32 Burst results for "Terry gross"

Novelist Donald Ray Pollock On Factory Work And Finding Fiction Later In Life

Fresh Air

20:21 min | Last month

Novelist Donald Ray Pollock On Factory Work And Finding Fiction Later In Life

"Today's first guest is author Donald Ray Pollock, whose novel the devil all the time has just been made into a new netflix movie premiering next Wednesday. It Stars Tom Holland and Robert Pattinson, and here's a taste in this clip. A young boy has just watched his father pulverized two guys after they made lewd comments about the father's wife, the son's mother. Afterward the father gives his son some advice. You remember what I told you. On. The buzzer gave you. That's what I mean. got. To. Sir. Good sons of bitches out there. One hundred. These that many. Cannonball. In, both the movie and the novel the characters in the devil all the time are driven to extremes whether their fathers and sons, serial killers or preachers. The story begins in the small town of knock him stiff a real place in southern Ohio where Donald Ray pollock grew up. He didn't become a writer until he put in over thirty years at the local paper mill and got sober. But. Once he did start writing. He was noticed quickly receiving both awards and critical. Acclaim. Terry, gross spoke to Donald Ray pollock in twenty eleven when the devil, all the time was first published. Donald, Ray pollock welcome to fresh air. I'd like to start with reading from your new book, the Devil, all the time It's about the second paragraph from the prologue. So would you just set it up for us? What we have here is A young boy's name is Arvin Eugene Russell and he's following behind his father Willard and there and place called knock him stiff and they're going to Willard's prayer logging as a log in the woods where he Wants to communicate with God and So this is where they are. You know early in the morning and their. have finally reached this log. Willard eased himself down on the high side of the law and motion for his son to kneel beside him in the dead soggy leaves unless he had whiskey running through his veins Willard came to the clearing every morning and evening talk to God. Arvin didn't know which was worse the drinking or the praying. As far back, as he could remember, it seemed that his father had faulted devil all the time. Arvin little with the damp pulled his Co. tighter. He wished he were still in bed even school with always miseries was better than this but it was a Saturday and there was no way to get around it. Through the mostly bare trees beyond the cross Arvin could see whisper smoke rising from a few chimneys, half a mile away four hundred or so people lived in, knock him stiff in nineteen, fifty seven nearly all of them connected by blood through one godforsaken clam or another be it lust were necessity or just plain ignorance along with the tar paper shacks and Cinder Block houses the Holler included two general stores and a Church of Christ in Christian Union and joint known throughout the township as the bullpen. Three days before he'd come home with another black I I, don't condone no fighting just for the hell of it but sometimes, you're just too easy going Willard told him that evening then boys might be bigger than you. But the next time one of them starts his stuff, I want you to finish it. Willard was standing on the porch changing out of his work clothes. He handed Arvin Brown pants stiff with dried blood and Greece. He worked in a slaughterhouse in Greenfield and that day sixteen hundred homes had been butchered a new record for RJ Carol meat-packing. Those boy didn't know yet what he wanted to do when he grew up he was pretty sure he didn't WanNa kill pigs for eleven. Let's Donald Ray pollock reading from his new novel, the Devil, all the time. You know in the reading that you did the father tells the sun that the next time. So many beats him up the sun has to fight back and that seems to be. A recurring theme like in the opening story of your collection of short stories, the collections called knock him stiff. The opening sentence reads my father showed me how to hurt a man one August night at the torch in when I was seven years old it was the only thing he was ever any good at. You certainly seem interested in the idea of a father. Kind of indoctrinating a sun on the need to fight back and then egging on to do it even when it's inappropriate. so was is this a story that played out in your life? Well, not so much in my life I. Mean as far as I don't my dad really didn't push me to fight or anything like that. But you know when I was growing up my father and I had a very Uneasy relationship. You've got to understand my dad was born in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty he's still alive. You know he's eighty years old and he's still kicking but He was born in. Nineteen thirty grew up in the depression I went to the eighth grade. He was working on the railroad by the time he was sixteen, and then he was in the navy. And, my dad is a very tough. Hard. man Stra very strong man. As and in contrast to that, my mother is very shy kind. Small Bone woman. and. Either fortunately or unfortunately for me, I took after my mother and I believe. When I was a kid, my dad was. Maybe disappointed for not taking after him more. So. You know that's where I guess part of that comes from it and part of it also comes from. Lived in stiff. That's where I grew up and I saw a lot of other fathers who were you know drinkers and hell raisers and they didn't treat their families very well You know maybe they went and worked for a while and. I got enough money to go on another band or whatever, and pretty much left the family to take care of themselves. So, yeah father's have a pretty rough time and my work I just. It's just. You know I'm a father. You know I have a daughter WHO's I'm thirty years old now and I have always felt that I. Wasn't. As good as I could have been. Her mother and I were divorced when she was very young she was like a year old and and I wasn't around that much and. That's probably the best explanation. I can give for why treat father's like I do my work. Were you bullied in school. You said you, you took after your mother who wouldn't hurt a fly. So and if you were bullied, would you fight back? Did you know how to actually I wasn't bullied in school I? Never really had any problems with that and yeah, I. Mean a would fight back if I had to but. That situation you know didn't come about very much probably you know just. No more than any other normal kid you know might face that sort of thing. But. Yeah. I mean I wasn't really interested in Working on cars or farm or anything like that was more of A. I won't call myself a bookworm because we really didn't have that many books but you know I like to read and watch old movies and drawl and stuff like that and My Dad. Just you know he's a very practical man I mean, even today you know his idea of success is. Owning your own farm, starting your own business or something like that and I know that he probably looks on what I'm doing now is. A pretty useless way to spend your life trying to write books. Would you describe what the town of knock him stiff was like when you were growing up well, when I was growing up there it was. You know relocated for us. Ok we'll knock him stiff. is about thirteen miles west of chillicothe Theo, which is you know southern Ohio. It was its own little place. You know there wasn't much else around there but it was a community There were three small general stores and a bar and a church, and probably four hundred, fifty, five, hundred people now I probably was related to. At least half those people. So did you find this nurturing being in a town where half the people in it were related to you or incredibly claustrophobic? I think when I was a kid when I was a kid I was claustrophobic for me. You know I was one of those kids I was always unsatisfied I always wanted to be. Else and somewhere else. And so from a very early age. You know I was thinking about escaping from the hauler. I just Thought that I'd rather be somewhere else are somewhere else. But where you are as in Chile coffee which is. PHILADELPHIA, which is about thirteen miles away like you got out but you didn't go very far. I, really didn't get out I mean that's the weird contradiction of that whole thing you know i. Wanted to escape and them what I finally got my chance or whatever I. I chose to stay I'm out at knock stiff at least once a week even today Ladder parents go to visit. My parents are still alive. You know I have a brother and two sisters and they all live fairly close to there and So I. Think though as far as escape goes what happened with me was I quit high school when I was seventeen. And I went to work in a meat packing plant much like Weller work, Dan? And then when I was eighteen I moved to Florida you know that was going to be I was going to get away that you know by moving to Florida and I was down are working a job in a nursery and I wasn't making much money or anything only been there a few months my dad called and said. Hey, I can get you a job at the paper mail if you come back up here so. I chose to come back. You know the paper Mills Calling it was union job and great benefits and. And I knew you know for a high school dropout that was probably going to be the best job I. Ever got. You had that job for. How many years did you work at the paper mill? I? was there thirty two years and you didn't start writing till you were around fifty or is that is fifth well I'm fifty six now and I started writing when I was forty five. Okay. So how come it took so long did you know? When you weren't writing did you know that you had that in you? Well. You know I'd always been a big reader as I said and I love books. And I think maybe in the back of my mind, you know always thought writing would be a great way to get by in the world and you know, of course, I was very naive about it. The principal reasons for me you know as far as being a writer were one, you were your own boss. To you could do it anywhere. And three, you made lots of money. Wasn't until actually began writing it. I found out. That was a real true. But I. Think you know Sorta like maybe a fantasy that? It was in the back of my mind for a long time. I had a problem with drinking and for a number of years and you know it was one of those fantasies that when you got half loaded and You started daydreaming or whatever it was. One of those things that you thought about right thought about. But it wasn't really. You know I went to school when I was in my thirties I went to college I went to Ohio University and I ended up with a degree in English and You. Know even while I was there though I wasn't thinking about being a writer I never took any writing workshops or anything like that. But then finally when I was forty five my dad retired from the paper mill. And there was just something about watching him retire and go home. and. You know that was you know pretty much the end of his career and it really. Bothered me and I. Just. decided. I had to try something else you know. To some other way to. Spend the rest of my life. So. When you decided, you wanted to learn how to write what did that mean? Any. Writers or anything in for a while I just sort of scribbled and struggled. And then I'd read an interview with a writer and I can't recall her name now or no it was a lady. But she talked about typing out other people's stories as a means of maybe getting closer to them or just learn how to put a story together. and. So I started doing that. Who did you type out? I typed out a lot of different stories I. I was typing out a story at least once a week and that went on for about a year and a half. So John. cheever hemingway. Flannery. O'Connor Richard. Yates Dennis Johnson the you know the list just goes on and on if it was a story that I really liked and it wasn't. Long I, type it out, and then I carry it around with me for a week and you look at over and you know jot notes on stuff like that, and then I'd throw it away and do another one. Typing a story out, just was a much better way for me to see how you know person puts dial together or you know. Moose from one scene to the next that sort of thing. Was it hard for you to find your subject matter as a writer? Well when I first started. Trying to learn how to write. As. I said like maybe I would copy out John cheever story. So then I would try to write my own story about some East Coast suburbanite having unfair. Something like that or maybe I'd write about a re Rita Andrei debut story, and then I'd write about a Catholic priest. and. So I did that for maybe two years or so and it just wasn't working at all for me. and. Then filing maybe at about two and a half years, I wrote a story that's included in the book. Knock him stiff called back teen. And it's a very short story. and. It's about these two losers sitting in a donut shop. And that was the first thing that I had. Written that I thought wasn't too bad. And so then I increasingly started focusing on you know the people that I knew about instead of nurses, lawyers, that sort of thing that I had absolutely no idea. How to write about There's a passage in your new novel that's about a bus driver and the bus drivers father had gotten a certificate from the railroad for not missing a single day of work in twenty years and bus drivers. Mother always held this up as like what you could do. If you really you know were strive and tried to accomplish something when the bus drivers father died the bus driver hope that that certificate would be buried with his father's. We didn't have to look at it anymore, but instead his mother just like. Put It on the wall, display it in the living room. And then the bus driver thinks it wore on you after a while other people's accomplishments. I love that sentence did you ever feel that way I mean he kochman here seems. So relatively small like a good attendance record and not to knock that. But for that to be like, you know the zenith of somebody's life is. You. but did you feel that way that a war on you? Other People's accomplishments? I don't think that I paid so much attention to other people's. Successes or whatever. But I, know that I was aware you know by the time. I was thirty two or so and I've been working at the mail for about fourteen years. And I knew that all the guys that I had come in with you got hired about the same time as mayor guys even much later than that. You know they own their own home. Maybe. They owned a boat and they had two or three vehicles and they were married and had kids and on and on and on. You know in contrast to them. I've been divorced twice. I'd filed bankruptcy when I got sober I was living in this little very small apartment above this garage. Of. Motel Room and I've been living there for about. Four or five years. I owned a black and white TV that my sister had given me and I had this seventy six chevy that had the whole side of smashed in and that was it. You know for fourteen years of working there. That's what I had. And so you know there was that sense I guess of me just being a failure. Wasn't really that I wasn't jealous of those people or anything like that. I, mean I had enough sense to know that you know where I ended up was my own fault. But there was always that that idea in back of my head that. I could have done more you know I could maybe went to college or something you know. I'm sure you know if I'd wanted to go to school when I was eighteen, my dad would try to help me. and. That's not the route that I chose though how has your life changed? Now as a published writer, you have a collection of short stories. You have a new novel you got a thirty five thousand dollars cash prize, the pen, Robert Bingham Award. So, what's different about your life? well, I have a lot more time to just set on the porch and. Smoke and daydream. Think it's a legitimate. Yeah well, at least that's what I tell my wife. But my life hasn't really changed that much I. Mean I get a lot more emails. Now you know that sort of thing, but you know I still live in the same house I still pretty much. You know my daily routine is. I really can't say that it's changed that much. It's a good life and I'm thrilled that you know I've got a publisher and. You know had at least a little bit of success. You know I know a lot of writers out there a lot of writers out there who are much better than I am. And would. Probably give their left arm. To be setting, you know where I'm setting today. Well Donald Ray, pollock thing you so much for talking with us. Terry I appreciate. It. Made my day. Donald Ray pollock speaking to Terry Gross in twenty eleven. The devil all the time a new movie based on his novel of the same name.

Writer Donald Ray Pollock Willard Terry Gross Ohio Arvin Arvin Brown Netflix Ray Pollock Donald Trump Donald Ray Arvin Eugene Russell Robert Pattinson Tom Holland Robert Bingham Chile John Cheever Ohio University Dennis Johnson Greenfield
Remembering Carl Reiner, A Legendary Writer, Producer And Performer

Fresh Air

04:34 min | 3 months ago

Remembering Carl Reiner, A Legendary Writer, Producer And Performer

"This is fresh air when Carl Reiner sitcom pilot starring him, his TV writer Rob Petrie was rejected by CBS producer Sheldon Leonard rescued it by persuading Reiner to replace the entire cast, including Reiner himself. The result. The Dick Van Dyke show was a major TV hit and made a star of its then unknown leading lady Mary Tyler Moore. Terry Gross spoke with her about the show and her TV character in 1995. What were you told about the character of Laura? Just that she was going to be a wife, a television wife, and that really had its classical parameters and dimensions that they were established. And they hardly ever varied except A Sze to whether or not the wife was the star of the show. In which case she was the funny one. Or if she were the straight man for the male star, and she was then totally supportive, but all these wives We're kind of obedient and you know, a representative of the vows to love, honor and obey. They hardly varied from that, and With with Carl Reiners character the way she was written, Laura actually had opinions of her own. While she was asserting herself. She also didn't make Dick Van Dyke look like a dummy. It was ah, a matter of two people. I mean, society's expectations of that point still said, Hey, wait a minute, lady. You only go so far here, but I think we broke new ground. And and that was helped by my insistence on wearing Pants. You know, jeans and and capri pants at the time because I said, I've I've seen all the other actresses, and they're always running the vacuum in these little flowered frocks with high heels on And I don't do that. And I don't know any of my friends to do that. So why don't we try to make this real and I'll dress on the show the way I do in real life, But it wasn't that easy. The sponsors were afraid you brazen right? They pointed specifically to if they used the term cupping under And I can only assume that that meant my you know my my seat that there was a little too much definition. And so they allowed me to continue to wear them in one episode. One scene per episode. And only after we check to make sure that there was a little cupping under as possible could coming under referring to the fit of your pants, the fit of the pants on my behind, right? But within a few weeks we were we were sneaking them into a few other scenes in every episode, and they were definitely cutting under and everyone thought it was great. The funny thing is, you know. Women liked me. They were not envious of the fact that their husbands had a crush on me. It was okay with them. They they were the first to know when I would meet people. They'd say My husband loves you so much. And he thinks you're so sexy. And this was it was not thing because they were also able to identify with me as a friend as a girlfriend. There was no resentment, no fear. Yeah, well, I think that that speaks so well for the character and your your portrayal of her. Did you do a lot of rehearsing with Dick Van Dyke? Or did you just have to do it? Minutes before the actual broken? The whole show was done in what they call multiple camera technique could still done today. But back then we were maybe the sixth or seventh show to use the technique. It began with Joan Davis, not Lucille Ball as everyone thinks John Davis did a show called I married Joan. What a girl! What a world What a life! Hey for you, and then Lucy and several other shows followed. But in that show it's a little like doing theater that's captured on film. You rehearsed for five days and then Ah, On the evening of the fifth day, the audience comes in and the camera's having blocked their moves in yours lined up with them. You film it from top to bottom in continuity. So during those five days, it was at least the 1st 3 days. It was very much a matter of rehearse. And contribute and attempt things and not be afraid to fail to make a fool of yourself. Just pick yourself up. And if it didn't happen this time, then the next time the experiment maybe it will Was a wonderfully supportive creative environment. Mary Tyler Moore, speaking to Terry Gross in 1995.

Dick Van Dyke Laura Carl Reiner Terry Gross Mary Tyler Moore Sheldon Leonard Carl Reiners Rob Petrie Joan Davis SZE CBS Representative Writer Producer Lucy Lucille Ball John Davis
What it Was Like to Interview Earlonne Woods and Nigel Poor of Ear Hustle

Inside Podcasting

06:06 min | 4 months ago

What it Was Like to Interview Earlonne Woods and Nigel Poor of Ear Hustle

"If you haven't heard my interview with Nigel poor and and Earl Woods from ear. Hustle I highly recommend you. Go back and listen to that episode, which should be right behind this one in your pod catcher after you've listened to that. Come back to this episodes that you can listen to the behind the scenes bonus show so with that I will introduce my special guest and he is Paul Condo welcome to the show Paul. Thank you for having me sky. Thank you for being a guest on your show. You're welcome. So. Hall writes the Podcast Gumbo Newsletter, but polly left for you to just introduce yourself quickly and tell them a little bit about about you before we get started. I have the podcast Gumbo newsletter, which recommends three podcast episodes. A week comes out every Wednesday I've been doing it. Just over about two years now, and then just at the beginning of this year I have a podcast of the same name, and that also is where I give three podcast episode recommendations and A little different than a newsletter at it focuses on national days of the year keeping it pretty consistent, though so that yes, always God. All right, so I guess we'll just get started talking about last week's show and how it came together. Take it away, Pau. All right my hope today is really that your listeners get a little inside baseball about inside podcasting and this particular episode keeping with the sports theme I'm going to give you a softball. Start us all off How do you pick your guests and and why Nigel and airline? That's a great question. It's a couple of different things usually for most episodes. It's a show that I am personally super passionate about if I'm not passionate about the show. That's GONNA. Come through in my interview and the interview just isn't going to be as good, but there have been a couple exceptions where I think that the person behind the show is someone that I'm either fascinated with personally. I would put Jason Cal so I interviewed in season one into that category I do listen to his show, but I really wanted in that interview to get under the hood of who is he because he has well I think a lot of people would say he's sort of a piece of work. And then also you know there might be someone who I think has a long history podcasting. Who I think my listeners can learn from So there's someone this season falls into that category, but for the most part it shows that I'm listening to you. I'm a fan of or that I'm just fascinated like. How did someone make something like this And so if there isn't some combination of those things going on, I think the interview is going to be terrible and I've been a fan of ear hustle since the beginning, they were on my hit list as I was planning season one. So i. mean that's a good question. I mean good point. Is You know how easy or hard is it to get interviews with people like Nigel? And early on you know what is the process you have to go through an agent or representative, or can you go straight to them? That is also a good question. In that case, I was in touch with. I don't know if I'm saying his name. Right David Qatrana I mentioned him at the end of the episode last week I was in touch with him, because he was my contact at Pr X., and he was sort of just keeping me abreast of the news coming out of the Organization for my newsletter, and he would let me know about your stuff, so I got him, and mentioned it before season one, and he was receptive, but they were really busy and I. I hope I have this chronology right, but I think it may have been I think when I first went to him. We didn't know that early on. You know. The public did not know that governor. Governor Jerry. Brown was commuting his sentence. I think that that was going on in the background. I hope I have that right because I remember after I asked him, and he said I'll really try, but they're super busy right now, so it was kind of like a maybe kind of an answer yet, and I remember that we went back and forth a few times, and it just seemed like we were sort of kicking the can down the road, and it wasn't happening and I had to figure out like who am I gonNA, talk to this season and so I finally said you know I think I have to make a decision here like let's try for next season and. I remember then listening to them on fresh air. Terry gross had them on fresh air, and she was the focus of the interview was the commutation of sentence, and how that was you know how that happened? And all of that, but they hadn't come out with season four, which was the first season where he is finally on the outside right from the outside. They had the end of season three. Though where you find out, it's happening and. You get to hear him on the phone with his mom, telling his mom might. I'm coming home and all that, so it was right in that period and I remember thinking interesting. You know that this has happened since. I started talking to David About having them on the show in retrospect. I'm really grateful that it didn't work out that first season because. Everyone wanted to interview them right around that time I mean Terry. Gross was one of many people who talk to them. Because that was like not that was big news that was at least state level, and you know I. Think there might have even been articles in. You know more national papers with national audiences about what had happened, and so I got to have a brand new type of conversation. Now you've been out. You've recorded an entire season like they were about to launch these and five when we had that conversation, so it was sort of like. What has it been like and it was a? A new angle

Nigel Terry Gross David Qatrana Paul Condo Earl Woods Baseball Governor Jerry Jason Cal Softball Representative Hall Polly Brown
"terry gross" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:38 min | 5 months ago

"terry gross" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is fresh AIR I'm Terry gross let's get back to my interview with John Barry is two thousand four book the great influenza about the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic the deadliest pandemic in history is on the current best seller list he co wrote a paper about the future of the covert nineteen pandemic and lessons learned from pandemic influenza which was published last month by the center for infectious disease research and policy at the university of Minnesota Barry is a professor at the Tulane University School of public health and tropical medicine what about the newspapers were they accurately reporting what was going on you know they were as a general rule not and in fact in early in the pandemic when one Wisconsin newspaper actually tried to report the truth the army initiated prosecution proceedings under the law you quoted the option a correct so they were going to try to put those editors and writers in jail they dropped the prosecution is a pandemic pandemic proceeded but again all around the country in most cases newspapers were not printing the truce in Phoenix it was funny normally local news predominates but in Phoenix when the disease first hit Boston which was the first place in the country that was hit by the second wave the legal way you can read about it a little bit in Phoenix when the disease actually got to Phoenix there was hardly a word about it anywhere in the newspapers Elise they weren't lying but they weren't printing anything about it because I thought that would be bad for the war effort bad for morale and again the only effect of that was to spread fear because people did not know and they need to know a famous example of something that was done wrong during the nineteen eighteen pandemic that we've heard a lot of references to recently is what happened in Philadelphia when I decided to have a war bond drive and not call it off in the face of the pandemic and I I want you to describe that war bond drive in this of course was to raise money for the war effort so what was that this is basically a a parade that stretch for like two miles describe what you know about that well was heavily promoted Philadelphians were supposed to demonstrate their patriotism by coming out by supporting of the war effort buying liberty loans bonds and you know was going to be one of the great events in the city's history the medical community to a person urged the public health commissioner and the mayor to cancel the parade that didn't happen several hundred thousand people turned out and I mean by then the virus was already circulating pretty widely in the community and and like clockwork forty eight seventy two hours later after the parade the disease dust exploded in Philadelphia and that was you know sort of a classic example eyes he said what not to do did you think about the Philadelphia example when do Moreland's held its Mardi Gras parade just a few weeks ago I didn't you know what as I mentioned earlier in in January actually wrote a piece for The Washington Post the saying you know does this arguing making point really that the virus could not be contained that it was going to get here and I was going to be pretty serious but at the time of Mardi Gras I don't think there even been a single death at the time known now we know there had been doubts but at the time there was not a single known death I don't think and you know no cases known although now we know there had been in Louisiana very little testing anywhere in the United States and it didn't seem dangerous to be banned because although I anticipated that the virus would get to the United States and it would be quite severe I didn't think it arrived yet based on the information I was getting on on testing obviously on that point I was wrong I live in the French Quarter I was even tangled Krueger who want us to Terrick crew a few years ago but I actually am not a parade person fortunately and I usually go to one parade here at least but I didn't go to any this year fortunately because it clearly did spread the virus do you feel very frustrated and worried watching us fall like making some of the same mistakes that were made in nineteen eighty yes there is a short answer what are some of the major mistakes you think we are repeating we have repeated well first for very different reasons the outbreak was trivialized for a long time and if these are public health measures social distancing and so forth are going to be successful people have to comply with the recommendations so by now trivializing the threat for a period of months that sort of encourages people to ignore recommendations gets it implanted in people's minds that this is not a real threat and that is being overblown by the media you know that's number one number two did testing the Bakul which continues unfortunately is just a huge huge problem when places come out of lockdown they really should have the testing and the contact tracing in place these things work they've been demonstrated to be highly successful in saving lives and also allowing the economy to function in many countries around the world I won't say we are dead last were enacted last year a good of the company by the countries worse off than we are on a policy and execution basis but for a country that should be the best in the world to be where we are in these areas is almost beyond belief John berry thank you so much for coming back to fresh AIR be well be safe and same to you thank you so much John berry is the author of the two thousand four book the great influenza about the nineteen eighteen pandemic it's on the current best seller list he's a professor at the Tulane University School of public health after we take a short break we'll listen back to an interview with Ian what com the weather in nineteen sixty five novelty hit you turn me on and left the rock world soon after to perform and write about pop music of the early twentieth century this is fresh AIR WNYC's supporters include Columbia University programs for high school students bringing Columbia's faculty courses and community.

John Barry Terry gross
Steve Martin On His Years As A Comic — And Walking Away From Stand-Up

Fresh Air

10:00 min | 5 months ago

Steve Martin On His Years As A Comic — And Walking Away From Stand-Up

"But if you could hold Steve Martin has been making people laugh often with highly conceptual humor since the nineteen sixties when he was a staff writer on the smothers brothers comedy hour in the seventies he became a major stand up comedy star filling arenas with his fans he rose to fame along with his then new TV show called Saturday Night Live on which he made many memorable appearances as a wild and crazy guy a medieval barber and a fan of king tut eventually the fame that brought in huge audiences also made it impossible for him to do the kind of comedy that made him original he starred in movies from the jerk to parenthood and in recent years has also written plays essays and books and toured with both his bluegrass band and with friend and fellow comic Martin short Steve Martin won the Mark Twain prize for American humor in two thousand five in was a Kennedy center honoree in two thousand seven Terry gross spoke with Steve Martin in two thousand eight about his memoir born standing up Steve Martin welcome back to fresh AIR eleven returning her thank you I thank you very much I'd like you to open with a reading from the beginning of the book and we've we've edited the slightly to make it crystal a little shorter for the broadcast great be happy to I did stand up comedy for eighteen years ten of those years were spent learning for years were spent refining and for years were spent in wild success I was seeking comic originality and fame fell on me as a by product the course was more plodding than her ROIC I did not strive valiantly against doubters but took incremental steps started with a few intuitive leaps I was not naturally talented I didn't sing dance or act the working around that minor detail made me inventive I was not self destructive though I almost destroyed myself in the end I turned away from stand up with the tired swivel of my head and never looked back until now a few years ago I began researching and recalling the details of this crucial part of my professional life which inevitably touches upon my personal life and was reminded why I did stand up and why I walked away in a sense this book is not an autobiography but a biography because I am writing about someone I used to know yes these events are true yet sometimes they seem to have happened to someone else and I often felt like a curious onlooker or someone trying to remember a dream I ignored my stand up career for twenty five years but now having finished this memoir I view this time with surprising warmth one can have it turns out an affection for the war years thanks for reading that that Steve Martin reading from his memoir born standing up which has just been published in paperback yeah I guess I didn't realize how much you closed the door on your comedy years how much there was like a before and after it ended you were done and that was it right I I I'm it was about nineteen eighty one I still had a few obligations left but I knew that hi I could not continue but I guess I could have continued if I had nothing to go to but I did have something to go to which was movies and you know the act had become so known that in order to go back I would have had to create an entirely new show and I wasn't up to it especially when the opportunity for movies and writing movies came around why would you have to create an entirely new show well like I say the the the act was really it there is a passage in the book which I caught because it was so hard to explain but the act essentially besides all the jokes and bits and everything was conceptual and once the concept was understood there was nothing more to develop it's like saying painting the same blank canvas over and over and over and over and over once the concept is no you don't see the need to see to that and that was in the back of my head that I was really done artistically with with what I had created or pastiche to you know in the reading that you just did you describe yourself as not being naturally talented did you think of yourself as naturally funny I'm I didn't didn't think of myself in that way no although I I just love to comedy I I was raised with laurel and hardy and I Love Lucy Anne and Jerry Lewis and I just loved it and I had a friend in high school and we would just laugh all day and put on skits and you know it's the Andy Kaufman thing over to Marty short thing where you're performing in your bedroom for yourself and I I loved magic and so I would practice my magic tricks in front of a mirror for hours and hours and hours because I was told that you must practice you must practice and never present a trip before it's ready but I was just inclined toward show business but I didn't know what I just like being on stage you got your start working in Disneyland you were living in southern California and when you were ten you were selling guidebooks there then you later work for magic shop demonstrating magic tricks and I get the sense from your memoir that demonstrating those magic tricks you know hours a day and really getting them getting them down because you're doing them so much that that gave you a sense that performance required a great deal of craft that even comedy wasn't just a question of going out on stage and saying funny things that there was enormous amounts of work and practice and thought that would have to go into it well that that idea of that that you really had to work at this stuff didn't necessarily come from Disneyland it I I mean I think yes and in terms of presenting a trick but having having it so well honed in your mind was really giving me a sense of security it was I don't want to go out there half baked and you know you learn that through the years you know you're you do a magic show with a friend and you rehearse it a couple of times and yes every all the timing has to be exactly perfect but while you're out there it's it's a different world it's not your mirror you have to make on the spot adjustments but that's just you know whatever entertainer does actually working at the magic shop really gave me a sense of comedy because it was all the jokes we did the tricks but we have all these jokes I had a friend Jim Barlow who you know he he was the the guy I worked with there but he had patter worked out you know it he would go to customers and say Medicare money I mean help you not and you know call them suckers it was really funny and and kind of friendly rude what was your patter I just took all of Jim's patter I'm I'm trying to think of other ones yeah I said it would just it would somebody would buy something it would say and because you are hundred customer today you get a free paperback it's a little silly things like that but Disneyland I'm fifteen right here at early act was a combination of banjo playing juggling magic tricks and comedy and some of that stating your later at two but it sounds like a vaudeville act yes I was very interested involved it was the only sort of discipline that was a five minute act on stage which is what I really enjoyed ins and saw myself doing and I bought books on it I went to the Long Beach pike which was off the carnival fair you know four is really a place for drunken sailors to get tattoos but there was also side shows is very interested in that but you know there is these are all in there these are short acts there was one of the employees at Disneyland that I worked with was named Steve Stewart and he worked in vaudeville and he did a sack for me one day on the floor of the magic shop and I had a couple of great gags one was that I actually used and I asked him if I could use them because I was very strict about using any material that wasn't mine or that that was taken from somebody else let's put it this way I became strict wasn't strict at first there is one trick that one joke that Dave steward did where he said are not yet a glove white glove in his hand the magicians glove any he said and now the glove into dove trick and he threw it into the air and then it hit the floor and he just looked at it and consent and set up for my next trick he went on and it was the first time I saw comedy created out of nothing of nothing happening and I Glaum don to that wait wait wait you're doing I think is not only making comedy out of nothing but making comedy out of people's expectations which you were going to fail to fulfill well yes exactly and I I really started that when I became a semi professional meaning I was working the local folk music clubs going around either working for free or for a week and I quickly decided that you know the material was you know good or weak or whatever and I decided whatever it was I was going to pretend like it was fantastic and how great am I how great is what you're seeing and I think that's what grizzly hunting it's a tune him too because they couldn't believe that someone actually was that confident

Steve Martin Staff Writer
"terry gross" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:20 min | 7 months ago

"terry gross" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is fresh AIR I'm Terry gross let's get back to the interview I recorded last month with Michael Pollan about his new audiobook caffeine how coffee and tea created the modern world it's about how caffeine affects the mind and body and about how coffee and tea became popular around the world caffeine is the world's most widely consumed psychoactive drug Poland's previous book how to change your mind was about how psychedelic drugs alter consciousness and how they're now being used experimentally to treat addiction depression and help the terminally ill face death one describes himself as writing about the places where culture and nature intersect on our plates in our farms and gardens and in our minds you visited a coffee plantation in Colombia what's the work like you like you you picked coffee beans what do you have to do to pick coffee beans were but yeah I mean I picked coffee beans for about twenty five minutes just to be clear this wasn't like I went under cover and I was I had this job but I wanted to see how it was grown in and I went to this finca outside of Midian and Columbia and spend a day with the coffee farmers and it was it was really interesting it's very hard work it's much harder than many other kinds of agriculture coffee grows on a very steep hillside because it needs it needs very needs lots of water so needs to be in the tropics but it needs lots of very good drainage to which you only get on the hillside and it's the spiky shrubs that has to be pruned and you are there rose that you walk between the rows of of of coffee plants that are so steep you can barely find your footing meanwhile you have this basket that suspended from your shoulders and your reaching in and picking the red berries and leaving the green berries and and you're doing this on a hillside this just incredibly hard to to move around on and and then you take them down to a processing shed and they have to be you know Paul you have to take off the pope there they they look like cherries or cranberries there read and they have a pope that actually tastes really good it's very sweet and has a coffee taste I don't know why people don't make preserves with it or something it should be used for something and and then has to be dried and fermented there many many steps so it's a very demanding and plant and it's very picky it has to have exactly the right altitude water angle in all this kind of stuff which is concerning now because coffee faces a tremendous threat from climate change you know they're they're there's a narrow band of of conditions that that make coffee happy and the estimates now on the climate scientists in this will be alarming to the to the fellow addicts out there is that fifty percent of the coffee growing regions will not be able to support the coffee plant by twenty fifty so capitalism may be killing the golden goose as climate change undermines coffee production and we may go back to rivers to which you know can grow in it is a little less picky about its environment so we may look back and say we lived in this you know golden age of good coffee that lasted from nineteen sixty six to twenty fifty and then it'll be downhill from there when we started our interview you were telling us how you gave up coffee cold Turkey when you were writing your book caffeine because she wanted to know what's it like what impact this caffeine have on you want to find out you stop that to see what the difference was and to see how addictive it was he did it cold Turkey so you can get the full force of ending your addiction yes and and then after how many months you decided to three months yeah and in three months on herbal tea and and when you started drinking it again was that still part of the experiment or just because you couldn't get her to live without it anymore no no no it was part of the experiment I I when as long as I could but I knew before I finished the the book that I would want to describe you know getting back on caffeine I fully intended to to get back to it there I didn't learn you know aside from the sleep issue I mentioned earlier they're they're not a lot of reasons to avoid caffeine I mean there are a lot of health benefits to drinking coffee and tea in moderation cough into your protective appear to be protective against several kinds of cancer Parkinson's disease cardiovascular disease there's been a suspicion that coffee must be terrible for you from the very start in the sixteen hundreds they they they claim that it reduced male potency and but it's it's it's been cleared of that too so so there isn't a good reason not to drink it unless you have a problem with it it makes you jittery you know your doctors told you not to so I fully intended to get back on it and and I look forward to the day and I planned it very carefully initially I thought I'd go to the original pizza and that would have a kind of poetic logic to it but it's a little strong for me so my wife and I Judith we we went to this local cafe where we used to go every morning before I had my fast and I got my coffee and sat outside it was a Saturday morning and it was kind of a beautiful day and there are lots of dads with little kids you know eating pastries and and I have this Cup of coffee and it was mind blowingly good I I just I you know I just had this this sense of well being sued for using my body that you know rose to the level of euphoria and I was like wow and it seemed like I had taken some kind of illicit drugs that this was cocaine or something N. and that lasted for maybe twenty minutes and then I got a little jittery and a little touchy and it was a garbage truck that was you know violently shaking these garbage cans into it across the street I was like let's get home I have to I want to get some stuff done and I've and I felt this incredible surge of almost compulsive desire to to get to some state some stuff done and I sat down at my computer and I unsubscribe from about a hundred list serves that were really bugging that you know with these things come up in your computer every day and you never have time to deal with well I dealt with them and then I turned in my closet and I saw that the pilot sweaters was all scrambled and I and I I organized all my sweaters and it was incredibly productive for a couple hours anyway V. experience made me realize that that the getting back on coffee and tea is very different than having your maintenance dose and so I thought is there a way I could hold on to the power of this drug experience otherwise I was going to slip back into the ranks of you know normal caffeine addicts so for a long time I said all right you just have coffee on Saturdays and for a long time I did that and it worked pretty well and I look forward to Saturday's I got a ton of stuff done but I venture leave the slippery slope intervened so what is caffeine doing for you now what caffeine is doing for me now is kind of organizing the rhythms of my day I mean something you know I missed when I was off caffeine is there is that you know that that morning surge and and that sitting down to work in and having that kind of real focuses you attack whatever you're doing for the day and then even I enjoyed even the subsiding after lunch and that low that you got around three o'clock and you could have a Cup of tea and that would kind of restore your energy for another hour or two and just the rhythm of the day was shaped by ingestion of this molecule and and it's doing that for me now and I understand that rhythm and I can you know I thread my work through that rhythm and it it it works for me and I did miss it I you know what I do another fast I might I mean it's you know I have to say that the pleasure of breaking the fast was so great that is almost worth the work so some people say in comparing coffee and tea that coffee is such an upper that against you to lose focus we're S. T. gets you to increase focus what do you think I think it all depends on how you kind of Thai trade it when I have a Cup of coffee by my side and I'm writing I don't take a bunch of steps because you can get to your right you can come over run yourself outstrip your mind and get a little too forward get ahead of yourself so I I think though that we we kind of automatically do that I mean if you look at when people take a sip of coffee something's going on it's not just that they're thirsty they're they're reaching another some rhythm of the experience that they're modulating and we do this subconsciously I think you can do the same with coffee or tea I don't think it's inherent but for me writing sipping coffee is you know really helpful I didn't feel the same when I was doing that certainly with herbal tea you know I say in the in the book what masterpieces ever been produced on camomile tea but but you know green tea is pretty good too I mean it's much more low level so I just think whatever the drink we kind of find a sweet spot for how calf unaided we want to be for whatever we're doing and you can make those adjustments whether you're drinking coffee or tea let's take a short break here and then we'll talk some more my guess is Michael Pollan and his new book is called caffeine how coffee and tea created the modern world and it's not a print book it's an audio book it's an audible original we'll be right back after a break this is fresh AIR WNYC's supporters include the Yale school of management executive education presenting women on boards a program which coaches executive women.

Michael Pollan caffeine Terry gross
"terry gross" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:15 min | 7 months ago

"terry gross" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is fresh AIR I'm Terry gross let's get back to my interview with Octavia Spencer she won an Oscar for her performance as a maid in the help and was nominated for Oscars for her performances in the shape of water and hidden figures now she's starring in the Netflix limited series self made which will start streaming Friday it's inspired by the story of madam CJ Walker who was born soon after the civil war two parents who had been slaves in the early nineteen hundreds she sold and manufactured hair products for African American women and became the first self made American woman millionaire Octavia Spencer grew up in Montgomery Alabama so as I hear you talk now I'm not hearing a southern accent I've heard you with southern accents and someone who rolls did you have an accent when you went to Hollywood is that something that you lost or that you never had but that you knew well enough so that you could call on an as needed for performances well I at one of the ways that I paid for college was through oration and speech competitions and that's one of the things that you you do you lose your accent and only for me I lost my accent only to find it again in Hollywood I mean the only people I know the only women I knew growing up were southern women so most of the characters I play will likely be southern if they're from a certain class if you know it's it's I I pick it up I lose it and if I'm around southern people it definitely comes back quite easily so how did oration speech competitions pay for calling out they were monetary prizes for a few that you would enter it was a great deal of money but for me there are scholarships involved but small monetary need piece them together to help pay for college at least that was my way so what are some of the topics that you had to operate about a whole man I I can't even remember I I think it actually you know I I remember excellence black excellence I definitely remember one that was about black excellence do you think that the operations speech competitions were helpful in terms of having an acting career meet it's kind of a performance and you have to do in front of an audience well I actually am not the best in front of an audience I have severe stage fright so I had to confront that and and public speaking I I always get extremely nervous before any speech that I have to do and that and that has not dissipated at all and so I had to embrace the fact that I will likely always have stage fright my impression is that you first thought really seriously about acting after seeing the movie the long walk home being shot in Montgomery Alabama where you live so and you manage to work your way into working on the film I think as an intern how did you talk your way into working on the film I annoyed them you know I don't I when I found out where the production our office is where I I I went by every day to tell them you know that I need to work on that film and they were so annoyed that they knew that I was going to continue to come back if they didn't give me a job and so I was paid a hundred dollars a week as an intern and it was I think I don't think I had ever been happier about anything so what was your job as an intern as an intern I worked in the extras casting office and we did the open our calls and sign people up and they all had their period costumes so they had to come in for their costume fitting so I was there monitoring that and then when we actually filmed I kind of was the extras wrangler so I had to keep them entertained and what I would do is make these certificates because all the extras wanted was to meet the actors and so I would give the actors to sign about ten certificates and then an extra holding we would have talent contest and the extras would vote for each other and the best once we get the prize which were signed certificates by the actors and this was all your idea it was all my well I mean if they're going to be there for for twelve thirteen hours you have to keep them entertained so they would come back especially for continuity and large crowd scenes and it was usually just for those days that we did that that I did the certificates so what what point did you decide to go to Hollywood well working on all those projects the one thing that always happened my boss would do the location casting and the extras and the directors would always have like a one line part that they were trying to cast and they would always referred to me like someone get someone like Octavia and then they would ask me to read for stuff and I was actually I guess to society or nervous to audition and so I would always say to her I would always turn the parts down or the audition down and then we were working on a time to kill in Mississippi and Joel Schumacher was the very first director who didn't ask me to read for something and so I went to him it made me actually more proactive I had to go to him and ask him to read for the part of a woman who started the riots I don't know if you remember the movie and he said no your face is too sweet to start a riot you should read for sandy's nurse and he gave me the part and I went on to play about thirty two nurses for the only way he started my career but that I think it was the fact that I don't if he had asked me I don't know that I would have been as a Ford I probably would have turned it down and and missed out on on the career that I have today I don't understand the leak you want her to be in movies you wanted to be an actress at and directors are asking you to read and you you you you wouldn't do it I wouldn't do it I fear that I wouldn't get the part I guess I don't know in fact we sometimes with we fear our own success and I think not being offered that part made me know that I wanted to actually do it and I had to commit and the rest is history so you played a lot of nurses that mostly on TV I played a lot and TV films it was a nurse number one baby nurse nurse number two then they give me a name I mean I was it Steven Bochco I was I have had a lot of nurse parts with Steven Bochco he was so good to me when did you break out of the nurse lane I mean I actually never broke out of a nurse like I was a nurse not even six years ago on a show called red band society I I finally had to to to say no more nurses so I don't I I don't think I ever broke out of it was just to the realization that I probably should stop being typecast as a nurse so when you first moved to LA you move with Tate Taylor who became the director of the help the movie you were in an one academy award for so what do you do to find a place when you first got there did you have money from your film jobs in Alabama I had three thousand dollars to my name which I I mean it when I think back on it well I was he had a house sitting job and then when I found out he had a house sitting job I thought well I can get a house sitting job hello I got a house that it was sort of we we we we I there is a young man that I had worked with on now Tom and Huck and his parents were affluent from Huntsville and decided that he yeah he was like a like maybe thirteen and he needed someone to drive him to auditions and everything and so I house sat for the parents and and drove him from time to time to auditions when he needed that so I was able to live for free and pocket my money from my my day job good deal yeah it was a great deal probably very nice house I recommend it let's take a short break here and then we'll talk some more if you're just joining us my guest is Octavia Spencer and she stars in the Netflix series that's a limited series called self made inspired by the life of madam CJ Walker it begins on Friday we'll be right back this.

Octavia Spencer Oscar Terry gross
Author Roth weighed in on 'Plot Against America' before TV series was adapted

Fresh Air

08:06 min | 7 months ago

Author Roth weighed in on 'Plot Against America' before TV series was adapted

"This is fresh AIR let's get back to Terry's two thousand four interview with Philip Roth his book the plot against America is the basis of a new HBO mini series that starts Monday the novel has been adapted by David Simon and ed burns who worked together on the wire Roth died in twenty eighteen no no president Limburg in your novel may be anti semitic but after he's elected he knows better than to just come out and say at any initiate a program that brings young Jewish children to the quote heartland to kind of initiate them in the ways of heartland American life he initiates a homeland program that relocates Jewish families to get a quote heart heartland places of America and nobody really knows the Jewish families don't really know whether this is really meant to be a way of opening up their horizons are broadening their lives or whether it's a truly anti semitic way of removing them from safe friendly neighborhoods and putting them in in communities that might be very hostile and it also kind of breaking up the Jewish vote by breaking up a Jewish communities did you imagine that for Lindberg to really catch on in America he would have to use euphemistic language for anything that might truly be anti semitic at heart and helps in the language of the you know the heartland and just folks in mmhm mmhm you know well they are it is ambiguous to know what the intention is of for instance to begin with the first one which is called just folks that is a program in which Jewish boys from I think ten to fifteen for remember correctly volunteer if they want to to spend eight weeks in the summer on a farm somewhere my brother goes to Kentucky networks and tobacco farm they can go to any any place that's available where they can do farm work and work they ordinarily wouldn't do what's wrong with that why is it mostly Jews and that's what makes people nervous put it on the face of it there's nothing wrong with it now we move on to the next program which is called homestead forty to nineteen forty two as opposed to homes at eighteen forty two which was the original homestead act that is something else according to that piece of legislation large corporations are encouraged to transfer their Jewish employees to offices in more remote parts of the country and in the face of this legislation my father whose company is going to move us to Kentucky quits his job our lives in a way that is more because that is what there's more coercive that is I would say a bit more ominous and may be Lindbergh handy shown a little more strongly on the other hand if that's all this guy does it's not too terrible you know the limber disappears from my book before you can do anymore so you never really know what he's up to and again that's what I wanted I you never really know what he's up to he's a kind of jam heroic statue who looms over the book after after limber disappears then all hell breaks loose but I don't remember nobody can even in that that homestead act you know that in which corporations relocate Jewish employees the letter that your father gets home in the novel is so euphemistically just read a few lines from it you know if you're calling in life is proud to be among the very first group of major American corporations and financial institutions selected to participate in the new homestead program which is designed to give emerging American families a once in a lifetime opportunity to move their house sold at government expense in order to strike roots in an inspiring region of America previously inaccessible to them well doesn't that sound great but you know as the family in the novel figures out this is this is the the government and the corporation joining hands to to coerce Jewish families to move it was great fun writing that letter yeah yeah you really got that cheerful corporate PR results down found out what it was like to be Dick Cheney yeah I it's it's it's it imagine most people would not I would be impenetrable they would just take it at face value my father because he's so committed again against liberty from the start refuses to to do with aspirin Philip's cousin you know your cousin Alvin in the book get who who is something of a hood Hey Taylor and wants to fight against him and you know the United States under Lindberg is not going to join the war but he wants to wants to enter it anyway so he joins the Canadian Army and fights against Hitler but he loses half of one leg in the war and returns with a stump that's covered in ulcers boils and scabs he moves in with the Roth family and a first it's horrifying to fill up he says it was bad enough that we weren't living in a normal country now we would never again be living in a normal house a life of even more suffering was taking shape around me any praise to the housekeeping guides to protect our humble five rooms and all they contain from the vengeful fury of the missing leg in thinking about the impact that this missing leg this stump would have on the young Philip Roth's life did you have anything like it anything comparable to draw on from your own life no I didn't I didn't I I had to think my way through it I think the only thing that comes close lineages I never had as a child when I was in the army and I guess I was in my early twenties I was in the public information officer will treat hospital in Washington and my job was to go out into the wards and get information about US soldiers newly arrived who were injured or hurt or whatever and then write a little press release for the hometown paper and they had a lot of amputees at Walter Reed may be able to reverse the center I don't remember but they had many entities and so I went out on the wards and and I talked to these guys it was a sad as you can imagine is just after the Korean War or I go down to P. T. within physical therapy and watch them learning to walk on the parallel bars and so and so I sold my shares of stumps and not just of legs and the pathos was overwhelming overwhelming and so I carried this with me I think into the block and I think it's why it maybe even when I came to me that in fact I haven't thought of it till till now but I think perhaps that those experiences had a lot to do with determining how often would be would be wounded author Philip Roth speaking to Terry gross in two thousand for his alternative history novel the plot against America was published that year he died in twenty eighteen a mini series based on the novel begins Monday on HBO adapted by David Simon and

Terry Philip Roth America HBO
Adam Driver Hates Watching Himself in Movies

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

01:57 min | 9 months ago

Adam Driver Hates Watching Himself in Movies

"It'll be interesting to see during the Oscar. TV Show exactly how Adam driver reacts when they play a clip of his best actor nominated performance because he hates seeing or hearing himself on screen so much that a few months ago he walked out on Terry Gross in the middle of an interview for fresh air when she played a clip of him which surprised me because when I talked to him in two thousand thirteen he was indulgent as we watched one scenes from the TV show girls. I did ask him why it made him so uncomfortable. I mean lots of reasons I just forgot why look like to was reminded in my God. That's what you have to go through that But mostly because I feel like If he was gonNA continue if it was going to kind of go on that You know I came from a theater background or you. Don't get to look at the end result or what what is actually being a Brosseau. You just have to do your homework than As much as you can then show up on the day and be open to something being different or not knowing the answer and I think think in things that I've watched in the past one I would just obsessed about them for months and drive myself crazy after you saw your work of things that I wanted to fix and change your or do over again in an obviously you can't and and same thing with the people around me. I just drive them nuts with like ask him quite so we would just couldn't wouldn't it be allow you to like. Oh next time and I won't do that or get better the next time. I don't think it's necessarily a good idea. Just kind of seems to be what I think. I have a natural tendency to try to make things perfect or better looking or Change it for the sake of changing at arbitrary Changing making it look better in the things that I'm interested in an watching in film theatre and television role is the imperfect or the ugly part of it. I just know it myself. Especially while we're shooting I have no interest to see what is coming

Terry Gross Oscar Brosseau Adam
China’s coronavirus - Here’s what we know

Fresh Air

11:11 min | 9 months ago

China’s coronavirus - Here’s what we know

"This is fresh air I'm Terry gross the new corona virus that emerged in Wuhan China has killed almost five hundred people and prompted the Chinese government to impose severe travel restrictions within the country the virus has spread to at least twenty four other countries including the U. S. American air carriers have suspended flights to and from China the US government is barring from entering the country any foreign nationals who visited China within last fourteen days our guest science writer David Coleman says the new corona virus is just the latest example of an ominous trend humans contracting deadly contagious viruses from wild animals other examples include H. I. V. west Nile fever anthrax bola and another from the corona virus family sars severe acute respiratory syndrome which also emerged in China and killed more than seven hundred people David common has written frequently for National Geographic and is the author of several books including spillover animal infections and the next human pandemic he spoke with fresh tears Dave Davies well David common welcome back to fresh air yeah this is scary stuff this virus and it's also a very fast moving story you and I are talking on Tuesday afternoon things may change a bit by time people hear it but us a sense of how serious the threat is of this virus compared to other outbreaks we've seen well it is very serious and needs to be taken very seriously and yet it's not an occasion for panic it's an occasion for calm effective response comparing it to other viral outbreaks he is is illuminating in some ways and problematic in other ways compared say to influence every year there's a seasonal influenza sweeps around the world F. infects hundreds and hundreds of thousands of people kills something like thirty thousand or thirty five thousand people in the US every year and yet it has a very low case fatality rate case fatality rate how many diaper the number of people infected it's down I think usually around point one percent a tenth of a percent sars virus that emerged from southern China with the syndrome caused by a virus that emerged from southern China in two thousand three a severe acute respiratory syndrome it infected eight thousand people a little over eight thousand and it killed seven hundred and seventy four for case fatality rate of almost ten percent in other words a hundred times seasonal influenza the average seasonal influenza and it scared the be Jesus out of the public health and disease scientist experts that I know they told me that that was a really scary one because the case fatality rate was so high and it spread quickly but they managed to stop it and we can talk a little bit about that so here's this novel coronavirus as they're calling it to two thousand nineteen novel coronavirus and it comes in somewhere between those two case fatality rates and that is one of the most important numbers at the experts have been watching and I've been watching over the last week or two as the numbers of infected people have exploded and the number of deaths have increased steadily the case fatality rate has hovered moving downward slowly from about three percent to a little over two percent now and it it is still very unpredictable we don't know how many people it's gonna infect and therefore how many people it's gonna kill but it's in the range that that requires being taken very seriously so let's look at what's what officials are doing to try and contain this novel coronavirus and your describes what what's happened in China China was slow to react to this particularly the officials in the city of Wuhan and the province of who by and then the course got out of the barn and the national officials reacted strongly and sealed off essentially first the city of Wuhan and then a number of other cities so I think there's more than fifty million people who are essentially in locked down with no public transportation going in and out of those cities China has been cutting internal flights in and out and to other countries have been cutting flights international flights in and out of China the US in terms of flights of foreign nationals are barred from entering the U. S. if they have recently traveled to China and US citizens coming back from Wuhan or who day province are being quarantined for fourteen days which is the suspected incubation period of the virus other countries are eliminating flights in and out of China I saw this morning that Japan has eliminated flights in and out of China so there is this international curtailment of flights in and out of China and in some cases people are being screened at airports and in a limited number of cases people are being quarantined if they have been and bay province and and want to come back to the U. S. or to another country do all these seem like reasonable and appropriate steps to well the the controversial to some people but to me they do seem reasonable controlling containment is important at this point I don't think it's an infringement around do infringement on anybody's personal rights we have to control cases and monitor cases and trace contacts and any time the thirties learn that an infected person has written on an airplane and then then we headed off into the city where they've arrived medially there three hundred people roughly on that airplane who are contacts that have to be traced and have to be monitored if not isolated and the person who is to enter the city and has gone to his or her family and they're more context there that will immediately have to be traced that's what happened in Toronto early on during the sars epidemic one case got into Toronto and she spread the the infection rather widely as soon as she's gotten there right so so the steps that managed to bring the sars epidemic under control back in the early two thousands were exactly these kinds of steps exactly these kinds of steps we knew less about sars at the very beginning except that it there was some very dangerous infectious disease caused by an unknown pathogen that had come out of southern China to Hong Kong and gotten to Toronto Beijing Bangkok and one or two I think Hong Kong one or two other cities and then there was very rigorous no medical isolation and containment and contact tracing and public health officials were able to reduce the transmission rate of sars to a very low level now in terms of the average secondary cases caused by each primary case the average number of infections that each infected person cost they brought that to a very low level and essentially they stopped the sars outbreak right now they've been some rip reporting suggesting that the trump administration has over the last couple years reduced the government's ability to fight a viral epidemic do you have an opinion about that yes I think it's I think it's well documented in the trunk budgets and it's been I think disastrous for the CDC and for our preparedness my understanding is that trumps twenty twenty budget proposed cutting one point three billion from the CDC budget that's twenty percent below the twenty nineteen level in the twenty nineteen level contained cuts of seven hundred fifty million including I look this up recently including a proposed cut of a hundred and two million specifically for emerging and zoonotic diseases which is what this is so the trump administration budgets have been hamstring the CDC and our ability to react to circumstances just like this course budget proposals aren't always inactive your point is well taken that budget proposals don't necessarily translate into approve budgets but the effort has been there by the trump administration to reduce drastically the CDC and I think that they have succeeded to a very great degree there's been around understandably on protective masks and gloves should should people be trying to get them what's it's a it's a sign of panic that there has been around but there has been I went into my local drug store here in Bozeman Montana yesterday to see if I could buy some masks to take with me just in case when I fly to Australia on Thursday I thought well what if on the way back a typhoon re routes me through China or something so I thought I would carry some masks my local drug store was sold out of masks and that has happened a lot of places around the country is that called for I would say no despite the fact that I was one person trying to buy some is and you know an emergency travel precaution but masks particularly the simple surgical mask that you see on so many people specially travelers I hear the experts saying that those are very helpful in containing the spread of infected droplets from people who are infected containing costs containing CSE sneezes buy a sick person but much much much less effective in protecting a well person from the sneeze is coming out of another person so in other words where mask if you're sick if you're coughing as a courtesy to people around you don't be nearly as concerned about wearing a mask just as a preventive when you step on an airliner go to a big store right I think the CDC our recommends that ordinary civil citizens don't really need to worry about masks but health workout probably should I think this I think the CDC is also saying look ordinary people we have a shortage of masks let those masks be used by health care workers who need them most rather than wearing and when you go to the hardware store David common is a science writer and the author of the book spillover animal infections in the next human

Wuhan China Chinese Government
"terry gross" Discussed on Inside Podcasting

Inside Podcasting

11:24 min | 9 months ago

"terry gross" Discussed on Inside Podcasting

"Hello and welcome to a bonus episode of inside podcasting. The show in which creators discuss their craft. This installment contained some juicy extras from my interview with everything alive creator. Ian Chill log in my hi opinion. This material which initially landed on the cutting room floor is just as compelling as what went into the interview episode. We released last year. But we just didn't have time to include -cluded during our regular season. I should probably tell you in advance at this. Content has two different sections. The first contains a bit more about Ian Background and the second unearth earth. Some additional good stuff about how he makes his show. And don't worry I'll jump in when we come to the end of that First Section just a you know when we're shifting gears one and final note on this. If you haven't listened to my original interview with Ian Please go back and listen to that I then listen to this bonus episode. It will make more sense that way. I'll put a link to that episode in this episode's show notes so that you can just click over from you're listening APP rather than scanning through everything also so a quick update on season two of the podcast due to some unforeseen scheduling issues. which I won't bore you with here? It's taking a little longer than expected to get rolling on season two. That's at it will come together and I will keep you closely posted on all related developments. Okay without further ADO. Let's roll the tape so at fresh air. When you say you weren't flexing the writing muscle? What was your role? Mostly the editing. And when I started there was meeting with a razor blade and tape which might make you think I started there in eighteen. Sixty three but in fact who We were on tape there until two thousand seven two thousand out which is great. It's such a great way to learn. So so when I was starting out at the baby boomer show the producer who is heading that up had a whole career where she learned on reel tate and I would be doing digital editing with her sitting in sort of directing what she wanted done and she would have have the whole thing in her head and say things like okay take the six question and take off the second half of it and then take the third question move that after the seventh question and and just like there was something about. I think I think learning on. Reel to reel tape where you just have to organize it in your mind and then you can kind of move it around in your mind because it requires a little more planning than non linear editing It's also really great. It's just fun cutting with a razor blade. Also what I learned from Danny Miller is that the best way to eat a snickers bar is to open it up and cut it in slices with a razor blade. You're not using to cut tape. You get like perfect cross section. Yeah it's beautiful. That's the main thing I learned all right. Well that's worth something. I'll all go and try that you should maybe you can interview a snickers bar one of these days. What it feels like? When they're being cut with a razor blade in tortured there would actually be a lot of voices? You could speak with you. He not airmail. Yeah so anyway. Back to business okay. So so so you were about to speak about what happened next. Yes Oh after Fisher. I went a to work on a NPR show called the Bryant Park project which was NPR's trying to do kind of a younger morning show. That was is more for the web than for the radio sky guests kind of a proto podcast and that was a really amazing place with a lot of people who are now all over the place doing really interesting things in that show got cancelled like it seems like about five minutes after I got hired and then I wondered the wilderness outside of NPR for a little while then. I hosted hosted an animated news show for Good magazine where we would do Daily News and I would talk and then they would animate this blue character as me. on Youtube. I don't know I I hope not sack You know what I don't. Yeah it's good. I think it was called good news from good magazine. We might have to look it up not on this show but we had our moments. Okay I think making a daily news show which has needs to be animated by. I A person every day is not a great Niagara Idea. Anyway from there I eventually. I started doing a little bit of worked for wait. Wait from New York. And then they eventually dragged me out to Chicago and I stayed there for several years and it was great and Mike and I started how to do everything there. Mike Danforth the EP of Wailing. Okay no I didn't realize that was connected to how to do everything. Yeah yes with host okay. Got It was that show Nissim him in that show you interview. Experts take listener questions and you answer them with the help of experts. wrecked act. Yes was that podcast. You know a distant cousin of everything is alive or DC. Those two completely different animals demoss. They're really different shows. I mean how did you everything was really rough in. I mean in a way that I like just felt it. Didn't I feel very produced. It was It was not beautifully scorer edited or anything But a lot of that. DNA exists in. Everything's alive certainly owes. You know a lot of my philosophy about editing. I how to do everything we we really found fun ways to tell stories. That could have been boring if we didn't find a fun way to tell them. And Yeah I mean that's like like everything's alive. I hope does that too. Yeah you did over two hundred and fifty episodes of that show. Why why did you ended it really just because I was I wanted to Kinda strike out on my own and leave? NPR and NPR owns that property. And so there was there was no way to continue But you miss your co host. You don't have a chance to see him area often anymore. We're we're we're in regular touch. I mean he gave toasted our wedding. So it's like he's yet no. He is very much in my life but I miss having we were we really have. It had a great creative partnership where he some somebody that you know we can edit each other without any kind of compliment. Sandwich in which and Yeah Yeah I mean I've I don't think I've ever had. That's true I with him. I I feel like he's a person I could give a pile of tape to and never need to listen before it ended up posted Because I trust what he would do with it. Even if it wasn't what I would do with it I trust what he would do with it and That's a rare and wonderful thing. That's a good friend to have have in podcasting man. Hey Sky here just letting you know that we're now jumping ahead in my conversation for station with ESPN to discuss a bit more about how he makes his show enjoy so when you're recording. According I'm picturing the two of you in the same recording studio looking at each other a reading each other's body language that is that am I right pretty much. Yeah there's there's been a couple of exceptions but It's almost all been in person. Yeah that's nice and I just want sorry I just did a taping. I just did a taping typing in a a studio. That isn't our normal studio. It was kind of a big radio studio and I was much further from the actor and I think it turned out okay but I realize I did want like there's something about proximity and really being able to see somebody and see that body language that I think matters. Yeah that's doing the remotely I think is. There's a lot of advantages there. And that's something I definitely took away from from working at fresh air where she's almost never in person with the people she's interviewing right. What would you say were the advantages when you have done them remotely let what are the advantages of that for me specifically with this show? I need to be picturing them as this thing. And so when you have a human one in front of you your prejudice towards seeing human talk and thinking you're talking to human who's pretending to be a thing but it's easier to sort of you know suspend may my own disbelief and kind of get get more into it. I think when the person isn't in front of me and then there's kind of the basic thing of and this is what you hear so so much from Terry grosses if you're talking to somebody and they're telling you something like yeah so I met this person at a party and we really hit it off and and the like nod at you or wink at you or something and so you don't ever say no wait. What happened but Terry doesn't have that nod or wink? So she's like oh so what what happened. And that's both a question that you kind of never here and that most people would go right past but also it makes that person and tell a story no one has ever made them tell before because everyone has just nodded with them and so they find things in the story that maybe they never thought about about before. Yeah I love. Harry's varies smart questions I also love her just very simple. Oh questions that someone is shocked to ask. Yeah yet need to read her book that she wrote about doing interviews isn. She talked about that has she. Does them remotely most of the time. And that gave me hope that I could pull it off because almost just all of my interviews have been remote as well and I've gotten quite used to it actually So many scenes didn't are hilarious. Do you ever have trouble staying in character. I mean not really. It's just me. It's not really a character. I mean there. Are there times when you just like start laughing. Oh Yeah Yeah. That's what I mean often. Yeah.

NPR Good magazine Ian Chill Ian Background Ian Mike Danforth Danny Miller Terry producer Niagara Idea Fisher ESPN tate New York Chicago Daily News Bryant Park Harry
"terry gross" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

11:47 min | 10 months ago

"terry gross" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"This is the New Yorker Radio Hour. David Ramnik the holidays are over. So it's back to work or whatever else you've got going on and to cheer you up a little bit. We're going to feature today. None other than Terry Gross Terry and I spoke at the New Yorker Festival about her very first time hosting a radio show. was that first show. Like what was your voice like. My voice was kind kind of like that like it was really high because when I was younger too because when I get nervous my voice tends to get high and that was especially true before I understood how my voice worked. How did you do that in other words? How did you listen into yourself training yourself and make it the voice that we hear every day and love? Well when I first heard my voice voice it was really a horrible experience. I don't know if that's true for people now because people have cell phones and you can record your voice on it but but I hadn't heard my voice and so you know the way our voices sound between our ears is very different than they sound on tape so when I heard it on table it was like Oh my God. Do I sound that way and I tried to speak more slowly. I try to not sound kind of like this. But it's hard you know. It's hard but one of the smartest things I did. I think I take Alexander lessons. which is a posture? Did you know about it. Oh It's Alexander Technique and its posture. Lessons don't judge my posture. Because I'm still not very a very well postured. But it's British actors take Alexander Technique lessons and a lot of musicians do too because you get tendonitis like if you hold your wrists wrong and you're playing guitar piano or any instrument so they teach you like how to hold things in alignment alignment so that you don't hurt n. b. just so everything is aligned and and part of that. If like if you're talking like this talking I like that. It's going to affect your your vocal cords. So teach me. I need to sit up straight. Well antion read from the diaphragm like a singer like a singer. Roy and I was talking to a friend who WNYC and she said you know the thing you have to understand about a career. Like Terry Gross is that it was made possible possible by the fact that public radio paid so poorly. That women came to public radios. So cokie Roberts it's Susan Stemberg and the rest of that the whole all things considered crew which was quite female compared to the rest of radio. Yeah true okay. There's probably some truth to that because men could get higher salaries. Public radio was brand new. But uh-huh early seventies right something like that this was in the early seventies but there's other reasons for it. One of the reasons named bill seem ring because bill ceremony the first vice president for programming or I head of programming was I mean he was just had feminist values and he hired Susan Steinberg and he hired other women he wanted women on the air and he was told. You're making a big mistake. Then he knew he wasn't and he set the tone. There was the voice of authority from New York. Male voice reading reading the news not really hearing from people that are talking about. They weren't women on the air. I don't think already hardly any people of Color on here so I believe that if you have the diversity of the country reflected on here you have a diverse audience if people hear their own invoice their own perspective being acknowledged they will pay attention. But another isn't why is public radio. NPR The talent allowed of it came from the local stations stations like WBF. Oh and buffalo where I worked and because feminism was so active on college campuses then that was like ground zero for most of the feminist movement mm-hmm and a lot of ways so feminists like me were coming to their public radio station on the college campus and getting their are start there. You know there was so like it was the start of the new wave of the women's movement and you were hearing hearing that on the local public radio stations and it helped feed. NPR CASSATT talent was coming from. You once wrote this. I often ask. It's my guests about what they consider to be their invisible weaknesses and shortcomings. I do this because these are the characteristics that define us no less than our strains grants what we feel sets US apart from other people is often the thing that shapes us as individuals. What do you see as your own invisible usable weaknesses especially be severe professional life Well because I don't see any. I met him perfect now. Now since you asked a discussion. I think I've overcome this but I was an inherently shy person and in like the microphone. Kind of liberated me to ask things and to have a power that I never felt that I had And it was hard at first. I didn't know how to do it at first but I enjoyed it immediately. You got off on it in a certain where well it was like. You know I like theater but I'm not an actor. I like reading but I never got to talk to authors. I love movies and I never got deducted people make them and this was way of doing things like that permission. It's permission and it's permission and you know I grew up socialized to be liked. You know from the generation of women. Where would be nice be liked? Don't create a problem uh-huh and like suddenly like no. It's not about being liked it about doing your job. Holding people accountable. Asking asking asking probing questions asking sensitive questions. I is there any relationship between conversation and therapy. Have you ever. Have you ever gone and through therapy and edited at all. I'm in I see a therapist and I love therapy because it's a really really different relationship but I'll try to define the difference like when you're in therapy. The therapist job is to help me right to so help me understand myself and get through life in as painless as possible. Ideally yes and to help help me think through matters that are very perplexing and that are Making it hard for me to move forward but the job up of the interviewer. I'm not there to be your life coach or to to help you solve your problems. I am there to help. You clarify her thoughts to help you. Express his thoughts to help shape the narrative that I'm going to try to move through and to ask. Ask questions that I think might be helpful in maybe even in framing some new thoughts and perhaps in seeing something in a different way but but but probably not. But that's the best possible scenario. You seem uniquely able to get people to unburden themselves or be honest about themselves. So as I look back to an interview that you did with great artists Maurice Sendak and his capacity to talk to you about issues An these are issues that you that are run throughout your interviews about mortality an illness and dying which are not easy to talk to about anybody much less a stranger stranger dedicated line. It's it's astonishing tears flow because to rates rates. Great friends died Close together all husband at a wife who've been everything I'm having to deal with that and it's very very hard very recently. Yes she died about SCO. He died that they before yesterday and I was except for her son a live person. Just be if it was my publisher of I loved. Ah loved her. You the point where you feel like you've outlived a lot of people who of course and says I don't believe in another world and another life that this they die. They're out of my life. They're gone forever like life like I'm not afraid of you. Have any theory of why you become this receptacle. That kind of Maurice. I mean had been interviewing them over the years so I wouldn't say they were friends but we were interview buddy by that point like oh we'd been through it before but I think I kind of learned as an interviewer and as an interviewee view we that the way to get somebody to speak honestly and openly isn't to flatter them or to show off. Its it's to ask questions that show your comprehension. If you can of the work that they've done and show through your questions that it has deeply affected you that it that it matters to you. Terry thank thank you and thank you. I'm Terry Gross. The host of fresh air since nineteen seventy five. We spoke at the New Yorker Festival in October. Twenty nineteen special. Thanks is to radio. Diaries and Joe Richmond interviewed the NPR Pioneer Bill. Seamer this is the New Yorker Radio Hour. I'm David Ramnik. Thanks for joining me today now. Hope you'll join US next time. The New Yorker Radio Hour is a CO production of WNYC studios and the New Yorker. Our theme music was composed and performed by Merrill Garbis of tune yards with additional music by Alexis Corato. This episode was produced by Alex Barron. Emily Boutin Gene Ave Korea. Rian Corby Karen from it. Cala David cries now. Caroline Lester Louis Mitchell. Michelle Moses and Stephen. Valentino this week's episode was produced with help from Rhonda Sherman and David Ohana of the New Yorker Festival. The New Yorker Radio Hour is supported in part by the Tarinah endowment find..

Terry Gross Terry Terry Gross David Ramnik US NPR Maurice Sendak Alexander Technique Alexander tendonitis New York Cala David Rian Corby Karen bill Caroline Lester Louis Mitchell Roy Alex Barron CASSATT Merrill Garbis WNYC studios
"terry gross" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

03:42 min | 10 months ago

"terry gross" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"What you're about to hear happened in Miami Gringo and I sitting on the beach now there was security of your life where you're kind of as I understand it a little on the directionless side? I think the Amish would call it a room spring when you you. You're in your early twenties when you go to sort of shed your identity from sheep's Head Bay a little bit. You were in a Hippie commune in my right well to be precise when when I was in college we called it. A collective not commun- In the sense that like for at least for a long period which share our money and cooking and the cleaning and all that which I think is a very sensible. You know arrangement have And then we did something really silly. We spent the summer on professors land living in tents and when it would really storm we'd go to the Dunkin donuts and that would be my favorite part. I was so not cut out for like living intense. You know you you wouldn't have done well at Woodstock. I don't think I went to Woodstock. Yeah what did you think you were going to do with your life. You're in buffalo and I studying to do to teach you. You were a teacher for a little while I was a teacher. I got fired within six weeks because I was that good. That's that's a bad teacher. How'd you get fired six weeks? Well it was kind of easy. It was eighth grade English rush junior high in Buffalo. New York's toughest inner city junior high. When someone from the board of Ed came to like observe? Observe me a AH. My students overturned the bookcase as if to send a direct message. Like she doesn't know what she's doing I didn't I didn't know how to keep them in the classroom. Let alone to teach. It seems harsh though to get it was six weeks short. Then like I'm short now and and you know I wasn't much older than they were and I. I really didn't know how to be an authority figure. They needed structure. They needed security. Those were the things that they often didn't have at home or in the streets and I didn't know oh how to give it to them so you go back home in defeat. Maybe doing some typing. I think to work. The temp agency is where I got criticized for when there was no work to do reading. Yeah so you decided to virtual visiting terrible terrible thing but so radio came to. It seems to me in a in in a pretty odd way if there was a feminist radio station or feminist radio show radio show at the college station and which I've been listening to add another Dr. I had which was typing. The Buffalo State College Casualty Policy Manual. So work doesn't get more interesting than I had on. WBF Oh The station on the college campus in the background. Like oh go. The shows were so good and when my job at the faculty policy manual was over. Cassette type. Everything Efficient I ended up having a roommate back in the house. That was not a Commun- who was going to be on the feminist show and it turns out that she came out on the show and then her her girlfriend was moving to the lesbian feminist. Show opening up a place on the feminist Michaux purchased the right which is long story. But I ended up taking that place.

Buffalo Commun Woodstock Ed Buffalo State College Dunkin donuts Head Bay Miami Michaux New York
"terry gross" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

08:47 min | 10 months ago

"terry gross" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"I'm David Ramnik. I've got a little confession to make when I first started doing this program. I was more than a little anxious. I've been in a print journalist all my life a writer and an editor but talking to you in my own voice on the radio or podcast felt a little alien so to prepare myself. I decided to study the great ones and at the very top of that list has got to be Terry. Gross gross has been the host of fresh air for nearly forty five years and over that time she's interviewed thousands and thousands of guests from Ray Charles to Hillary Clinton too. I don't know any summary of her. Big Gets doesn't actually do her. Her Justice Terry is perhaps the best interviewer of our time. Let's strike the. Perhaps she is TERI gross. Join me in October. Twenty nineteen at the a New Yorker Festival with a crowd welcomed here Mica Rockstar. The Terry I'm basically going to steal tips from you. I don't really care about them. I WanNa know how you do it because you go into an interview it is. It's it's it's obvious to me and I think all your listeners from the get-go that you are so grounded in what the knowledge that's necessary to have for extended real conversation. I'd like to know about a process what goes into your week. How does it work? Well do the research the afternoon and the night before and and then in the morning I write up the questions my interviews often at ten in the morning so I don't have a lot of time to do anything really And and then after that I'm reading a copy to introduce gas while the show is actually on the air so to speak. I'm in the studio Just in case as but I've tried to prerecord all the all the introductions and I'm writing copy for tomorrow show our show is on and then back to the route you don't do it all yourself that God God knows I I even on our modest show. I have a team of people that works very hard to research and and book people and all the arrest who you've had the same some of the same people for a very long time. We have a great generational mix on our show. People are in their twenties thirties. Forties fifties sixties. We we try so hard to keep up with pop culture. It's not possible anymore. There is just too much to keep up with so they go to the film festivals and watch all the netflix stuff stuff. That's coming out and all the screenings and TV shows and then they'll give me like little little film festival things like they'll show show me scenes from earlier movies. I'll see the new movie and maybe I've seen some of their old movies already but then they'll show me seen firms from movies or if it's one of those twenty episodes they drop at the same time kind of things the producers will watch the episodes. Give me a good sense of the highlights. Show me scenes but when it comes to the book like with few exceptions I will be the one who reads the book and read the research and and do all the processing of that one of the distinguishing features of your show and being on it is that we're never in the same very rarely in the same room with you. I've been interviewed a lot of people than Yorker have and what they do. is they go to a public radio studio and they put on headphones and sooner or later after the usual what did you have for breakfast to get sound levels you come on and you welcome us and you give us a few rules are there. Okay the advice I always give. Ah The bill of rights that I read to people and I told them that since we're recording. They should feel free to take advantage of that. If at and you point in the middle of an answer of they feel like they're not what they really want there to say or they just thought of a clearer better more concise way of putting it and they want a second crack at it they can back up to an earlier part of the answer and say it again but if they do that they should start at the beginning of a sentence so we can make a clean edit and if I asked them anything too who personal they should let me know move onto something else and I'll also tell them like if I make a mistake. Interrupt me and correct me that way. I can say it again and get it right. We can edit out the error and prevent it from going on the air and prevent it from being on your wikipedia page forever now. I I think you probably know what's coming next I. I was raised in print journalism. And if I were interviewing Henry Kissinger and it slipped out of his mouth have tomorrow. I'm going to bomb Cambodia. And then he said wait a minute. I didn't mean that I wouldn't and we were on the record. I wouldn't give them a back sees. I wouldn't let them Redo. I understand it completely for lots of other fields of endeavor but particularly particularly political conversation consequential yes And I do not do that with politicians. So who would you not do it with anybody. WHO's in elected office or running for elected office? Would you but you interview them anyway. So you don't like doing politicians to you know because for two reasons one is I feel like they walk in with their talking points. No matter what you ask them that's what they're going to tell you and the other thing is. I think if if you're interviewing a politician you owe it to your readers to your listeners. To know the difference between the Bullshit and the truth and if you're not following them I'm on a regular basis. You're not going to necessarily be able to catch that if I'm doing. Say like three hours of researcher. Even if I'm taking off off a day just to prepare for that interview I'm not GonNa know enough to know when they're just being hypocritical or did nine nine an action covering up an action if you're following them if you're covering them on your beat you will know the difference and be able to catch them in that so I feel like unprepared and therefore inapt at doing that. I just don't I take politics too seriously. Salihi to be in a position where I'm letting somebody get away with something. How soon into an interview do you know? This is going to be good or this is going to to be not so good. Sometimes I feel like I know in the soundcheck sometimes. Somebody is so kind of grumpy and just like Oh they made me be here. It says in my contract to be here to promote an here. What do you want from me and you could just tell? Sometimes you get past the first few questions and suddenly you hear shift and you hear like somebody's Kinda were clicking in and engaging and that's it's great when that happens and there's an advantage to being in Philadelphia by yourself be. It seems paradoxical to make you would think as in the conversation we're having now despite despite the fact that there are all these other people we have physical cues we have things that are is work or hands or something to indicate confusion or ask me more or back off or something. You don't have that but maybe you're listening better. I don't know well well. I was thinking the best of all possible worlds since we're both just hearing each other though. were making better radio because everything has to all the queues have to be in our the voice and whether that's actually true or not in terms of being effective I don't know but there is something incredibly surprisingly intimate about having somebody's voice just fed into your ears directly into your head in your brain tear. You grew up in Brooklyn. I grew up the New Jersey. Same Radio area if we're being honest with ourselves in when we were kids and you're just a little older than me. There were no women on the radio. The Allison Allison for the night for W. W. FM kind of purring into the exactly into the microphone. The the night will sue you like a tender mother full new against a soft person and hiking. You from the home of the world in this brief our you a massive all well hi ways and the universe nestles in yourself so come.

Terry TERI gross Ray Charles David Ramnik netflix Hillary Clinton New Jersey Cambodia Henry Kissinger Allison Allison writer Yorker Philadelphia editor Brooklyn researcher W. W. FM
"terry gross" Discussed on Celeb News Ride Home

Celeb News Ride Home

04:25 min | 10 months ago

"terry gross" Discussed on Celeb News Ride Home

"Beauty routine while her mom and Dad Lori Loughlin and Mossy mojo newly continued tin. You'd their legal battle. And the Olsen twins made a rare video for Ashley Benson's birthday and no they're not on cameo so year you can't get one. Here's what you missed today in the world of celebrity news do you feel that deal it. The air has changed changed. And we're now in the middle of a magical time in history. That's right Adam. Driver has somehow become one of the most famous people alive. How do I know this because it seems like? He's at the centre of different major controversy every single week. People Love Adam driver. People Hate Adam driver. I mean folks folks. This is the time to be alive. Today's Adam driver news revolves around him walking out on Terry Gross in the middle of fresh air interview that he did to promote his movie. Marriage story daily beast. Got The exclusive on this. They described the incident as follows and I quote sources at. NPR told told the daily beast. That driver walked out of an interview earlier. This month with fresh air host Terry Gross after expressing displeasure at the idea of listening to a clip of himself. Singing being alive from the musical company drivers character sings the song late. In Noah Baumbach New Netflix film marriage story and quote. Wow okay okay. So Adam driver walked out on Terry Gross. Because he didn't want to hear himself saying I mean that's kind of relatable. He also did mention before the interview. that he it doesn't watch clips of himself. Some people are calling him a diva for doing this. A lot of people are coming to Adams defense. Low calling his walking out on the interview a mental health self preservation tactic in Adam drivers October New Yorker profile. He discusses his anxiety over watching himself perform. The New Yorker wrote wrote quote. The first time driver saw himself in girls on Dunham's laptop he was mortified. That's when I was like I can't watch myself in things. I certainly can't watch this this if we're going to continue doing it. He said many actress declined to watch themselves but for driver that reluctance amounts to a phobia and quote depending on where you stand you either. Thank Adam drivers a diva shore. Like I said or you think he's someone with really intact boundaries. WHO's protecting his phobia or you don't care at all and you probably have a a really nice chill brain? That's not constantly thinking about Adam driver personally. I don't know what side of Adam drive her story. I'm on I don't know if there's a wrong or right side I mean I don't I just don't think about it. I really have to. I have to let this marinate if you are one of the people that's reluctant to make fun of Adam driver for walking out on this interview. That's totally fair. That being said surely we can all come together and make fun of Adam driver for how he used to eat. A whole rotisserie chicken back in the middle of acting class at juilliard. Right if you're behind on your Adam driver news and didn't know eater wrote about this a few days ago saying quote on an episode of the podcast. The film re Roll Drivers Juilliard Classmates Scott Yellow recalls drivers love for Rotisserie chicken to the point where he'd eat a whole one in class eater then unquote solo. WHO said quote? He would walk around school with an entire chicken in one hand and a jug of water in the other end quote. Can you just picture that a young young Adam driver walking into a black box theater with a whole chicken and a whole jug of water. I'm personally picturing the plastic jug of water that you get at the grocery store it kind of looks like it should have milk in it but it doesn't it has water and it has like the blue plastic top and listen. It's not like acting. Classes typically have desks so I'm guessing if Adam driver related eat a whole chicken in acting class he had to have eaten it on his lap the mandated chicken on his lap. Okay and we can all agree that that's funny and worth making fun of. Isn't it beautiful. How we all just came together like that I could cry? Teresa.

Adam Terry Gross Lori Loughlin Dunham Ashley Benson Noah Baumbach Olsen NPR Netflix Teresa Scott Yellow
Adam Driver Walked Out in the Middle of His Interview With Terry Gross

Celeb News Ride Home

03:39 min | 10 months ago

Adam Driver Walked Out in the Middle of His Interview With Terry Gross

"Do you feel that deal it. The air has changed changed. And we're now in the middle of a magical time in history. That's right Adam. Driver has somehow become one of the most famous people alive. How do I know this because it seems like? He's at the centre of different major controversy every single week. People Love Adam driver. People Hate Adam driver. I mean folks folks. This is the time to be alive. Today's Adam driver news revolves around him walking out on Terry Gross in the middle of fresh air interview that he did to promote his movie. Marriage story daily beast. Got The exclusive on this. They described the incident as follows and I quote sources at. NPR told told the daily beast. That driver walked out of an interview earlier. This month with fresh air host Terry Gross after expressing displeasure at the idea of listening to a clip of himself. Singing being alive from the musical company drivers character sings the song late. In Noah Baumbach New Netflix film marriage story and quote. Wow okay okay. So Adam driver walked out on Terry Gross. Because he didn't want to hear himself saying I mean that's kind of relatable. He also did mention before the interview. that he it doesn't watch clips of himself. Some people are calling him a diva for doing this. A lot of people are coming to Adams defense. Low calling his walking out on the interview a mental health self preservation tactic in Adam drivers October New Yorker profile. He discusses his anxiety over watching himself perform. The New Yorker wrote wrote quote. The first time driver saw himself in girls on Dunham's laptop he was mortified. That's when I was like I can't watch myself in things. I certainly can't watch this this if we're going to continue doing it. He said many actress declined to watch themselves but for driver that reluctance amounts to a phobia and quote depending on where you stand you either. Thank Adam drivers a diva shore. Like I said or you think he's someone with really intact boundaries. WHO's protecting his phobia or you don't care at all and you probably have a a really nice chill brain? That's not constantly thinking about Adam driver personally. I don't know what side of Adam drive her story. I'm on I don't know if there's a wrong or right side I mean I don't I just don't think about it. I really have to. I have to let this marinate if you are one of the people that's reluctant to make fun of Adam driver for walking out on this interview. That's totally fair. That being said surely we can all come together and make fun of Adam driver for how he used to eat. A whole rotisserie chicken back in the middle of acting class at juilliard. Right if you're behind on your Adam driver news and didn't know eater wrote about this a few days ago saying quote on an episode of the podcast. The film re Roll Drivers Juilliard Classmates Scott Yellow recalls drivers love for Rotisserie chicken to the point where he'd eat a whole one in class eater then unquote solo. WHO said quote? He would walk around school with an entire chicken in one hand and a jug of water in the other end quote. Can you just picture that a young young Adam driver walking into a black box theater with a whole chicken and a whole jug of water. I'm personally picturing the plastic jug of water that you get at the grocery store it kind of looks like it should have milk in it but it doesn't it has water and it has like the blue plastic top and listen. It's not like acting. Classes typically have desks so I'm guessing if Adam driver related eat a whole chicken in acting class he had to have eaten it on his lap the mandated chicken on his lap. Okay and we can all agree that that's funny and worth making fun of. Isn't it beautiful. How we all just came together like that I could cry?

Adam Terry Gross Dunham Noah Baumbach NPR Netflix Scott Yellow One Hand Milk
Adam Driver reportedly walked out of an NPR interview with Philly's Terry Gross

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 10 months ago

Adam Driver reportedly walked out of an NPR interview with Philly's Terry Gross

"Well to Star Wars fans he's Connell ran but Adam driver is getting Oscar buzz for marriage story in part because of this someone told you to someone to shoot to his rendition and being alive from the show company NPR's Terry gross was interviewing driver but when she played that clip he walked out mid interview a producer admits that her driver doesn't like listening to clips of his movies driver has SAG and golden globe nominations and has already won the Gotham Best Actor

Connell NPR Terry Gross Producer Adam Oscar Gotham
"terry gross" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:18 min | 11 months ago

"terry gross" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is fresh air I'm Terry gross let's get back to my interview with Mario Heller who directed the new movie a beautiful day in the neighborhood starring Tom Hanks as Fred Rogers and Matthew Rees as a journalist assigned to profile him for esquire magazine Heller also directed the films can you ever forgive me and the diary of a teenage girl when we left off Heller and just told the story of how she and her three year old son had watched an episode of Mister Rogers neighborhood that dealt with death which was an upsetting idea for her son who would never heard about that before do you remember how you learned about tough I remember my grandmother's husband dying but I think I was older I think it was seven or eight when he died but I remember that being the first real person I knew who died and I and that my parents didn't let me go to the funeral and I remember feeling like it was really unfair you want to go I wanted to go I don't I I thought I wasn't like I felt and I think about sort of Mister Rogers and that way of like I I felt like a full person you know I felt like I was having as big of an experience as everybody else and why wasn't I allowed to go to the funeral and I think they were trying to protect me was upsetting for you to learn that such a thing existed and stuff yeah yeah I mean I yeah I was one of those kids who thought about death a lot and we had we had the big earthquake in the bay area needing on how old were you then ten mmhm but that really it scared me in like a deep dark way you know it really shook my sense of what could happen in the world it was just the first my my brother was trapped in a warehouse we couldn't get to him in the house of bread Jenna we didn't know if he was okay and you know friends of mine their parents were in San Francisco and the bay bridge collapsed and we didn't know if they were okay and that there are people who are part of our community who died in it it was just so chaotic it was just the end of the world it felt like the end of the world at the time it really depends and it it's definitely I had a high was it it's still something that has meant you know meant something in my bigger emotional life that I am still dealing with intact and you know I think back on myself as a kid and I'm like I and I see it in my kid I think that's why this experience of showing in that episode was so I felt for him so much because I I remember what it was to be the kid who was thinking about the kind of dark questions of life and while other people aren't but now you know I had this experience when I was preparing to make this movie before I went to Pittsburgh I went to a a talk at the Buddhist send center in Brooklyn and I think I had this idea in the little I really know about Buddhism or Buddha where I was thinking that somehow if you are very enlightened that you're very peaceful that year you're at peace you're sort of happy and this woman who's giving this talk said of the goal of Buddhism is not your peace or to to never feel any pain the goal is to feel all the pain and that made me think about Fred at that time because all all of all the things we were hearing in the research about Fred was that he went to emphasize such a great degree with the people he came into contact with you would need a stranger on the street and they would pour their heart out to him about what they were going through and he worked almost hold it like a vessel like he he just became this great vessel for other people to for what they were experiencing into and and I think he felt at all he was he was present in the pain of the world and not denying it and he grew up with a lot of illness I mean he was a sick child was often isolated that's how we started doing voices like forces first puppets right he was his parents were so nervous that he was going to be kidnapped Adam chauffeured to school so that he was even more isolated from his friends yeah and I think he was in his own in his own head a lot in that way but I think he also was very he spent the rest of his life therefore trying to be super connected to other people rather than being so separated from them I want to play one of Mister Rogers songs that you use in the film hi I particularly like this one it's it's it's one called what do you do with the mad that you feel and it's all it's it's a song all about learning to control yourself and your emotions get out of hand and I think this is a song that most of us adults should learn by heart to so so this is the real Fred Rogers singing at here we go.

Mario Heller Terry gross three year
"terry gross" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

12:34 min | 1 year ago

"terry gross" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"Last month at an advertising week event in New York I had the chance to sit down with a legend of public radio and of good conversation Terry Gross has host so for people who might not be as familiar with the way daily radio is made what is this sort of quick and dirty version of what your schedule looks like putting together a week of fresh air with their staff well we have several producers well one producer handles books we have a couple of producers who handle movies and TV it's impossible to keep up with movies and TV now and a news producer and they're spending their days just looking for good stuff to talk about and then I kinda jump in and give a curse look to all the materials they're looking out to see who should be on the show we have these interminably long meetings deciding who should be on the show sometimes the guests are pre interview just to see like I speak well do you want to hear them because if somebody sounds kind of like this on the air no matter what story they have to tell you're not gonNa want listen and I've interviewed people who have experienced the most amazing things and they've been boring and then I've interviewed people who are basically talking about small things they've made it fascinating because some people know how to speak and tell a story and sadly some people don't it's something you have to adjust to on radio some people say everybody's got a great story I mean actually everybody doesn't have a great story that you wanNA share on the radio and that's part of the the thing about doing a show like fresh air is that you're always saying no to people we do just a few interviews a week and for every interview we do there's a whole lot of people who have said no to who've like knocked on our door and they want to be on the show that's something I found very hard to do it I guess being a woman growing up being a girl like Wannabe liked you want to be your social to be liked to be nice and suddenly you're saying no to people it's hard yeah I heard an interview with you in two thousand seventeen and you were talking about making some changes to the prep they did at that time so that you're not trying to digest every page of every book and great agonizing detail and those seems to be at that time fairly fresh changes to the year process how did it go back to reading the book attack that takes up a lot of time is it does read a lot of bugs I do know it's hard and I've I've come up with my own way of reading the were I kind of read each page really quickly and then circle things don't WanNa remember one or take notes on and then I dog ear that page on I'm done going through all those pages. Then I take notes on everything I've dog eared and it's just it's a really long process then I read articles after so and then I try to pretend like getting enough sleep knowing that I won't I try not to panic about that yeah so when you're doing that amount of pressure it seems to me that now a person who is particularly an artist musician or something like that an actor is likely to have done kind of put a lot more personal content out into the world then maybe they would have at some point they have appeared on as you know every human being issued tested birth now so they've appeared on if they don't have their own podcast their friends podcasts they have an instagram account. How does it change the conversations that you have with people when there's already very often a big big supply of their personal voice out there sure well one is I tell myself that not everybody in our audience has spent their year listening to my guess be interviewed so that I have to tell myself that to move forward but then I try to read or listen to some of the things that are out there and go a step deeper and instead of like repeat would've already read say like you've said that Blah Blah Blah but what about Yada Yada Yada or just like take what's already out there and try to get it up further with it that's the dream anyways I wanted to talk to you a little bit about your conversation with Liz oh which I thought was yes very interesting it was as if you don't know though musician she pushed back on a couple of the premises of the questions that you were asking her some tried to do with her for example she and you had really different ideas about what it means for a woman to be naked on an album cover her eight struck her as a really different thing than it did you what are you thinking when that starts to happen in an interview our you balancing I don't want to make this about myself but I want to engage with what she's challenging about the question and and just to give a little more detail about that so Liz oh is into body positivity and which is great and she's naked on her album cover she's you know she's is a large woman her her dancers are large too and it's you know it's important of pride but for me growing up when I did in the earlier days of the women's movement in in the late sixties and early seventies being nude on the album cover being nude in a context where you're actually selling thing always struck me a lot of other young women at the time as being exploitive because we were used to if a woman's nude or if she's partially dressed it's to sell stuff to men it's all about the male gaze and okay so women have taken control now and they're putting themselves out there but sometimes I'm not always is comfortable with it because it still feels like no matter what the intent you're putting out with still might be perceived differently it's a very confusing issue and I love having Jenner `rational conversations and dialogues about that because I think it's really important that feminists have different generations understand but understand where we're all coming because I think the bottom line is we all agree that our bodies are on there shouldn't be used by other people to exploit things but then she also really challenged me on Saudi positively because I had said that it was a bold statement for her to picture herself naked on the cover because typically people who for large aren't naked on things to sell them and I think of an album covers being sales thing you know maybe really no I think that's right and so everybody was tweeting Terry said Lizard was brave in putting herself and I said bold I didn't say brave and like the whole conversation in a way got hijacked by one word which was bowled instead of brave and I think they have to in my mind to slightly different meanings yeah here's the interesting thing I what I was thinking about when I listened to that interview is that in some ways her reaction to the premises of the question and this has happened in other interviews that you've done certainly tallahassee coats and other people part of what it does I think is it it shines a little bit of a light on the of the idea in journalism of it's not about me I'm just doing the interview is based on the idea of a kind of completely neutral point of view free the person asking questions and I think when she pushed back on that it really demonstrates that everybody has a point of view and you know you have a kind of awesome that you sort of have a lot of experience with and just like you're saying and it's just dip it was interesting to me because I think when you get into that and when you have a guest who say banged question that you're asking is based on premise that that I don't agree with it changes kind of what your role is and I know that journalists never want it to turn into a that's about themselves and their point of view I think cultural journalism when you're dealing with artists I think it's really different than when you're dealing with politics in politics it's my job to be neutral but t challenge misrepresentation and lies with people on culture unless you are passionate unless you can back to the material why the hell you're talking to this person like the meaning of art is that it means something to you that brings out something to you that it makes your life the better that you know it makes you connect to people who are like you and to people who aren't like that brings you pleasure that it's reflective all of them and unless you can express that in your questions then what's the point and when somebody like Elizabeth like I said I like that kind of dialogue and I think it actually makes so really good radio when there's pushback I don't mind when somebody pushes back at me because I think it adds a little drama and also I think it opens up the door for more on you're standing in this case more understanding generation only about what it means to be nude on your album cover and also maybe a lago body positively it's not a problem team yeah yeah I just don't like getting misinterpreted on twitter when people didn't say yeah that's a that's a hard one I think for everybody in very common when you talk about the interviews that are really great because you have that kind of dialogue you obviously have had interviews you probably do your wikipedia page as an entire section on difficult interviews outright yes the sort of the notoriously difficult interviews in Simmons and the Bill O'Reilly and things like that those are the ones that everyone else thinks of is difficult are there interviews or kinds of interviews that you think of as having been difficult What's that really are challenging for you that don't necessarily that aren't necessarily of that someone being really rude to you kind of brand but that T- you are really challenging and call well some of the really hard interviews or the one where the ones where you're interviewing journalist about a really complicated subject and you're trying to simplify it and Clara fire for listeners but the subject is so complicated it's hard to figure out how to do it so that would be one example when somebody is a well known writer and maybe I've only read one of their books and I have a lot to catch up on because people are going to be all over you unless you really know your stuff like that makes it really hard or nowadays as people how long has your book my book re hundred pages and by the way fresh air is on page fifteen so oh sang a lot of the books are unlike Linda's William longer than three hundred I mean I get these five hundred and six hundred page book supposed to digest just feel like the editors you didn't really need to be this long naked short our biggest function of my editor yeah we agree with that their interviews that are difficult for you because of the regard that you have for the person that you're interviewing I ready talking about Stevenson yes I'm those can be very difficult because it seems me that engaging with someone as a sort of like what's it like to be so awesome is actually not necessarily the most interesting way to engage with an artist but it's very hard not I kind of learned that tell somebody before the interview starts how much you admire them and then let it go because they want to be interviewed by a professional and not by ahead of their fan club or worse yet stocker so I try to really.

Terry Gross instagram New York
"terry gross" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

16:17 min | 1 year ago

"terry gross" Discussed on Fresh Air

"In Philadelphia I'm Terry Gross with fresh air today insects while we can't live without them. No matter how much you might wish we could there are the obvious reasons we need. Insects like pollinating pollinating plants and making honey and less obvious ones experiments are showing how even cockroaches might soon be heroes. Also insects can be a nutritious sustainable alternative to meet. I mean it's like shrimps. Why should it be any different fantasy? Just the shrimps of the sky instead of shrimps from the sea. We'll talk with conservation. Biologist ends for Droop thijssen author of Buzz Sting Bite later. We'll hear from Lisa Hanna Walt creative designer of the animated series Bujak of course men and creator of the Netflix Animated Series Toco and Birdie and Ken Tucker reviews the new album by Titus andronicus. That's coming up on fresh. Air Summer.

Lisa Hanna Walt Terry Gross Titus andronicus Ken Tucker Philadelphia creative designer Netflix
The Apollo 11 Moon Landing, 50 Years Later

KQED Radio Show

01:26 min | 1 year ago

The Apollo 11 Moon Landing, 50 Years Later

"Tomorrow is the fiftieth anniversary of man's first steps on the moon courtesy of the NASA Apollo eleven mission which remains the most astounding and most viewed moment in the history of television today fresh air is noting that anniversary by listening to interviews with astronauts and test pilots during this hour we'll speak with pioneering test pilot Chuck Yeager one of this century's astronauts Chris Hadfield and the first American in space Alan Shephard and we'll start with one of the astronauts from that Apollo eleven moon mission fifty years ago Michael comes well Neil Armstrong and buzz Aldrin walked on the moon on July twentieth nineteen sixty nine Michael Collins was orbiting in the Apollo eleven command capsule waiting to take Armstrong and Aldrin back to earth three years before that Collins pie with a German I ten and walked in space attached to a spacecraft only by a high tech umbilical cord Michael Collins wrote an autobiography then wrote a book called lift off about the US space program lance when Terry gross spoke with Michael Collins in nineteen eighty eight she asked him about the very start of the Apollo eleven moon mission back in July nineteen sixty nine when you were strapped down in July of nineteen sixty nine waiting to head for the moon and you heard the countdown what were you thinking about when you heard the countdown I

Chuck Yeager Alan Shephard Neil Armstrong Buzz Aldrin Michael Collins Nasa Apollo Chris Hadfield United States Lance Terry Gross Fifty Years Three Years
"terry gross" Discussed on How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"terry gross" Discussed on How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

"She is a scholar of the ancient Hebrew. Christian texts. And so she turned to those texts including the NAS two gospels, which is her area. Specialization? Those are the ancient texts that were intentionally left out of the Christian canon because they were considered heretical or to mystical. And so it's this really interesting combination of her reflecting on her grief and trying to comprehend what these ancient texts tell her and then rejecting some of it as being like ridiculous, and then finding great meaning and other parts of it. Are you a practicing? No, I'm Jewish by by birth. And by culture, I'm not trying to back away from Judaism. I'm just trying to say, I don't I don't practice, and you you said, it's lane Pagel's. Remember, I don't think the title of it. It's called why religion why religion food food. Okay. Okay. I'm going with sweet potato fries. Classic. Yes. I, you know, I love eating at places that have them on the menu. Because I just think there's so I eat out a lot 'cause it's too time consuming to cook. And and I don't I just rather sit and be served for a while. And just are you a couple that goes out for thanksgiving or you go out. Yes. I once cooked, you know, when you know, my my parents died Francis's mother died where far away from from family like geographically, and so and it's become a ritual. So this is it's a ritual we maintain. Now, we go to a movie, and then we go out to eat, and I once actually tried cooking a Turkey breast and one of those plastic bags that they come in. Oh my God. It was kind of like. Sponge, you was it like a brining thing solution. I put it in the oven and and hope for the best. And and I think general you're not supposed to put plastic in the oven. I could be wrong about that within it was a paper. It was the sign maybe it was designed to be put in the Hudson. And let's just say did not work out. Finally, miscellaneous anything from your life that you love that you would recommend to others. I'm gonna go with opera. I feel like I've become a proselytizer for opera, but I fell in love with it maybe four years ago, and, you know, s somebody who grew up with rock and roll, and, you know, love country music and jazz and rock and roll and some rock, and you know, contemporary stuff and a little bit of hip hop. I never thought I never thought that. I'd like opera is there is there a particular oppor that you have fallen in love with for for those of us who maybe wanna take your advice want to get into it. Well, one of the ones I really love is Eugene on Yagan, and there's a version with an a trip co the first version of that that she did that I think is just war GIS. Opera. Terry gross. Thank you so much for taking the time. And I took a lot of your time. And I apologize. Thank you for so many years of enjoyment. Thank you for coming on. And thank you for being amazing. Oh, thank you, Michael. And thank you. You know, I I'm a big fan of yours. I like the acting work that you've done your comedy your podcast. I've listened to like a bunch of episodes, you know, over the last probably couple of years or so, and I think a really as I said before I think you're really good interviewer. And I think people who don't listen to your podcast, probably wouldn't guess that. Do you know what I mean, because they don't know that side of you that you really bring out people and you ask really perceptive questions, and you're not just trying to joke around. I think you're a really serious interviewer. And I I appreciate that. I appreciate your work. So so thank you. How it be amazing is brought to you by PR ex.

Terry gross Francis Hudson Eugene Yagan Michael four years
"terry gross" Discussed on How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"terry gross" Discussed on How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

"I experienced this to certain degree with with some people in in particular. I would say people in the political realm activists in some capacity where I often feel like there is a sometimes if you'll come with an agenda that you can't quite break through or there's a lack of authenticity. That you can't quite breakthrough. Because these people are kind of so rehearsed and so good at driving a message. Do you ever have that problem? And if so how do you how do you deal with it? Well, for me the equivalent since I'm not talking to people in office who are giving their talking points for me, the equivalent would be if somebody's on a book tour a little bit too long, and they're just kind of automatically answering questions that you might not even that might not even be the questions you ask you know, that will happen sometimes and also sometimes like someone has been interviewed so many times over the course of their career that it seems like hardly anything. You can ask where they haven't answered it already an only that we're they're not tired of answering. It I remember like the first time I interviewed Steve Martin. And I was asking him about some of a Saturday Night Live sketches and stuff like that any basically in the nicest way, he said to me. Please don't make me talk. And he was so generous in how he asked that it might have been about being a magician. When he was a kid. I forget what exactly what the questions were. But I felt like, oh, I feel for you. You know, I understand how that would be hard. But I also felt like, oh, but I haven't heard you talk about it in. You haven't been on our show talking about it. So that's a real bind for me. What's the what's the quintessential question that Terry gross skits asked more than other than any other that you would you would prefer nobody ever asked. Again, tell me about the interview with gene Simmons. You said you don't have sympathy for for a guy on the on the roof who keeps saying I'm I'm gonna jump. But my impression is you not much sympathy for anyone you you're so into yourself and just so deep. I think I think everybody should be. If it sounds like admirations coming out of you. I accept it. I think life is too short to have anything but delusional notions about yourself, which is you should really like yourself more than you deserve to for for listeners of fresh air. And I imagine if you listen to this podcast. I mean, you you you listen to fresh air one of the things you've talked about repeated Leah's how you wanted you Terry gross wanted. You got the repeatedly in there. I'm sorry. It's because it attacking by people repeat. No, it was defensive on my part because I didn't want you to feel like you were going over the same old ground. So I was going to cover it for you. Okay. I'm such a shit head. No one of the things you've talked about ad nauseam. Terry gross is. You for for a long time. If you wanted to just sort of be a cipher innocence like you didn't want people to project too much onto you because he felt like it allowed people to enjoy your work better in recent years. It seems like you've really kind of stepped into the light a little bit. You did an episode of this is uh this last season. You did Mike. You did a really funny short films this season. But this season. She's coming. Hey, I Kevin. Hi, I'm Terry gross. Thanks for coming to our show and honor to be here, Terry. This is my my Zoe Hayes. She's a big fan. Thanks so much. I read your book. It was so good. Thank you. How so good? I need the essence of people. Oh, I guess I'm curious person. And I try never to underestimate me. Kevin we can start anytime. You ready to go? Mike bigly made a really funny short film starring you and him, and you are on Falun. And so what has it been in recent years that that allows you to feel like you could step forward and be more public? Yeah. And I'll add Marc Maron interviewed me too at at bam. And I was more forthcoming in that interview. Then I think I'd ever been before him. And I think part of it is that first of all in the age of the internet like there's no hiding anymore..

Terry gross Steve Martin Mike bigly Marc Maron Zoe Hayes gene Simmons Kevin Leah
"terry gross" Discussed on How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"terry gross" Discussed on How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

"It's hard to be amazing. I Michael, Ian, black. And there is a I would I would call it a weird thing that happens when you sit down with somebody to conduct an interview like the one I'm about to conduct. So the two of you interviewer in interview e kind of entered this contract in which you both agree that one of you was going to ask questions and one of you is going to answer questions. And then that's exactly what happens in it's weird. Because a lot of times you end up talking about things that you might not even talk about with a good friend, and there can be these really profound moments of deep human connection between most of the time to strangers and then listen to by many more strangers, and it's such an artificial construct and yet when it's done. Well, it seems like those sorts of conversations not only happen all the time. But are are meant to happen. And I can tell you. It's just somebody who goes through life. Those conversations don't happen that. Much. My guest today is one of the people who makes this most unnatural format seem totally natural. And I would argue in many of argued in. Although I don't even think it's an argument that she's the best at it. Terry gross is the host of the long running radio program fresh air over the course of the last forty ish years, Terry gross has interviewed something like thirteen thousand people about as far as I can tell everything and she has become something like there's no term for it. But let's call it a national interviewer fresh air has won a bunch of awards, including a Peabody in nineteen Ninety-four in Edward r. Murrow award in two thousand and three and Terry one a national humanities medal awarded by president. Barack Obama Terry gross is also the author of all I did was ask conversations with writers actors artists, and it is my. Pleasure to welcome Terry gross to how to be amazing. Hi. Oh, hi, Michael. It's so great to be on your podcast, which I enjoy very much because I think you're really good interview. Well, thank you and taking myself out of that occasion. And it really does mean a lot. I'm not trying to brush over it. But if I spend any time on it like the blood will drain from my head, and I'll faint so taking myself out of that. Yes. What are you listening for when you are listening to an interview or from the for from the interviewer? What are you listening for from an interviewer me when I'm getting interviewed? No, even when you're just when you're just like if you're listening to let's say migrate frienemie, Marc Maron or another just terrific interviewer that you like what is it about an interview were that you really respond to. Well, there's so many different kinds of interviewers like with with more mariner respond to his personality as well. As to the questions that he's asked I respond to his personality negatively, and he knows that how did you become frenemies? Do you can't we're not? We're not like him like him. I'm going to deflect and so you can't ask me questions at least at this point. Okay later. Yeah. But suffice to say we've known each other forever. He disliked me. I disliked him. And it's been like that for decades. But we, but we have made shame anyways, we've made peace. We really have. Well, really when I'm listening to an interview, I'm not just trying to like analyze the interviewer. I'm listening to see if I'm going to enjoy the conversation and get something from it. And I'm listening for the interview interviewer to here like are they paying attention? Are they asking like no questions that get beneath the surface of things? Do they seem to care about the person and or the person's work or they're just kind of going through the motions? But mostly like, I'm listening to you know, just as like a whole like is this is this fun as interesting as worth my time. You know, this thing that's happening between these two people. Do you have anxiety as an interest in that everything? Do you? That that that is actually surprising to me to hear..

Terry gross Michael Barack Obama Terry gross Marc Maron Edward r Murrow Ian president
Review: Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj

Fresh Air

03:10 min | 2 years ago

Review: Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj

"Mission in Saudi Arabia. This is the official military document. You get it describes the Saudi people as indigenous tribes with some later mixture of negro blood from slaves imported from Africa. Oh, America, even boring technical manuals, you still somehow manage to be raised. This. This is still on the internet you guys, but a son, you know, it was probably written a while ago. Really? It was updated June twenty but has done these things are like an itunes user agreement. It's at the bottom. It's chapter one page five. Okay. But as negro still a bad word, dictionary dot com offensive after that program. Aired the American military subsequently apologized for that language and removed the entire sixty-nine page booklet from the internet Monagas parents are Muslim immigrants from India. Last year, he hosted the White House correspondents dinner the first one under the presidency of Donald Trump who breaking with tradition did not attend before hosting this new series Hassan. Manashe did a comedy special on Netflix called homecoming king? That's when Terry gross spoke with him about his family background growing up in California, the son of immigrants, she started with a clip in which he's telling the story of the anonymous threatening phone call his family received at home right after nine eleven just after the phone, call the windows on the family car were shattered Hassan went out into the street to see if he could find who did it. I look back in the middle of the street my dad's in the. The middle of the road sweeping glass out of the road. Like he works at like a hate crime barbershop. Like Muslim was anger. We gotta clean this zen Brown. Mr. Miaki, just like not saying a word I run up to my dad. Why aren't you saying something I've known ask you say something? He looks at me. And he goes I sent. Us at the whole thing. Wing it. These things happen in these things will continue to happen. That's the price we pay for being. And that's when I was like on, oh, we really are from two different generations like BMX bikes aside. My dad's from not generation like a lot of immigrants really feels like if you come to this country, you pay this thing like the American dream tax, right? Like, you're going to endorse them racism. And if it doesn't cost you your life. Well, hey, you lucked out pay it. There you go. San but

Mr. Miaki Saudi Arabia Hassan Terry Gross Africa Donald Trump White House Official America Netflix SAN India Manashe California
Donald Trump, NPR and Washington discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

00:47 sec | 2 years ago

Donald Trump, NPR and Washington discussed on Fresh Air

"Air I'm David Cooley in for. Terry gross today we continue our series of EMMY nominees Alec Baldwin who's been. Nominated for his portrayal of Donald Trump on Saturday. Night Live tells us how he created his Trump. Impression I, always say the same stupid thing, to myself I say left eyebrow up right eyebrow down stick your mouth at as far as you can try to bite. Somebody's nose off and kind. Of growl with that irritability he's also written a memoir he fell in love with movies by watching. Old black and white films. On TV with his parents I watched track fifty times listen to. Them children of the night what the music they make we'll also hear from Brian Tyree Henry who's been nominated for an EMMY for his, role as rapper paper boy on the. FX series Atlanta

Donald Trump NPR Washington Emmy David Cooley United States Christopher Freeland Scott Horsely Terry Gross Paul Taylor Alec Baldwin Brian Tyree Henry John Mccain Canada Whyy Marianna Granddad Debbie Elliott Justin Trudeau Brain Cancer
"terry gross" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"terry gross" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air I'm Terry gross let's get back. To my interview with comic and. Satirical songwriter Bo Burnham who's. Just written and directed his first feature film called eighth grade it's. About a girl on the verge of graduating from middle school she suffering from. Social anxiety but she has a YouTube blog which, she records in her bedroom giving advice to other, teens about how to be confident and be yourself, her blog has very few followers you an early YouTube, star you started making videos of. You singing your original satirical songs in, I think your bedroom What. Was the state of YouTube when you started and how old did you say you were fifteen I was sixteen yeah. It was two thousand six it was just when it started and I. Had written some little silly songs and wanted to show them to my brother who. Was a college and someone said you should, post it on, YouTube it's the site that? You can post videos? And share them and I? Was like oh cool and really it was like YouTube is just a place? Where it was like he got a funny skit or something posted here, it was like that. In my space. For sort of the things people used and they were asking very shallow questions my space was sort of just like make a little website. For yourself put your profile picture up and tell us your top. Friends and list your interests, and now kids are using Twitter, and Instagram which is basically what, do you look like what do you think what are you look like. What do you think asking base. Deep deep questions of you. All the time so the internet felt like when I was sixteen. Felt like a digit It'll bulletin board? And now it feels like really a place to exist and reflect yourself So when you? Started posting videos of your songs for your family how did they end up going viral They were posted on this site break. Dot com and it got like two hundred and fifty thousand views in a day, just sort of happened it was a website that. Sort of featured popular videos and they just snagged it and it kind of went crazy and it was it. Was very strange because I saw this giant number and then I went to school and nothing was different I think it just sort of started a lifelong journey. Of these two separate sort of narratives being sort of absolutely incoherent, but overlaid on top of each other Why. Don't we hear what I think is the first song that you posted which is which is checking out for this my, whole family is out the first one Sure So it's, it's it's called my whole family or my whole family thinks I'm gay and you posted this in two thousand, six but you're making technique wasn't. Great so I would say, basically all of my technique wasn't. Great my technique for subtlety are writing or, performing but, yeah let's go with the Mike. Technique, okay we'll go with the Mike. Technique so the piano is like drowning out your, voice and I'm afraid our listeners won't be able to hear the. Lyrics so instead of going with the original, wait, no is that it's going to be bad again instead of going with the original YouTube? Video we're gonna go with two thousand eight recording that you made because it's just it's just clear and thank. God and the lyrics are, funny and I think our audience should be able to hear. Them so this is my guest Bobino every time I go to. Dinner I can sit. Down at the breakfast table I can talk will they're not able I look at. Them I single question. On their mind As you could. Go back to the way. It was it's not easy now Family Damian Hi like boys.

YouTube Bo Burnham Terry gross Twitter Bobino
Tab Hunter, Star of Damn Yankees!, Dead at 86

All Things Considered

01:54 min | 2 years ago

Tab Hunter, Star of Damn Yankees!, Dead at 86

"Tab hunter had a pop hit in nineteen fifty seven with this song young love it was at the height of his fame and while he had no dramatic training he acted in dozens of movies including the world war two drama battlecry the burning hills a western with natalie wood and the pleasure of his company a romantic comedy with fred astaire and debbie reynolds he also starred in the movie version of the musical damn yankees the story of a baseball player who sold his soul to the devil but his greatest role during those years was simply playing tab hunter he was known as arthur galina before he took that screen name and for years while he would hollywood's leading ladies he hid the fact that he was gay hunter told terry gross on whyy's fresh air that at that time he didn't mind i was a young white eyed kid thrown into the studio system and starring in motion pictures and i loved it i mean god what what young man wouldn't love all that stuff tab hunter made an unlikely comeback in the nineteen eighties he co starred with drag queen divine in john waters film polyester the role parodied has earlier onscreen image he played a love scene with divide and that was a really brave and wonderful thing that have did and revitalized his career that's jeffrey schwartz who made a feature length documentary called tab hunter confidential it was based on hunter's two thousand six memoir the first time he publicly came out is gay and the name tab hunter jeffrey schwartz says talent agent henry willson came up with it when hunter started working in hollywood henry said well we have to have you something that's how the first name came in and then taboo a lover of horses henry said well you you love horses and you love hunters and jumpers so let's call you tab hunter instead of tab jumper tab hunter died yesterday from cardiac arrest producer allan glaser his partner of thirty years said his death was sudden and unexpected tab hunter was eighty six.

Producer John Waters Whyy Terry Gross Hollywood Baseball Yankees Fred Astaire Hunter Partner Allan Glaser Henry Willson Jeffrey Schwartz Arthur Galina Debbie Reynolds Natalie Wood Thirty Years
Take that, America. Europe's tariffs take effect

Morning Edition

01:49 min | 2 years ago

Take that, America. Europe's tariffs take effect

"More today to sell products like orange juice and motorboats to customers in europe npr's dustin dwyer reports the u has if officially imposed tariffs on us made products worth more than three billion dollars this is the second major round of retaliatory tariffs to take affect against the united states in what's fast becoming an all out trade war the first came from mexico earlier this month tariffs from canada are set to take effect next month the eu canada and mexico are all responding to tariffs on aluminum and steel imposed on them by the united states on june first house republicans say of haute on a compromise immigration bill won't come until next week but representative michael mccall chair of the homeland security committee says thursday's meetings dig yield progress productive member i didn't quite understand what was bill is fairly rushed process and now the members and they have veteran shane what's in this bill in the mccoll bill and also we heard from the numbers about the things they went to see in meanwhile virginia's governor has ordered state officials to investigate claims by immigrant teens that they were severely abused at the shannon doa juvenile detention facility the centers attorneys deny the allegations this is npr on the next fresh air the secret doomsday plans in case of nuclear attack to maintain the continuity of government we talked with garrett graff author of the book raven rock the story of the us government secret plan to save itself while the rest of us die it's now out in paperback join us you can join terry gross fresh air at one o'clock and then again at seven o'clock here on k q e d public radio.

Dustin Dwyer United States Mexico Canada Homeland Security Committee Shane Virginia Europe EU June First House Representative Michael Mccall NPR Garrett Graff Terry Three Billion Dollars
"terry gross" Discussed on Sooo Many White Guys

Sooo Many White Guys

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"terry gross" Discussed on Sooo Many White Guys

"No and that's really exciting you know what to have terry gross till you some positive about yourself come on thank you thank you it's really fun talking with joanie and that was like the most fun and love teary grows and i'm really just gonna like work on making her my friend i mean she is like she is the madonna of radio and like the she is going to go bruno mars together i'm like this is the most important thing and my life right now is securing bruno mars tickets get little miss terry gross and potentially her bay up to new york to go with me please coordinate your oh you know what i will dress you know the finesse video music video just like bruno in and i'll just like cardboard anyway guys i'm excited the episodes over because i means we have more goodies like one of my favorite segments of all time that i do with my girlfriend my squirrel friend alana rose glazer is called small acts resist stone let's take it away take it away resist the system resists the man resist the dominant discourse imposed upon us by establishment.

joanie new york bruno terry gross alana rose glazer
 In 'No Turning Back,' the journeys of four Syrians in wartime

02:27 min | 2 years ago

In 'No Turning Back,' the journeys of four Syrians in wartime

"This is fresh air i'm terry gross my guest has put herself in great danger to report on the syrian civil war the danger comes from the exposure to bombs and bullets as well as from threats from the government rania abuzaid was placed on the wanted list of three of the four main intelligence directorates in damascus she was banned from entering the country so she tracked in from the turkish border syria is the world's deadliest country for journalists according to the group reporters without borders half serious population has been displaced by the war the death toll has been estimated at half a million abbas aid started reporting on syria in two thousand eleven when the uprising against the assad regime began and she continued when the conflict turned into civil war civil war was part of her childhood abuzaid grew up in australia the daughter of lebanese immigrants who left the country during lebanon's civil war as a child she spent time in beirut during the war visiting her grandparents now abbas aid lives in lebanon her new book no turning back life loss and hope in wartime syria tells the story of serious civil war through her reporting on members of rival radical islamist groups prisoners and families who have been victims of the war her reporting has been published in the new yorker politico time and foreign policy rania of his aide welcome to fresh air so this week marks the seventh anniversary of the uprising in syria of the start of the syrian revolution which turned into a civil war why has the civil war gone on so long because like most civil wars it became a proxy war for international bowers with the russians and the iranians lebanese has long iraqi shiite militias and afghan mercenaries on assad side and qatar saudi arabia other gulf states turkey the us and the european states backing the syrian opposition so in addition to be this being of approximately war what is it about is just about a fight for power is it still about overthrowing assad the thing about the syrian uprising is that it was existential from the beginning the protesters knew that when i took to the streets and the regime knew that this was a fight to the.

Damascus Syria Lebanon Beirut United States Assad Rania Abuzaid Australia Qatar Saudi Arabia
"terry gross" Discussed on The Turnaround with Jesse Thorn

The Turnaround with Jesse Thorn

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"terry gross" Discussed on The Turnaround with Jesse Thorn

"This was the one that i was fearing the most this is the one that i was sick at my stomach before i did and also i had taken my migraine medication and was literally physically ill when i recorded it but i didn't want to reschedule it because i was worried that if i tried to reschedule it it would all disappear into the vapour so i have not listen to this i don't want to listen to it because i am very convinced that i did a bad job uh but terry gross may be is the smartest nicest lady ever so she did a great job i don't know what to tell ya you can tell me if i did a bad job now don't don't tell me if i did a bad job last episode of the turnaround let's just go the tape terry gross welcome to the turnaround that it's great to get to talk to you and to tattoo you're thinking this is a question that is a clarification perhaps more for me than for our audience but do you think this is something that i think about a lot for myself do you think of yourself as a journalist yes but not a reporter i used to think that a journalist in reported where the same thing therefore probably al asthma journalist but i think of myself as a journalist because i follow what i think are the ethics that journalists would follow i believe things have to be truthful an accurate that there's you know there's certain journalistic standards that you have to follow but it doesn't mean the roma reporter it doesn't mean you know that dumb m just you know i'm in an interview or two different type of journalism.

reporter terry gross asthma