35 Burst results for "Tesco"

"tesco" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:38 min | 3 weeks ago

"tesco" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"To a number of shoppers who were talking about exactly the price, Pence difference for a bag of carrots for their Christmas dinner, and they were comparing 29 pence for about et cetera. Anyway, house prices really matter. They do, they matter to consume this very much. So, coming to the key question, then, has food price inflation peaked? Is it starting to ease? Well, typically the supply chain for food retail is three to 6 months. So we work with the British on consortium. We look at their price shop price index. We anticipate and this is a guess that food inflation will peak around quarter one. There's always a bit of a lag because the supply chain. I think we will see quarter one being quite a tough period for shoppers because clearly Chris feels are coming in. Mortgages have increased and then he has those, of course, energy cost. So we do anticipate a tougher quarter one. But food inflation is close to peaking. The question is, will the retailers keep maintaining these price discounts to track shoppers to drive spend? I think they will. We spent over 25 million pound in that one big week of Christmas on party food stuff for entertaining friends and family. There's a lot of money and that shows the risk spend there, but to record that shop is a cutting back on some of the poor essentials. They're delaying spend on certain categories, trade and buy more private label. So households managed to a budget. The price of items important but the overall money spent the check in, I spent 50 pounds last week on spending 55 pounds this week. Those are sort of things that trigger the behavior. I need to follow it. How are you doing this? I need to follow. I need to get some tips off off Mike about how you managed to go from 50 quid a week to 35 quid a week. I could do with that, Mike. Caroline definitely stocking up on the party food. I can vouch for that. What is the rest of the year looking like then in terms of sales? So to use a football tone, we think it's going to be yet another you have to have. We see the first part of the year growth probably around 8 or 9% because of the import of inflation. But a second part of the year, we think growth will normalise food retail, possibly around three to 5%. We're uncharted territory. It's very difficult. I don't have a crystal ball, but we do see things improving later in the year, but let's not forget shop is our store reduced in the amount of money they spend on food and drink. Volumes were down for most of 2022 and they were still then at Christmas, a little bit less. We think that will be a recurring theme for 2023. So it's not all doom and gloom, shop is a compensating, but of course the big things that can change that are energy prices, fuel travel prices, of course, overall CPI and goods and services, not just in food. Yeah, really interesting. Mike, it's been great fun to have you on the program for your insights. A lovely to speak to you, Mike Watkins head of retail business insight at Nielsen IQ there talking about supermarkets in the UK. Remember, we do have some reports out on Thursday for the UK Tesco marks and Spencer's asos, but also halfords and number of the trading updates for that crucial Christmas period coming our way. On Thursday we'll have it for you right here on Bloomberg radio, and it's currently 9 30 a.m.. I'm Caroline Hepburn. And I'm Tom McKenzie. You are listening to Bloomberg daybreak, Europe on London DAB, very briefly checking your markets. We are looking at losses across the benchmark of 7 tenths of a percent European stocks here in the UK, the FTSE 100 is down by 20 points. The futures in the U.S. also lower by between the tenth and two tenths of a percent fed speakers warning that rates will be higher for longer. The pound currently trading at one 21 down about a tenth of a percent the Euro at one O 7 versus the U.S. dollar and that's a gain of two tenths of a percent and oil Brent is trading at $79 a barrel not all the movement WTI is just edging up two tenths of $74 a barrel of Caroline. Tom, a reminder of today's key news stories here in the UK, the government is scaling back support for companies energy bills, Bloomberg's Lizzie burden has more details. This new 12 month program is going to be much smaller. It's worth about 5.5 billion pounds compared with the 18 billion pounds over 6 months for the program that it's replacing. Now we heard from treasury minister James cartilage in the House of Commons yesterday. He said, the defense is continuing support is simply not sustainable at the scale it was before. The government can't permanently shield businesses from the energy price shock of the war in Ukraine. So that was our UK correspondent Lizzie burden, while the confederation of British industry says that they knew energy scheme provides quite respite, but some manufacturers are warning that surging energy costs could spark job cuts. Meanwhile, a strike by ambulance staff in the UK is set to go ahead tomorrow after talks with government ended without resolution, unites national leader office national lead office says the talks were an insult. The dispute, if it's going to be resolved, it has to be resolved by dealing with the 2022 pay claim. The government wanted it all about submissions to the pay review body for 23, 24. Well, we can't do that until we've resolved the current dispute. Unites on cassava there who represents ambulance workers striking tomorrow, talks with health unions may have stalled, but there were more positive signs from efforts to end the rail strikes, both the RMT union and transport secretary say discussions will continue throughout the week. Meanwhile, turning to the U.S. now, two Federal Reserve officials say that they expect interest rates to reach above 5% before pausing. Raphael bostic and Mary Daly both say that it's too early to declare victory over inflation in the U.S., although they both do not vote on policy at the next rate meeting at the end of January. They join a course of U.S. monetary policy makers who are signaling rates will linger higher for longer. And in top corporate news, Bloomberg has learned Apple will ditch a key Broadcom chip from its devices by 2025, that's as part of its push to use more homegrown components, sources say Apple also plans to have its own cellular modem chip in action by about the same time, apple is Broadcom's largest customer accounting for about 20% of the chip maker's revenue last year. And the first ever space launch from Britain ended in failure yesterday the virgin orbit rocket failed to deploy its 9 satellites as planned on Monday, this was the moment that the control room learned of the problem. It appears that launcher one has suffered an anomaly, which will prevent us from making orbit for this mission. We are looking at the information and data that we have gotten, and we'll be back with you in a moment with more. That was virgin orbit's director of systems engineering Chris Ralph there during the launch of Sunday extremely disappointed I thought the news has sent the company's share price down 25% in after hours trading. Yeah, a blow there for the UK's aspirations around space and the space sector, of course they're working to find out what went wrong and we'll see whether or not there is a launch date, a new launch date scheduled in as we wait for more details from virgin orbit. There's a lot more coming up. We're going to get preview of what our colleagues in the U.S. are going to be teeing up on a day when we focus of course on a speech by fed chair Jay pal, big corporate stories around Apple, of course, and the Disney boss, telling employees

UK Mike Mike Watkins Nielsen IQ Caroline Hepburn Tom McKenzie Bloomberg Caroline U.S. James cartilage Lizzie burden
"tesco" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

04:26 min | 5 months ago

"tesco" Discussed on WCPT 820

"To get you to read assess the situation. You know, it's weird because we played the sound bite where he said he's done with Trump, and he's for desantis, but maybe the builder is put that in ourselves. But maybe the lizard people brought it in the tiny airplane. Why? Bob Tesco joins us now. Broadcast. You're cute. I love you, obsessed. Washington. Just follow the money. Alex that clip. Alex out of that clip. How did that get on our song by list, Alex? You know, was it the? Well, make sure mister president, when you go and watch the video, make sure to click the link in the description and while you're there, make sure to subscribe and smash that like button. Oh my God, Alex Jones, the YouTuber. Even though he's not on YouTube anymore. I just realized that. I assume, don't you think the bilderberg gave it to the lizard? People who took it as a tiny airplane. Weather weapons, weather weapons are making them do it. People gave frogs. The gay frogs are turning the freaking frogs gaze what they're doing. It's the hormone mimickers in the juice boxes that they're given to children. Bob says, my voice toy. I already, we've already discussed how when I ran a bike when I come to D.C. for sexy liberal, we're going to go for a ride. There's a bike path by the Watergate, and I'm going to make bob ceska to G Gordon lit the entire ride. With a pencil. That's in my way. A bicycle. I'll be setting Stephanie Mueller's wife. I'll be sitting on a tandem right behind your high pockets. I assume. That's right. I thought it would be funny if we switched bicycles and I rode the really small like Stephanie Miller sized bicycle, and then you rode the giant bicycle. And we could take that on the road. Right. Like peewee. I'm trying to run a bike. Okay. All right, so wait, can you explain to people why G. Gordon Liddy called you high pockets? Because I'm very, very tall. Yes. I'm very, very tall. And he was a very diminutive. Obviously overcompensating for. If you want to see the centerpiece of what was wrong with G. Gordon Liddy. It's like a little teeny tiny guy. Like, you could wear a little wear raspberry as a hat. You have a lot of great stories because you worked with him. I only have the one of him hitting on me at the radio. And we were at right in front of his wife. He's like, ah, you're gonna look like lady, what are you doing later? I was like, me? Ew. Anyway, anyway. Yeah. Oh, I have lots of fun stories. Like watching G Gordon Letty slip on the ice and land right on his bald head. That was and we laughed. You know, a bunch of DJs standing in the window, you know, looking out and seeing him slip and fall. Oh, we had a fun laugh at the Watergate architect slipping on the ice. And then he tried to kill you with a pencil. And he tried to kill me with a pencil, yes. You know, he used to carry a knife in a holster on his ankle. Because he wasn't allowed to carry firearms. He had this like ninja blade that you would get at like a renaissance fair or something like that. Yeah. Okay. I was always terrified of that thing. Wait, one last one. For sure. Was it your David Letterman picture that enraged him? It was buzz as David Letterman picture. And then but Gordon liddy asked me to take it down. I said, no, that's buzz's picture. You're going to have to ask him or Don or Mike or one of those guys. And oh my God, he made a noise like this as he wandered away. He just went. Like a Batman, like a Batman villain. That's exactly right. Penguin. Exactly. And then he tried to kill you with a pencil. All right, let's move on. To today's, that's about right. It's kind of a Batman goal. Let's move on from Nixon's sort of garden variety criminality to, first of all, you asked, what are the legal ramifications if any for repeatedly claiming in a lawsuit that you're the president of the United States with executive privilege when you're not? Oh man. It would be like if I identified myself as America's junior miss fourth runner up. Yeah. Or miss congeniality 1979. Oops. That was like a legal mad libs. You know, it's like Donald Trump sat down with his lawyers and they went through and they just had him fill in the blanks. And they had to revise it a bunch of times because of course all the blanks were filled in with fart, some variation fart

Alex Bob Tesco Gordon liddy bob ceska Stephanie Mueller desantis Alex Jones Trump Gordon Letty Stephanie Miller David Letterman D.C. YouTube Washington Gordon Bob Don Mike Nixon America
"tesco" Discussed on Sonidos de acá

Sonidos de acá

03:30 min | 9 months ago

"tesco" Discussed on Sonidos de acá

"A representer. Apple podcast Google podcast. These are a box in trim. So noodles are. Filling a Spotify on a grand buddy that they playlist. It is the content. It'll tell my sweet pick before I land all this YouTube. And today's Spotify YouTube are the masculine aggregate on a Quattro playlist of the Spotify. International, he can Tesco. He bear in persona. The Mauricio issues studios. And tosses his very masculine. The music was still moving. Pop, it is cool. Artist, that's what we in case. We are meant to be a boost. I experiment that is telos..

YouTube Mauricio issues studios Apple Google Tesco
"tesco" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:45 min | 10 months ago

"tesco" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"From Bloomberg's European headquarters in London I'm Anna Edwards with this Bloomberg business flash European equity markets flats and negative this morning it seems overall the stock 600 down and 8th of a percent the FTSE 100 a fairly resilient pretty flat actually at this stage a cafe around not all that far from the flat line just down a tenth of a percent The zetro Dax down around half a percent So we have quite a bit of divergence across the European equity markets and part of that is due to sector exposure of course we see that basic resources and energy and banks actually are three fairly resilient sectors across Europe also healthcare and media and some of those obviously will play to the strengths of the UK certainly basic resources to the downside we've got retail actually is the worst performing sector down by 1.4% the Tesco news perhaps weighing on that particular sector auto marks and Spencer's joining them in negative territory that was certainly the story earlier on this morning and we've seen the Tesco share price down by just over 4% Elsewhere in terms of the broader equities picture the U.S. as stock markets look as if we could see a bit of a bounce at the start of trade after selling yesterday caused by focus on inflation but actually more than that of focus on in oil prices and oil prices were bouncing yesterday and that weighed on stocks Today we see futures pointing higher so E minis and Dow futures both up by around four or 5 tenths of a percent Now's their features up by 7 cents of a percent So positive but off earlier highs oil prices are around $100 a barrel on WTI still so 100 spot four three the Brent price one O four 55 so fairly stable compared to the close but after a strong rally yesterday 2.76% is the yield on the U.S. ten year so we have yields that are rising this morning but are at lower levels than before that CPI print from the U.S. the pound actually down two tenths of a percent despite Inflation figures that came in higher than anticipated here today one 29.

Anna Edwards Bloomberg Tesco London Spencer Europe UK U.S.
"tesco" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"tesco" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"Network end quote. Microsoft says the Russian backed nobelium group responsible for the SolarWinds hack is still targeting global IT supply chains with 14 breaches just since May of this year. I wonder if this news might be related Tesco, the UK's largest supermarket chain was hacked on Saturday, halting online grocery orders through Sunday. Tesco says its site and app are back up and running. But back to that Microsoft report, quoting bleeping computer, the main targets of these new attacks are resellers and technology service providers that deploy and manage cloud services and similar tech for their customers. Microsoft notified impacted targets of the attacks after spotting them and also added detections to their threat protection products, enabling those targeted in the future to spot intrusion attempts. Since May, we have notified more than a 140 resellers and technology service providers that have been targeted by Nobel said Tom Burt corporate vice president at Microsoft. We continue to investigate, but to date, we believe as many as 14 of these resellers and service providers have been compromised. As Bert added in all more than 600 Microsoft customers were attacked thousands of times, although with a very low rate of success between July and October. These attacks have been a part of a larger wave of Nobel activities this summer. In fact, between July 1 and October 19 this year, we informed 609 customers that they had been attacked 22,868 times by Nobel with a success rate in the low single digits. Bert said by comparison prior to July 1st, 2021, we had notified customers about attacks from all nation state actors, 20,500 times over the past three years. This shows that Nobel is still attempting to launch attacks similar to the one they pulled off after breaching SolarWinds systems to gain long-term access to the systems of targets of interest and establish espionage and exfiltration.

Microsoft nobelium group Tesco Tom Burt Bert UK Nobel
"tesco" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"tesco" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This problem No and I think this dude we mentioned this is this is all through the system So obviously Laurie drivers are important but it's just one aspect of it You know you've got the ports in Asia the container shortages containers in the wrong place escalating break costs So it's just part of this bigger picture And that's the reason why retailers and consumer goods companies are worried that this isn't going to be a temporary thing that actually this is going to continue I mean we definitely going to see this continued through to the end of the year The big question is whether how much into 2022 this situation continues for Well yeah I mean digital the obvious fact is we've got Christmas coming up I mean a lot of people have been drawing attention to that These traditionally a massive consumer time whether it's turkeys or presence or whatever else I mean that is going to be the focus I guess Absolutely Tess goes bosses said rather glibly that the good thing about Christmas is that it comes every year But what he was getting at is retailers have huge planning programs that go into Christmas and this year that planning would have started a lot earlier because of these problems which haven't just cropped up overnight They've been building up for months At Tesco actually said you know that they're shipping more produce from Spain via rail and that they're going to increase the number of containers from 65,000 to 90,000 by the end of the year The fact remains that for a retailer like Tesco with huge scale and ability to flex its supply chain as it needs to they can manage these things perhaps better than other retailers But even for them it's a challenge And certainly Ken Murphy the boss of Tesco we're saying that there are going to be bumps in the road in the run up to Christmas And I think for smaller businesses they will be far less able to absorb some of these problems than a big giant like Tesco Andrew what then When you talk to bosses I mean did you mention various at the moment What are they saying they want to happen What is it that could change this more than anything else and bring the situation back under control Labor is definitely a big factor That comes across quite clearly But I think there are some sort of signs that we might be passed the worst although we don't know how far this is going to continue into next year Next we're saying that they thought the shipping situation could get a bit better by the end of next year Andrew clay finished with you with one thought I mean is he just something we need to get used to You know not getting quite the choice we used to have Definitely One of the things that happened during the pandemic when we reached were really trying to build the shelves was they cut back on their ranges Now some of that's come back but they've just realized that you know maybe you don't need you know 15 different pack sizes or flavors of something You know you could do with 5 And you know we started to see that combat but now having to face all these issues again I think that rationalization of the product range is something that we are going to see because that simplifies businesses that allows you to do bigger volumes of these smaller range And so I think we are definitely going to see less choice at least in the short term while they're working through all these issues Andrea thanks so much for being with us Andrew felstead Also speaking to DJ well my thanks to both of you for joining us with those insights I'm roger hearing in London You can catch us every weekday morning for Bloomberg daybreak here at beginning at 6 a.m. in London and one a.m. on Wall Street John All right thanks roger And just to hit on Bloomberg daybreak weekend some key economic events happening in.

Tesco Ken Murphy Laurie Tess Andrew clay Asia Spain Andrew Andrew felstead Andrea roger London Bloomberg daybreak John
"tesco" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"tesco" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Oh maybe they really could exist to really fleshing out black holes exist and they're everywhere and they've played important role in the universe and so on and that's taken a lot of a lot of advances in technology and telescopes and so on so this is not the people thing that comes to the race today that That speak league onagawa radiation that we see uh from sort of bracco beacon on c. today the didn't beam enough that became picked out by the hard enough to actually create tremendous amount accommodation. So did you did. You see that doesn't make sense you. I'm not aware of it. I would have to look at the would have to look at the article. But i think there are general. Yeah i think it's news general questions. About what sort of background. Radiation is produced by different sources. And that's one way that that black holes might actually play an interesting role so one one of them that that they knows a little bit about is just the early on in in the universe reorganization and there's a possible role. There that that black holes could have potentially played as well know the publicly appreciate sort of the tech nico accomplishment of even tesco feature doesn't look that infested is is a menace league. Technically implicit somebody predicted this one hundred years ago and now he's an amazing things in it. Yeah it's really. It's really rewarding to me that the most fun thing about astrophysics is that is really driven by this type of technical logical advance some new instrument or facility comes along and makes new discoveries outlets you. If you think i mostly think about this. From the theoretical and computational point of view but it really lets you make predictions and test ideas. And you really feel like you're learning something new on short timescales right. It's not a decades long project to refine and understanding of something that may or may not ever be measured for a lot of us doing astrophysics really the reward of try things changing the field changing on short timescales and being able to test those types of ideas so seeing an image in the case of that image. It's really remarkable bowl technically anything. It's remarkable that it looks kind of like what many people predicted this kind of. Actually what we expected. Image of a black hole to look like and that's a non trivial complicated problem So at least for me..

tesco
"tesco" Discussed on Talk with Oliver

Talk with Oliver

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"tesco" Discussed on Talk with Oliver

"A job or japan for the mortgage. How do i get food. I'll go tesco's the shop. Where does the food come from. Oh i don't know as long it's in the shop then that's where the food comes from. Okay so no my food comes from. I know the war comes from. I know the show comes from now. I'm gonna have the kid see advocate. You bring it all up right. And he didn't even understand that we'll be departments of whether food and the water and the shelter is is the old days the beach over there for the water. Coconut trees district movies coconuts k. and and all the food comes from the ocean. You'd now have no idea where this comes from. And if you want food and all these other stuff spirits you've got to work to pay money to trade for somebody else to go to the ocean and get the fish so now you're trying to bring up a child manage the food. Pay the mortgage to get the house. Manage money to get food. Goes to shop to fucking fine. The food spends all day whatever setting they've got all these departments where all your energy congress goto the child is going to. The food is going to the water is to the shelter. And i would like to say it's going to the fucking but fucking stops in relationship so you can set us blessed skies otherwise. It's just one more thing you've got a deal with so now you trying to balance out all these things at one point was animal just says once i know the war comes from the three comes on the show comes from i can give everything to my child and teach you on the warriors the show or isn't the food and once he knows where it is he can get himself and now i'm by myself again i can eat breathe again because now of gt of helping my jake to survive. Or i can just be an independent free-spirited animal. Climb trees often wonder and do whatever i can get. Hold on eight fuck. Another man and more kids. Come out. And i do the same thing eventually based on your lifespan or the exhaustion you have through teaching. Will these kids go. Go to the warsaw's go to the food source that you might be so weak that like a bird caps having lots of letters it just died from exhaustion popping out. Kids of any species is exhausting. And then you might die. But then you've created say twenty new living things in his world from your one living thing which is the purpose of life. But as i said it complicated because you in his partners manmade system where you can't just teach this kid before basics of survival you get mortgage. How have been relationships how to get a job. House gets unique. Get up to get wallpaper has get competent. It's so fucking complicated. But it's not a simple.

tesco japan congress warsaw
"tesco" Discussed on H-Hour: A Sniper's Podcast

H-Hour: A Sniper's Podcast

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"tesco" Discussed on H-Hour: A Sniper's Podcast

"Enough for you to be able to put an edge on there without you know any particular skill. So it's the perfect medium between the two nick by bush grabbed. Nick was taught this upper. Give me a call every every yeah. Of course yeah but the difference between the different different metals. You shop some some of them any point trained shop for example. Your kitchen knife off the shelf in tesco like no ever bother trying to take a shopping centre on. Yeah you might as well just like a one time. Use thing if you're going to spend three quit on a kitchen if you're going to get three of value in so yeah it's every stale as its own little little nuances little ways. It needs to be treated. I've got i've got range of. It's called a recipe a heat tweeting recipe. So the one got there is eight hundred degrees. I hold it for a certain amount of time. Then our.

nick Nick bush tesco
Dow Closes Above 35,000 as U.S. Stocks Rebound From Jitters

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

Dow Closes Above 35,000 as U.S. Stocks Rebound From Jitters

"Here's Jim Tesco stocks closed out a strong week with 1/4 straight advance and the major market indexes at new highs. The Dow industrials ending above 35,000 for the first time. In the Friday session. That blue chip index rose 238 points the S and P 500 gained 44. The NASDAQ composite leaped

Jim Tesco
"tesco" Discussed on H-Hour: A Sniper's Podcast

H-Hour: A Sniper's Podcast

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"tesco" Discussed on H-Hour: A Sniper's Podcast

"Wet. The moment carrots being harvested so again t rugby pitch. If that was a failed for carrots. May i tell you that was fearful carrots flipping act. some people who kickoff rugby club mantle. They would go crazy. Honest to god pressure. For next season i would amuse me me after after the garden. Yeah get get get get grown and so much if that failed was you know. We can't rugby pitches waterlogged waterlogged but the person you are supplying said sorry. Supermarket needs ten tons of carrots. You've got to go out and obviously carrots even if it's pissing diamond rain even if you're making a mess damaging the soil because you got a contractor feel so actually suddenly just which into vegetables. He doesn't sue all of the uk. What i think. Sixty percent of the. Uk's is unable to grow crops anyway because it's hilland upland gratin this neighborhood you know rivers etc but it's the same brussels sprouts cabbage anything in the field. You know potatoes and stuff. You can't turn around to see from Hangups rain. It's too wet. We contacted machine on the failed. The contracts that you've got to supply potatoes carrots cauliflower. Whatever when when they want so things so suddenly going from actually a nice greenfield with a few animals in it to maybe six or seven tractors driving around in the mud taking mud out in the roads because the character in two miles down the road. It's a completely different idea of doing it. But there are people Looking at the lowest smaller-scale vegetables but along a no deadlines and actually you can get into something called. I'm spicy to see coming when it's done but you've you pay a monthly fee to that person producing the vegetables and you get your box vegetables or your box meet every month every week. Have anytime you want but you you pay the next six months. So you're not going to tesco wherever we're saying Mars cosima fresh to that. Yeah the same thing but a lot smaller people assigned to it so direct so your funding their a business. You know. say if i went if i went round to the right to the farm. Yeah literally look into. Because i want to start healthy meat looking for meat supplier i wanna regulates. The player founded steep. They were big big companies. Don't want ni-. I wanna local semi flip mistakes. Yeah exactly like on a regular be. I would happily pay. Because i look at this. I'm jumping in. I'm probably going to pay more for steaks. I wouldn't tesco's right but the healthier another thing is wanna test by fucking steaks all the other way as i feel the basket we crop up saving money. God you are you start you start shopping for what you need. And you're exactly right and this is one thing we've been looking at doing when we got the farm as in a location will be exactly. It'd be starting meet boxes and things of that because yes. We limited on shipping distance. But if you say to someone. I i'll tell you what you wanna spend. Tell me what you want. If you're meant chops lamb if you check in and we'll plan that for your month and then we'll deliver either. You know or or and pick up. Tom's yes you could find some. Yeah all the way in telling you as a friend who went. He's is northampton direction. But anyway there's a network a- but there's a good networks that i know there's one quote my local ladder on instagram. You can have a look at that. And that's exactly what they want to davies link-up local producers with with consumers. And you can go. Actually this great found five different jobs and ordered ends and it runs through this small startup business..

rugby Mars cosima Uk tesco northampton Tom
Woman Shot and Killed While Trying to Flee Carjackers Outside Houston Gym

The Great Outdoors

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Woman Shot and Killed While Trying to Flee Carjackers Outside Houston Gym

"Are releasing surveillance video in hopes of finding the suspect in a woman's death outside of gym. Ailsa McKay, Tesco was shot to death early Thursday eight while running from the suspects that life fit personal fitness studio on few quite near Beamer. The video shows two people getting out of a white Chevy suburban as a woman believed to be makin Baska starts walking towards the gym. Suburban is then seen leaving the area. Anyone with information should call police the Texas

Ailsa Mckay Tesco Beamer Makin Baska Suburban Texas
"tesco" Discussed on Fancy Free Podcast

Fancy Free Podcast

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"tesco" Discussed on Fancy Free Podcast

"Up <Silence> <Advertisement> all day. <Speech_Female> Thank you <Speech_Female> so much for listening <Speech_Female> to the fancy free podcast <Speech_Female> today. <Speech_Female> Make sure to go <Speech_Female> to the show notes <Speech_Female> at fancy free <Speech_Female> podcasts dot com <Speech_Female> slash episode <Speech_Female> one one <Speech_Female> zero <Speech_Female> to find <Speech_Female> all the links that we <Speech_Female> discussed in today's <Speech_Female> episode. <Speech_Female> If you want more <Speech_Female> laughter sharing <Speech_Female> and connection <Speech_Female> why not join the <Speech_Female> fancy free facebook <Speech_Female> group. It's our <Speech_Female> private little slice <Speech_Female> of the internet and <Speech_Female> we have some fun <Speech_Female> conversations there <Speech_Female> this week. The question <Speech_Female> of the week is <Speech_Female> if you could have <Speech_Female> celebrity. Be your best <Silence> friend. Who would you choose. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I love listeners <Speech_Female> stories. If you have <Speech_Female> a story to tell <Speech_Female> email me at not fancy. <Speech_Female> Fancy free <Speech_Female> podcasts. Dot com <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> or go to fancy <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> free. Podcasts dot com <Speech_Female> and click <Speech_Female> the red button and <Speech_Female> record a <Speech_Female> voice memo for me right <Speech_Female> there my a website. <Speech_Female> I did just <Speech_Female> get some more <Speech_Female> leggings in stock <Speech_Female> for selfie shop. <Speech_Female> I'm still waiting <Speech_Female> for the tunic. <Speech_Female> The t <Speech_Female> shirt and the <Speech_Female> maxi dress <Speech_Female> and the short dress <Speech_Female> though should becoming <Speech_Female> so soon <Speech_Female> and as soon as i <Speech_Female> get them you guys will be <Speech_Female> first to know. <Speech_Female> I think they're gonna sell out <Speech_Female> really fast. So <Speech_Female> if you're interested <Speech_Female> in one you might wanna <Speech_Female> go to shelf shop <Speech_Female> dot com. That's s. <Speech_Female> h. e. l. f. <Speech_Female> e. s. h. o. p. <Speech_Female> p. e. dot <Speech_Female> com and <Speech_Female> find <Speech_Female> the size and color <Speech_Female> that you're interested in <Speech_Female> and click the back in <Speech_Female> stock email <Speech_Female> alert <Speech_Female> so that you get an alert. As <Speech_Female> soon as they go back and stock <Speech_Female> have <Speech_Female> a wonderful week <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and remember. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> No one <SpeakerChange> is a <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> he has they look.

"tesco" Discussed on Fancy Free Podcast

Fancy Free Podcast

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"tesco" Discussed on Fancy Free Podcast

"Well if you do <Speech_Female> go back on very <Speech_Female> gradually <Speech_Female> the reason that they stopped <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> women's initiative <Speech_Female> study here <Speech_Female> when they were looking to see <Speech_Female> if cardiovascular <Speech_Female> risk <Speech_Female> would go down <Speech_Female> on they actually <Speech_Female> stopped the study early <Speech_Female> because what they were doing was <Speech_Female> they were restarting <Speech_Female> hormones on women who <Speech_Female> hadn't had any for <Speech_Female> a decade <Speech_Female> and they were having events <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> what they realized. Was <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> the hormones deep <Speech_Female> prevent <Speech_Female> cardiovascular <Speech_Female> events <Speech_Female> if you were on <Speech_Female> them but <Speech_Female> starting them back also <Speech_Female> put you at risk for <Speech_Female> cardiovascular meant so you <Speech_Female> just wanna you just wanna take <Speech_Female> taper on really <Speech_Female> gradually <Speech_Female> by <Speech_Female> sta restart <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> anyway. That's for what <Speech_Female> it's worth. Yeah thank <Speech_Female> you <SpeakerChange> appreciate <Speech_Female> it. Yeah <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> alright <Speech_Female> well on <Speech_Female> that note <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> tell my listeners. <Speech_Female> All the places where <Speech_Female> they can find <SpeakerChange> you <Speech_Female> online. They can find <Speech_Female> me on amazon. That's <Speech_Female> us basically <Speech_Female> where it's <Speech_Female> under skirmish press. <Speech_Female> But it's called <Speech_Female> the high beside the cherry <Speech_Female> tree. <Speech_Female> It doesn't <Speech_Female> come easy. I'm <Speech_Female> please please please <Speech_Female> if you do read it. Please <Speech_Female> leave a review <Speech_Female> so important <Speech_Female> really <Speech_Female> important <Speech_Female> off so family <Speech_Female> members who celebrated <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> like could you leave review. <Speech_Female> Not <Speech_Female> tech <SpeakerChange> counting. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I'll come over <Speech_Female> and walk you through it. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> It just <Speech_Female> the algorithms <Speech_Female> require <Speech_Female> it and then your <Speech_Female> website is away <Speech_Female> with <SpeakerChange> dot <Speech_Female> co dot uk <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and then <SpeakerChange> your twitter <Speech_Female> handle <Speech_Female> at lee <Speech_Female> l. e. a taylor <Speech_Female> t. a. y. <Speech_Female> l. o. r. Five seven <Speech_Female> eight three. <SpeakerChange> That's <Speech_Female> it yet can <Speech_Female> also give a shy type. <Speech_Female> Mary susan <Speech_Female> i do something called <Speech_Female> the book whispers <Speech_Female> and it's a free <Speech_Female> online <Speech_Female> writing groups <Speech_Female> anybody's interested <Speech_Female> in developing their creative <Speech_Female> writing. <Speech_Female> We don't charge <SpeakerChange> you anything. <Speech_Female> All materials <Speech_Female> for free <Speech_Female> and where supportive <Speech_Female> community <Speech_Female> we generated it specifically <Speech_Female> philoctetes <Speech_Female> but you know <Speech_Female> where he if people <Speech_Female> want to. Just get <Speech_Female> into writing <Speech_Female> and like. I say it's <Speech_Female> online as well. <Speech_Female> So we've got <Speech_Female> a book whispers group <Speech_Female> so it's than a <Speech_Female> book whisperers <Speech_Female> dot <Speech_Female> com. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> I'll i'll definitely <Speech_Female> linked to that too. <Speech_Female> I think if <Speech_Female> you are thinking about <Speech_Female> writing a book or <Speech_Female> if anybody has ever <Speech_Female> told you oh you should <Speech_Female> write a book. <Speech_Female> Then we're not looking to <Speech_Female> it. It's always something <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> project <Speech_Female> on the side and <Speech_Female> sometimes <Silence> all you need to bring <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> the zine <Speech_Female> bacter- life or <Speech_Female> the passion bacteria <Speech_Female> life is a creative <Speech_Female> outlet. And i think <Speech_Female> writing is <Speech_Female> always available <Speech_Female> to ask but it is nice <Speech_Female> to have support <Speech_Female> and to me have a structure <Speech_Female> and have some people <Speech_Female> who have experienced <Speech_Female> sort <Speech_Female> of guiding <SpeakerChange> us through. It's <Speech_Female> something i <Speech_Female> yeah. We've got <Speech_Female> very supportive community <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> Please don't <Speech_Female> be afraid to come and <Speech_Female> join us. What <Speech_Female> can <Speech_Female> were very bonkers <Speech_Female> though <SpeakerChange> madness <Speech_Female> included. I wouldn't <Speech_Female> have it any other way. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Oh <Speech_Female> my gosh you are <Speech_Female> so much fun. <Speech_Female> I have <Speech_Female> had a blast <Speech_Female> interviewing you. <Speech_Female> this might be two <Speech_Female> episodes. I can't <Speech_Female> cut any of it out. <Speech_Music_Female> It was all golden <SpeakerChange> <Music> state. <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Oh my <Speech_Female> gosh you guys. I didn't <Speech_Female> want that conversation <Speech_Female> to end. Lee <Speech_Female> was so much <Speech_Female> fun <Speech_Female> we could. He acted

Lee Mary susan twitter amazon taylor two Five seven
"tesco" Discussed on Fancy Free Podcast

Fancy Free Podcast

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"tesco" Discussed on Fancy Free Podcast

"But i do suffer from significant clinical depression and i have actually how you quite a few conversations especially with my younger daughter about my worry of how it would affect her and how it has affected earned sort of her memories of when i've been at my worst and i i can't wait to read it you know it's something we have to look at. It is something we have to look and if you look at the statistics every single one of us will have a mental health episode at some stage in our life. You tend to be more vulnerable and more fragile when sydney when your mother as well and because you're taking on something new things but this this particular story. Sydney highlights all the stigma and how people viewed mental health certainly in the sixty s. And how it was treated was probably the spoiler but this lady ended up having itchy. I have known families that have gone through that and to be really honest. It's a fictionalized account of my upbringing. One of the two story. I did feel my brother off in it but some of it is. I took the patent of my parents and decided that i would write on that. Because i think i'm not the only person whose family has suffered something like that absolutely so so important that that it's marked that it's acknowledged rather than sort of you know glossing over and saying. Oh this is just some of these things that you sit in two fingers up going have to get on with. It's nice to get on with it. It's something you do need help with. We still don't have very many treatment. Modalities but we have a lot. More than was available to our parents generation in the fifties sixties seventies in my parents generation. Yeah they all they did was medicare or electrocute really and even institutionalized without much hope because there just wasn't as much available and i hadn't even really thought about living without an antidepressant which for me would have been hard because i am on medication now but i always joke that. Oh i wouldn't have been able to live in the pioneer days. Because i need advil for headaches but i mean that's nothing compared to having no treatment for depression even as back as nineteen eighteen. This is going to suffragettes. Women would just chuckle soon the uk. I'm not quite sure how the situation was you in the states and women are just chattels and they could be taken away and incarcerated just for having. Pmt imagine menopause. I'm on in that stage now. When you menopausal or pmt you could get locked up because you would behave in the appropriate manner that was deemed by men who didn't these conditions and women. The women didn't understand it either because nobody was looking into it. Nobody was talking about it. I have a girlfriend who her mother literally thought she had just gone crazy and when she finally figured out that some of her symptoms were because of menopause. She was so relieved yet. At least we have something to do to treat it. I don't know. I would be honestly without my home because what happened to me. Is i struggle with depression often on my entire adult life. But i always managed to handle it myself until i start going through menopause and then it was like the hormones just sent me right over the edge and oh i just can't imagine living with that without help. I was having a rough day yesterday..

yesterday uk One two story sydney sixty s. two fingers fifties sixties seventies Sydney nineteen eighteen every single one
"tesco" Discussed on Fancy Free Podcast

Fancy Free Podcast

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"tesco" Discussed on Fancy Free Podcast

"Have you been loving lately that you think listeners might love to on tv. I don't know if you can get it. Over there by happy loving procam vehicle motherland which is just brilliant. Basically about school mums. They've obviously met at the school gate. Know the kids during the same year and stuff like that but it just shows all the different characters and the dynamics. There's one thinks she's better than everybody else but is constantly making faux pas and really putting a foot in it but doesn't recognize the fact that she's putting a footing it and then you've got the aeko dodd. Who's a stay at home dad. Who's just wet behind the ears. Tote wet lettuce he gets dr by all the rest of the moms because they kind of feel sorry for them and then you got the radical ones that just misbehave or behave badly which i can identify with quite a lot actually thinks that that's a fun show. Okay you'll find. You want to binge-watch it or i can't wait okay. What's your favorite podcast. Favorite podcast at them apart from my own and yours. Of course you're can listening to your debt to me. The history stories really talking about dead people. Obviously but it gives you the sort of like nitty gritty details. Nice kind of like what you're talking about with more interest angle. Yeah sometimes it has a quick yongle to sometimes is quite straightforward. But who listened to the other day on that one commune or something like that. But it's a very very broad range. I'm looking now. There's an episode. About the prohibition in the us p.t. Barnum lord byron secca julia. Yes i to wish. She was really good with newsom. Carroll wasn't jay she she did. loosen cuddles trail. Yeah might just pressing you really are. I can't. I can't dish it back at all. I want you to tell the listeners about your latest novel. Tell us all own it. Well my no hope disappoint now after all the fun we had. This novel is serious for me on. All my previous writings have been folklore and folktales. But this one's called the highest beside the cherry tree. Motherhood doesn't come easy. It's it's looking at motherhood mental health and the main protagonist in this has a nervous breakdown. Ch- got a young couple who seventeen set in the late. Nineteen fifties is their first sexual encounter and unfortunately she gets pregnant and they're forced into marriage. You know she doesn't love. This guy is besotted with her. But she doesn't love him and that that's the start of it. Really that the marriage unravels as she has a nervous breakdown but the the of the story. it's from three perspectives. The wife's perspective the husband's affective and their child and what happens a lot of people talk about the person who suffering the mental health. But you don't get any real discussion about what happens to the family dynamics of the family and how impacts on men so i wanted to explore that is quite a dark story but it does have a wrestling ending. And it's going to be part of a trilogy so on currently writing the next one. I cannot wait to read it i relate. I mean i didn't get pregnant at seventeen in mary someone. I don't love..

Carroll three perspectives seventeen first sexual encounter Nineteen fifties Barnum couple byron secca julia one aeko motherland
"tesco" Discussed on Fancy Free Podcast

Fancy Free Podcast

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"tesco" Discussed on Fancy Free Podcast

"Eight and one of the guys that came in to the boss said dc needs somewhere to stay because at the time i was living in a it was called to campo and i said if you've got room i'll clean your flats in exchange so i moved in with these two. Us marines which was funded in of itself. Anyway they will likely full matt absolutely mad. We had these difficulties with the language. And i think only been there a week. And i didn't have an alarm clock just didn't watch at all but i didn't want to sleep in for some reason. I want to go off and do something. So i took on sets them. If don't mind could you not me up nine. Am and they both literally spat his co. Out notes have gouged could walk me up at nine pm. They stood there with their myers hanging open. I said if i said something wrong they would just ending themselves upset into himselves and then they explained what i'd said it was like. Oh i not that no but not in that way. We have quite fun. I used to take the mickey out of telling the Spent their lives dressing up trees and things like that you know. Sometimes he used to hang me over the balcony. Hope you by my my legs and hang me over the balcony to being belligerent. They that does sound like a lively crew. Very likely tell me what happened with the fire. Alarm all the filon. Yes they comes doing. Some temporary secretary work or something like that. And i decided i was going to go for fulltime job and am i getting into and went through. The interview did really wet life. While i was doing well knows answering questions and seem to be getting the right reactions from them. And in the end you know finish. The interviews shook their hands. They had said that. I was so excited. I went the wrong door. But it's one of these fire exit tools that had an alarm attached to it. So i went out the door and all of a sudden these alarms going i. I just thought it wasn't really related to me. I thought it might have been something else going on in the building so made my way at the door the exit down the stairs and everything and i saw these people finding out. What are the guys indicates that you went through the wrong door mortified that i'm not very good with introduce a wants to another into where it apart the cop. I couldn't find the entrance to the place. But i could see over fence so i literally climbed over the fence to get it and they were working late in. Your view should joe. I climbed the fence to get it. Like she's resourceful. She puts her nose to the grindstone. She gets it done. Have high heels on a pencil skirt and everything all relates that we have to hire her..

Eight nine pm two one both campo a week matt fire exit grindstone nine
"tesco" Discussed on Fancy Free Podcast

Fancy Free Podcast

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"tesco" Discussed on Fancy Free Podcast

"On miles away from pasadena. He must've absolutely rabid eventually. We got the petrol in. Then i had to say to my husband. I'm phoning in is about one in the morning this time going. He's can wear. I you and i'm a palm springs. Having seen the bloody joshua tree stock can't even see the sights so came back having not seen any of the sites. One of the really interesting when you drive to palm springs is the wind. Degenerated mills that giant the. Yeah you promise. Oh my gosh. I hate rental cars even in your own country where cars are somewhat familiar. Why aren't they standardize. I can't imagine trying to get gas in the middle of the night in a rental car. When you're not even driving on the side of the road. Oh my precious cargo in the back. And you're like you gotta wake up and go. We go by in the car all day. Gosh so cute okay. You have your interview form here that you were having a. Pmt moment in the middle of tesco's car park. I'm assuming pmt is what we call. Yeah pre-announcements retention oakland. Yes premenstrual tension like it. That's better than premenstrual syndrome. It just adds attention to it. Doesn't it keeps you in inkling of what's going on. I do you want this story. You might sure tap to little notice to people. Because i might use a couple of english ways. Sleaze do no i. I want everything that you'll give to me i can. I can give my listeners warning at the beginning. If i need this this will make all you females there. When you have your. Pms it will make you feel so much better when you do something to disgrace yourself. This is disgrace of old disgraces. Let you know. Now what happened. Was i woke up this day and i knew i was very. Pmt or pianist you know. I woke up in what i call a nasty mood. And i thought i don't want to take out in my husband and son. I know i should go and distract myself. I should go to the shops and do some shopping. So written molest got in the car on truth down the road and as i drove down the road there was another kind for to mean pulled up. Without indicating swerved. And i think he was dropping off passengers something but it was very bad because it could've gone into the back of him but anyway you know didn't let it bother me. I was thinking now. I know i'm go. I've got pmt at the moment. But i'm gonna try and rise above it so i drove off and driving down the road. I hit a roundabout and roundabout is sort of like. It's like a never ending junction. In the sense that you go round in the new drive off that makes sense. Yes so. I hit the roundabout coming off the roundabout i was going into tesco's and this guy was right behind me almost tailgating me same. Yep saint guide. Maybe i did indicate a little bit too late. I don't know what can i say. He's lucky you did it at all. Yes he's lucky. Especially after the example he gave you food anyway so it turned into tesco's and he hit the whole like beep so i just sort of kind of inclined my head and very not afflict vs flipped them. The bird is that yes. Yes yes you guys call it. Well i call it flick. The vs on dvd sign in other words. Sort of that kind of thing. Okay so i drove into test tesco's car park and always trying parkway you get trolleys because i think well i can often get into the car. And that's not usually at the hub of things Smart and i was just tootling along with my charlie ahead this car..

pasadena charlie english One test tesco flick one oakland tesco
Nielsen Invests in New TV Ratings Platform After Selling Unit

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Nielsen Invests in New TV Ratings Platform After Selling Unit

"Jim Tesco. Over the last few months, Nielsen has been working on a new TV ratings platform that it believes will improve the way it measures viewership. New platform dubbed Nielsen. One will combine ratings from both live live TV and streaming when it debuts next year. It's hoping the new system will become the US standard for ratings by late

Jim Tesco Nielsen United States
Crash Victim Had Posted Videos Riding in Tesla on Autopilot

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Crash Victim Had Posted Videos Riding in Tesla on Autopilot

"I'm Julie Walker the driver of a Tesla involved in a fatal crash that authorities say may have been on auto pilot posted numerous social media pictures and videos without his hands on the wheel or foot on the pedal Stephen Hendrickson was killed when his Tesla struck an overturned semi on a freeway in Fontana California on may fifth another man helping the truck driver was injured when the tests were also hit him California highway patrol is still investigating what driving mode the electric car was in Tesco's manual says autopilot and full self driving are not fully autonomous and drivers must pay attention and be ready to intervene at least three people have died in previous U. S. crashes involving autopilot twenty nine crashes are being investigated by federal officials I'm Julie Walker

Julie Walker Stephen Hendrickson Tesla Fontana California Highway Patrol California Tesco
Q1 Tesla Earnings Report and Shareholder Letter Analysis

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

02:12 min | 1 year ago

Q1 Tesla Earnings Report and Shareholder Letter Analysis

"Our here and today we're going to go through with tesco's earnings report. They just reported earnings. They did deliver a beat reading through all the numbers here and then a couple of takeaways from the call and then we'll also after this livestream head into the earnings call and will livestream that as well. I'll take notes so make sure to check that out the link for that will be in the show notes but let's get into the numbers here so starting off with top line here we can see tussles. Total sales came in at just over ten point. Three billion ten point three eight nine billion as a little bit ahead of analysts consensus a little bit ahead of my numbers but basically in the right ballpark. We did see kind of a mixed. Though in between the categories automotive sales came in about where we expected but a lot of that was driven by regulatory credits. So tesla actually new record for regulatory credit sales. Quarter almost half. A billion dollars of fifty. Four percent more than expected for six percent higher than last year Fifty nine percent higher than what i had expected with three hundred twenty five million so that means that my average selling prices my forecast there were a little bit high. And tesla made up the difference there with regulatory credit sales energy sales so just about half a billion dollars there in revenue little bit below where the street had forecasted twelve percent below Thirty percent below where i had forecasted but still quite a bit of an improvement over year over year up seventy percent so if we look down here we can see that the reason i'm zoom in a little bit here. The reason that that happened was because tess only Four hundred and forty five megawatt hours of energy storage versus We look at you for almost three times more than three times that amount. So tesla definitely saw drop there in terms of energy storage That is leading to that lower revenue in energy sales. They also lost quite a bit of money on energy. You can see negative twenty percent gross margin there. That's definitely the lowest that we've ever seen from tesla and continues the down trend that we've been seeing for the last four quarters so not a great sign there but as we've seen tesla did raise the price on solar roof there now knowing solar with power wall. So they're doing a lot of things here to improve their profitability here. But we just haven't seen that come to fruition quite yet so hopefully over the next couple of quarters. Tessa can get that figured out. Because i was about one hundred million dollar drag on prophet which is pretty significant when we look at tesla's overall profitability

Tesla Tesco Tessa
Thousands flee into Thailand following Myanmar air strikes

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 years ago

Thousands flee into Thailand following Myanmar air strikes

"The German government has condemned the use of violence by security forces in Myanmar calling for it to immediately renounce the use of force and release political prisoners and even securing football tights Tesco vitamins spokesman Steffen aside but says security force tactics unfortunately reached a new sign low at the weekend I think it is distressing to see the almost daily death toll including lots of children the escalating violence which took the lives of over one hundred people on Saturday this prompted the U. N. to accuse the Myanmar junta of committing mass murder and it to criticize the international community for not doing enough to stop it I'm Charles last month

German Government Myanmar Steffen Tesco Football U. Charles
Predictions of Email Marketing 2021

The Email Marketing Show

07:32 min | 2 years ago

Predictions of Email Marketing 2021

"What do we think is really going to be important in the coming year because even a marketing does change the priorities. The world's changes of course. What do you. What do you mean what's one of your big things that you're thinking. Twenty twenty one. The focus on what i think sending emails is probably going to be a really big thing. If we start sending emails rather than just thinking about us going to hell. No so i think one of the really big things that we talk about all of the time is engagement is is working on engagement of your email lists we all collectively trying to get away from this idea of emailing bombarding emails until they buy unsubscribe. Just build a massive mess and beat them over the head with emails. So that you. If you've got this one hundred thousand people three percent of them open your email. She might go. What still quite a lot of people. That's three thousand people might not everyday but actions. You know what that's really expense. It's hard to manage. It's not doing your marketing and good to instead. We need to focus on actually having really small list. The actively works in fact. I'm going to go as far as to say this. I recently had an email marketing platform. That was painful with rooms twenty thousand subscribers and one of my businesses and i was paying and the reason being it was like a negative price so i signed a ten years ago and so i had the place in ten years ago. Not the place today. And as a result of that. I was like clinging onto it can also be used that one day actually recently i just got rid of it and i said you know i'm not interested. I mean a different platform. Because i don't want to have a list of twenty thousand people necessarily anymore because you can do a lot more damage with a lot smaller list and be more profitable if you're willing to manage the engagement of those people into the woods. If you're willing to chop off the whole roster people who are not paying attention anymore and that's probably not gonna buy anything anymore. You can make the same amount of money. It's much smaller segment of your list. Actually if you ignore the vanity metrics of how big your walter of a-listers and instead focus on how much money you actually take thus a much better place to be right and we're talking about law you pay the bills. You can't grow a business you concrete freedom or achieve any of your goals with a big old list of of email subscribers i. It doesn't matter how big a list you wielding it. It really doesn't matter it's all. About what value are you getting from that list as a business right. Or if you're if you're if you're a non nonprofit for example who have a couple of of those guys listening. It's about the the number of people who who's having an impact on and if you're not getting any engagement not having an impact on them. Let's be honest right if people are not engaging and what would mean here is people are not actually opening in reading clicking replying to forwarding. Actually get involved in your emails just seeing your name and delete in a worse. It's not even open it. Don't even bother deleting it and your inbox engaging not literally serves. Nobody in terms of them themselves the person who subscribed they are in volley from your emails. Because they're not reading them. Say knock involved from you. Secondly you're not able to get any value from because you're not only meals that you can't make sales office to them and third and this is the most terrifying bought of at all is all of the people who do receive in from you that ability to receive from you is negatively impacted by the people who are not opening your emails you damaging reputation with the email platforms so some of the people who do want to receive m e mails from you. Who do see value in you who you can get volley from on seeing emails. So no one's even so. I think we need to have a massive focus on engagement. Now will comes down to making sure that every single email you send you ask directly for some kind of engagement. Whether it's click a link reply this thing go check this out forwarded whatever. It's going to be just to make sure that you're getting engage with the museum. So this is definitely as the as the spam world tightens up even further because everything on the internet. Don't you know so renita. Remember that all these algorithms gonna get smarter. So engagement is going to be massive for me. I think the next thing is going to be about giving people a reason to actually open your emails. What i mean by that is if all you email and look people are guilty of this. I know we can look back at my my older my previous self and see that. I used to only email people when i had a new offer. Hey here's a new. Or i was leading up to an offer giving some value in advance of framing the offer. Lots of people only email. Hey here's the next thing. I've got the next part service. The next thing the problem with that is if i receive an email if you receive an email right now from somebody and you know the only thing they email you about is other products the only reason to ever open the email is to see what they've got on sale right now or to see if if a discount on the thing you'd be careful but if you're not in zone now if you're not in a place while you're looking to buy something from the category of stuff that person sells then you've got no reason to all to open that person's emails whereas to actually give people a reason to open their emails which is not there might be a discount code or they might be a thing they want to buy. If it's actually there is value in the email themselves that they can they can enjoy that volume in get value fraum. Then there's a reason to open that email regardless of whether anita have my credit card honda not right absolutely. I think i really wanted to allow businesses idea that at the minute we think of emails is being a bit like a lot of people know a lot of people think of email is being a bit like knowing somebody comes around the doors and puts a catalog three blocks. You only look up by. If you're interested in the idea of all the i might wanna buy some new took boxes or something like a new dust or i might wanna see what gadget economic my kitchen and never used for the rest of us like the rest of the time just threw away. Just don't use it. don't even look at it emails. Become thing the to even even the big supermarkets have realized this is the case in the uk. If you go to marks and spencers right at overhaul of christmas look christmas right. They had all of that stuff inside on the lead up to christmas of. Here's the beautiful turkey you can get. And he has all this stuff but what they switched on the fact that people won't read them if there's no value enough it's a free magazine is a free calog. So what do they do. They put in beautiful turkey recipes. That had -ality the do at tesco that do it everywhere. They give you great recipes. Here's some great christmas soups and all this stuff. So there's a reason pick catalog up. Because the reason we still got two or three of them lying around in the kitchen even now because we know that some great recipes nuts and nothing so that's value in the off they are catalogs which are selling products directly. So we've gone gauge. When we think value is the second one interesting in that example you just gave just about that. O obviously the articles and the stuff that you're getting recipes is stuff that you can do with the stock you're gonna go and buy from that shop so like it's not like defeating the purpose it's not like here's the perfect ten list to go camping next week when you doing anything related accompanying it's mitchely a lotta stuff that is valuable in its own right. But it's congress when he makes sense that you're gonna be able to get results from the study you can then go and blocks from that shop and by the way kennedy. I have to say about jerry makes a lot more sense now. Marks and spencer.

Renita Anita Honda Tesco UK Congress Kennedy Jerry Marks Spencer
"tesco" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

07:38 min | 2 years ago

"tesco" Discussed on WTVN

"Watch people okay from Tesco, which is I think it's just a straight up like supermarket in Britain. I saw that, actually. Yeah, You're right. And there is a Luisa Dough, which normally goes for about £15 was selling on sale for £5. That's good deal. But one of the guys who purchased it contacted some people who are in the wine and said, I think this is funny because the label looks like it's a photocopy. So somebody was doing knockoff Luisa dough, which normally goes for not that much and sold it to Tesco, who was in turn selling it, and this is a huge thing, and there's a big Debate even still on just how widespread Wine fraud is it's really difficult to get to the bottom of because there's so many people who have their fingers in this fraudulent pot, whether wittingly or unwittingly, And either way, are unwilling to admit that it's his extensive as it is, or the people who are burned, are making a bigger deal out of it than they are the right It really is because they have the money in the context to get CBS to do a story on how they got burned by buying some fake wine, So it's not entirely clear how widespread it is. But There have been some really great Very famous. Almost proven stories of outright wine fraud, but it's a pretty new phenomenon well. If you think ancient Rome is pretty new, let's hear it, man. Well, that's I mean, ever since there was wine, people were making fake wine or trumping it up. It's something other than it was so the newer practice Like you can divide it into two things that was in ancient Rome. They were doing stuff like this and adding, like lead to wind to sweeten it while they were killing people. But then there's the new practice of like. Hey, This is a Thomas Jefferson bottle of wine, and you confided to Christie's auction for $100,000. And it's really not that at all. Do you remember back in the eighties? I think where you're needy was adding like Windshield wiper fluid or something. Yeah, I'm always at the very least in urban legend. More recently, there was something added to want to make it sweeter. That was really bad for you, but I don't know. I can't confirm if it was that case or not. This is specifically re you needy in the eighties and again. It could have just been in our religion because at the same time that there was fighters, eggs and bubble yum, Uh sure, you know? Yeah, There was a lot of like. Consumer A panic. I think it was the Golden age for urban legends, agreed. On. You know what we need to do? One on wine period? Yes, thistles. So us. Yeah, we'll do episodes on everything but the actual thing, And then we'll finally get to the thing on. We could also probably do a completely separate podcast on Wine tasting because Him. That's a really Bitter pill because there are some people who say there really is no difference in these wines, and there have been numerous occasions over the years where jerks have set up wine tasters to fail. Bye. Just switching out wines and saying, This is a really nice bottle. What's really crappy and they say, Well, this is lovely. The tannins are really coming in. It's Jamie and full and like you're drinking two Buck Chuck. People love this stuff That is a big bone of contention with wine drinkers and also people who like to poo poo that right on, say, it's all subjective and you're all just snooping either really is no difference. But there really is a different well. Okay, so there is a Like you say there's a big debate over that, right? Yeah, um But if you if you dive into the world of high and vintage wine collecting, yes, it is very It's like an aura. Boris right? That snake that eats its own tail, right? In that the people who are In charge of judging whether something's real or not, are basing that on their previous experiences, which may or may not have been an experience with the fraudulent wine. So even if you can tell the difference if you've only been exposed to say fraudulent 18th century wine Then, when you are asked to judge a bottle of like 18th century wine, you're gonna compare it to that. And if it's ultimately coming from the same counterfeiter, you will be like, yes, This is the real thing because I've had that before, and it tastes like that. Yeah, And here's the other thing is there There is a vintage, uh, appropriately aged wine that is tastes great. Because it is aged in such a way. And then there are these super old bottles that apparently tastes like canned asparagus eyes. The note that it brings out and these don't even taste that good. It's just the fact that you can own it and show people you don't even drink it In Most cases, yes, but you don't drink it. Jefferson wine? No, you have in your collection. So you say you look at my collection. Exactly. That's the whole point. A lot of people for a lot of people. That's the whole point. It's just Onus bottles like owning a piece of Thomas Jefferson. You get to show off and tell people how great you are right. Exactly. So that's how a lot of wine counterfeiting has gotten away with because the people are never going to open the line. Exactly. So whatever tampering you did with the seal is never gonna be discovered. They're never going to taste the wine inside so it could be Two Buck Chuck or whatever won't see the cork. Yeah, and they're just they're just happy to have this thing and their status to the elevated to the point where they don't really want to know if it's a counterfeit. So long as they can walk around and tell people right? This is Thomas Jefferson. Right. Well, we should go ahead and start talking about Bill Coke. He is one of the other brothers. Hey, is not Charles or David joke of the famous Uh, Republican Cook Brother Fame. Billionaire supporters of the Republican Party. Yeah. Yeah, sure, actually saying that's like the nicest way that Yeah, right. There really is. It is Hey, is the brother one of the brothers who got out along with another brother? Um, not another brother from another mother. No, they have the same mother, right? Okay. Yeah. He got out of the family business and said, You know what? I'm a billionaire. I'm gonna what I'm gonna do is gonna start collecting really rare and expensive things. One thing he has is a gun collection. He owns Custer's rifle, Billy the kid's pistol. Does he? Yeah. He owns the gun that killed Jesse James. Oh, I'm sorry. Is Jesse James pistol and that gun? And what was his name? Robert Ford. Yeah, And it's a good movie boy. Was it really good? Beautifully shot as well. Yeah, wider rifle. Doc Holliday's rifle hymns, Lot of vintage guns. He has a lot of very famous works of art. Like original Picassos and money's right. It's hard enough exactly. You sound like a big sucker to me any also owns, uh Is this article says several 100 bottles of what he calls Moves piss. Yeah, that's what he calls it, he said he well, he's saying that for all he knows, that's what's inside. He got duped. Very famously, many, many times. Yeah, and he has had many, many lawsuits over the years that have come out. This guy loves suing.

Thomas Jefferson Luisa Dough Tesco fraud Rome Jesse James Doc Holliday Britain Republican Party CBS Picassos Jamie Boris Christie Bill Coke Robert Ford Custer Charles David joke
Governor puts Oregon National Guard on standby to assist with Election Day issues

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:27 sec | 2 years ago

Governor puts Oregon National Guard on standby to assist with Election Day issues

"The country of racing Or the possibility of violent protests and demonstrations. Organs. Governor Kate Brown has the National guard standing by want to be very, very clear that voter intimidation And political violence will not be tolerated. The city of Portland has seen continuous demonstration since the killing of George Floyd in May. And it's presumed that Portland's streets will again be the scene of some kind of clash Tesco and is a senior reporter

Kate Brown National Guard George Floyd Portland Tesco
UK says EU trade talks 'over' but bloc sees room for a deal

The Leader

04:19 min | 2 years ago

UK says EU trade talks 'over' but bloc sees room for a deal

"Boris Johnson has dramatically told Britain to prepare for the new deal brexit after a bust up with Brussels on trade talks the minister put the country on notice that it's e you departure at the end of the transition period. On December, thirty first could be without a trade deal with the European bloc that could leave businesses facing tariffs and quotas to trade with European bloc and transport delays could see some food shortages. Deputy political editor Nicholas says spoke to the Evening Standard's Bonnie Christian. Nick, what happened today and we're we're expecting it. This was a bit of a surprise. This announcement by Boyce Johnson appear that the EU and the government were coming to an arrangement to continue talks next week on a trade deal. But there seems to be a difference in stance taken by the EU leaders and the European Commission. The EU leaders probably Egged on by Emmanuel macron. Stiffen the stance or the European bloc and particularly over the row over fishing. This led to a response for Mr Johnson threatening to walk away from the talks. Why has this decision been made completely out of the blue? Boys. Johnson had set a deadline of October, the fifteenth for a breakthrough. In, the negotiations in order for them to continue this has not happened basically. Going to be some woods agreed for them to continue of them pull the whole house of cards down now. One with the British demands was an intensification of talks. This had been proposed and flashed around Brussels. But when the summit conclusions came out, there was no mention of that. The government in Britain responded by saying that we were going to start prepare now for a no deal. So does this main? A deal is completely off the table? No. It doesn't mean that could mean that. But what happened Lychee now after Bush Johnson has made a statement is that the European Commission President Sheila Underlay? tweeted that a team from Brussels would be heading to London to intensify the talks. This was a key British demand. So it looks like there's been a political spat between the leaders at political level. But now that the Are, trying to keep the show on the road if we are to leave without a deal what are the big knock on effects of that, we could see here in the UK economically, they could potentially be catastrophic. You'll certainly talking about businesses, facing tariffs and also quotas. That could also be food shortages. Some shorter particular fresh food shortages in the UK I for weeks even before the threat of a no deal ruptured lunchtime the boss of TESCO's was saying that they could be some future tages. If there literally is no deal. Then obviously, the likelihood of those would increase dramatically shortly optimistic Johnson spoke that the pound fell against the euro, which is a sign of concerns. The next step is really the me t next week to see whether they eat negotiators and the okay Shakespeare's could make a break food. The meeting may not happen, but it looks like it will happen and is imposed. Sides interest to strike a deal both will play hard ball and often agreements are really only reach five minutes to midnight when both parties are staring into the abyss and the they know that unless a deal now things can get very very messy. These talks have been stalled for months. Now with a the side, not really bunching at all is there any sense of what the outcome could be? Is Too hard to tell given. The economic damage in Odio could calls and Boris Johnson will be fully aware of this and Michael is you would expect a deal to be reached but e you leaders they got the stronger hand and so we'll trying really go for the best possible for them. and. That will put pressure and strain on the British government because they really don't want to make many more concessions especially with so many hard line brexit is in the Tory party.

Boris Johnson Brussels EU European Commission Britain UK Political Editor Nick British Government Bonnie Christian Emmanuel Macron Tory Party Nicholas Tesco Odio Sheila Underlay London Shakespeare
Seattle Genetics takes a new identity

News, Traffic and Weather

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

Seattle Genetics takes a new identity

"Here's Jim Tesco, the region's biggest biotechnology company, has a new name Seattle Genetics, which is actually in bottle announced via regulatory filing the other day that it has changed its name to see Jen. A biotech company, which has about 600 employees says it decided on the name change because it has begun to expand its presence beyond the Pacific Northwest.

Jim Tesco Pacific Northwest JEN Seattle
Tesla stock rally accelerates

Squawk Pod

02:44 min | 2 years ago

Tesla stock rally accelerates

"Tessa says on the move this morning at pairing gains up to the company Equity Distribution Agreement to sell up to five billion dollars of sheds. Joins us with more on that Phil Not enough to put it into negative territory though this morning pre market. No. Because I think when you look at this Agreem- in, what did Tesla has essentially done is it has formed an agreement with a series of bank and I haven't counted how many exactly I think there are seven or eight where from time to time at Tesla's direction, they will sell test shares to raise up to potentially overtime five billion dollars. Now, we don't know exactly what the schedule is going to be how frequently these sexless stock sales will take place the money is going to. Be, used according to the eight K. that they announced this with to sure up the balance sheet and provide a liquidity for the company which raises the question. HOW IS TESLA'S LIQUIDITY? It ended the second quarter with about five billion dollars in liquidity. But remember they've got some strong capital commitments that are coming. They're still building the gigafactory outside of Berlin they've made the commitment to build a gigafactory outside of Austin Texas they're constantly investing in the GIGAFACTORY which is expanding and adding more battery production outside of Reno Nevada. So I think when you look at this TESCO investors will look at this and they'll say look. We don't know exactly what they're going to be using this money for in the future but we do realize that they're going to have these big capital commitments and so now they have said with this series of banks look from time to time we will ask you to take advantage of the market and sell our shares at our direction and Phil we was saying. It's a sign of. The progress of this company that they can re raise five billion. So easily, it's a percent or so just just over a percentage of the market cap today the shares on even flinching and eighteen months ago, two years ago. This would have been nylon impossible correct and remember the reaction that we've seen over the last couple of years whenever Tesla has raised capital, it's been more muted with each capital raise there was. A big reaction. I remember to a capital rate what are they? Two or three years ago and the big question is oh. My goodness what are they doing? Is this an indication that these guys will never be able to make money for just always going to be spending money we have seen less and less of a reaction from the market with each subsequent capital raise or an indication that they will be selling shares. And the share price gains again, not just to mention the eighteen percent since August eleventh announcement of the stocks yesterday up double digit percents off the first of the stock split Phillips thanks much

Tesla Phil Tessa Tesco Reno Nevada Phillips Texas Austin Berlin
CALM, The Campaign Against Living Miserably

Mentally Yours

04:42 min | 2 years ago

CALM, The Campaign Against Living Miserably

"Simon welcomes mentally ill thanks very much for joining me. So, can we start off just with the basics tell us about com what exactly does it do? com is the campaign against living miserably, which is an excellent name and adds up to com. Ca Yellen we are we're suicide prevention, organization So our I guess chosen Lens on the world is suicide. an and that's to us as a barometer of how well society is doing and. How it needs to be fixed. In two thousand, eighteen, nineteen, the office of National Statistics numbers showed the suicide in the UK by eleven, percents, and that's off to a steady plateauing of numbers. So we can see there's something. Happening across society in the UK The needs to be addressed that now that of course, he's pretty coded pre lockdown pre economic impact or those kinds of things. So the way way tackle suicide. Is. Three one as we campaign for Societal and personal change. So we with big. Brands. The everybody will know like. TV and Dave and spotify and talk shop top man TESCO and. They just the list goes on and on positive messages people to enable them to change behaviors, which they preach may be damaging to seek help to help people around them epitomised thing by a recent partnership that we launched with Carling. Calling of the L. Become Caring and. Working there to help people. Coffee a macaw themselves also campaigning that we do is to societal change result. Of thing, we did projects four in two, thousand, eighteen, two years ago. With it in this morning we. Were responsible for the appointment of the first of A. Mischief assault prevention. So that's campaigning The second leg on stole if you like is cooled collective, which is where we bring people together will though virtually now around shed passion points. Running and And football and those kind of things when we allow people to join groups through the complexes the final on. The most. Tangible output of where we where we raise money and what we spend it on his help line, which is open from five till midnight seven days a week for anyone that needs it whatever agenda whatever you need when non-judgmental and hotline staffed by Professionals by people who are paid to work on the outline and their that to give advice to help people whether you're at your wit's end and suicide is is becoming an option will help you with a You might be feeling just a little bit. Wait it out by what's going on right now I now I am on most people with to help you any with anything that you need. You might be feeling fine worried about somebody else without help Yugoslavia all no matter what com is there to help. You have a happy life and to try to Change Society for the better. I'm what about you? Personally, when did you get involved in? Why did you want to get involved with this charity in particular? Up I've never worked for charity or been involved in mental health tool I. Wilson Television in the business and then lastly, in appetizing don't judge me but I I was literally run up by the Chairman James skulks to say why you why senior life will advising advertising agencies on stuff coming through something worthwhile for four months and of site. That's three and a half years in is fantastic. It's calm. I. Think he's attractive to so many people because we don't behave like a charity. Now, that is any way to denigrate chows as a child. She's fantastic. Brilliant things Supplement stuff that arguably government should be doing but did have have real profound pup calm is a charity but we behave and communicates in ways which may be more like a a modern brand. So we communicate through music and comedy and football, and running and cycling, and or those kind of things which we tap into popular culture So we've seen huge growth in the last three years most notably in the use of helpline, which is which is more than double. So it's a brilliant privileged to be able to run the thing.

UK Football Simon Change Society Tesco Carling Assault Spotify Chairman Yugoslavia Dave James Skulks
Gary Bernhardt - TypeScript and Testing

Full Stack Radio

06:11 min | 2 years ago

Gary Bernhardt - TypeScript and Testing

"Thing that you said about the test, we verifying the behavior system is totally true if you number one have well, if you have perfect coverage to the system. And that doesn't mean just line wise coverage because executing every line isn't sufficient. It doesn't mean even path coverage path coverage means like let's say you have a function with two with a conditional with two sides and an els, and then after that on related to the second conditional with two sides, you have four paths to that function because you can take either side of the first conditional on either side of the second. So. Even covering all the paths isn't sufficient because the data might vary in weird ways that 'cause you might, for example, you never thought to test for when some arrays empty and you're indexing until you're getting an undefined out your test never tested that. So the thing about. Let's throw away the integer versus strength and just think about like you have a function that takes a supposedly takes a string. and. You didn't think about what happens if it's undefined. Well, maybe you never pass undefined that function, but maybe you pass something that was indexed out of an array to a, and if that array was emptier, didn't contain that index, you're going to get an undefined and this is like at least in dynamic languages. This is one of the most common and annoying sources of bugs is whatever kind of knowles your language has and they show up. Yeah Yeah. Exactly. And these languages tend to have very lax with with somewhat an exception of Python. They have very lax handling of knowles. So like indexing ray with an unexpected index gives you all in undefined, her nail or whatever. It's called same thing with Hashes objects. So. One of the big benefits of a static type system. As you can say, this function takes a string and under no conditions will allow you to pass an undefined into their. except. Took mentioned, the type script was designed under severe constraints. Actually, type script does have this problem because of the type of indexing array is the type of the array. It is not union with undefined. So. This is not the greatest example, but there are lots of sort of other situations like this objects are a better example. Cause type stripped will prevent you from. Accessing a property that doesn't exist on an object and getting an unexpected undefined, and then passing that down into a function that never expected the undefined, all of that kind of weird. Stuff. This kind of weird bugs that can only occur due to run time. Data. A lot of them go away, not all of them and you know the language determines how many if you're programming Idris like really, you get pretty close to all them going away if you programming in type script like. It probably gets you eighty percent of the way towards preventing those kinds of things. But. This stuff comes up constantly with. A. So that was all. That's all of that was supposing perfect test coverage. You still have these problems that are based on run time data. They're not based on the structure of the code you wrote, would that mean that you don't actually have perfect test coverage though like that is the implication. So. I. Don't want to write I, don't want to one. Hundred Percent Path Coverage, I? Don't even want achieve one hundred percent line coverage. So an execute programs code base. The ratio of test code to should've written the actual number down, but it's something like maybe four to one production code test code is. That is that feels like a lot more production code to TESCO than what I remember seeing like the destroyer software screen casts and stuff. Like Ruby and rails stuff. Yeah, and it's a lot. It's a lot more production to test than in the destroy all software code base as well because in Ruby and like I have to. Constantly. Protect myself from from mistakes. and. With type script and play. I can strategically test. Things at just the right place. So like EXCO program has this core bit of code that handles year kind of progression through a course and the lessons and so on. That's really critical and quite complex code. All of that is like just paranoid testing around because if any of that ever goes wrong, it's going to get baked into the database and it's you know it's GonNa be there forever. But for example, our reactor components. Strictly speaking we have zero tests around the entire react. And that's there are a few points that are actually tested, but they're kind of factored out like reducer, kind of stuff like the actual. Component testing. But just like there's some areas of logic that I'd extract, it emerged test for because it was easier to write the code if I had tests while I was writing it sorta thing. Yep, exactly. and that's not to say that the front is never tested because we have some Cyprus tests drive a browser so. Are, tests actually step through every single lesson in the system just to make sure that nothing blows up, but that's more of a just a giant smoke test. So. And it requires no incremental work when I write new content or new components, just kind of works for free. So. By, having type script in place, not having to worry about all the wiring of components I can focus on. Very, complex tight fine grain tests for the core logic. Of the system and I can have this nice high level test runs through and make sure nothing is totally broken, but I don't have to write a whole lot of just really boring like this component. When it this, it renders you know with this class or whatever I. Don't do any of that stuff and. I. Think it's worked really well, I have no regrets about about switching type script for that purpose because the overhead is quite small when programming but the test over the saved as massive, I mean, we're talking about. I wrote a blog post with numbers in it, but I think it was something like the system would be two point, five times as many lines of code. If I had done standard, what was it two to one test to code ratio?

Exco Tesco Cyprus
Showing off our personal bars - Personal projects

Front End Happy Hour

09:21 min | 3 years ago

Showing off our personal bars - Personal projects

"Welcome to episode one hundred and one of the front unhappy our podcast. It's actually been along milestone tat. Hit episode one hundred. Do you think we will maybe hit the milestone of two hundred at point only if the government bails us out jemmy needs some of that sweet sweet cash out small business bailout money. Yeah but definitely. It's kind of exciting to be released though episode. One hundred ten for this episode. We all focus a lot of our time on engineering work for large companies. But we've always you know there's always been side projects or things that we've worked on throughout our careers and so we thought it'd be in this episode to be really cool to share some details about some of our side projects that we've done in the past before we get started. Let's go around and give introductions of today's panelists Augusta's you want to start off. Sure maims Augusta's software engineer at twitch. Jim Young Senior software engineer at net flicks. And I am Ryan Burgess. I'm a software engineering manager at net flicks. So only the three of us today. So we'll be fine art in each episode the Front End Happier podcast. We love to choose a keyword that if it's mentioned all in the podcast we will all take a drink. What did we decide? Today's keyword is personal personal. Awesome all right so if we say the word personal which I'm sure we will. We will all take a drink to start off. I'm really interested and curious to hear each of your side projects that you've done in the past. I'm sure there's been a few and I'd love to hear some of the things that you've done and I can say. This topic came up with from our previous episode. We did a twitch livestream one of our listeners asked. Hey y'all talk about corporate programming all the time because the corporations do you ever do personal side projects anymore. And here's like jeers took a topic Let's see done a few in the past or if done many in the past obviously Yeah One Shoghi engineer who is pretty senior and like who's never done a side project like it just doesn't happen like I think to get where you are up to some sort of work on the side. It's just the nature of being is offering engineer. I feel like that's how I learned like that's really how I truly learned. It was constantly China. Solve some sort of a problem that I was really excited to do and build and and I felt like I learned a lot by doing that. You can read and learn but I feel like actually applying it. is where I excelled to learn. Really quickly yeah. I agree I find that when you work in just for your job. You're so focused on the problem and just maybe shipping. Like how do you ship it out to users? But the nicely. Cy Projects is he can really focus more on the learning aspect of. Oh this is what I ideally want to build and even if it's even if it doesn't solve anything it's like exciting. Maybe you might choose a random new technology like oh I WANNA learn view this time where something. It's just really nice. You've a lot more freedom and also you can cut corners it. Does you're like whatever it's my project. I'm going to do what I want. Great Test if you want. Combine your coat if you want. You should always comment your code. I've heard him say that. I do MICO because looking at my repo from years ago and my projects. I'm glad my code because I have no idea what I was doing at the time and the comments. I'm like okay. I can make a quick change here if I need to because I commented my code so I'm guilty. I gotTA say on my side projects. I HAVE NOT APPLIED. The Best Practices sometimes and it has that commenting is seriously. It is bit me in the ass a few times. 'cause YOU'RE RIGHT MIGHT. WanNa make a change to something and you're like I'll just quickly go do that. But when you haven't made those comments it becomes really difficult then. It becomes a bigger tour to try and make that change. So I'm with you gem. I should take that advice more often. I'll say this that it's controversial for those listening in the car. At home I would comment my code before I wrote tests. If you're asking me like which one is more valuable for personal projects commenting code like I? Almost I almost never test for my personal projects like I. I don't care I know it's bad practice Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah but that there's stakes so unless is doing something for money but that point it'd be more of a side hustle. Not a personal project cheers cheers. It's funny I feel like a lot of people are really obsessed with test driven development or really. Let's run the tests upfront first. And then you have one hundred percent code coverage or all these things but especially for side projects you know. Just just build what you want to build the damping get me started on the like one hundred percent TESCO. Yeah it's like I don't believe that I mean I don't think you can do it no I don't. I don't think the schools Aaron I don't think there's one hundred percent test coverage like if that's the case then you never have bugs and if that's the case I don't know there's no there's no case for us. No bugs like it doesn't happen before begins. I like the projects we've been working on. I'll say like a failure that I see and I think what discourages a lot of new people is feel like. Oh I wanNA build something. I want to build a quick game website on my own. You ask vice on twitter people like well what you need is react starter kit. You need that you need every was bad. You need Apache. You like your own server. You need like a million things to get started. I'm like no start with an html page at a script tag and like see where you go if you need that sort of thing cool but if you look at most of the work that I've done in the past arise I projects thereby minimum minimum. Like maybe node almost never framework it just like hassle. And if I'm doing that I'm not learning anything it's different if you're trying to react or view or angular something like that but I really think side projects for exploration just like free form like art as you can make it and if you get too hung up on like the precision tests in like the right framework and all these things then you're kind of doing yourself a disservice using the frameworks grader. Using node or some other language that you're like I'm just kinda curious about learning or this will do the job really well absolutely but I used that people get hung up too much on getting all the things like I gotTa make sure web pack is configured of gotTa make sure that all these different tasks are happening. Do your point. I'm like maybe just writing some vanilla javascript in a script tag might actually do. Do just what you need for that project. I think another one that I always hear too is especially when people are trying to learn something. It's like well what can I create? That's already been created. I'm always like go create another facebook. I honestly you'll learn lots like if that's something that you want to do is create another social network or game or something like that. That's a great way to learn as recreating something From scratch yeah plus one thousand two that I felt like I had that kind of same mentality. Where as they own. This sounds like a good idea. That's already done like I guess the world doesn't need it and it's like don't don't think of everything you want to build as something that needs to solve a problem that everyone has barely. I mean those are good problems to solve. I guess just do it. Even for learning for your own sake is like a really beneficial side project. I was like doing projects or something that will make my life better in like or easier like some when I think of building like tool or command line tools script plug in library. Something that I'm creating like. Hey this help me. And just the smallest slightest way to be more productive or just shave off some time. Whatever it is if I throw it up on get hub in like one or two people find it useful. Great if not who cares. It made my life easier. And that's all that matters and and it was cool to create like that's kind of the way I look at it yet. I want to hear the past projects that you've all worked on. I think I know of two that worked on but it's embarrassing as not that big but I I guess I'm proud of the proud of proud of them enough. I would pin them on my of with zero stars or but So one project I worked on was it's called co Co Nami. Commando it's on MPM and literally all it is is. There's this thing called the code and I forgot what game did it. But there's a lot of games they have this secret code. This contrast I'll cut. Yeah so yeah. So there's this codes like up up down down left right left right B. A or something and I saw a lot of game stewart. I thought it'd be cool if it'd be like there's just this cool mpm package they could just install onto your website and then you could just have this very convenient handler that said when this chain of commands was was done then it would just do something as I just published it Npr One day so so the added. It's awesome yeah I love it. Yeah the this was like when I was like super new to MPM in general is like Oh wow. There's a whole package manager and so I just thought it'd be cool thing to do

Augusta Software Engineer Engineer Cy Projects Ryan Burgess Jim Young Engineering Manager Co Co Nami Twitter China Facebook Tesco Aaron
Procter & Gamble Posts Biggest U.S. Sales Gain in Decades

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:22 sec | 3 years ago

Procter & Gamble Posts Biggest U.S. Sales Gain in Decades

"Tesco consumer products giant Procter and gamble reported its biggest U. S. sales increase in decades as we stock up on household mainstays from laundry detergent to cough medicine increased the and in the U. S. more than offset steep declines in China P. and G. is the first maker of household staples to report financial results for the start of twenty twenty its shares are marginally higher

Procter Tesco China
New policies enacted in Britain over panic shopping

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 3 years ago

New policies enacted in Britain over panic shopping

"I think buying around Britain in reaction to the spread of the coronavirus has left supermarket shelves around the country and T. prompting pretty supermarket chains to bring in measures to limit customer's stockpiling produce limitations have been in place to allow elderly and vulnerable people to be able to get the products they need Tesco Britain's largest supermarket chain is limiting customers to three items each across its entire product range and Sainsbury's was out the past hour of trading and its tools the elderly and vulnerable customers Karen Thomas London

Britain Tesco Britain Sainsbury Karen Thomas London
Ruminating on Food

The Sustainable Futures Report

07:28 min | 3 years ago

Ruminating on Food

"We start with an interview. Anthony Davis now guest today on the sustainable futures report you'll the CEO of big bomb which is a not for profit organization which is being trading for some twenty years. As I understand that your role is to encourage healthy eating and sustainable agriculture correct. So how do you do that? Well we when I first set up. I'm a fifth generation farmer and set up the side. Because we were growing onions in Norfolk at them. Every time we went to sell them we could get about one hundred pounds a tonne and two days later. We'd see the onions on the TESCO shelved for about eight hundred pounds a tonne Food supply chain has is giving as Dale and consumes about Dale because If anyone turned out femme Australians we'd be happy to sell them off the process signet so the big bomb is all about reconnecting. People buy that through came from at helping to sell directing consumers by right and we're hoping that process that people would find us about three day on eight health late because they buy fresh local food. You've been doing quantitative what with schools leave. That's right we say that To change people to cooking and buying food we really need to act on the influences and we say the main influences as children because if you can get children eighteen lane that parents wanting healthy fade away. It'll encourage parents to eat better food as well. So what you're doing with the children in the schools well we ran a project in Leicester where we went in every week to help the kid. Some grow seats In plant pulse and that we built some raise bets implanted fruit trees and these children lentil about growing food and when it was ready they were really enthused to taste it and Actually Cook with it and we had this added incentives that they could then take. Will they'd grown to the local shop and the local shop and sell it for them and says cool crop for the shop and it was really brilliant way of introducing children about food and growing only plans to roll it out further into other schools across the country. We absolutely love to because We Got Twenty six thousand schools in this country and we found out that fourteen thousand of them will go to veg. Patch and a m Or Garden as would actually quite easy the mold getting both but unfortunately it's not on the curriculum and at the end of the year with the School Esta. We went to the teacher. Teaching nights as the VEGGIE PATCH. We managed to get a lot of them. Academic Subjects Fetch. So are you going to do it? And she said On anything what's on the creation and unfortunately waving running petition for a long time about getting school food growing grant and cookie on the curriculum and The the government with allstate only measure scope foments on a level massive English and. That's a big mistake. So we all lobbying and we'd love to do more but we're restricted by government mind. That's a dead end for the moment. Unfortunately them while there is a new food and farming policy coming out at the moment and being worked on and we hope that with the evidence week with another number of other organizations that it will change and the government will say the opportunity. Because if you can if you can change able to eat healthy food I think at the moment. Twenty percent of energy as spend is on food related disease so we can get paid eighteen healthy food and if we get infants at school eating healthy food we could see some massive savings Indiana chess. I just told me that again. Twenty percent direction of. Nhs expenditure is on food related disease. Yeah and I think ten percent diabetes and the rest is Be St in Hop. Z's and Allah food related problems. So Yeah Yeah. That's a lot can be done. And I think the time is ripe with Brexit and with people about mole and with the The massive amounts of food aid programs on TV like Brexit. To this will start thinking about whether food comes from and We have kind of news of out sanctions and import duties on some products. Hopefully things like Kim American. None cheap food chlorinated chicken and processed pool come from low animal welfare factories in America said that they will be on. The tariffs kept type thing. Yeah okay Ob some GT but Mr Trump doesn't want much self-aware going to have to look into domestic food production. We're GONNA have to and hopefully when people see this. Trait will happening with cheat American food. They'll stop thinking about will feed they should buy and when they to seek market. They'll think about whether three comes from clear. Labelling which will be really good at. But the I need Kinda Is someone who is produced locally. And he's a he's reputations in state which is where all Lakewood food map comes in. Not Yes I was gonNA come onto that single food map. Tell us about not because it seems to be a cover the whole country. I looked at my lug layer. Your canoe got five or six produces listed so tell me more about it well. It's constantly evolving constantly. Updating map that Tim at eight and a half thousand local food outlets on it and every outlet has a username password to add pictures video description and even build themselves online shop if they want to do now is we share all matt with many websites we can so we'd love Yorkshire Websites to have on that and actually be adding to it and the idea. Is that when you have it? Looks like it's you'll 's and the mole websites have the map the mold as who will not benefit because they can update page updates. Don't allow the websites so I'm to help that process we becoming am a co-op community benefit society. We're sending a message that everyone can deposits and if its success. We share in the SUCCESS FOR ALL RANDOM. A lot of these companies that Backed by venture capitalists Orem investors. Who saw cancel the money?

Brexit Dale Anthony Davis CEO Norfolk Allstate Indiana NHS Leicester Yorkshire Websites School Esta M Or Garden Mr Trump America Kim American
IBM's Ginni Rometty retiring after nearly 40 years at tech giant

News, Traffic and Weather

00:15 sec | 3 years ago

IBM's Ginni Rometty retiring after nearly 40 years at tech giant

"IBM is getting a new chief executive the technology giant made Arvind Krishna as its new CEO effective April sixth three placing a Ginni Rometty who will continue as executive chairman of the board through the end of the year that's your money now I'm Jim Tesco

IBM Chief Executive Arvind Krishna CEO Ginni Rometty Executive Chairman Jim Tesco