a lot of this. Millennium bug has an struggle. hasn't it troll. Boy rocked computers. Make planes guiding all day doing it. All it's about watch map said to me that sequencing the human genome will diminish humanity by taking the mystery out of life. Be in no doubt about what we're witnessing today. A resolution medical science and now. There's a new form of cyber matchmaking networking websites. Is this perhaps the next big thing. The facebook dot com. It'd be easier to find a girlfriend if i could just search database for when i want when we first launched we were hoping for maybe four hundred five hundred people who knows where. We're going next what we're going to announce today liquid water has been found on mars ladies and gentlemen houses sixteen detected gravitational waves. We did it. He's off hundreds of men and women. It seen our universe with new eyes in an entirely new way. The royal swedish academy of sciences has today decided to award the two thousand and twenty and a bell prize in chemistry jointly to shop jennifer. Dial da over the move. I'm in shock. Crisper revolutionary technology that can edit genetic mistakes getting crisper. technology is like software gene. We can program at easily corona virus rages become of the biggest catcher be is doing what a ride i have to ask if you had to pick one one personal top scientific wear or what moment for the last twenty years. What would it be bell. Well i've been thinking about. You know the past year and hell. It'd be nice to just get away from it all so my big whale. Moment is the voyager missions which busted air solar system in the last twenty is. I mean who wouldn't want to just be on one of them. Just leave all this line. Don't wanna be alone on a spacecraft entering into. Hey i slice and same serve really. What about you top. Where will moment from the last two decades many of them. I think looking at the start with the human genome project in two thousand and two thousand one whenever it was but the real thing that blew my mind was the rise of epigenetics in the in the first decade of this century. And just after being told all our lives you know. Heritage ability was all about dna genes dna james and then just learning that we can pass these environmental effects onto our children through epigenetics. All that going to switch our jeans on and off exactly why which we leave a fix those switches. Let's right so smoking or eating a lot as a child can affect your grandchildren and children for a couple of generations sitting dozen loss and flaws and things and there's been some evidence in humans so it's just it's just really i love it when we see that extra layer of complexity in something that we thought it was nice and black. And what. I love it i. That's one of my favorites as well and powerful and potent. But there's a lot of hocus pocus around as well yes. The new age movement got rod on board the epigenetics sane in booklet. What about you. I found a sneaky way of choosing two things at once again. Yeah exactly so for hundreds of years from looked out on the night skies. We've only been using lies. And then more recently radio waves but he's still still electromagnetic radiation it's photons but in the last twenty years we've had the advent of multi messenger astronomy so that means detection of gravitational waves and also neutrino observatories like the q. Tick during anti ticket which is built into a cubic kilometer of ice these things together. We've combined with radio telescopes and i'll tell telescopes. I think just a phenomenal achievements avenue. I looked at the universe brooks well. I was thinking about the genome staff and probably is the most profound but something. That's happened steadily. There hasn't been a moment but the tap and steadily over the last two decades is phenomenal rise in artificial intelligence and particularly machine learning to the point where machines and now learning had to manage us how to push our buttons. I think when we look back. That's the big story that's gonna come out of these two decades shared a panel loader festival of dangerous ideas about six boats.

bernie hobbs bannon bernie irs mitchell facebook royal swedish academy of scien australia writer glasgow australian national university physicist brooks professor Scott south wales
On the trail of COVID-19 misinformation

Science Friction

06:03 min | 10 months ago

On the trail of COVID-19 misinformation

"Hi. An tesha Mitchell welcome to science fiction. You are about to mate to people who have really felt the fault lines of covid nineteen in their families. But in the way you might imagine. A mother, he told me I've been on the Victorian government website and the coronavirus testing is boosted a son. That's when my father said Australian scientists have now found out that sunlight is quite effective in preventing nineteen fiction confronting two pieces of medical misinformation. When it comes to medical misinformation, that term is actually really knew what we're used to as snake oil quackery, the waves of misinformation misleading content conspiracy content. It's really everywhere in a way that's really shocking. ABC's technology reporter investigative journalist Ariel Bogle joins us. Now she's been tracking the spread of health information since this pandemic began some of its mono-, some of it easy flat out dangerous and aerial imagine the spink kind of like wrestling with the arms of an octopus. It's really out there. I've seen dodgy posts and videos about carbon nineteen everywhere, and when we put a call out on ABC News website for examples. We received hundreds of tips and that's we're investigating here in click sick this a three part series on where health misinformation comes from, and it's impacting our lives. We're going to start with a single social media post then aerial and the team going digging and found what's out. There is really confusing papal testing their relationships including this woman. We'll call her lucy she lives a life on the move. Yeah Gypsy had. For more than two years Lucy's been travelling around Australia with a small dog picks the angel in a Pink Caravan. I couldn't afford to rent a house at any of the places places near where my children live, which ones album winds up in Byron Bay. So then I was like our will all to stick to being in the caravan and and that way I can float between my children but early in the pandemic in Queensland and interstate travel bans kept her apart from the son and daughter. So when restrictions as FA- caravan parks in Victoria I really wanted to just come and see my son that was that was migraine lot and I just bugged out acquaintance. When she arrived in Melbourne, she heads straight for his sons share house. There's been a dramatic escalation in the efforts to control a spiking corona virus cases in. Victoria in Melbourne. Getting grim as the number of covid nineteen cases, Russula, large parts of Melbourne now in danger of being put into lockdown. So I, only really got to see my son. A COUPLE OF TIMES BECAUSE? I want it to be careful because I didn't know you know how well they were self-isolating and protecting themselves. Busey was more worried than most about being infected with the coronavirus as you're going to hear Ya when Melbourne look like it was heading for a second wave of covid nineteen she bio just before the city went into second lockdown she was staying in a caravan park in country Victoria when she got some bad news on he got really sick really really sick about a week after I left Melbourne a son was on the fine couldn't get out of bed aching alive. You know coughing and I was really nervous I was like honey I really think you should get tested. It wasn't clear what it was, but his son saying it's probably not covid earned. It's probably just a bad flu and I was like, yeah. But for my sake, just to reassure your Mama I'd really appreciate it. If you go get tested because if you get tested and it's negative than I, know at least I'm okay and then he said something that really took her by surprise his words on the phone were I've been on the Victorian government website and the coronavirus testing is boosted. Lucy was really worried about him, but she was also especially worried for Oregon Health I've got to autoimmune diseases and the worst being rheumatoid arthritis, which affects all the joints causes stiffness and sometimes I can't walk. So Lucy takes powerful medication, which also suppresses her immune system's ability to protect itself from infections. My immune system does not function well. Well doesn't really function at all. But I do tend to pick out coughs and colds and sniffles sore throats if I just around people. I live as a total recluse on my iron but that's what I have to do to to stay healthy. And this means contain is a big threat to. Lucy. So at this point, lucy son was feeling really sick and they was a risk he might have covid nineteen though it seems he wasn't eager to take testify doubt. It's important to say that Lucy son didn't want to be part of the story. Sorry. These impressions only. But this was a time when Victorian health authorities wanted everyone even with modest symptoms to get tested to help contain the pandemic Lucy didn't know what to do so I said well. What makes you think that it's crap and he said, well, I've been reading on the government website and it says the tests that they give you. Is just the test corona viruses in general, not specific to. Sarah's To the one that causes covid nineteen then her sunset Lucy a screen shot of a website he'd seen on facebook and it was from CDC Dot Gov Had the link at the top and pretty said what he'd said. But it had like highlights across the words and a big Red Maka pen round

Lucy Melbourne Victoria Abc News Mitchell Pink Caravan Byron Bay FLU ABC Australia Ariel Bogle Migraine Reporter Facebook CDC Queensland
Medical misinformation, COVID-19, Big Data and Black Lives Matter

Science Friction

08:04 min | 11 months ago

Medical misinformation, COVID-19, Big Data and Black Lives Matter

"Welcome to science fiction on medical misinformation, big data and black lives matter in this time of pandemic is in the months since these based of a virus heat. My two guests have occupied all of those worlds all at once. The TESHA Mitchell with you and joining me at two superstars of the world of digital epidemiology. They are mining digital data from all sorts of unusual sources, some very familiar to you to help us. Make sense of things dot Miami. Gender is a computational epidemiologist at Harvard, medical school and Boston. Hospitals Computational Health Informatics Program Adam Dan is associate professor in Biomedical Informatics and Digital Health at the University of Sydney. Etem part of your work as you suggested, investigates have health misinformation sporades on social media platforms in online forums, hell potent. has this pandemic being in terms of appendix of misinformation as well I? kind of feel like appendix Storms I'll take of misinformation for for a few reasons. Really I mean I just the sheer volume of of information that's being generated imposs- on. This some quite interesting studies have been done in computational social science to show that as we increase the volume of information that exposed to the influx throughout timelines, and makes it hotter and hotter for us to be able to discern what's actually credible, and so we're more likely to pass on less credible information to our friends and family and people paper now social networks, which makes it much easier to spread misinformation. And just as an example in a weeping collecting tweets about things like vaccines, all sorts of stuff for a long time, and says the first case where we were completely unable to collect all of the tweets that were related to of the pandemic. You know just attempting to collect it. We constantly ran into all of our API limits. We're unable to do all the stuff that we wanted to do so this absolute flood of information all the time, so there's too much data to work with yeah. Yeah and that makes it really hard for people to discern what's actually high quality information? What's credible information so that they tend to pass on things that may not be credible at all, but this two hundred reasons that I think that this has been kind of the perfect storm uptake of misinformation. You know there's a lot of politicization. When she mentioned already in a for example, it was reasonably obvious to those of us who looked at quality of clinical studies around the drug hydroxy chloroquine. that it was unlikely to be useful on the pandemic that it was some serious flaws in the way, the evidence was being discussed and the the way the study's being done, but when things became politicized around the drug, they quickly became sort of entrenched in the partisan communities that exist online and becomes much much hotter to to use elements to change people's attitudes on something has become politicized I. Think the other reason why is that? We had seen what I think. People become more susceptible to being affected by misinformation and letting it affect the way they make decisions in their behaviors when they're more concerned when anxious when I have a loss of control. In a feelings of uncertainty and loss of control are associated with conspiracy beliefs and. The fact we have is invisible threat that his CO. MAINTAIN A book. Such big differences in the way governments are responding stoneleigh created in Iraq kind of environment from certain feelings. Of Powerlessness, yeah, I mean. A global pandemic is the ultimate loss of control. Isn't it and it's tricky to know. Who attuned to in terms of expertise because science and medicine. Rising to Cape Up with all the variables with the very basics of this virus. Yeah, look absolutely right, and you know we have this kind of environment where there's just too much information making positive for us to tell the difference between what's credible and what isn't we've got strong. Citation makes hard to change people's attitudes, but evidence and we're in this situation. People find misinformation more salient, and then we'll likely to kind of absorb it, and then let it affect decision making, and it's been a really interesting to watch, but it's also sort of a ended a lot of the work that we try and do to study misinformation Maya Atom. maxine interesting observation there that. Misinformation, during this pandemic hasn't just sprung from conspiracy, theories or wellness theorists are wellness gurus. It's coming also from. At least science from scientists during this pandemic to an extent, because research is being done in a record time to try and chase down this corona virus, early results are being shared before they are robustly peer reviewed on so-called preprinted service for all to see. The media is picking up those papers before really they've been properly vetted by scientific colleagues, so it's an interesting phenomenon, isn't it? It is at is definitely an unprecedented time for the development of new scientific discovery and I think that one of the things that's very challenging. Science by design is meant to reinvent itself with every passing day. What we know today should not be what we knew yesterday. It should be better more refined more credible, and I think that because that entire process is not public in a way that it perhaps was not before or at least was not given the attention by the public that it is being given now I think that that definitely influences the way that a lot of early findings are now being interpreted and I think that even early findings that were credible and are now being. Not necessarily questioned, but are being overtaken by newer better science for scientists. This feels like part of the scientific process,

Associate Professor In Biomedi Hospitals Computational Health Mitchell Miami University Of Sydney Boston Cape Up Harvard Iraq Chloroquine. Adam Dan
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

07:42 min | 1 year ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an ABC podcast. Aikido got You Butterfly Net Enhancement. Gravity Heaven and what she step. We're right next to the Bank of Torrens River on Ghani country in the heart of Adelaide plays. Don't fall in the torrents. Those of you that are not South. Straighten off a good ribbon polling today on the white out feeling very sorry. Try and start wipers water Do into the podcast of last week. Show if you've arrived at the dorms late because we're on camp here on science friction and it's going well. Everyone's getting on. This is the C. Syros Aboriginal Summa School for Excellence in technology and science and I'm living in with the nearly forty indigenous students from across the strategy here from Perth to the Torres Strait. They've come from far and wide and it's great to have you with us to on the Tesha Mitchell. You've caught an enormous something or dragonfly. It's huge thing. It was just innocent. Thought Maybe we could Kate Me Swan and then if we get any more or less just Alana line Patched candidate the University of Adelaide so working on parasitic wasps. My mission is to teach a bit more of an appreciation awareness of what's around which these kids have embraced wholeheartedly fishnet Connor Looking. It's camouflaged really. Yeah so as part of ABC's walking together. I'm bringing you powerful personal stories from three generations of indigenous. Australians today on racism in classrooms on triumphantly pushing past the low expectations others can have foyer and are knowing who you Would Hi this is a Science Camp Theresa? Let's get some of that good stuff at by the reba without insect. Nate's I love it because when I was little I used to do this in the backyard. I'll just for the fun of it. Like we did. Ones and lacked playful the bugs and stuff and Done things we went touches. The real big because that's scary. This is year eleven student Catherine. She's from Queensland. I've always had a interest in biodiversity because when I was lying about it in school I just found it fascinating the way things like adapted to the surroundings and how strong Some animals off. But do you think you might study in Uni? I definitely want medicine like the medicine. Science and even in science medicine side of it because on surf fascinated about the way humans like animals too but mostly humans alphabrain the actual workings about nerves and our nervous system and everything. I just find it so fascinating to fix people with your knowledge of that. It's just it's mind blowing to me. If you're ever original or Torres Strait islander you make up about three percent over strides population but just under two percent of all students enrolled at university are indigenous. That's growing by around half of a said over the last decade or side when it comes to Unical says in the natural and physical sciences. It and engineering. Less than one percent of students are indigenous for first year medicine. That's around two point. Four percent and of course completion rights alarm but this camp is about helping to change that. It's about road tasting university. Simon names macaroni. I'm an epidemiologist with. Csiro food and nutrition and things are about to get very real for the students right now. We're talking about their activities for the rest of the week and in particular their inquiry which is quite a lot of pressure for them. They'll need to spend a lot of their time thinking about the question that they want to investigate for the next few days and then they'll have to be ready to present it by next week. You asking them to do scientific experiment in two days scientific inquiry. That might be an experiment but it might be some other activities but yet in today's Yep they'll spend a lot of the allison a day. Doing it will be under a lot of pressure but based on previous years they do a great job so they've got to collect data definitely have to collect data they'd go to interpret data and they'll go to present it all of the precious situations for them so the pressure is on from pretty much all mice now not quite a couple of days. I think they'll feel it from tomorrow morning. Hitler research can be conceded. A A dirty word Saith West head is a young research scientist irregular mentor on these caves. He comes from Alaba Coal. And we're edgy. Country in these half miles research was something that was done on. Aboriginal people not with Aboriginal people and certainly not let by aboriginal people but as we get more aboriginal academics in high positions within the academy. This is where we can start to see a change of the culture so we need young people. All of the students present curious and inquisitive mind and from my perspective. That's all you need to be a scientist. The rest is just learning the specific language to answer the specific questions that you come up with and that's just a process. Anybody can do that. We really made more indigenous people in science. We've got so much work today. But we need more indigenous people everywhere. It's hard to access education for aboriginal people and are stolen papal. It's hard to walk to welds of wanting to preserve your own culture and sense of identity. Sometimes studying integrate main sacrificing culture identity and sometimes staying strong culture means sacrificing education. Perhaps no one knows these more than an ano education later. I made it a gathering by the five page of the Wheelchair Boarding House. Where all staying at Miami's Ruben and direct for education does P. Y. Yeah we didn't on almost for you know all the people it's our language and then another language as we had last week students from the remote traditional lands of the unindo people in South Australia. Come stay here. We'll check to go to high school in Adelaide. Now looking at you know dairies. To Wolves do peak will come together. You know the wisden world is really important that are now people need to get educated through sure school to get a job and money travel around you know speak language English and understand where there was an will come from and why why we see really important pulled in you know kids to university by his crowd. I need to build than me on the stand with coming from and you're not educated to vision. It's a big thing you know.

Torres Strait Adelaide ABC C. Syros Aboriginal Summa Scho Torrens River University of Adelaide Kate Me Swan Tesha Mitchell Csiro Connor Queensland Miami Wheelchair Boarding House Nate Alaba Coal research scientist Alana line Unical scientist
Racism at the school gate and education reclaimed (Part 2)

Science Friction

07:37 min | 1 year ago

Racism at the school gate and education reclaimed (Part 2)

"Aikido got You Butterfly Net Enhancement. Gravity Heaven and what she step. We're right next to the Bank of Torrens River on Ghani country in the heart of Adelaide plays. Don't fall in the torrents. Those of you that are not South. Straighten off a good ribbon polling today on the white out feeling very sorry. Try and start wipers water Do into the podcast of last week. Show if you've arrived at the dorms late because we're on camp here on science friction and it's going well. Everyone's getting on. This is the C. Syros Aboriginal Summa School for Excellence in technology and science and I'm living in with the nearly forty indigenous students from across the strategy here from Perth to the Torres Strait. They've come from far and wide and it's great to have you with us to on the Tesha Mitchell. You've caught an enormous something or dragonfly. It's huge thing. It was just innocent. Thought Maybe we could Kate Me Swan and then if we get any more or less just Alana line Patched candidate the University of Adelaide so working on parasitic wasps. My mission is to teach a bit more of an appreciation awareness of what's around which these kids have embraced wholeheartedly fishnet Connor Looking. It's camouflaged really. Yeah so as part of ABC's walking together. I'm bringing you powerful personal stories from three generations of indigenous. Australians today on racism in classrooms on triumphantly pushing past the low expectations others can have foyer and are knowing who you Would Hi this is a Science Camp Theresa? Let's get some of that good stuff at by the reba without insect. Nate's I love it because when I was little I used to do this in the backyard. I'll just for the fun of it. Like we did. Ones and lacked playful the bugs and stuff and Done things we went touches. The real big because that's scary. This is year eleven student Catherine. She's from Queensland. I've always had a interest in biodiversity because when I was lying about it in school I just found it fascinating the way things like adapted to the surroundings and how strong Some animals off. But do you think you might study in Uni? I definitely want medicine like the medicine. Science and even in science medicine side of it because on surf fascinated about the way humans like animals too but mostly humans alphabrain the actual workings about nerves and our nervous system and everything. I just find it so fascinating to fix people with your knowledge of that. It's just it's mind blowing to me. If you're ever original or Torres Strait islander you make up about three percent over strides population but just under two percent of all students enrolled at university are indigenous. That's growing by around half of a said over the last decade or side when it comes to Unical says in the natural and physical sciences. It and engineering. Less than one percent of students are indigenous for first year medicine. That's around two point. Four percent and of course completion rights alarm but this camp is about helping to change that. It's about road tasting university. Simon names macaroni. I'm an epidemiologist with. Csiro food and nutrition and things are about to get very real for the students right now. We're talking about their activities for the rest of the week and in particular their inquiry which is quite a lot of pressure for them. They'll need to spend a lot of their time thinking about the question that they want to investigate for the next few days and then they'll have to be ready to present it by next week. You asking them to do scientific experiment in two days scientific inquiry. That might be an experiment but it might be some other activities but yet in today's Yep they'll spend a lot of the allison a day. Doing it will be under a lot of pressure but based on previous years they do a great job so they've got to collect data definitely have to collect data they'd go to interpret data and they'll go to present it all of the precious situations for them so the pressure is on from pretty much all mice now not quite a couple of days. I think they'll feel it from tomorrow morning. Hitler research can be conceded. A A dirty word Saith West head is a young research scientist irregular mentor on these caves. He comes from Alaba Coal. And we're edgy. Country in these half miles research was something that was done on. Aboriginal people not with Aboriginal people and certainly not let by aboriginal people but as we get more aboriginal academics in high positions within the academy. This is where we can start to see a change of the culture so we need young people. All of the students present curious and inquisitive mind and from my perspective. That's all you need to be a scientist. The rest is just learning the specific language to answer the specific questions that you come up with and that's just a process. Anybody can do that. We really made more indigenous people in science. We've got so much work today. But we need more indigenous people everywhere. It's hard to access education for aboriginal people and are stolen papal. It's hard to walk to welds of wanting to preserve your own culture and sense of identity. Sometimes studying integrate main sacrificing culture identity and sometimes staying strong culture means sacrificing education. Perhaps no one knows these more than an ano education later. I made it a gathering by the five page of the Wheelchair Boarding House. Where all staying at Miami's Ruben and direct for education does P. Y. Yeah we didn't on almost for you know all the people it's our language and then another language as we had last week students from the remote traditional lands of the unindo people in South Australia. Come stay here. We'll check to go to high school in Adelaide. Now looking at you know dairies. To Wolves do peak will come together. You know the wisden world is really important that are now people need to get educated through sure school to get a job and money travel around you know speak language English and understand where there was an will come from and why why we see really important pulled in you know kids to university by his crowd. I need to build than me on the stand with coming from and you're not educated to vision. It's a big thing you know for

Torres Strait Adelaide C. Syros Aboriginal Summa Scho Torrens River University Of Adelaide Kate Me Swan Tesha Mitchell Csiro ABC Connor Queensland Wheelchair Boarding House Miami Nate Alaba Coal Research Scientist Alana Line Unical Scientist
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"And they stay to protect their assets and a very committed to remaining. Ken Accuse that a better understanding of the seven different types of evacuee could lead to more effective emergency messaging. That's tailor-made to your particular evacuation tied. The emergency services. Still push hard on. You should leave leave early. It's safer to leave early. Which is absolutely true but the act types works suggests that the emergency services can better target and communicate with people at that stage at the stage of influencing their preparation and planning by identifying their particular interests that beliefs the likely responses. And really recognizing that saying. We know that this is how you feel. These are your motivators. This is perhaps what you can do to better prepare. So it's really saying we understand you. Had you identify the people because I mean I guess that's the trick like had you know ahead of time if someone's going to be a threat denier or worried waiver it's a great question the cf? I in in Victoria is actually being doing work for a couple of years now since we identified the targets in the post season surveys. They've talked to other two thousand people in Victoria and identified the archetype so they're looking at their programs and how people respond to their programs using that data. I've recently finished a large project under the safer together program which recommended that we actually develop an online tool to allow practitioners or householders themselves to establish their archetype. So that's work to be done but yeah hopefully be done on their way to the main evacuation center in Basements Bay will flatmate mobile reception for the first time since the crisis kicked off earlier that morning so we stopped him suddenly making a lot of calls and messages. And the so my mom straightaway and it was bad because it cut out a sin as a cold and all I got through his mom saying you'RE K. Thank God and mazing mom and cut up. And that's like my mom was just thinking some kind of panicked final phone call don't will was able to call it back soon. After and gave a brief update before continuing onto the main evacuation center. Once they arrived they found well equipped and not too crowded. They had the Red Cross disaster welfare and it was a really sex bought and so we had some food and there was some beautiful moments there because I was sitting next to someone and they said have you into the briefing said. Oh no no but I heard this Blah Blah and I said oh. Where do you live? And then they said we're on Lilly pilly as a same and then they said their address sent here actually three houses up for me. It's quite funny. You can know your immediate neighbors but after this we started knowing the Hull Street. So that was quite lovely. So willingly slap may bunket down for the night. I decided to stay in my car that not my flatmate winning these ten. I think it was about ten o'clock at night brushing my teeth and I had this moment. I thought Shit. He's my knees. Haven't even had a drink today in the past at ten o'clock because I was so exhausted and then it's there wasn't my car news. Eight laughing going. I can't believe this. This is just ridiculous. Thank you so much. We'll Hawk for sharing your story so generously with Joel and to inspector Ben Shepard from the hardworking New South Wales Rural Fire Service. Dr King's drawn and photographer Alex Coppell for his audio of the fires. He's instagram sought by the way is really something to behold on the tesha Mitchell. Talk to me on twitter at Natasha. Mitchell and you can catch Joe Werner producer of today's science fiction and the sum of pots. Podcast over on twitter at Joe were in until next week..

Alex Coppell twitter Victoria Joe Werner Ken Lilly pilly Dr King Basements Bay tesha Mitchell Red Cross Mitchell New South Wales Rural Fire Ser Ben Shepard producer Natasha Joel
The radical experimenters: a rapper, a poet, and a biological artist

Science Friction

09:21 min | 1 year ago

The radical experimenters: a rapper, a poet, and a biological artist

"The first three minutes of the universe doesn't expansion simultaneously Teini Asli everywhere not zero second but close the first hundred of a second hotter than the hottest star blew hot bruting rooting halt. The nor Smith Says Earth was not found or heaven above but in a yawning gap. That was grasp but no way there were no vikings kings. No Vanilla no lampshades but there was Lego like for life in the first three minutes of the universe everything started added to come together. ferment began to develop lips to form the word poem. one-star dreamed of turning away and now they're just so it could have time. I'm to shape clay. The universe became a rogue gallery of Jigsaw fighting for space and in quiet moments. Mango juice squeezed from the heavens and sparkled like Shaq suits. There was the first spoonful of the CARTWHEEL GALAXY N G C one. Three six five with its. Jim Like bots spiraled wills sentence hyperion Jupiter's moons pulsars born cramping the styles of the middle. I molecules began collecting just so that the wood Po Quaid could be part of this missing in the first three minutes of the universe. Atoms rose dancing and just like the poet. Rumi said they were dancing like madmen. Happy on miserable and they just kept on dancing lover. Melvin poet and performer Alicia. Sometimes there with her pace the first three minutes of the universe and Tesha Mitchell joining you for science friction. We're at this end of the universe you are about to in Canada. I eight poetry cosmos a biological artist who grows organisms as living artworks and a rat performer. Whose lyrics ricks pulse site with? Science Professor Oren Katz is co-founder of the Tissue Culture and art project and director of the University of Western. Australia's influential art. Science lab symbiotic. Baba Brinkman is a new york-based rep performer and playwright whose awesome Rep God's to science audits range from climate change to consciousness and Alicia sometimes is most recent show. Particle wave gathered audiences under planetarium dimes times. These three creative experiment is pushing the elastic boundaries of both at n science and shared a stage at the quantum words festival in Perth. Recently cently he's Aleisha reflecting on those first three minutes. What we want to do when we passion about and scientists connect with an audience? And I I have that problem I'm full of hyperbole and scientists aren't and I love that about them and they care about the mess they care about the facts and I hear all that and I read all that and then I'm just like oh his blitz. He's some poetry so I remember Reading Steven Weinberg's book the first three minutes of the universe and it's full of great fact so this was my interpretation mango juice squeezing from the heavens technically correct Richt by the way the physicists would disagree in that universe buddies taking a obviously a poetic license. But that's what I as a poet what I can never find the right words and the reason the movie dirty dancing connected so well with me. Is that moment. That one of the main characters is carrying a watermelon win and she goes up to Patrick swayze who she likes and says. I carried a watermelon. And that's all she can say and that is what I am like so often. I can't find the exact words and I love that about science that they can find words really matter and in a scientific communication or scientific paper hyper words mean everything but I love as a poet. I can sort of pie around with that and Taika Pot. Isn't it interesting that you draw contrast because as I often think when I'm reading your work that infect poetry and science scherer conciseness and brevity of language precision each word gets placed with intent. And yet your thinking of the relationship is quite contrasted. I totally understand what you're saying. And Brevity is so true and as a poet and I'm sure poets in the audience. They can understand this. Every word matters this and carries it's white but the thing is how do you communicate dark matter. Or how do you communicate Nebula something in biology or does I mean I can never find the right words. I love in contact. A film inspired by. Carl Sagan's book by the same. I'm Nice Cellular pinup boy. I'm so glad it was there. I didn't know you were gonNA talk about him. When demon haunted world is such an important political inspiring because well the Jodi foster character Elliott Airway says when she's thrust into space they should have center poet and finally why Korea I get to go in space so maybe on Amazon or something? I'll get to go just to ago. Mango juice everywhere. Do you feel like you could take sides. Or is that that's not your raisin for you all the Wanda I'm about to wonder in storytelling. I do understand that sometimes the failure of can you just beautifying science and that is somehow not enough and and that's why I love what so many people do is they take it apart in question and what aren was hanging is just so incredible what they do but I yes yeah so just like the storytelling and I really need to communicate it to audiences so they can just take away a little bit of wondering their pocket full of wonder. Hey John Adams Americans said you never learn if you have a poet in your pocket. I just loved that I said what are you trying to do with. I've seen your show particle wave. which takes you inside a planetarium? Describe it for people but also what you're hoping to do with that piece it's musical visual Poetic Extravaganza yes. I loved canvas of the Planetarium Dome and from when I was young and a lot of you would feel feel the Siamese diaby lie back. And you've got this gorgeous. Almost three sixty canvas above you and so I wanted to use that canvas to sell tell held. The story of gravitational waves got to work with a lot of scientists and I recorded a lot of scientists and I want the general public to coming and have a sense of awe four so it mixes poetry music visuals just to tell the story from general relativity some black holes look lookit to kill an and just sort of pint pitcher and I want people to come out and say well I might go read up on that but I had a science instinct come in an eighteen year old. He said that she walked in wanting to do chemistry and came out wanting to do gravitational wave astronomy. And I'm like my works done. That's enough poet delicious. Sometimes there when you think about rap song lyrics what comes to mind politics. Maybe six drugs love last year. American crime and punishment. Absolutely what about science though not really well here as Baba Brinkman canadian-born and and married to a neuroscientist at some point these graduate in comparatively chat court the science bug big time and he's now a renowned science communicate through he's rap gods to things like climate change evolution human nature religion and culture my first rap theater popularisation project CHAUCER's Canterbury Tales and a An evolutionary biologists in England saw that and he said good job. Now do you think you could do for Darwin. What you did for Chaucer and the first time I was introduced to do a performance which was at the Darwin Bicentennial Mark Pailin? The biologist introduced me by saying. Don't worry I checked his lyrics. You're about to witness the first ever rap performance. That's peer reviewed house like peer reviewed rap. That's the best idea ever confession. Spend my whole life perplexed. By Religiousness Front doorstep debating with Jehovah Witnesses I was a teenaged empirical thinker a spiritual seeker obsessed with rap. I considered it liberal research. This was the medium the Daca thinking speaking flipping ridiculous speech over beats like every weekend weekend my CD collection became my personal gospel. I wasn't apostle I think part of it was an unexpected side effect of doing science. This communication rap projects and that side effect was that I became way more gangster rapper

Baba Brinkman Alicia Vikings Teini Asli Shaq Rumi Smith Patrick Swayze Steven Weinberg Po Quaid Planetarium Dome Carl Sagan Canada Australia Tesha Mitchell Taika Pot Perth JIM
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

09:54 min | 1 year ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an ABC podcast Sir. Science Fiction Hey on the Tesha Mitchell. Welcome search this week. The pursuit of a Predator as a reporter. You you get all kinds of of little suggestions. Tips complaints yes. And you can't deal with them all. This one intrigued me. I had started to hear about similar complaints and sort of once. You hear enough of of them. The signal adds up. You think. Maybe there's a story here. What was I seeing? What what the clues that? That major smell a rash. I was a researcher myself. I was a faculty librarian at my university and I did a research probably starting five six years ago I I was always looking for publishing opportunities. I started getting letters and I started to receive these emails. Sort of saying extremely nice. Nice things to me that basically said call for Paper Journal Editors Wanting Me To submit my manuscript to their journal and they had lots of grammatical errors in addition to that one in the emails and then generally speaking editor. I don't say very nice things about you and they don't typically they don't write to you and ask you to submit a manuscript. Will you ever tempted to submit. No no I mean I'm a clinical epidemiology in some of these journals were literally from Soil Science Right. Why would somebody from soil science be asking me and saying Nice things about me? They wouldn't no me from anywhere he's smell. I did maybe several but that rash or several thousand rats via now well and truly on the loose predatory publishes and the predatory journals have become a mega industry global in reach ending ending destructive potential. In fact you're going to hear from someone who believes that this industry represents the biggest threat to science since the inquisition Shen the. US Federal Court recently ordered one of the biggest of these companies to pay up over fifty million US dollars. Only international headquartered voted in Hyderabad in India but also operating in the US claims to publish hundreds of scientific and medical journals. It was found to employ deceptive business practices essentially entrapping scientists to other publishing their journals or participate in conferences. So does the ruling site. bye-bye predatory publishes. Well let's see if Any of that money actually moves anywhere. It's not clear with a mix ex-group will cough up that fifty million dollars which is an estimate of how much the company made from customers over a six-year period or whether it will appeal. We sent a list list of questions to its representatives but yet to receive a reply but it is nice clear message to all the Sake Journal. Publishers of the world that they're being watched touched and there could be consequences. John Bohannon a science journalist and now director of science at an artificial intelligence startup in San Fran called primer. They didn't basically slipping under the radar and using American Canadian and European banks to move money millions of dollars of money from elicit gains. So this court ruling basically makes extremely inconvenient to do now. Joan was asked to present evidence in the case brought against the annex group by the US Federal Trade Commission because he'd had an unusually Hansa with the publisher so mix was one of hundreds of publishers offers. That I tested in sting operation. I wrote some computer code to generate thousands of very bad scientific papers. And what happened next these kind of legendary in science circles back in two thousand twelve John was reporting for the Journal. Science and the expression expression predatory journals wasn't in common news There was a guy named Jeffrey. You who was probably the only person around making a big stink about this and trying to actually Shine a light on it. It was very very bold effort. He had something called feels list or at least it became known as beal's list. My name is Jeffrey Bill. And I'm a retired academic librarian from the University of Colorado Denver professor. Beal beal's blacklist fame and a climb and Notaro He was the first to coin. The phrase predatory journals the Journal. Publishers hated being malysz because it stigmatizes them and meant that their income was decreased. Most of the predatory publishers are predatory not only in their publishing but in just the way they operate in general and they would use the heckler's actors veto. They would call the library director and complain about me and they would try to annoy people at my university as much as possible in order to manipulate those people at the university to make me stop the list so that their complaints would stop. I also received several threats of legal action including think it was in twenty twelve international threatened to sue me for one billion dollars one billion dollars. It was just a threat what I learned from it is that you can basically basically pay an attorney five hundred dollars in all right a threatening letter so they they did that but they never followed through with. It was never introduced in any court personal consequences consequences for Jeffrey of running. That black least were immense. And I'll come back to that. One estimate suggests that there are at least eight thousand predatory journals. This is just one publisher of many. But Jeffrey Bill provocatively calls it. The Evil Empire of Predatory Publishing I stand Dan by that statement and what they do is. They've really hurt a lot of people. You know the scholarly publishing system works on the honor system and people operate in good faith but oh mix international has has totally broken all that down. They use a lot of spamming to solicit article manuscripts from researchers they have journal titles that match the titles of respected journals. Usually one word off enough to confuse people that might be the respected journal in the `field they will at People's names to their editorial boards without the person's permission people from top universities top researchers in the field and they'll use their identity to promote the journal and when the person finds out about it and ask them to remove their name. They don't remove it they just leave it there because they're operating operating from foreign country. There's really nothing you can do about it and especially prey on young researchers in emerging researchers researchers who don't speak English as their first language it's not just scientists from developing countries that are targeted although that easing acknowledged problem clinical epidemiologist. David Mo- assays the crosses reaches into some of America's most delayed institutions including Harvard in an analysis that we did where we looked at a close to two thousand thousand articles published in Predator journals. We found that actually the most frequent corresponding authors were from what we would call first. World countries countries would lots of money and lots of resources that is troubling very very troubling because it suggests that at these institutions authors may not Be Aware of predatory journals and we need to obviously ramp up some educational activities. People think that they're sending the manuscript to a legitimate respected journal. When it's really just a phony dough mix international journal and then they quickly accept the paper without any peer review and then send them an invoice and at that point the authors realized that something is wrong because There was really no peer reviewed done yet. The papers accepted and they have this two thousand dollars invoice that comes through email and the olmecs demanding payment. Most of them asked to withdraw the paper when they realized that they've been duped. But then oh mix says has you can't withdraw your paper unless you pay US withdrawal fee. An often than olmecs will publish the article quickly and one of their journals and then and they can't submit it anywhere else. Because that would be duplicate submission it would be publishing the same article twice. which is something not supposed to do that? Nothing about predatory regionals. He's what he's supposed to happening science as John Bowen discovered when he sent them a taste. Yes yeah so I just wanted some data. It's frustrating to have such an enticing story of you know bad actors that Potentially Ricky and millions of ill gotten dollars dollars and not get some data to find out if it's true so we appear stay in molecular biology from Oxford oppy slave. He plotted an experiment which was pretty straightforward. And the idea in a nutshell is if I submit a really and I mean truly bad scientific paper to your journal title and you accept it with no sign of any peer review and you ask me for money then you're you're a fake journal publisher. Yeah John Wanted to test how easy it was to get published in a predatory journal it can usually take many months years even to get a pipe into a reputable scientific journal. And even then it's not a given. That's partly because of what's called Peer Review essential to the scientific process. So you do an experiment. You brought it up reporting your results. Submitted to a journal and then it gets pulled to shreds.

the Journal publisher Jeffrey Bill Peer Review Paper Journal US Beal beal Sake Journal researcher Tesha Mitchell director ABC reporter international journal US Federal Trade Commission John Bohannon John Wanted University of Colorado San Fran John
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an ABC podcast. Hey welcome this. asides sides friction on the Tesha Mitchell. You know it's been a modern mantra of sorts that greed is good survival of the fittest even our biology elegy gets cast as selfish as in the selfish gene the ID obeying selfishness and competition Somehow in night in all of us in in all species that it's essential to ask survival into our evolution but you know is it really is selfishness the natural way of things so it's journalists so a cane is joining us on the show this week. hazo welcome Hey Natasha yes. I stumbled across his bizarre story of a man who developed an obsession in with altruism and how it came to exist he even came up with a mathematical equation for love but as we'll hear he ended up paying being the ultimate price. Along the way. We'll meet some pioneering. Scientists have challenged the dogma. That competition is king. The whole Western world took an individualistic swing at about the same time in the twentieth century. Certainly economics think of homework onomic because the the rational actor model the idea that everything selfish at the end of the day and that our task is to interpret varieties of selfishness. Chen says it's nice behaviors didn't exist. You still had individuals helping each other but now the way to understand that was basically it was all being manipulated by selfish genes. It's a very difficult dog but to break because it's logic seems to be pretty strong and yet increasingly we are finding and more and more evidence in nature that that's not the case and that in fact the philosophy of the Celtics gene which seemed to us like like very hard nosed science light the more reflection of the Cultural Moors of the day you know of the logic of markets translated into nature rather than just a naive description of what happens in nature. It's difficult to feel feel comfortable in nature. If that's what you feel is going on all around you if you go outside and go for a walk in the park or go on a hike do you feel like you're in hostile territory or do you feel like you're.

Tesha Mitchell ABC Celtics Cultural Moors Chen
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"So welcome to science friction with this week is all about and the first cartoons up and guys and the Beatles guy what is that I am not touching. This is not in my job description. I'm used to these little dry pellets. I'm not the sorry. It's not happening on that yet. We are so going there folks. We're talking the Tobu's the psychology and the science of excretion the Tesha Mitchell with children's author James Foley who is the Creator and illustrator of the Super Popular S. TINCA INC graphic novels dungs. Zillah and guest renaults starring Selley. Tinca.

James Foley Zillah Beatles Tesha Mitchell TINCA INC
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

11:52 min | 2 years ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an ABC podcast. I'm up in a free country. I probably would not have become a scientist. It's not because I not interested in science. I've always been tricked by these most fundamental questions of nature. But I've also been tweaked by the governance of human beings. And that very young age growing up in China realized all the other career paths, I aspire to they were not possible because of the political conditions in China. I couldn't be John Lewis without a free press a politician without democratic elections or lawyer without a rule of law as science became the only profession within my interests. And that is accessible to me that I could pursue without compromise. The personal ease getting political onsides friction today. Welcome to the show on the Tesha Mitchell with a passionate story of the pursuit of freedom, and of science and human rights. Particle physicist. Dr.

China ABC John Lewis Tesha Mitchell physicist scientist
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

16:12 min | 2 years ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an ABC podcast. Welcome to sides friction on the Tesha Mitchell, and with great news show has won the science and medicine category. At this is strident podcast award. We are so thrilled about that. And thank you for listening. So in today's episode ease genomic science to want a striking story of the Shawqi gate when you do a genetic history tests, and the problems earned in your DNA there in the science. Oh man. So I want you to make mercury to buy. Oh my gosh. So she's an American Palestinian, cartoonist illustrator leaving in Brooklyn, New York. And when she started to draw well, it kind of helped his stop making sense of the world. When I was younger, all they wanted to do was draw as for more Fiqh fantasy characters who were exploring some fantasy world adventuring. Trying to figure out the meaning of war. Yeah. You matz. I she was an intense keyed us. I relate to that. I'm not even joking. That was my first comic when I was like thirteen or fourteen trying to figure out the meaning of war. Yes, the whole flood, it was really hard core. Was trying to figure out the world. Her family stories. We're helping figure out a self my family. So my Palestinian side of the family were originally from.

Tesha Mitchell ABC Shawqi gate Brooklyn New York
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an ABC podcast. Earner? Hello. This is science fiction on the Tesha Mitchell. In the Handmaid's tile, Margaret, Atwood has a totalitarian theocracy called Gilead where pregnancy gets outsourced forcibly and violently to the last remaining food are women cold hand mates. How was up within dumb? There. We healed. I know this is difficult for you. But you have done something extraordinarily you promised me. Take care of this. We'll hear on science fiction. I want you to imagine a different world. Is it easy? One way. Pregnancy ease outsourced, but to technology not Handmaid's. His mercy. She had tried one on ones years ago should wanted to understand what it felt like to wear one. But more than that as well. The appeal of it. The voice of character called Eva in novel called the growing season. It imagine 's a hypothetical future where babies could be growing inside a woman's body, but outside of the human body altogether in an artificial portable baby patch, it was before all the different textures were available though. There was a range of colors bright yellow should requested fluorescent like one of those tropical fish. Hello. Welcome to future uterus mini series, where I'm taking a wombs view of the future of reproduction. This is the equivalent of six months that told her as they let her strap it on over t shirt in the early days the full life. Doctors had helped people position it over the shoulders snug on the belly. But they realized it was making people nervous much better to do it yourself. They decided then you can see how easy it is. How versatile? How safe? Over the next few shows extraordinary, stories and extraordinary sites. You'll made a Swedish woman who received one of the world's first ever uterus transplants. The latest story will blow your mind who donated they uterus to what would the risks. Did it work thirteen children have been born now using this pioneering procedure, but it is raw with scientific and ethical challenges. Also, we're gonna look at tribalising efforts to construct an artificial womb that could help tiny precariously premature babies survive and thrive. What does it actually type to build a wound that works just like a real one? But look I'm kicking it all off with pure science fiction. The text Joe was almost butter soft, but padded and it slipped into place so easily it terrified her. Instead, she should've gone for a deep red like the color of the inside to remind yourself of what it really was to make sure she didn't slip quietly into feeling at ease with it. Even though there was no baby inside the trial pout. She was wearing. She knew she could let herself relax Ellen sage week is physicist and a bio engineer tuned, novelist. And she wants you to try on a baby patch for solids. The pouch it self is fluid filled. Flexible, warm, pouched, you strap on almost like a sort of rucksack, I suppose, but it sits around your front sits on your belly exactly where pregnant belly would be, and you strap it on your shoulders and vowed your back, so it's very comfortable and secure on you, and you can carry it like that you can feel the baby kicking through the membranes of it. You can stroke, it, you can you can sing to your baby and things like that there were various adapters. So that you can talk to through a special adapter, and it's fed with nutrients, the nutrients can be specially designed for your genetic makeup. So you can feel incredibly close to the baby and a different times to the book. We see people wearing it and kinda stroking cuddling it and feeling really predict protective of their child inside. So it's it's a very personal tactile experience for the parents. They can be shared by men and women it can be shed with all the family members. If you won't in my society. It's quite rare. At it's presented as being much healthier for the baby for the fetus as well. It's almost become a designer autumn hasn't it? It's almost aficionados is baby. You can choose for example, different different styles different covers different textures for it. There have been photos in the press of celebrities wearing these pouches and having twins wearing matching pouches and things like that. It's become really trendy for the kids wearing these pouches. We don't have babies and yet, but but wearing them and trying them on his own come like having the latest smartphone.

Atwood Joe Tesha Mitchell ABC Margaret Ellen physicist engineer six months
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on The Science Show

"And sometimes we gave the impression that we've really made a lot of progress, and I'm not. So that's always true. There's one that our love metro Japan rose who's been on the sign show last year talking. About the importance of gravity is being one of the great puzzles, but also sticking his nose right up at string theory, actually well nonsense. I'm a huge fan of Roger Penrose because he says the things that other people are thinking but wearing say, and he has this incredible legacy in his work and his gravity collapse interpretation where he says will, you know, things if they're in two places at once which quantum theory says they are they're mass must be into place at once. So they're affecting space time in two different ways at once. And so maybe it's just a reaction of space time that collapses these things into one. And I think his makes sense in some ways we haven't been up to test it yet. But we're developing the technology to be able to do that. And I think Penrose is interpretation. In fact, it might not even be an interpretation it's much more of a kind of scientific hypothesis. I think that might be the one that turns out to be closer to the truth, shall we say, we'll let you have it the whole universe and everything plus the sixteenth century the astrologer by Michael Brooks. Bob. Boggling the mind in so many ways and you'll find another version of that adventure in Tesha Mitchell's marvelous science friction to pound whenever you like next week on the sign show is birdsong music that thrilling exploration by Hollis Taylor of bird, jazz an acapella work to minister stopped funding production today by David Fisher. And marked on. I'm Robin Williams..

Roger Penrose Japan Tesha Mitchell Robin Williams Hollis Taylor Michael Brooks David Fisher Bob
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on The Science Show

"And he thinks it contains the keys to understanding the universe. His domestic life is chaos. A nightmarish and his intellectual life is soaring above the heavens. I don't know how he managed to handle all in one brain one of the delicious parts of the way, you write this is you keep us on tenterhooks. What's true? And what isn't more than one author seems to be having us on and making it up was true or not? When I talk about his biography, and the things that went on in his life almost all of it is true. And then I admit the end of the sometimes my sources are reliable, and I have to go back and think about some of the things I've written and where they come from. And it was quite a journey. I'm quite honest about it in the book making the history of some of this mainly twentieth. Century physics part of the book, we go from the story in the sixteenth century through to everyone from four to Rutherford plank. You name it. You've got all of the stars. There was that hard to do. All did you just bright as a came? I wrote it as it came. Because I wanted to talk about these things when I was writing I very much felt I was writing full him glorious other people reading, but really it was for him. And I wanted to say to him that he was trying to understand the structure of the universe and how everything worked four hundred years ago, and I wanted to get across we. We have a different story that we're telling now, but there's new actual coherence to that story when we're looking at quantum physics, the micro-structural the universe. How everything hangs together? We didn't really have a good understanding of it. And we have interpretations of quantum theory, which totally contradict each other. And you can choose which one you want to follow. So you might choose the Copenhagen interpretation where nothing exists until it's measured. Although nobody ever defines what measured activity means or you can choose the many wills hypothesis where every possible thing happens all in a different universe. And there's lots of other ones there's one called super determinism where everything is one giant cosmic conspiracy. And we think we have free will any way you explain quantum physics is actually we have free will. And we're all puppets of the universe, bats. So Jerome was starting to understand the universe. And we're still trying to understand the universe. And sometimes we gave the impression that we've really made a lot of progress, and I'm not. So that's always true. There's one that in love metro Japan rose who's been on the sign show last year talking. About the importance of gravity is being one of the great puzzles, but also sticking his nose right up at string theory, actually well nonsense. I'm a huge fan of Roger Penrose because he says the things that other people are thinking but wearing say, and he has this incredible legacy in his work and his gravity collapse interpretation where he says will, you know, things if they're in two places at once which quantum theory says they are they're mass must be into place at once. So they're affecting space time in two different ways at once. And so maybe it's just a reaction of space time that collapses these things into one. And I think his makes sense in some ways we haven't been up to test it yet. But we're developing the technology to be able to do that. And I think Penrose is interpretation. In fact, it might not even be an interpretation it's much more of a kind of scientific hypothesis. I think that might be the one that turns out to be closer to the truth, shall we say, we'll let you have it the whole universe and everything plus the sixteenth century these strategy by Michael Brooks, Bob. Alling the mind in so many ways and you'll find another version of that adventure in Tesha Mitchell's marvelous science friction to pound whenever you like next week on the sign show is birdsong music that thrilling exploration by Hollis Taylor of bird, jazz an acapella work to minister stopped funding production today by David Fisher. And marked on. I'm Robin Williams..

Roger Penrose Rutherford plank Japan Robin Williams Tesha Mitchell Copenhagen Jerome Hollis Taylor Michael Brooks David Fisher Bob four hundred years
"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"tesha mitchell" Discussed on Science Friction

"Hey. Tesha Mitchell joining you this week for another science friction live from the floor of the Melbourne museum. So we're told that learning maths and science matters a whole heap for the careers of the future and not just for those who go on and become scientists or mathematicians all sorts of jobs. I mean, Netflix even employs mathematical minds as days, it's part of the history of knowledge. It's pot of mankind's like appreciation for the wealth. But it's also very part of the inquiry process pot of what really drives us to be this way. What really drives us to live in the well this way, and I think that's just really cool. You don't have to go on to become a Nobel laureate or a racer or a science teacher. But you do need to have in the win the world around you so studying science and Mets not only raises your awareness of the world around you. But also gets you to think in an open way, you use your critical thinking skills easier problem solving skills, and it takes a lot of hard work as well. I think maybe a bit of the work ethic aspect in combination with the creativity. I'm expected to exhibit Mamie just realize that science is something that is not only beautiful that is not only useful. But it's also something that is fundamentally a pot of us. And yet so many kids more and more than a running a mile from science and math subjects at school. Something's really going astray. What exactly and can we stem the tide? The if Betty Chung speaking there, who's finishing you twelve at the Methodist ladies college, she's founder of the Victorian student science scored which links up Hough school students around science events. You also heard from Sola banish alone time science teacher, president of the science teaches association, Victoria, and director of quantum Victoria, which develop a whole lot of science programs for school students imitators across Victoria. Also on the show is Eddie. Woo. Who's causing a big stir? We've he's Chubu channel. He was a top ten finalist in last year's global teacher prize, and is author of a new book wonderful world of maths. He's hit Mets teacher at cherry brook technology high school in Weston CBI. Paid a coke kill has taught in schools from rural Maryvale to Frank Ston to Brunei he's founding principle of the John Monash science school Victoria's first specialist science high school and was principal of the year in the state in two thousand sixteen. When you started out you loved history and English at school, not maths. Thank mats. He didn't feel about good Abed was definitely humanities buff. And I still I still love stories and characters and and the tension when you try to work out what's happening in a mystery. But when I looked at mass, it was sort of characterize myself this way, all those sills adults that I now race through as I could see them as a student memorize them for just enough time to get through that damn put a number in get a number out cross my fingers, really hot. And the monks were good enough that I could say, yeah, I can do but do not have much of a fundamental grasp of why are we learning calculus? I can draw an in Jerusalem, really neatly. But I don't really know what the point of it is. And for me. There was a very rich lack of appreciation of what was crafted. Why did fractions lead to algebra which led to treat an almond tree which led to? There was actually a story on that. I was told us at all. I mean, I say that a lot I'm now wondering if I was told and I just didn't listen lesson. Just like everyone else. But for me that watershed moment was to be able to get to university with the full intent to become an English and history and to say to find out actually that there was this critical shortage of mathematics and science. Teachers particularly physics, and this is what it was like fifteen years ago. It's still true today. And I had a professor push me and say, this is this is where there's need would you consider going this direction rather than that? And so that was kind of what sent me done this rabbit hole. Pay to-. What is this conversation matter for you? And how would you respond to the third annual who says amid gonna use these why do I need to learn about maths what do logo rhythms have to do with anything?.

cherry brook technology high s John Monash science school Vic Frank Ston Betty Chung Netflix Melbourne museum Tesha Mitchell Victoria Mets Hough school Mamie Eddie Weston CBI Brunei professor Abed president Methodist ladies college director