19 Episode results for "Terry Yokum"

Facebook Pledges $130 Million to Fund 'Supreme Court' for Content

WSJ Tech News Briefing

10:01 min | 10 months ago

Facebook Pledges $130 Million to Fund 'Supreme Court' for Content

"Artificial intelligence is no longer the stuff of science fiction. It's one of the key underpinnings of modern digital first business. What role does it play in creating a better customer experience find out when we return to the transformation minute comcast business? This is your tech news briefing being for Friday December thirteenth. I'm Terry Yokum from the newsroom. Of The Wall Street Journal in New York facebook has gotten a lot of flak for how it deals with controversial content on its platform form now. They've announced a new Supreme Court to review. How the company moderates that content our reporter Horwitz will explain in just a minute but first let's check some headlines? Officials have confirmed. That Pensacola Florida is dealing with a ransomware attack ransomware. That's the kind of malicious software aware that denies users access until ransom is paid. The attack began on Saturday and it shut down. Most of the city's computer network including city emails phone lines and three one one in customer services as well as payments the city sanitation and energy services. The attack came just days after a mass shooting at a nearby navy base that left three sailors dead and it's unclear whether the cyber attack is connected the FBI is investigating. Disney is in hot water over frozen to several. Japanese artists hired hired to promote the new movie on twitter. said they were instructed to hide that they were paid to do so Disney had originally said that emission was unintentional but now they've changed their tune. Pr Professionals in Tokyo. Say IT'S COMMON IN JAPAN FOR COMPANIES TO PAY influencers for posts without disclosing the relationship and an official says. The government hadn't set any the guidelines about paid posts and two pieces of facebook news today. FACEBOOK says it won't need to make any changes to its web tracking services in order to comply with a new California privacy law setting up an early test of the law which takes effect next year. This law will require websites with third-party trackers to give users the ability to opt opt out while other tech companies have made changes to comply. facebook argues that routine data. Transfers about consumers may not fit the law's definition of selling being data. And you know how you can post a story to both instagram facebook at the same time or use. What's APP to message? Someone from your facebook messenger wrap while we report exclusively. That officials at the Federal Trade Commission are considering seeking a preliminary injunction against facebook for how its APPs interact with one another the FTC DC concerned that those interoperability functions could shut out competitors if materializes. The action would seek to stop facebook from integrating apps any further and could be part art future break-up of the company welcome back to the transformation minute from comcast business. How is artificial intelligence playing a role in creating a better customer experience? We asked Denise Tasty as VP of comcast business. This sort of technology will allow brands like cruise ships to offer experiences. That are more tailored to you. Than what did you ever thought possible. They are now using facial recognition to blink back to your preferences in order to recommend customized experiences for are you based on those preferences. FACEBOOK has long been the subject of public and regulatory dilatory scrutiny over how it polices or doesn't police content on its platform. It's been criticized for how it handles misinformation hate speech and pretty graphic content content like the Christ church manifesto but now facebook says it's introducing a new oversight board to make some of those tough content calls for them here to explain Moore's our reporter Jeff Horwitz Warwick Jeff. Thanks for joining us. Certainly so this idea of an oversight board has been in the works for a while. Hasn't it yes. So this was announced more than a year ago by mark. Berg who acknowledged that while he still believed in facebook's power for good clearly left to its own devices. Without sufficient oversight bad things happen on the Internet Internet and this board was sort of proposed as kind of a facebook supreme court originally and that doesn't mean that it was going to handle all of facebook's got content enforcement I mean decisions but the idea was gonNA provide really high level guidance in the same way that the US Supreme Court handles just a small selection of cases but the idea is that everyone else is supposed to take their marching orders from them. This has been in the works for around a year with kind of a global listening to her that facebook undertook to try to get in but a lot of that came from when you and rights organizations and you can kind of see the result. so you describe this. Are you compared this to the Supreme Court now. The Supreme Court usually waits for people to you come to them and complain about something and then they make a judgement call on. It is that what's going to be happening here. So they are going to be the top appellate entity And so You know any disputes over. Say someone saying that opposed shouldn't have been taken down or the post is hate speech and should be taken down. They can appeal to the board and the board can choose to sort of grant so she are the same way as this court would to hear the case and then render a binding decision on the company so I think the one of the more interesting things about this is the first time that a major social media platform has decided that it is going to hand off responsibility for some of the most difficult court decisions it has to make to outside group that comes with some benefits from facebook to of course because they spent years in controversies over whether they should or shouldn't take down content. Remove a polarizing political figure. Things like that. Yeah I mean. Mark Zuckerberg has very recently even defended facebook as a place where free speech was supposed supposed to live freely. He's defended the company's decision to continue to put political ads on the platform even if they contained misinformation you mentioned I hate speech earlier. What other kinds of content are we expecting them to be deciding over? I mean it could be anything that is sort of falls under the rubric of Community Standards Standards. FACEBOOK isn't getting the board. have any say on matters that it feels. It has to do to comply with laws in many countries in which it operates but but basically everything else is fair game so that could be everything from nudity to you. Know hate speech to anything specifically political ads with misinformation information. Are they going to be making judgment calls about things like that as well. Yes so in addition to being able to decide on particular pieces of content and whether they should stay or go. FACEBOOK is also going to be listening to them in an advisory capacity on sort of bigger picture policy questions so if the board recommends something then. FACEBOOK is required to publicly respond respond to it not to adopt it necessarily so this is kind of a way to force facebook to publicly address concerns of a whole bunch of civil society type type groups that presumably will have representation on this board. What do we know about who's going to be on this board and what is going to be the basis for them to make these kind of tough calls this? This has been a point of debate over the course of the formation of this thing we know that there have been a whole bunch of groups that have been consulted from lawyers goes to government officials to a lot of human rights organizations to journalistic organizations and figures and facebook is going to choose the first eleven members burs after that though the board which is going to have one hundred and thirty million dollars in a trust is pretty much on its own. It'll choose the remainder of the members and choose all board members. There's going forward so it will truly be independent. What are the guiding principles that they're going to be using to make some of these calls so they haven't said entirely it has to be facebook's community standards right so the idea is that they are interpreting facebook's existing rules however there's a lot to be said for the vagaries as of that and one of the things that facebook did along with announcing the hundred and thirty million dollars in funding for this board is announced basically kind of a human rights? It's framework that. They had commissioned that the company says it hopes will guide the board so the principles there are very much focused on sort of international human human rights norms as in United Nations sort of sanctioned approaches to looking at potential harm human rights. So I think as you noted earlier mark Zuckerberg recently recently has been talking a lot about free speech. This definitely the guidelines that the company has kind of endorsed are certainly focused on free expression. They're focused on a lot more. FACEBOOK is now the first big social media platform to implement this kind of solution but obviously this issue moderating speech on social media platforms. Twitter Youtube you name. It has been a big issue. Are we expecting other tech companies to follow suit. I said that that it would be very happy. If other entities wanted to sort of join in on this particular structure but there has been no indication that anyone else is ready to do that they have been on their own on in some of these content moderation decisions partly because of how high profile facebook Spin and how by profile accompanies mistakes have been so this is definitely experimental right now. is this decision by Facebook to create its own oversight board an attempt to appease regulators who might want a to do that for them. I think that facebook has been coming to terms for a few years now with just how vastly much power does have an how awkward it is as for that to be vested in a company that is run by one guy mark Zuckerberg and so. They've done a lot of things in which they've sort of tried to recede into the background a little bit and handing off control over some of the most controversial perhaps the most controversial content decisions facebook book makes is something that sort of plays into that. Jeff Horowitz. Thanks for joining us. Thank you and that was your techniques. Breathing I'm Qatari Yoga from the newsroom of the Wall Street Journal. Thanks for listening.

facebook Mark Zuckerberg comcast official Supreme Court Supreme Court Jeff Horwitz The Wall Street Journal US Supreme Court reporter Terry Yokum New York Disney FBI instagram
Automate Your Emails and Digitize Your To-Do Lists

WSJ Tech News Briefing

09:43 min | 4 months ago

Automate Your Emails and Digitize Your To-Do Lists

"Facts allow you to make decisions in unpredictable times. Get the facts you need. From The Wall Street Journal from Free Corona virus updates to daily deep dives and our podcasts and videos. Wsj is a trusted source in uncertain times visit. Wsj.com this is tech. News briefing for Friday may eighth. I'm Terry Yokum from the Wall Street Journal. Congratulations you've finished. Another week of working from home your award. Our senior personal tech columnist bannister is back to share some solutions to your work from home tech troubles. Today we've got some simple automation and how to take your to do list digital. That's coming up after these headlines. It's well known that China requires social media and messaging companies to censor its citizens messages that includes the country's most popular apple he chat but researchers at the University of Toronto have now found that we chat also closely monitors its international users activity. They say we chat analyzes messages sent over the platform and adds any taboo images and documents to its internal blacklist. The report found that human and automated sensors. Then use that blacklist scrub Chinese messages faster and more effectively. The new findings come as International. Governments are investigating Chinese APPS for Censorship and Privacy Violations tencent holdings which is the operator of Chad did not respond to our request for comment. Facebook expects the pandemic to affect their business for months to come a spokeswoman says the social media giant will not be opening many of its offices until at least July and that employees will be allowed to work from home until the end of twenty twenty. Facebook has already canceled events with more than fifty people through twenty twenty one. We're still in. The midst of season and Uber is the latest report. Uber's food delivery service eats was alone. Bright spot we talked about that yesterday but still reported a loss of nearly three billion dollars for the last quarter. The news comes as lift reported losses earlier this week. Both rideshare companies have laid off thousands of workers in recent days as depend takes especially hard toll on the GIG economy and normally the first quarter after the holidays is a slow time for video game sellers but Nintendo says people stuck at home have reversed that trend if only temporarily in earnings released on Thursday Nintendo reported that they'd sold more than three million switches and over thirteen million copies of the game. Animal crossing in the last quarter meaning. Yes it wasn't just you. There were a lot of people talking about their islands in the past couple of months after the break senior personal columnist Joanna Stern. We'll be back with tech tips of the week. That's coming up next. I'm Jack. How hosted the Baron Streetwise podcast? I'm business investing each week. We hear from company chiefs and analysts about profound changes facing investors. We've heard from Disney's Bob Eiger about the future of movies and theme parks. Cvs Is Larry Merlo about stores providing more health services. And Ford's Jim Hackett about how the pandemic might change the car business. Subscribe to Baron Streetwise on Apple. Podcast spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. Eight weeks of working from home has brought our team fresh challenges especially in the Tech Department. It's the same for you. You've been calling and emailing us all week to let us know about your work from home tech headaches so our senior personal tech columnist Joanna Stern his back once again to share her best Tech Tips. So you can implement them over the weekend. Joanna thanks for coming back good to be back. You know what I was thinking about today since you come on every Friday I find myself typing the same things in our planning documents and scripts all the time. The like it would be ripe for some automation. You got any ideas there. You mean by adding extra wonderful. Great Adjectives before you mentioned my name. Oh maybe the beautiful amazing wonderful smarts. Yes so Aniston. Yes so you can automate that you can get together. Fifteen different adjectives and type two three letters. A kind of a secret code and it would expand that out and you wouldn't have to keep retyping those every time that you want to put them in the script perfect. How do I do it on a Mac? You can do that with a built in tool you go to system preferences keyboard text and you can go in there and type in the long string of words or sentences that you want to expand on my computer have set up my address my home address my phone number things that I feel like I'm constantly retyping a windows computer. You could do the same but you need to download some special for that. You can try one called phrase express and text expand and you can actually do this on your iphone and android phone. You can find those directions at the website so the other thing that keeps having to me is that while. I'm in the middle of a meeting or recording. Something with you. My computer keeps asking me to update my software. Is there a way for me to set that up? So that just happens overnight. Yeah I mean the worst is when it doesn't remind you and it just starts doing it and so that is usually because you've told it please postpone it for a specific amount of time or to a specific date and you're not ready to update at that time on windows. You have a lot more controls on windows ten. If you go settings update insecurity and windows update you can go in there and have some more precise control of when those updates happen on a Mac you have less control but on a Mac. What happens is if you get that notification it says. Do you want to update our? Do you want to schedule it for some time in the future? I find those very annoying because I don't usually want to keep scheduling for some time in the future. I just don't want to do them. But it is important to do this. The security updates that come with these can be really important same with other apps that you may use you. Get very important privacy and security updates with this. I have also been finding. I feel like this is more like me asking you questions that I'm interested in so apologies for that but I've also been finding it really hard to keep track of stuff at work I have you know. Listen I make and I have my whole desk setup and I have like you know. Little reminders everywhere. Is there another better way for me? I've tried different list APPS BEFORE. But is there a better way for me to try to keep track of my lists electronically somehow? Yeah I. This was something I've been thinking about since I started working from home because when I was at the office and I was working on multiple devices all the time I was using a great to do list APP called tick tick and it worked really well on my iphone works well on my ipad works well on my computer but now that. I'm only working really on my laptop and I'm sitting a lot at my desk and sometimes I really just not really adding dues that often. When I'm doing something else on a smartphone. I came to the old great thing called paper notebook and I love writing down into every day because just sits right here. And I don't need to take the notebook back and forth from the office so it it works really well but sometimes I want to digitize those notes or digitize that to do list because I do want to have it digitally so what I bought was awesome reusable notebook. It's called the rocket book and I actually Ketari show by WANNABES. Yeah I feel like I'm like everyone. They're not a sponsor of this podcast. But it's a reusable notebook so you can actually comes with a pen and micro fiber cloth so you can wash off the pages but when you write on it it actually feels like and looks like regular and not like you know sometimes when you write on something plastic. He doesn't feel like a real pan. So you're probably wondering why I'm telling you all about just a regular notebook but it actually has a tech trick in it that when you use the rocket book App You can program it so when you take photos of your notebook to save them digitally it automatically uploads the page to service of your choice so mine goes to Google drive and e mails the note to myself and it makes those searchable so it makes the text searchable so if you type in you know if you wrote on tap your to do list podcast notes and you search podcast. In one of those apps it would come up. That's awesome. Yeah it's just like also a great book and you don't waste paper and so you can and also I love to clean so I can just clean my notebook. Well you and I are very different. They're great tips though appreciate that. We have heard some good ones from our audience lately and our hotline is still open for a little while longer. If people still want to reach out to us how can they do that? They can email to Anna dot stern wsj.com or they can call our work from home hotline. It is still open. I would love to get in some extra tips because I'm working on an e book that collects all of these tips. Were doing fifty tips from me. And then some tips from our readers in our listeners. And they're great but we could use a couple of more so please call in or email that phone number three one four six three five zero. Three eight awesome alright. Our senior personnel tech columnist. Joanna stern thanks so much for being back with us. Don't worry we're only like twenty tips away from this all being over okay. If you like this podcast you can rate and review us in your APP store. If you want more news about Wall Street Journal. Podcast you can follow us on twitter at WSJ podcasts. Our Tech news briefing is produced by the fill in the blank. Amazing Amanda. I'm Qatari. Oh come from the Wall Street Journal. Thanks for listening and stay safe out there.

Joanna Stern The Wall Street Journal Apple Facebook Mac Nintendo Tech Department Terry Yokum bannister tencent holdings spotify Ford twitter Jim Hackett Bob Eiger Baron Streetwise
Rivals Step Up to Take on Amazon Amid Pandemic

WSJ Tech News Briefing

13:37 min | 3 months ago

Rivals Step Up to Take on Amazon Amid Pandemic

"Facts allow you to make decisions and unpredictable times. Get the facts you need from the Wall Street. Journal from Free Corona virus updates to daily deep dives and our podcasts and videos. WSJ is a trusted source. In Uncertain Times visit wsj.com. This! Is Your Tech news briefing for Tuesday June eleventh I'm Terry Yokum for the Wall Street Journal. Shutdowns around the world have led more shoppers to take their carts digital, and even the biggest ecommerce platforms like Walmart Amazon have been struggling to keep up, but what about the little guys on today's show, our reporters Sebastian Herrera looks at one startup. That's been trying to stay afloat. That's coming up after these headlines. GRUB HUB is working on an all stock deal with the Dutch food delivery company. Just eat takeaway. The two are now close to a deal that would value grub hub at seventy dollars a share, but any agreement would mean that grop was turning its back on weeks of talks with Uber. which we reported about last month, the conversations between GRUB came to a head over various issues including who should shoulder the bulk of the antitrust risk. On Tuesday night Tesla CEO Elon Musk said it was time to start volume production on Tesla's long promised all electric semi truck and day later on Wednesday investors pushed the company's stock past one thousand dollars a share for the first time ever Tesla's valuation is now even closer to that of Toyota which is the world's largest automaker by market value. The news comes just a day after the electric car startup Nikola briefly search pass Ford and the overall investment enthusiasm indicates a bright future for electric vehicles and a belief that the future of ground transportation could be powered by batteries and not gas. Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey has announced that his companies will honor June nineteenth as a holiday tune. Teen is the annual celebration to commemorate the end of slavery in the US that takes place on June nineteenth doors. His action puts him in line with a slew of American corporations who've announced new financial and structural measures to support racial justice in recent weeks, and that includes Amazon. The ECOMMERCE giant said on Wednesday that it would ban police from using its facial recognition software for the next year. The company said it hoped Congress. It would use this time to implement stronger regulations for using the technology more quote ethically. Speaking of Amazon, it's been struggling to keep up with online orders place during the pandemic and some smaller rivals have tried to use the opportunity to step up, but do they stand a chance that's coming up after the break. The conditions we work in are changing more rapidly than ever. Employers are looking to leaders and are searching for path forward. Time's up is here to help. The time guide to equity and inclusion during crisis offers practical steps that leaders can take to care for their people equalize their workplace and lead with purpose. Download the new guide by texting inclusion, two, three, zero, six Dash, four four message and data rates apply text. Stop to opt out. At the beginning of the coronavirus shutdowns in the US everyone was flocking to the big e commerce platforms and buying them out of essentials. If you want on Amazon, you might have had trouble finding toilet, paper or hand sanitizer. At least at a reasonable price, Amazon responded and hired nearly two hundred thousand workers to help with distribution, but A. how have? ECOMMERCE platforms fared our reporter Sebastian Herrera followed one startup, the organic food platform thrive market, as it tried to keep up with the influx of orders and joins us now. Sebastian thanks for being here. So to start for those who aren't familiar, what is thrive market so thrive market operates. Online grocery store and basically it has like a costco like membership, so you pay a yearly subscription fee of sixty dollars, or you can also pay quarterly or monthly, and that gives you access to shop on their website, and they offer that subscription to what they say to make prices lower and basically sell them at wholesale. It's a very organic type of store, so if you can imagine like whole foods kind of. Of being online. That's kind of what they're going after that they don't have any physical stores. They just deliver products from from their warehouses. It began in two thousand fourteen. That's when it was launched. And it's just grown since then and kind of become a player in the online food commerce world, which out of everything that we've seen with the pandemic in terms, growing commerce grocery has been the largest part of that. Yeah, for sure I mean grocery delivery was already happening, but obviously a lot of people were concerned about going into stores, and they had to keep the food coming. How did the early days of the pandemic impact thrive? So it was really interesting, because it was a lot like it impacted Amazon. They saw a huge influx of orders. People were ordering at five times what they could handle and it caused a huge backup as well I mean one example that the CEO Nick Green gave me is they had six months supply of toilet paper meaning like what they would expect to sell. In six months sold out in three days and was adjust those kind of staple supplies that everyone was was stocking up on or did they also see a huge growth in in food delivery regular food? It was really across the board, but it was mainly like what you would consider essential products where food out people would stock up on so a lot of good items a lot of flour. As everyone knows by now like I have very popular product by during you know as as people started panic buying, and of course just. Hand. sanitizer paper towels sort of stuff. It became so overwhelming that they decided. Basically we're going to not sell items that aren't very popular right now, so they would so like yoga mats and water bottles, and they decided to just completely take those off the site partly so that they could just focus on the high demand products, but also because those lower demand are actually like in the back of their warehouses, and like they were just trying to. To, save those minutes of workers and the warehouses walking back to the back of the warehouses to pick those items, so is that kind of like you know every minute counted basically and I think that that brings us to a really important question. We said in the beginning, Amazon was able to hire two hundred thousand workers at the drop of a hat. What are these smaller ECOMMERCE PLATFORMS DO? Are they able to leverage workers in the same way? Yeah. It was similar in terms of scale Amazon harder, a little bit of two, hundred, thousand, one, hundred and seventy, five thousand, but thrive also ramped up. They're hiring. They hired more people than they've ever hired. In terms of their warehouses. They have two warehouses one on the East Coast and one on the over the West Coast and they said that they had to hire more than three hundred workers and less than two months. Months! They were hiring as many as thirty workers a day, and they had to do things that they've never done before like pay several recruiting agencies to find workers as soon as possible and and to speed up like that hiring process like before the pandemic hit, they had about five hundred warehouse workers, and then they added three hundred and a matter of less than two months, so they almost double what they had before. We just kind of shows like the mandate. They were seeing how much they were scrambling to be able to get. Orders out of out of their warehouses and just fixed the backlog that they themselves were also seeing much like Amazon. Let's talk a little bit about profit margins. I know that we saw companies like Amazon, but also a big box stores like target and Walmart see sales go up, but actually their profit margins got hit because they were selling a lot products that didn't have a huge profit margin like toilet paper, for example that are also quite expensive to ship. How has that extra shipping? Payments impacted thrive. How did they see this impact? Their profit margin so the thing of this share with. With me on on that aspect is that the higher cost they saw in terms of fulfillment and shipping, and all that reduce the percentage of profit made on orders, so basically the mount of money in terms of percentage, wise that they were making it on orders went down, and they had to use some of their cash reserves to basically pay for the spike and inventory and cost associated with this, so just think about ordering more products than you've ever before obviously adding. Adding a bunch of warehouse workers now they said that was largely offset by the increase in sales that they saw in Martius ninety percent increase. In May it's been about one hundred and ten percent increase so all in all they say that the businesses in good shape, but they certainly had to like use money from their cash reserves, and they weren't making as much money in terms of percentage wise on each order, so they certainly felt that hit as well in that regard. Regard Yeah and you mentioned before that. This is a membership company. I mean people have Amazon prime memberships, but for an entire year I'm sure they're getting a whole bunch of new orders. They're also trying to struggle to make sure that people who've been customers for awhile. Stay on board. Yeah, that was part of the hardship for them is there is some customers? Our of course upset about how long they're. Orders were taking which in some cases customers I spoke to is. Basically around two weeks or maybe a little bit over that. which is much greater than the two or so days that they would usually expect sometimes with within twenty four hours for some customers they were getting there there used to gain their packages and a lot of members and understand why they were taking on new members, even though they were seeing an increase in storage, and obviously struggling to kind of. Fix that and so would negrin co told me. Is You know all in all with with what they tried to do? Which is basically his perspective, be as transparent as possible by having the like daily blog that they would put out on how things were going by him. Sending emails himself to customers and appearing on videos on on social media kind of describing the problems. He thought that really helped out in terms of. Keeping customers over maybe somewhat said, and that the rate of customers left after one month, which is when they can leave without having to take on the cost of the whole years. Basically you have a one month window to cancel. Their rates stayed the same, and the companies said they gained more than one hundred thousand. Members since March that remembers right now. They said that the they've ever had so They see that as a positive on all give even given the kind of frustrations that some customers expressed. Big Question here is I mean thrive is an interesting story, but we kind of WANNA, look at how all of these smaller e commerce platforms did overtime they really wanted to compete with Amazon and whole foods at the end of the day, the pandemic gift thrive, and some of the other smaller e commerce platforms a real shot at doing that. Those was interesting was the stories that thrives really representative of a lot of smaller ecommerce players and Amazon rivals, and it just showed how difficult it was. Even one Amazon was struggling that they themselves to were struggling. Thrive is not alone in this. You know there's even some websites that had shut down entire like deliveries because they couldn't handle the overwhelming amount, and so I think going forward. What's been made clear so far? Is that all my commerce is going to grow and for companies? Companies like thrive. They're betting that growth that they've seen. We'll continue in that getting Kinda. The rough spots of dealing with all this demand after having gone through that they can continue growing the interesting thing that will take place in the next few years is a lot of people were expecting Amazon to even stronger through this, and certainly like their stock, it has been a record highs even as they struggled, because again like the the bigger picture is online commerce has basically been accelerated. So, if you really bet on that as a company, you, certainly, a lot of companies have received a boost our way. Most people are expecting that to continue to grow, and you know the the competition will be even fiercer in some ways with Amazon than it's ever been. All right are Sebastian Harare. Thanks so much for joining US thank you. and. That was technique briefing. Don't forget that. If you like this podcast, you can rate and review as in APP store, and if you want more news about Wall Street Journal podcasts, you can follow us on twitter at WSJ podcasts. I'm guitar. Yokum for the Wall Street Journal. Thanks for listening.

Amazon US Wall Street Journal Sebastian Herrera Walmart Twitter CEO Terry Yokum Tesla Congress costco Sebastian Jack Dorsey Sebastian Harare Elon Musk Toyota Nick Green Martius reporter
Uber Tests Allowing California Drivers to Set Fares

WSJ Tech News Briefing

12:05 min | 8 months ago

Uber Tests Allowing California Drivers to Set Fares

"This briefing is sponsored by Deloitte business process with less process. See what's possible when data and automation come together to help reinvent workflows visit Deloitte dot com slash. US slash only see possible. This is your techniques breathing in for Wednesday January twenty second. I'm Terry Yokum from the newsroom. Of The Wall Street Journal in New York Uber's introduce a new pricing model. That could make getting a ride home from the airport. Afford even more hectic in a few cities in California drivers will be able to set their own rates for rides tech and transportation reporter predate. Arana will join us to explain how that could impact drivers Uber and passengers in just a minute but first let's check some headlines. Good News Ri- B. M.. The company said Tuesday that its fourth quarter revenue rose point one percent to twenty one point. Seventy eight billion dollars. The slight increase comes after five. Straight quarters of declines the turnaround could be a sign that IBM's acquisition of the open source. Software giant red hat back in July may finally finally be paying off IBM said the acquisition could bolster its competitiveness in cloud computing. where it's lagged behind market leaders like Amazon and Microsoft IBM posted twenty one percent percent growth in the cloud and it's hoping the momentum will carry over into twenty twenty speaking of Markets Netflix shares fell more than one percent in after hours trading Tuesday after after the company reported it had missed its target on new? US subscribers facing increased competition from new players in streaming. Netflix said it had added just four four hundred twenty three thousand domestic users in the fourth quarter short of its six hundred thousand forecast. The company had better luck abroad. Though adding more than eight million users users overseas far outpacing the seven million at had expected at the World Economic Forum in Davos Switzerland Tuesday Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin threatened the UK and Italy with tariffs if they go ahead with taxes on American tech companies like facebook and Google the web based companies currently pay little to no tax to those governments despite spite doing business there the US sees the taxes as an unfair levy on the company's Gross Revenue Mnuchin warnings come after France agreed to delay. The imposition of a similar tax tax to avoid heavy tariffs on French exports alike wine. An Uber is selling its food. Delivery Unit in India to local rivals Amato Uber's been working towards profitability and part of that strategy has been to shed food delivery units in places where they can't break into the market like Austria South Korea and now India ubereats has been steadily losing money. India sends. It's two thousand seventeen launch because the motto and other competitors have been in the country longer Uber says it will continue to operate in India as a the ride hailing business but uber's also making changes to its ride hailing APP at least in California. That's coming up after the break. This this briefing is sponsored by Deloitte on podcasts. You hear a lot about what's possible but one thing is certain. No business or city achieves their possible alone that's why deloitte collaborates with vast ecosystem of alliances in everything from systems hardware to cloud platforms data migration to analytics exc to VR collaboration. It's one key way to turn possible into actual learn more at Deloitte dot com slash. US US slash only see possible if you thought surge pricing was confusing. Wait till you hear this Subaru's got a new model. That could throw you for a loop as of Tuesday morning Uber Drivers and a few California cities can set their own rates for rides up up to five times. The fair that Uber Sets automatically. It's part of Uber's response to California's new GIG economy law here to explain. Moore's our tech and Transportation Haitian reporter pre-take Arana Pretty. Thanks so much for joining us. Thanks for having me okay. So how exactly do these new rules work. How'd that works is pretty simple? Drivers can increase fares in increments of point one starting from Uber's fair which is one one x and go all the way up to five X. So if I'm a driver I can just pull out my APP. TAP The screen and go from one point nine one one point two one point three and one point four onto five times the fair price. So it's kind of like task rabbit or that that dog-walking APP rover where people can set their own rates. How does how is that going to benefit drivers in real time? It's going to be chaotic if you ask me. And it's confusing for drivers as well because what Uber's essentially doing now is creating a bidding war between drivers. What happens is that if there let's say for simplicity? Two drivers one driver picks two times the fair. That Uber set another picks three times times. The fair that Uber's said the writer gets the lowest fare so the riders going to see the driver who picked two-time Zuber's Subas price as demand increases. Drivers who set higher prices are shown to the writer so say in again. Let's say see for simplicity. You have five drivers. One is set the price at ten another twenty thirty forty and fifty and there are five writers waiting thing for rides the one who clicks on the APP. The quickest gets matched with the driver who selected ten dollars. The other one will see the next lowest price which is twenty need dollars. The third rider sees the next lowest price. which is thirty? Four forty in the fifth fifty so as demand increases the fares. Go up this is going to be very confusing for both drivers and riders. Potentially drivers could drive themselves out of business. So if Uber's Chris to expensive a rider just won't take that option and plan to take public transport or irregular taxi. The way you just described it sound very simple. Oh but obviously especially at these huge airports. We're not talking about five. Drivers and five passengers were talking about hundreds and thousands of people who are clicking new. All the time right so I mean it just sounds like a huge mess. It could be that I look my APP and right now. I'm kind of in the middle of the road in terms of pricing. And if I don't accept that somebody else may come along and offer me a lower rate two seconds from now right so it feels like people are just going to be hedging hedging all the time to figure out if they can get a lower rate absolutely and Uber itself expects to be chaos because the rates are changing in a matter of seconds. If I go onto my APP and see I'm waiting for my baggage To arrive and I'm five seconds late and someone else snaps up the lowest possible price. Then I get shown prices that are higher and higher and if you think that's complicated there's another layer of complexity. Starting next week Heuberger plans to let drivers charge fares that are lower than price and they can go as low. As one tenth Uber's price they're also going to be allowed to turn off the surge Pricing feature effectively. What Uber's doing is that drivers are waiting for a ride and not getting one they can drop the prices below the supposed- market rate that Uber sets to get writers? What kind of impact is that going to have on that? Are they going to have to pay Uber. Back the same amount as if they had gotten the higher rate no whatever they choose is the Fed they end up with. After of course suber takes their commissions but the question really is if your setting prices so low just to get rides. Are you even covering the cost of see not your gas so why is doing all of this. It sounds very chaotic right. Uber's doing this for one. Very simple reason. It wants to respond to a new law that California has passed which wants companies like Uber reclassified drivers as employees. So this is Uber. As we've seen look we're putting drivers in the front seat. They can charge whatever they want and so their their own boss. They're not controlled. Bye Bye. uh-huh they're completely independent. How can we reclassify them? As employees one of the requirements of this new law call eighty five basically if companies can show that the people that they're hiring on not controlled by the hiring entity. Then they wouldn't need to reclassify them as employees. He's so this is Uber as we have seen we on controlling with the drivers are charging and therefore we don't have to reclassify them meaning. We don't have to pay for six days. We don't have to give them benefits at the end of the day. That's what it means to reclassify them as employees right remember Uber's already struggling to turn turn a profit and so adding hundreds of thousands potentially more drivers to your businesses never going to lead to profitability ability. They have though unveiled this ballot measure. They've joined forces with rivals like lift. And other companies that operate all pre owned the GIG economy space to ask voters later this year to exempt them from the law and they're also promising promising. Some additional guarantees like covering insurance health benefits if they get that exemption but of course. It's not going to be to the degree that you would need to. If they were your employees you talked about profitability. The plan as I understand it is to roll out. This new pricing pricing structure to other markets. What impact could that have on Uber and its profitability? At the end of the day. It's unclear how drivers and riders riders are going to respond to the change. But I think it's fair to say that it adds another layer of complexity to what is already a pretty complex Al Gore them as far as fair's goal and as far as demand and supply goes. I think uber is waiting to see how it pans out. As well before taking making a call on rolling it out statewide I think for drivers wile on one hand it could increase earning potential. It also would mean charging fares that are too high me result in few rides and longer wait times for riders it could mean higher fares ears and more volatility and writers could also just say hey. Let's go with one of the other rivals that are out there right. That's the Ray The key point lift. Interestingly hasn't made any new changes to its APP even though it's also fighting the same law that Uber is so I can just look at my Uber App and say oh the lowest price that I'm getting for a ride home from the airport is one hundred dollars dollars. Oh lift is giving fifty. Let me just go with that. So on one hand Uber's trying to protect itself from the regulation in doing doing so it could lose. Its business two rivals like lift. It's a wait and see Predate Arana. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you and and that was your tech news briefing From The Wall Street Journal in New York. Thanks for listening.

Uber Uber Amato Uber California US Deloitte New York writer Arana India reporter Deloitte dot Terry Yokum The Wall Street Journal Netflix IBM Subaru Fed Switzerland
New Tactics Get Around Big Tech's Ad-Fraud Defenses

WSJ Tech News Briefing

09:31 min | 8 months ago

New Tactics Get Around Big Tech's Ad-Fraud Defenses

"This briefing is sponsored by Deloitte business process with less process. See what's possible when data and automation come together to help reinvent workflows visit Deloitte dot com slash. US slash only. See Possible. This is your tech news briefing. Mm for Monday January thirteenth. I'm Terry Yokum from the newsroom of the Wall Street Journal in New York the kinds of ads and products. You see when you're browsing on. The Internet usually depend on a bunch bungee factors like clicks and the number of positive reviews. They've gotten but new reporting shows that frauds are finding ways to boost their product images online and nats impacting the ads. You see in just a minute reporter. Parmi Olson will join us to explain how they're doing it but first let's check some headlines. India's Supreme Court ruled Friday that the indefinite suspension of the Internet and the muslim-majority region of Kashmir is unconstitutional. The Internet gag in the region agent has been going on for more than one hundred fifty days the longest ever in a democracy. It was imposed after India's controversial decision to end Kashmir status as a special special autonomous region last year the court said access to the Internet is protected in the constitution which guarantees freedom of speech. A government official said the central government and local authorities authorities would comply with the court ruling the electric scooter rental startup line is laying off fourteen percent of its workforce and it's pulling out of a dozen markets in the US. Ask and abroad lime. CEOS that his company is downsizing in order to reach profitability. Lime helped pioneer the electric scooter rental industry in two thousand seventeen but quickly faced competition as rideshare companies like Uber and lift launched their own electric scooter options. Other companies in the space have also laid off workers or closed operations in the the past year and Amazon is looking to sell more ads on streaming services. It's been building a business selling ads on fire it streaming television platform but now Amazon wants to sell some of its AD inventory on other streaming services like apple. TV and xbox Amazon's technology uses data. It collects on shopping and browsing behavior behavior on Amazon owned sites to target users with ads. Relevant to them companies as targeting would be available to advertisers who buy through Amazon's ad buying tool. This briefing is sponsored by Deloitte on podcasts. You hear a lot about what's possible but one thing is certain. No business or city achieves their possible awesome alone that's why deloitte collaborates with a vast ecosystem of alliances in everything from systems hardware to cloud platforms data migration into analytics a VR collaboration. It's one key way to turn possible into actual learn more at deloitte dot com mm slash. US slash only possible. Pretty much anywhere you go online and he site you visit. You probably run into ads. In some cases the kinds of ads you see depends on things like the number of clicks and positive reviews views like their popularity but new reporting shows that some companies are selling technology that help advertisers juice site. Traffic Bolster Search search results and pad reviews making their products. Look a lot more desirable than they actually are reported rummy. Olson will explain armies with us. Now thanks for joining us. My pleasure so Parmi tell me more about these news software programs that are out there. How do they work? So yeah so these tools. Those are essentially browsers so we use browsers every day to surf the Internet. But there are some browsers out there which you probably haven't heard of which have been used by some You could call them fraudsters or people who want to try and make it look like a lot of web. Traffic is going to an ad that they've bought and what these particular browsers do. Is they allow you to take some stolen credit card credentials or facebook account credentials or any kind of account that you might buy from from the dark web and you can buy hundreds of these accounts of real people and the new sign in with these account credentials on these browsers and then with these special browsers Hauser's you can go send these fake people essentially to different sites to make it look like lots of people are going on these sites and the thing that makes these browsers Hauser's release unique. Is that normally sites like facebook and Amazon. Have special systems like defenses on their sites that detect fake traffic. Or what you might have heard of his thoughts But these browsers are really good at mimicking human behavior so when you sign in a stolen account on on this browser it will actually send that person out onto the web that fake person and make it look like they're looking at a website by Hovering over for a particular link or waiting before clicking on a link an even getting through what's known as capture so these are special ways that you get through a password system. And that's how these browsers are actually able to get through some of these. Anti fraud defenses. So who's behind these and wire they doing. What's a real purpose here? So each one of these browsers that I looked at their developed by people who sell access to them. So it's just like buying a subscription to Microsoft Office or Adobe Photoshop except you're buying a subscription to Lincoln's fear and in this particular case you would spend about one hundred dollars a month to get access to this browser in some cases with other browsers the more you pay per month the more so-called configurations you can get and and these are Basically when you download the browser You know when you actually surf the web. You can put lots of different tabs in your browsers. You can remember to go to this site or the site With this browser each one of those tabs is a different fake persona and each one of those fake personas will go to a different website. And they'll oh click on this link and that link and they might scroll down a little bit and because they're browsing almost like a human. Each one of those accounts is able to get past the anti-fraud fraud detection systems that are put in place by the big websites for me as a consumer. What kind of impact does that have this? This boost their traffic and that does what like. What's what's the impact of that? Well it's hard to quantify it's a great question. It's a little bit hard to quantify exactly how this is affecting affecting consumers but I can give you one example. I spoke to one person who actually used Lincoln sphere to try and push the rankings of certain products. What's on Amazon? Up The rankings. So they would take these fake personas with this special browser and they would all those fake personas would actually be looking at the same same product at the same time and because each one of those personas looked like they were human or they were exhibiting human behavior. They had managed to get through the anti-fraud system of of Amazon according to this particular person Amazon comment for the story by the way And another thing that this user of this tool told me was that it could also be used to do boost. five-star reviews for certain products to this is a problem that particularly Amazon has any big e commerce site we as consumers rely why on you know the the number of stars that product gets to know. Should I click on this. Should I trust that. This is a good product or not but a lot of times fraudsters and advertisers who are using special tools. Like this are actually able to manipulate those figures. Got It so it would look like for example. A website might appear higher in regular search results than it normally would have because it seems like more people are looking at it. So it's it's getting it's getting by getting the fake. Traffic is enhancing what appears to be the value of. Yeah that thing correct. And there's a term that some of the people who use this tool use for that phenomenon they call it traffic arbitrage and what that basically means in practice in one example for instance is to use this tool to send lots of fake bots. You could call them to. Let's say a page on facebook so you get lots of fake facebook accounts that go to this one facebook page and they like the page then. The person that's behind that page can have another website where they're are selling ad space and they can say advertisers look how many people have clicked on our facebook page. More than ten thousand people have liked it when actually maybe most of those people were not real real people so this is also going to have an impact financially for advertisers or for companies who are selling ad space absolutely and again. This is a very very complicated problem. And the big tech companies who are effectively in a Lotta ways add companies facebook and Google make their money from selling ads. It's like a cat and mouse game. I'm for them because whenever they tried to Clo- close one loophole fraudsters will find another loophole to try and game and so when I reached out to Google for the story story. They said we're aware of this issue. We've been researching anti fraud detection browsers you know. It's just kind of like a constant battle with the fraudsters to try and close loopholes polls and try to detect tools like these but they are getting smarter all right Parmi thanks so much and that was your news briefing. I'm Qatar Yoga from the Wall Street Journal in New York. Thanks for listening.

Amazon facebook US Deloitte fraud Wall Street Journal Parmi Olson New York India Terry Yokum Supreme Court Lime Google reporter Parmi Parmi Hauser Microsoft
Why Hackers Are Targeting Companies You've Never Heard Of

WSJ Tech News Briefing

11:56 min | 3 months ago

Why Hackers Are Targeting Companies You've Never Heard Of

"The end of the article isn't the end of the story. The Journal podcast goes behind the scenes with reporters and covers everything from the Mormon Church's one hundred billion dollar fund to Corona Virus Listen to the Journal on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. This. Is Your Tech news briefing for Friday June nineteenth I'm Terry Yokum for the Wall Street Journal. We often hear about cybercriminals when they go after big companies or entities, but recently some ransomware attacks have been infiltrating smaller, but important players behind the scenes. Our reporter Jenny Strasbourg will join us to explain why after these headlines? Feast Book has removed some posts and ads for president trump's reelection campaign, saying they violate the company's policy against what it calls organized heat, a reporter Emily Glaser has. So facebook, Google and twitter have all been. Had A treat political ads and political content. This has been going on for months and late last year. Twitter and Google took more stringent actions with their new political ad policies that either limited or really didn't allow political ads on the platform. FACEBOOK has been criticized for not doing as much as the other platforms especially as we've seen more recent content that some. Some have argued is questionable. Things got heated again this week. When facebook decided to take down trump campaign posts and ads, and said that those posting ads violated facebook's policy against quote organized hate. Specifically, the trump ads included a red downward, pointing triangle that it said was targeting Antifa a movement that they described as dangerous mobs of far left groups, however, the anti-defamation. anti-defamation League. has said that the inverted Red Triangle is a marking that Nazis used to designate political prisoners in concentration camps amas. FACEBOOK's decision to take down. This content will have consequences for the trump campaign. Facebook is an essential platform for the trump campaign to raise money connect with their supporters and try to reach potential voters. The trump campaign spent more than eighteen. Eighteen million dollars on facebook so far just this year twenty twenty, and that's on top of millions, tens of millions at it spent in prior years, so this decision by facebook to take down its ads wile not the first time definitely sends a message, and it'll be interesting to see how this affects political ads, especially those by the trump campaign moving forward. The international community has been negotiating about whether and how to tax the tech giant's, but talks have been at a standstill on Thursday France and other leaders in the European Union said they would go ahead with their own digital services taxes by next year. Even if no international agreement has been reached, it's an escalation of talks between some European countries and the US, which argued that taxing tech companies disproportionately hurts American businesses. And superheroes like Superman. Batman and wonderwoman are joining the cast of spotify, the streaming giant and Partnership. With Warner Brothers to produce original podcasts based on the DC of superheroes and villains. It's just the latest acquisition for spotify which has spent over six hundred million dollars, as it seeks to reposition itself as a full service audio company, instead of just a music streaming platform. Have to mention here that the Wall Street Journal has a podcast partnership with Gimblett which is owned by spotify. After the break, how and why? Hackers are avoiding headlines by going after more under the radar companies? That's next. When the world is at a standstill facts can move us forward. Facts help us make decisions and bring us together. Even were apart the Wall Street Journal has the facts in these uncertain times get the latest on the corona virus outbreak with free coverage of the crisis and its impact on the economy, politics, culture and daily life. Find the clarity. You need with America's most trusted news source, visit wsj.com and stay informed. When hackers target high profile entities like hospitals, retailers were the Democratic National Convention, it makes headlines that might be why savvy cybercriminals have begun looking for quieter ways to get at the information and sometimes the money that they're after analysts. They were beginning to see more attacks on companies. You've probably never heard of cybersecurity reporter Jenny Strasbourg joins us to explain. Jenny, thank you so much for being here. Thank you for having me. Jenny you spoke to a Legal Services Company called epoch that was hacked earlier this year. How did they discover the bridge and clean up for them sure so? They, discovered on February twenty, nine late at night that they had intruders, and they quickly decided to shut down their systems, realizing that they were under ransomware attack which is. Frightening for any company. It usually means that the attackers have been on your system for a while. They've chosen an optimum time in. It's hard to know how much they already know. And how bad it already is, so they shut down their systems globally in the hopes that they could basically like shut off the digital corridors of access, and and limit the damage, and basically they bet on the idea that they could bring it back. Back up from their backup systems, and the scary thing is and the the really costly thing with ransomware taxes. Often, it's not just about the ransom and the demands of the attackers. It's about lost business, and in your client's going elsewhere and lawsuits, and all those ramifications, so they spent two to three weeks going through a process of like scrambling to get their public facing websites up and giving their clients. Cloud based options to do what they do. Which is managed a lot of legal documents discoveries for trial they handle like claims and bankruptcies. They handle compliance file documentation for corporations and banks, so there's a lot of sensitive documents involved so I guess we'll be questioned. Why would a hacker target a company like why not target a bigger more powerful company? What did they have? They wanted? They have big powerful clients. They have extremely deadline driven clients I mean. There were trials happening in us. District Court, you know. Victims of wrongdoing, waiting for restitutions and payments and bankruptcies happening and think of it like this is March of Twenty Twenty, the pandemics picking up. Epoch is not a household name by any means, but if you're a bankruptcy lawyer, YOU-KNOW-WHO EPOCA's. They handle a lot of major bankruptcy. They're like this behind the scenes administer. You might go on their website to file a claim or get information on filing a claim, or they might be the the company that serves you notice that you're eligible to claim something, so it seems likely that a lot of cases these ransomware attackers will hit at the time when they can do the most damage and put the company under the most pressure possible, and in this case you've got law firms banks global conglomerates like needing this documentation needing access to these websites that were down. They went dark and. and. That's a scary proposition for a company that its livelihood depends on meeting these clients, demands and keeping their data secure, and at a time when it's I mean we've talked about this on the show before the challenges of keeping cyber security protections in place during the pandemic when everyone is working from home, did that play a role in this at this was happening during the pandemic when it's harder to protect your kind of internal systems, a lot of good question, a lot of ransomware attacks they can be. Your garden variety phishing emails fishing. The! It can take one employee to an infected computer, and then the malware can spread laterally through the system, gathering information, and essentially becoming smarter and smarter about the about the target about the victim. You know we've reported a lot on the dangers of people working from home because there's a lot more injury points and a lot of companies scrambled to do this quickly now. This was February twenty nine, so. Epic was just starting to. They were juggling the work from home plans they were they were actually furloughing employees because of law firms closing offices. Then all the sudden they're. They're shutting down their systems. They're essentially like not operating or at least not operating in the way that they're accustomed to operating, you know they had to resort to all different ways of communicating with their clients and filing claims by a different like backup website. They had to scramble to setup backup websites, but yeah, I'm in the pandemic has created a lot more opportunities for cybercriminals and a lot of desperation among their victims. Yeah, I was just GONNA ask to. Is this just one company? Are we seeing a broader trend for these smaller behind the scenes crucial critical. Points of contact to be targeted by hackers. Yeah, there are a lot of what are called managed service providers like the kind of companies that will host services for other companies, and so they end up, being like the CONDU- enter the keeper of a lot of sensitive data. You know if they're managing payroll for hospital or patient records, or or like CPA firms, accounting firms and law firms, themselves are also targeted a lot because they handle a lot of sensitive data for their clients, but. A lot of ransomware attacks are hitting companies that you and I have probably never heard of but their cogs in the economy, and their cogs in the court systems, and what we wanted to show was how a single attack can kind of ripple across the country in ways that are largely unseen, but really can bring things to grinding halt in 'cause just like a massive scramble. In it's unfortunately not uncommon. Our reporter Jenny Strasbourg things so much for joining us. Thank you for having me I appreciate it. Before we go. Today is June eighteenth and some major tech companies have given employees off and announced other changes in response to the killing of George Floyd. We know a lot of our listeners work intact. We want to hear how these changes are impacting you the employees. How has your company address? The protests have they implemented new diversity and inclusion policies like celebrating June teeth. What changes do you still want to see? Give us a call. We put the number in the description and tell us your stories. We may include them on the show. That was your tech news briefing for today were produced by Amanda. Llewellyn I'm your host Correo. com have a great weekend and thanks for listening.

facebook Jenny Strasbourg Wall Street Journal reporter spotify Twitter Google trump Twenty Twenty Terry Yokum Mormon Church US Warner Brothers George Floyd president Emily Glaser France District Court
Microsoft Patches Severe Windows Flaw Detected by NSA

WSJ Tech News Briefing

11:33 min | 8 months ago

Microsoft Patches Severe Windows Flaw Detected by NSA

"This briefing is sponsored by Deloitte business process with less process. See what's possible when data and automation come together to help reinvent workflows visit Deloitte dot com slash. US slash only see possible. This is your tech news briefing Thursday January sixteenth. I'm Terry Yokum from the newsroom. Of The Wall Street Journal in New York Public Safety and data privacy the debate has been raging in the US for years and this week it's been brought back into the spotlight for a number of reasons on Tuesday. Microsoft released a patch in its Windows operating system and weirdly enough it. It was the national security agency that found the flaw reporter. Bob mcmillen joins us to explain. That's up in a minute but first. Let's check some outlines it. If you listen to tech news briefing yesterday you might remember that despite an easing up of the trade war the tech war between the US and China is not going anywhere with the telecom giant wall way at the center of the conflict. Many national security officials are concerned that the technology behind the beijing-backed way could could be used for surveillance people and they're especially concerned because wall way is a leader in telecom equipment for five G. wireless networks. The trump administration has been trying to keep Wa out of the the US and even put pressure on other countries and now Congress is also getting into the fight. A bipartisan group of senators has introduced legislation to subsidize that is US firms that could counter China's five G. advances. It's got a great name. It's called the Utilizing Strategic Allied Telecommunications Act and it would put seven one hundred fifty million dollars toward developing five g technology and set aside five hundred million dollars for US companies that implement secure equipment around the world a federal court in New York her closing arguments on Wednesday in the T. mobile sprint antitrust. Case the case was filed by coalition of state attorneys who sued after the DOJ the OJ approved a merger on the two carriers twenty nineteen after some concessions from the companies T. mobile and sprint. Have Long argued that teaming up would allow them to compete more effectively. Flee against the likes of verizon. At a decision is expected in the coming weeks. But in the meantime the market is looking bearish on the outcome. Shares of sprint are trading more more than forty percent discount to the value of the original all-stock deal and you may see more technological advances in physical stores in the future at the national national retail. Federation's Twenty Twenty Vision Conference this week. Companies showed off new applications attack in brick and mortar stores. We're talking about replacing cashiers with facial recognition technology using AI to help manage inventory and even putting robots in the aisles. As consumers do more of their shopping online companies are hoping they can lure people back in by implementing technology that enhances the in-store experience. Get this briefing is sponsored by Deloitte on podcasts. You hear a lot about what's possible but one thing is certain. No business or city achieves their possible alone that's why deloitte collaborates with a vast ecosystem of alliances lances in everything from systems hardware to cloud platforms data migration to analytics a VR collaboration. It's one key he way to turn possible into actual learn more at Deloitte dot com slash. US slash only see possible. The conflict between public safety and data privacy has been raging this week on a number of levels on Susan. Dey came out related to Microsoft. It released a patch to fix a software vulnerability in its Windows operating system that would allow hackers to breach or surveilled targeted computer networks. The interesting thing here is that it was the national security agency that detected the flaw reporter. Bog McMillan is with us on the line. From from San Francisco to explain. Bob Thanks for joining us. Hey It's a pleasure to be here. So what was this Microsoft Flaw. And how did the NSA actually discover right. So the flaw was a bug that affects windows ten the most popular operating system that Microsoft offers. It's if you're up to date on windows you're going to be hit with it. It it it has to do with the CRYPTOGRAPHIC technology that Microsoft uses to make sure that the software running on the computer is what it says it is so. It's not a malicious program. Created by Russian hacker. That says. Hey I'm Microsoft word. Please run me so Microsoft. Has these checks that it uses to to prevent unauthorized software. Air From from running on the computer and related to that so having this loophole would potentially have allowed hackers to install malware on systems undetected as all right. Well it hasn't been exploited right now so we don't know exactly what the real consequences of real malware would look like on it. But yeah that's the concern is that somebody would leverage. This ought to run software. They weren't supposed to run on your computer. You wouldn't know about it. It would do bad things to it. I mean it's serious enough that the federal government is warning first of all Microsoft about it but they also warned their own users about this. Is this problem. said it's really serious. You gotta take this one seriously. Everybody in the security industry is saying you're running windows ten make sure you get those patches. That were released on Tuesday and install them. How common is it for the NSA or other government agencies to be hacking into systems finding flaws and then letting the companies now well the NSA has never notified that we know of a Microsoft of a flaw of this nature before we know that they find bugs like this a few years ago A number a number of them were disclosed and Microsoft got angry with the NSA basically they said you guys have found all these bugs in our products. And you haven't told us about them. You're supposed to be doing that. So this is kind of touchy area because the NSA is in the business of information collection and the way you collect information off of computers nowadays is by finding bugs eggs in exploiting them so they're considered to be some of the greatest you know security bug finders in the world there. They mission mandates that they use them but then part of their mission in is also to help defend the the federal networks and to make sure that other people can't break into our computer systems and the best way eighty do that would be by telling Microsoft about the software flaws and having Microsoft patch them in getting those patches out to everybody so it's kind of a balancing act they have to do and it was interesting interesting to me was this was the first time. NSA had publicly came forward and said here's a bug. We found it. We told Microsoft about it. You all need to patch and it happened like the same week that the Department of Justice was saying we want you know you wanna way into the iphone. It was like these two conflicting messages coming from the federal government. Yeah I mean it's kind of ironic as an on the one hand they're telling attack company. You've got a flaw that you haven't found on the on the other hand they're saying to another tech company. Your security courtesy is so tight we can't get in even if we want to. Yeah it's like it's almost like the NSA is bragging we we have so many ways of getting into your computers. Here's here's one we just found. I don't think they're really doing that. But but it is. There is a contrast because obviously if the federal government knew of flow of this nature that affected apple devices they would be able to get the data off of the the these phones in Pensacola shooting which are sort of what the Department of Justice's fighting apple over this week. There two phones there that they want to get access to. They're not able to get the data off the phones. How do they do it? They're asking apple to do it for them exactly so I guess the big question is. Why is the government doing this? Maybe maybe it's self explanatory right. Are they worried about threats from foreign governments. Y Are they kind of the lead hackers in the in the business right now. Well the government really legitimately is interested in not having critical infrastructure. Here in the United States be hacked. They very much see it as their mission to WHO PROTECT US networks federal networks in particular part of the NSA's mission and they they have for years had a process called devoted abilities equities process whereby the government finds these bugs and then they transfer them to the private sector so the private sector can then improve the security purity of its products and this process has been very mysterious. You know it's all classified this kind of stuff and we we really have never had a very good insight into how much information mation Israeli transferring. A lot of critics would say that the government has been you know sits on these bugs when it finds them for too long and the the process isn't isn't isn't really working. They're supposed to tell us about. How much is being transferred? And we just there's just no public knowledge of the sort of nitty gritty details. Like how many bugs it's the NSA and the government finding and how many are they transferring over to to whom and how often does this happen so does NSA bug the fact that the NSA came forward said we found it. We gave it to Microsoft soft patch. It that's that's something new and it really feels. We've just we talked about this a little bit already but it really feels like we're kind of at a crossroads here on the one hand. The the companies are happy and excited when they find something that they can fix easily on the other hand. They don't want to work with them when they're asking for their help right when the government's governments asking for Apple for example to open up the IPHONE. Where are we going to be at this in terms of cybersecurity? Where do you see this going this? This cooperation collaboration or conflict between governments and companies over cyber security will. I would come to modify what you're you're just a little bit. It's not that apple and the tech companies don't cooperate with law enforcement's not that they're refusing to cooperate. But what's happening is they are setting up systems where they their hands are tied where they can't cooperate whether there is there the data is so secure that even the maker of the device or the operator of the online service can access it so this solves the problem for the tech industry in that provides very high levels of assurance. If you're if you're using the products you can you can feel like you're using them without them. Being spied on and at the same time creates a problem for them which is that the federal government has for years years. Gone to apple and said Hey we WANNA get data off a phones and in the early days APP would be able to do that. And as they made their iphone more and more secure they eventually they reached a point where they said no we not that we don't want to so that we can't we don't have a way of getting the data off the phone and so the government says well come on. You could do do something you could do. A software update that like you know unlocked the phone just for the government and apple says this is a back door. This is something that if we if we created it then and somebody else might figure out how to figure out a way to make it work and it's introducing a security problem into our devices so there's this kind of of a chicken and egg fight that's going on where apple says it will undermine security to to add the the method of getting the data and the government says is will. Why can't we get the data? We always get the data chicken and the egg bog McMillan. Thanks so much for joining us my pleasure and that was your tech news briefing. I'm Qatar Yokum for the Wall Street Journal in New York things for listening.

Microsoft NSA federal government US apple Deloitte New York Bob mcmillen reporter The Wall Street Journal Terry Yokum Deloitte dot Department of Justice Twenty Twenty Vision verizon
Our Guide to Grocery Delivery Services

WSJ Tech News Briefing

12:07 min | 4 months ago

Our Guide to Grocery Delivery Services

"The end of the article isn't the end of the story. The Journal podcast goes behind the scenes with reporters and covers everything from the Mormon Church's one hundred billion dollar fund to Corona virus. Listen to the Journal on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. This is your Tech News. Briefing for Wednesday may sixth. I'm Terry Yokum for the wall. Street Journal. Going to the grocery store has become tedious and actually dangerous during the pandemic to stay out of the stores. Many people have started ordering their groceries online. But it's so many that become nearly impossible to score delivery slot. Our personal tech columnist. Nicole knew when will join us to share her guide for getting your groceries delivered after these headlines Airbnb announced layoffs during the pandemic on Tuesday. The company said it would cut twenty five percent of its workforce. That's one thousand nine hundred. Employees Airbnb says it's also going to reduce investment in newer areas. Like it's transportation studios initiatives and scale back plans to bring traditional hotels and luxury properties onto its platform as global. Travel has come to a halt. Airbnb has been forced to slash its revenue forecast by more than half Disney reported. Its earnings on Tuesday. The company has lost over one point. Five billion dollars operating revenue sends it Shutdown Walt Disneyworld analysts. Expect the losses to be even more pronounced in the future but the division that includes Disney plus has been a bright spot bringing in more than four billion dollars in revenue. The service crossed fifty million subscribers in April but Disney is still spending significantly on marketing Disney plus and says it's consolidating with Hulu and ESPN plus. California is Suing Uber and lyft saying they miss classified their drivers as independent contractors rather than full employees. The state is seeking millions of dollars in penalties and unpaid payroll taxes. This is part of a battle. That's been going on since California past the AB five law last year which required more gig workers to be classified as full employees. There's been a flood of counterfeit masks test kits and other medical equipment entering the US. Pandemic began now report exclusively that US Immigration and customs enforcement known as ice is partnering with Amazon and two other companies to try and stop it and many parts of the country are beginning to reopen. But what will it look like in our offices when we go back to work to keep people safe some workplaces we'll be implementing solutions like plexiglass dividers and sending in cleaning crews more frequently but our reporter? Conrad puts says they might also be implementing more high tech solutions a lot of companies installing thermal cameras in the lobbies of buildings. So that if you walk into your office and you have a fever. The camera will notice this. And maybe there's going to be someone at the door who stops you and says hey don't come in you have a fever. Companies are now installing APPs on their employees smartphones. That basically track. How good you are at social distancing and who you come into contact with their all these sensors and cameras and buildings that keep track of occupancy if it gets too crowded the employer will know they'll know who is in that room and who to blame so this all this essentially surveillance technology that's being added to the office in the name of safety and while most people acknowledge that these sorts of measures will help keep the spread of the virus in check. There are obviously still concerns about using this kind of surveillance technology in the workplace. One huge concern. Is that all this surveillance tech. That's being installed may remain in the office permanently even even when the pandemic is over so maybe over the next six months the next year. That thermal camera is being used to take your temperature and these sensors are being used to make sure you don't come into contact with someone who is infected but what happens when the pandemic is over these sensors still going to trace your movements. Is that going to violate your privacy? A second concern that we hear about is the potential for discrimination so one of the things that employers are doing is they're considering dividing their workforce into groups based on how at risk they are to the virus so into republic which is a huge advertising company they are considering dividing their workforce into three groups so level one would be. You're young and healthy and you have. Antibodies against the virus. So you're basically safe level to would be. You're young and healthy. But you don't have antibodies but you're probably GONNA be fine if you get the virus three is maybe you're old. You're pre existing conditions or you're a smoker and they basically wanted group the workforce into these battles to then decide who can come back to the office at what time but the risk is that people being discriminated against. You know if you're at risk you can't go back to the Office. That's maybe in your interest because it keeps you safe but maybe it has a disadvantage to you if you can go to meetings. People don't see you in the office is going to be harmful to your career and I think those are some of the issues that will be will be grappling with for months to come up next our personnel tech columnist. Nicole joins us with her guide to grocery delivery. That's when the world is at a standstill. Facts can move facts. Help us make decisions and bring us together. Even as we're apart the Wall Street Journal has the facts in these uncertain times. Get the latest on the corona virus outbreak with free coverage of the crisis and its impact on the economy politics culture and daily life. Find the clarity. You need with America's most trusted news source physic- wsj.com and stay informed to after the break a lot of things have changed in the past few months and that includes the process of getting groceries. If you're still going to the local grocery store in person you may have experienced longer. Lines and higher stress levels as people try to maintain that six feet of distance while they fill their carts or not but if you're a high risk individual or an essential worker or you're just trying to stay home you might be getting your groceries delivered in fact so many people are turning to delivery that drop off slots are becoming increasingly rare on services like instant card and Amazon. Fresh our personal tech columnist Nicole Nuance has been talking to the companies delivering our groceries during the pandemic and she joins us to tell us what she found out. Hanukah has gone good. How are you good so yeah I think a lot of people have experienced this Salat scarcity? You spoke to people from some of the most popular delivery services INSTA- Card Amazon and Walmart. Can you just give us a sense of how the companies have seen? Their services changed since the pandemic began. Well Grocery delivery definitely wasn't ready for a pandemic and that was apparent almost immediately I think that as people started realizing that they needed to stay home and stock up on groceries for two weeks at a time. Though slots became more and more scarce INSTA- carts at customer order volume was up one hundred percent in the same time last year and they have started introducing new measures like out in grocery pickup. Instead of just just delivery. Now it's delivery now you can pick up your order ready in store And other things like car you can also opt to get a flat fast and flexible delivery which means that. Your order isn't pegged to a certain times since you're at home anyways you'll be there to accept the delivery but I think that delivery availability slots are now more available however. It's still difficult to get a time slot if you want it. Yeah I mean. In the beginning. We were hearing anecdotally stories of people waking up at four o'clock in the morning to try to get a slot a week in advance. You spoke to a mom in Seattle. Who's also going to extreme lengths to try to get enough food? Because she's got three very hungry teenagers that she needs to feed. Is that right? Yes and so because she has three teenagers she has three different windows open. They're all different services and she as she's working. She's just refreshing them all day every day when she gets up to go to the bathroom in the middle of the night she opens her phone and she checks for for time slots and this is what people have to do now in order to get a successful checkout one of the things that she described. I've also heard stories about and experience myself that even when you do get that delivery slot and you try to fill up your cart. You often find out that the delivery is incomplete because a lot of things are not in stock. That's right and that's why it's really helpful especially on instrument we can do this to preselect replacements or else when you get your delivery. Almost half of your order Might not arrive because things are out of stock and if you're ordering on Amazon or whole foods you have to be by your phone or on your computer. To approve up replacements. In real time or else you won't get those deliveries though on Walmart shoppers. Do Pick your placements on your behalf. So you basically have to trust that chopper is GonNa knows your taste and is going to pick a good replacement for you okay. So this is tech news briefing. Podcast we want to hear about some of the tech options. That are out there to try to help people out with these. Some people have started using chrome extensions and other browser tools. Can you tell us a little bit about those he has so? These browser extensions essentially auto refresh the checkout page for you and it sends you a ding or an alarm sound went into Texas. There's and availability window but you really need to be careful with these kinds of extensions scripts available online on websites like get hub. But if you don't know how to read scripting language I'm saying scrap the script entirely because it can essentially do anything on your computer without your knowledge. The risk of a browser extension is a bit more contained. But you do need to play it. Pay Close attention to the permissions. It asks for so for example. If it's an Amazon delivery sought checker it should only need permission to look at websites on Amazon's domain and it shouldn't require access to for example a keyboard events so if people are just starting out using these services or maybe even thinking about switching from one service to another. Do you have any good rules of thumb for how to figure out which platform to use? I think that you'll want to use the platform. That has the most delivery availability. If you're a prime member you'll get a ton of perks on both Amazon fresh and whole foods and Amazon prime now three services that are essentially do the same thing except that whole foods obviously sources only from whole foods and not from Amazon. And if you're a prime member you'll get free delivery for orders over thirty five dollars for example and access to a ton of sales instant cart. You'll get a ton of selection as it pertains to stores a lot of local stores in your neighborhood and on Walmart it just. There's a vast selection of items into it really just depends on what you need it at that time and a lot of people are looking at these big conglomerates and thinking you know what. I really want to support my local businesses. I WanNa make sure that those grocery stores are still there when all of this is over and I'm just not reduced to only ordering things online. Are there any ways to do that and support those local businesses whole an instrument? You you get access to a lot of local stores aren't just big box retailers. But also there are a ton of bakeries and local restaurants that are now selling produce and bakery around the corner from me selling bread flour flour which is sold out almost so definitely. Give your local bakery or restaurant call to see if they're willing to sell groceries. Excellent alright our personal tech columnist Nicole new end. Thanks so much coming back. Throw come thinks before we go. We are still taking your work from home tech stories questions. Our senior personal tech columnist Joanna Stern. We'll be back with us on Friday to share her favourite tips and solutions. You can call us and leave us a voice message at the number and the description or you can email Joanna at Joanna dot stern at wsj.com and that was your tech news briefing. I'm Qatar Yokum from the Wall Street Journal. Thanks for listening.

Amazon Office Amazon Walmart Airbnb Disney Wall Street Journal Nicole California reporter US spotify Terry Yokum Street Journal Mormon Church Joanna Stern fever Seattle Qatar Yokum ESPN
Why Police Could Still Be Using Facial Recognition, Despite Big Exits

WSJ Tech News Briefing

14:40 min | 3 months ago

Why Police Could Still Be Using Facial Recognition, Despite Big Exits

"Facts allow you to make decisions and unpredictable times. Get the facts you need from the Wall Street Journal from Free Corona virus updates to daily deep dives, and our podcasts and videos. WSJ is a trusted source in uncertain times visit wsj.com. This is your tech news briefing for Tuesday June, Sixteenth I'm Terry Yokum for the Wall Street Journal. Some of the biggest names in tack of announced that they won't be selling facial recognition software to law enforcement or talking about Amazon Microsoft and IBM, but that doesn't mean. Police aren't going to be using the technology. Our reporter Jared Council will break this down for us after these headlines. Lawyers for Amazon CEO Jeff, bezos have indicated that he's willing to testify on Capitol Hill in a house antitrust probe later this summer. Congressmen pushing for visas to appear since April when we reported that Amazon. Employees use data from third party. Independent sellers on their platform to develop their own competing products is a practice that an Amazon executive denied before the same committee last year. bezos is one of several tech leaders who've been called to speak at the hearing. It's part of the house. Judiciary Committee's probe into anti-competitive. In Tech Markets. The embattled ad tech industry is getting a PR makeover. In recent years, these companies have come under fire for collecting location data from people's phones, which later ended up in the hands of businesses, political groups, and sometimes even law enforcement governments around the world of instituted laws to protect against privacy violations, but our reporters Schechner says that the pandemic has made some public health authorities set aside those concerns at least for now what we're starting to see is that companies that have access to data coming off of millions of smartphones from acts on those phones are turning to public health authorities in offering them databases or Through contractors that have various analytical tools offering them access to this data in order to do things like monitoring social distancing or determining, which areas could even be hot spots are tracking back where the people who were at a place known to have been infectious, later went or where they had come from, but we're not talking about big name. Companies like apple and Google. Apple and Google have at least for the time being drawn a line in the sand that they don't want to use the location data that they have to draw this level of insights. There's a whole other tier of AD companies. These are companies that are kind of middlemen in the advertising. Industry Online. They've been under increasing fire in recent years building what some critics call a surveillance economy, and they often harvest a bunch of information from smartphone APPS, including very precise location for from certain APPS and. Some. Critics say that there's not really sufficient notification to users the after taking data and using it in various ways that might go beyond advertising. San Says it's possible that these sorts of deals could lead to a thawing of relations between tech companies and the government agencies that regulate them. It certainly shows that there are marriage. Of Convenience in the midst of a pandemic and you know this kind of information is attractive to government officials who might be able to use it for reasons that people could get behind fighting pandemic and might use it for reasons that people don't much support. There's certainly evidence that we reported about law enforcement agencies using information like this or political groups getting accessed information like this. And the Department of Justice has charged six former employees at Ebay with leading cyber stalking campaign that targeted the editor and publisher of a newsletter critical of Bay. The DOJ says. The campaign began after two members of ebays. Team suggested it was time to quote. Take down the editor and that their tactics included sending threatening messages packages with live cockroaches and a bloody pig mask ebay said it was notified of the activity in August and that it had fired all involved parties after an investigation. Up next several major tech companies have announced moratoriums on selling facial recognition technology to law enforcement, but will that actually change anything? Social distancing slows the spread of corona virus, so we should all stay home to lower the risk for everyone more INFO at Corona Virus Dot Gov. Let's all do our part because we're all Hashtag alone together brought to you by the Ad Council. We've seen. The biggest company is making changes in response to protest over the killing of George Floyd. They've announced massive donations to racial justice. Initiatives held town halls in their own companies and introduce new diversity and inclusion policies among those commitments Microsoft Amazon. IBM and others have said they're no longer selling facial recognition technology to law enforcement, and they've called on Congress to institute national regulations to govern its use. But I reporter. Jerry Council says that might not spell. The end of police use official recognition tech, and he joins us now to explain jared thanks so much for being with us. Forever Man. All right, let's from the beginning. How does law enforcement use facial recognition technology right now? Why is it so controversial so I'll start with the second part I this. This technology has been around for years, and it's not just us by law enforcement. It's used in airports and retail establishments stadiums on and so forth, but the reason it's so controversial is there's really two reasons one has to do with the accuracy of these systems you know these systems for the most part have a tougher time identifying darker skinned people and women than they do. white males. Males essentially the other reason has to do with privacy. Even if these systems are ninety nine point nine percent accurate, some people were concerned that they're being used to survey them and to uncover information about them. That otherwise may not have been known so those are those are the two reasons why this technology is so controversial I'd say in recent years a lot of law enforcement agencies have turned to this technology to help with investigations, so if someone commits a robbery or crime in public somewhere in there are cameras that got footage of the perpetrator, then they. They would use the technology to essentially take an image of person and compared with the database of suspects that they have to essentially fight crime. Right and we've obviously had that going on for a long time. We have cameras that pick people up. And then they go through databases of potential suspects people that have committed crimes in the past, and they try to match those faces. How is this technology different from that kind of eyewitness matching in the lineup? Yeah, yeah, yeah, so technology allows it that process to happen a lot quicker so if you are. are able to get a again. An image of someone you can just run it through a database of of suspects and get results in minutes. The other aspect about the technology is that it's also being used to not just search databases, but the really the entire Internet there's a there's a company out there called clearview that sees itself as a as a search engine for faces, so if the police were using this technology upload of face of it could be a suspect, or it could even be a witness to a crime, they can essentially find. Find out who that person is based on social media, posed and other upload, so that's new and different about it, the the risk of the technology and again this is one of the main reasons. It's come under such criticism in recent years is that let's say a law. Enforcement agencies is using it, and they are trying to figure out the suspect Hula suspect is a in a robbery or some other crime. They use technology and IT pulls up potential matches for that suspect if it's not accurate if it's not if it doesn't do well at making those. Those matches for for faces that are that are darker, skinned or for women. There's a chance that police go after the wrong person, and it even goes beyond that it's not just the police agencies that use it, but there are stadiums I'd use it, you know. Retailers say we don't want this person who has been accused of shoplifting before to come back into our stores. You know if these technologies send an alert that says hey, you know, look out for this person. He or she is on our watch list and ends up being a wrong person you. You know that could that could cause a lot of headache in a lot of you know undue harm for whoever the whoever that person is. Each spoke about clear view and the work that they do. We've now seeing big companies that are are household names. Amazon Microsoft IBM come out and say that they are not going to allow police forces to Hughes facial recognition technology anymore at least for a moratorium at least for a time your reporting seems indicate that might make a big difference in terms of police use of facial recognition technology. Why is that? That yeah, yeah, the big players from Amazon. Microsoft of IBM they all announced that they're pulling back from the market. The only thing about it is is that they're big names in the facial recognition market, but they're not the biggest players per se and the market is made up of other companies including a whole range of startups that focus on this technology, so with the big tech players pulling back. There are still going to be other providers out there. That are selling this technology to police departments. They have no plans to pullback. They see this as. Their bread and butter. If you will you know despite some of the concerns around the technology, they feel that their technology. Does a lot of good. They say that it helps with investigations to find suspects quicker than otherwise might be possible. They also say that their technology is is used to help. Find Missing exploited children. A lot of them do want regulations, but they don't see any reason. Pull back right now because they feel that their services are are essential, and that there is still a market for it, so Microsoft an Amazon are calling on Congress to develop clear national laws about who can use facial recognition technology and how they're using it. Is there any kind of legislation already in the pipeline? So at the federal level, not so much. Last week the House of Representatives introduced a police reform bill that provides or at least touches on a lot of aspects of policing the country, but there was a mentioned in there about facial recognition, and essentially said federal law enforcement officers think you know FBI, and so on and so forth they had. They're not allowed to use facial recognition software on body camera footage without. Without a judge's warrant again that bill was not all about facial recognition. It was just a small part of it, but that's all. That's taking place at the federal level, and there are initiatives around the country and states and municipalities. Some them have sought to ban or put a moratorium on the technology by police agencies. At least for the time being, there have been other. Bills including one in Washington. That seek to regulate the use of the technology, so there's there's really kind of efforts happening across the country in various fashions, but at the at the federal level there hasn't been anything there and just add to that I think that actually was was part of the reason why a lot of these these large companies from Microsoft and Amazon why they why they took A. A step back. They saw the recent police reform bill and say hey, y'all congress. If you're looking at doing something, we're going to wait for you to address the whole issue. You know instead back until then as we wait for legislation on facial recognition software specifically, we're also hearing calls to defend the police. Is that something that could have an impact on this market? Oh Yeah for sure. Yeah, we we. We are seeing a lot of those calls which again just to be clear about not eliminating police departments. At least that's not what everyone wants. It's more so diverting resources and funds away from policing in changing how it operates as those calls and increase obviously in the wake of the George Floyd protests. A lot of police departments may be forced to look at what they're spending their money on, and some of the most controversial elements of what they're spending. Their money on could be the first to go, so you know. I spoke to a fellow at the Berkman Klein Center at Harvard, and she mentioned that these protests are really putting a lot of public pressure on police departments, and some of them, not all of them, but some of them may say this is just not worth it right now, you know. Know where we're going to wait and step back until there are rules of the road for how to use this technology so again. This is by no means to say that police are still going to be interested in it. They're there still are a lot of them are still using it a lot of facial recognition companies still have business in the US. But some believe that that that these calls the defunding police could change that calculation. Our reporter jared. Council thanks so much for joining us right, thank you. Okay, before we go, we know a lot of our listeners work in tack. We WanNA hear how tech companies policy changes related to diversity and inclusion are impacting you the employees so let us know. How is your company addressing these protests? Are they introducing new products or the getting rid of others? Are they holding townhalls? Are they giving you the day off? You can call the number and the description and tell us your stories, and we may include them on our show. That? Was Your Tech news briefing for today. I'm Qatari Yoga for the wall. Street Journal. Thanks for listening.

Amazon Microsoft reporter Jared Council IBM Wall Street Journal George Floyd robbery Congress Judiciary Committee Terry Yokum Ad Council apple bezos Ebay San Says Google executive
Why Trump's Campaign is Looking for Alternatives to Facebook, Twitter

WSJ Tech News Briefing

11:44 min | 3 months ago

Why Trump's Campaign is Looking for Alternatives to Facebook, Twitter

"Business casual is a new podcast by morning. Brew that Makes Business News enjoyable, relatable and Dare I say fun I interview the biggest names in business covering topics like how technology is changing the fitness industry, and the economics of influence or marketing. It's the business podcast that you smarter and makes you laugh. Listen to business casual wherever you get your podcasts. This is your tech news briefing for Thursday June twenty fifth I'm Terry Yokum for the Wall Street Journal. It's pandemic and it's election year. If you're a politician that means your digital strategy is your best shot at reaching voters, but many of the big social media platforms have been coming under pressure to moderate political content and now president trump's campaign is looking for other ways to connect with people. A reporter Emily Glazer will explain how after these headlines. The House Committee on oversight and reform says it's opened an investigation into a data broker called ven tell. Tell is accused of pulling location data from of US mobile phones and selling that data to law enforcement. We reported earlier this year that the Department of Homeland Security used then tell to track illegal border crossings and that the company has contracts with other government agencies as well. Tesla vehicles scored the worst among major automakers according to a new survey of customers in its first appearance in the annual JD. Power Survey Tesla vehicles were found to have problems with wind noise, pain, quality and other parts and a higher rate than other brands Tesla didn't respond to requests for comment, but it has brushed aside complaints about quality in the past, pointing to its own internal data. And Apple says it's closing seven stores around Houston Texas because of concerns over the coronavirus. The announcement follows nearly a dozen closures of apple stores last week in states where cases of the virus have been climbing. Up next why the trump campaign has been weighing alternatives to the big social media platforms? That's after the break. Robotics artificial intelligence augmented reality. The future is here. Listen to tomorrow today with the Wall Street Journal's future of everything podcast that takes you to the frontlines of science and tech and shows you what's coming next? Look ahead. What do you hear? The future of everything from the Wall Street Journal, Subscribe Wherever you get your podcasts. Social Media, companies and political campaigns. It's kind of love hate relationship. At least a very challenging one facebook and twitter have been a huge part of president trump's campaign strategy, but recently as sites have come under pressure to moderate political content, the been butting heads, and now trump campaign. Officials are thinking about plan. B Our Tech reporter Emily. Glaser has been looking into this and she joins us now Hanley. Thanks so much for being here. Thanks for having me. All right. Emily. Let's start with the big picture. Why are big social media companies like twitter and facebook so important to the trump campaign? The trump campaign is one of the most digital savvy presidential campaigns ever seen and they especially US facebook to raise money to engage with supporters and to find new potential voters. Twitter is also a hugely important platform in one of the main ways. Ways that president trump gets his thoughts and his statements, and what he's doing out in the public sphere, and what we've seen in the last week or two especially is that twitter and facebook are in different ways limiting or blocking different types of trump or trump campaign content that they violate violates their policies. Many of which turn you're you're? Let's talk about these policies whether they've. They've been doing. And what are the policies that they say that the campaign has been violating? Yes, so there's quite a bit I'm GonNa try my best to summarize here. Because like you mentioned. This has been a little bit of a love, hate relationship and this kind of tangle for several months now so we can go back to late last year when a number of different tech. Tech companies including twitter, facebook and Google late last year into early this year announced that they were changing their political ad. Policies twitter just decided. They were pretty much not doing most political ads anymore. Google Limited. There's quite a bit facebook decide announced that it would enable users to turn off political ads if they want to. And advertising is a really big way to raise money. Let's fast forward a little bit. What we've seen more recently as that twitter has started labeling certain tweets by president trump one was where there is a doctor video so labeled manipulated media. It also labeled a tweet just earlier this week. It violated its policy against abusive behavior. It was a tweet where trump condemned an autonomous own in Washington DC that he said would be met with quote. Serious force, so twitter is really. Upping the amount of times that it is limiting or labeling trump tweets to be sure most of these tweets there tens of thousands of them that trump puts out. He's got more than eighty million twitter followers. Most of them do go through and facebook side. What we saw that really changed things up was last week. Facebook took down trump campaign ads and posts that used. Used a symbol bat Nazis had us to designate political prisoners concentration camps decades ago and facebook said that it does not allow groups to use hate group symbols, unless it gives any kind of appropriate context condemning that, so we've seen a lot of these actions recently and the trump campaign is not happy about it. Yeah, I mean facebook has been pretty lenient till now. Now. The seems to have come as a pretty big surprise to the campaign. How has that decision changed their calculation in terms of how they're using facebook, and are they considering any other alternatives will from the sources that I in myself and Michael Bender spoke with our White House reporter. The trump campaign was really shocked when facebook took down the ADS and post last. Last week it really put into a completely different Dr efforts that they've been loosely talking about in terms of alternative options, the problem is you really can't replicate the reach of facebook and the scale that it has certainly on the advertising side and twitter, though to a lesser extent so from our reporting. We've heard that the trump campaign is considering moving to a lesser. Known Platform One is partner spelled P. A. R. L.. E. R., which is according to its website all about free expression and free speech. The trump campaign has also been talking about boosting its campaign APP where it owns. The distribution owns the content, and it doesn't have to be worried about social media, giants, potentially blocking or limiting what they're trying to get out so I guess the question is how our social media. Media companies reacting to that potential I mean it's not just that trump posts or any of the politicians post on twitter. They're also spending money there in revenue on Facebook, for example not on twitter, but on facebook. So what are they saying about? The potential of moving off of their platform will let's be clear. It doesn't sound like the trump campaign is moving off of facebook anytime soon. They still need facebook. Facebook they've spent close to twenty million dollars on facebook advertising, and that's just since January of this year it's tens of millions. If you look at the past couple of years, and they really still need facebook to reach new potential donors engage with supporters and try to find new voters as well, but in terms of twitter. What we saw last week was that Brad Par Scowl Trump's campaign manager and Dansk Gavino. Gavino who run social media at the White House and sometimes operates trump's twitter account were both posting about Parlour Brad Parcel wrote. Hey, twitter, your days are numbered and linked to oppose from him on the other site. Dansk Gavino also tweeted a link to his own parlor post and tagged the platform, so they're certainly getting a little bit more public about threatening to move off of twitter at least right now for. For a long time, conservative groups have said that there is a bias against them on social media and we've been talking about this just to be clear. These red flags that are going are these flags that are going up on trump's post. They aren't specifically about him or his campaign. Right correct. The policies that are being violated our wholesale across the platform, so in the case of Facebook, taking down ads or content. Content, it was related to using a he group symbol without contacts and facebook says that they have taken down other content before for using hate group symbols like swastikas that completely unrelated to the trump campaign twitter also has labeled or limited tweets for violating its policies again, not necessarily the trump campaign you know one of the things that facebook's head of communications and Policy Nick Clegg said on a call with reporters. Reporters last week that I found pretty interesting. I'm going to read this out loud. He said quote. The trump administration is demanding that we stop a reduced censoring content, and that we fact check less materials, civil rights, groups and the Biden campaign are demanding that we censor and or fact check more policymakers are just going to have to decide what rules they want for campaigns, and for the role of the Internet. Internet, and particularly at times of electoral campaigns and quote, we've got the right saying one thing the left saying another thing we've got company saying something else and at the end of the day. There just aren't consistent rules, and it seems like no one will be happy, and this is all kind of happening at the same time that the administration has been taking a closer look at old legislation that really protected. The Internet Internet companies including including social media companies from being responsible for the content on their platforms. How is that kind of political conversation playing a role here? Absolutely like beneath all of this, or perhaps on top of all, this is what kind of regulations exist and right now it's not a whole lot I spoke with a Boston. University professor Marshall Van. All Stein who researches social media firms free speech policy is he said they're really while there is some legislation. There isn't a whole lot and eventually what we're seeing here is that the social media platforms are flooding users with information but really pushed the. The responsibility onto users says to decide what is true and what is not and each social media platform whether it's facebook twitter youtube, which is owned by Google dare they've created their own rules that are specific to their own companies and keep updating them depending on what they're seeing happening in the political space especially, and so there really isn't a consistent way to judge and to regulate. What's going on right now? which is part of the problem? A reporter Emily Glazer. Thank you so much for us. Thank you before we go. Tech companies have been announcing sweeping changes in response to the black lives. Matter protest, we know a lot of our listeners work intact, so we want to hear how the changes are impacting you. How has your company addressed? Protests have they implemented new diversity and inclusion policies. And what changes do you still want to see? We love the number and the description, so call us and let us know. Tell us your stories and we may include them on the show. And that was your tech news briefing. I'm Caserio come for the Wall Street Journal. Thanks for listening.

facebook twitter Scowl Trump Wall Street Journal president Emily Glazer reporter US Google Terry Yokum House Committee Tesla Tech reporter Apple Department of Homeland Securit Texas
Apple Posts Record Earnings on Strong iPhone, App Sales

WSJ Tech News Briefing

11:57 min | 8 months ago

Apple Posts Record Earnings on Strong iPhone, App Sales

"This briefing is sponsored by Deloitte business process with less process. See what's possible when data and automation come together to help reinvent workflows visit Deloitte dot com slash. US slash only. See Possible. This is your Tech News Briefing Ping for Wednesday January twenty ninth. I'm Terry Yokum from the newsroom. Of The Wall Street Journal in New York a host of tech companies are posting their earnings this week starting with apple. The tech giant released its fourth-quarter earnings on Tuesday. Night including record revenue and return to profit growth order trip. MICKLE will join us to explain the details in a minute but first let's check some headlines. The trump administration has been calling on its allies to boycott wall way over security concerns but this week the U K gave wow away the green light to build part of its five G. Network after investigating. Britain's National Security Council said that the risks posed by alway could be managed but the company will only be allowed to build non critical parts of the UK's five G. Network it's a setback for the trump administration's efforts to clamp down on the use of Weiwei products and and the move could embolden other countries to follow suit. Germany is expected to make a decision on Wa products later this year. High Level Autonomous Vehicle Technology. Sounds sounds like the future but consumers might not want to pay for it right now. A new survey from Alex Partner's found that customers are willing to spend just eight to twenty four percent. More for advanced technology then was already available is not a great sign for the industry which is funneling billions of dollars towards developing self driving cars and and the parent company of Tinder Hinge and match DOT COM is getting a new leader match group. CEO Mandy Ginsburg announced on Tuesday that she's stepping down citing challenges. In her personal life. Ginsberg had spent fourteen years at the company and was promoted to see. Oh in two thousand seventeen. She'll be replaced by the company's current President Sharpie Bay right now match. Group is a subsidiary area of the media company. I A C but the news comes just months before match will be spun off into its own company. Amazon Tesla and facebook. Those are some of the major tech companies scheduled to report their fourth quarter earnings. This week all coming. After apple reporter trickle will give us the details on its earnings report and what it can mean about the company's growth strategy that's after the break capital one knows. Life doesn't alert you about your credit card. That's why they've created iino. The capital one assistant the catches things that might look wrong with your credit card e-e-e-e-no catches over tipping duplicate charges or potential fraud than sends an alert to your phone own and helps you fix it. It's another way capital. One is watching out for your money when you're not capital one. What's in your wallet? SEE CAPITAL ONE DOT COM for details details SH- as we've talked about this week last year apple looked to be headed it for a slump. iphone sales were sluggish analysts. Were worried about slowing demand in China but instead investors got one of the biggest one year stock rallies in in history. Apple's share price has more than doubled adding over seven hundred twenty five billion dollars to its value. That is more than the total value of facebook. Abba released its fourth-quarter earnings on Tuesday and our reporter trip. Miko who covers apple for the Journal joins us to talk about what we learned trip. Thanks for joining joining us. Thanks for having me all right. So what did they report. Did it compared expectations. It exceeded expectations. apple was lined up to the report record revenue and Record Prophet And it did both. It actually fulfilled the expectations of analysts. And then it it actually. Oh you know went even beyond that and projected revenue in the current quarter That would be another record. So after a year of really sluggish results. It seems to you have turned the corner and charted a new path. So tell us a little bit about what contributed to this rally and also these these great earnings reports from the fourth quarter in the throes of last year when apple was really dealing with this iphone slowdown. The company emphasized services business business and out of big events and March were talked about a new. TV Video Service is going to launch a new news service. It was going to launch a new video game service plus a credit card. All of that came later in the year. And it shifted investor attention and really love you know the collective apple customer attention to apple as a services company. Everybody I had to think about it differently. And what we saw in this quarter as we saw in the previous quarters is it's delivering more and more revenue growth from the sale of those types of services. That's helping the company on its business. I think it's really interesting. I mean. Obviously we talk about companies as service companies a lot nowadays. I think it's really important to remember member. That apple was a computer company and then it became a computer and phone company. That's a major shift right. Yeah they're they're kind of the old school company on the block and Silicon Valley right there you know. This different came along way before Google way before facebook. You know the only rival. There's that you know has the same history as Microsoft and so for apple to move into services. It's different you're right. They were computer company than they were the ipod Company and Computer Company. Then they were adding the iphone into it and really became known as the IPHONE IPHONE company because it was such a successful full product and launched the ipod as well. So so what we're seeing now is just a new and different phase for for Apple. What do you think I mean we? We saw them really they lean into services. Are we going to see them. Lean away from those core products As well the thing about the services businesses us as it only works so long as the iphone business remains healthy essentially. What apple has done is it said we have one of the largest distribution that works in the world? We have nine hundred million iphones around the world instead of just selling those customers new iphones when they need a replacement. Let's sell services across those iphones and and that's what it's that's what it's doing so for that to work. It needs to continue to maintain that healthy iphone customer base. And that means making good in you know appealing iphones in the future as well and I mean that I think that raises a really important question. I mean for years Apple Cup raising prices on its iphones and on and basically selling them for what was the price of a computer and offering them as a a computer in your hand. In order to continue to to generate those new generations of users is their strategy around their IPHONES GONNA change. It's certainly shifting right now. What we saw last year was a reduction in iphone in prices? That's not something apples known for. You know lowering prices isn't something that does a lot and with its iphone eleven which was an update to the prior years. There's ten our iphone it drop the price by fifty dollars the bed. It was making. was you know what if we cut the price. Maybe we will sell more of these iphones than we would. Otherwise is we may make less money on each individual one but collectively will will make more and that's actually what looks like happened in the December quarter you know that strategy of lower prices paid off and in the long term. That may help to your point. Keep that iphone customer base healthy and keep people coming back to buy more I phones and then by more services services and it kind of feeds on itself you mentioned The new apple streaming service. Do we get any idea about the subscription numbers. I that service you know. That's the one thing we still don't know Apple put a lot of emphasis on these services last year. It held a big keynote event. At the Steve Jobs Theater talked a lot about them but in terms of how many subscribers it has for any of those services at announced in March including TV. Plus we don't know where that stands Hans we knew you know at this point like the most we know about it as they got a Golden Globe nomination and Jennifer Aniston WanNa Sag Award. We know about the critical acclaim. But we don't know how many people are reviewing it or not and certainly not how many people are paying to view and it's not just the streaming services. What about their new credit card and video game services breath the credit card was introduced in August of last year? Same thing we don't have a lot of Visibility into how it's done and what the adoption rates men and and same with video games and and same with with news plus which was a service for magazines and newspapers including the Wall Street Journal. That's a a monthly monthly payment option in order to get the content as well. I want to touch on something seemingly a little bit unrelated But very related obviously obviously China the countries we can economy has been undercutting smartphone sales. We saw that a year ago. Now we have a lot of concerns with the corona virus that manufacturing factoring employees. There won't be able to return to work I know we have really great fourth quarter sales numbers here. What kind of impact could that have on apple heading into into the first quarter of two thousand twenty first the good news in the previous quarter in December apple return to growth in China? That's the first time in in a year that that it is seen sales growth which is positive for the company Second you know the more the more concerning thing. Globally is the spread of this corona virus and questions about how that will affect apple and others that operate in the region Tim Cook said that Apple. has alternatives to its two suppliers in the Wuhan region. That are at at the center of the epicenter of this Virus and should be okay with its supply chain although it's coming up with plans in case there are production challenges as far or as its retail operations has curtailed some of its store operating hours. And you know we'll just have to wait and see how that affects the company. Broadly he did say that apple took that into account when it set its revenue guidance and obviously a guided for record quarter so it seems like even if it faces trouble in China around around this outbreak. It will be okay and it's business will continue to deliver. I guess my final question and kind of goes back to the beginnings of of Apple. The apple computer the Apple iphone. Those were also very much focused on design and Steve Jobs was really the leader of that has the company structure and power structure in the company. Changed at all as we're seeing these. Subscriptions and services says become more important. We saw a lot of change at the top of apple a year ago. We saw Johnny. I've we've We saw Angela aarons. Who oversaw retail? Leave those are big departures. They don't happen everyday at apple and they coincided with this transition Were the consequence of apple shifting to services. No but and you know anytime you have changed like that it does raise questions about the identity of the company and and who is leading it into the future Certainly Tim Cook is is putting his imprint. On services pushing the company in that direction he was at the Golden Globes you can tell he's invested in the the TV Offering that it has clearly clearly us pushing the company To make that a core focus of of its future all right we'll see how it goes from here trump. Michael thank you so much for joining us. Thank you and that was your tech news briefing. Don't forget that if you like this podcast you can rate and review us in your APP store and you want more news about Wall Street Journal. PODCASTS you can and follow us on twitter at W._S._J.. PODCASTS and with that I'm here Yokum from the Wall Street Journal in New York thanks for listening.

apple apple facebook The Wall Street Journal Computer Company New York Terry Yokum China Deloitte Tim Cook US MICKLE Wa G. Network Germany
Away Chief Steph Korey Reverses Resignation

WSJ Tech News Briefing

11:55 min | 8 months ago

Away Chief Steph Korey Reverses Resignation

"This briefing is sponsored by Deloitte business process with less process. See what's possible when data and automation come together to help reinvent workflows visit Deloitte dot com slash. US slash only. See Possible. This is your tech news briefing for for Tuesday January fourteenth. I'm Terry Yokum from the newsroom. Of The Wall Street Journal in New York. You're in you're out and sometimes you're back in. That's what happened to the CEO of the luggage luggage. Startup Away Steph Corey. The company's reversal comes just weeks. After an explosive article from the verge forced her to resign columnist John Stole will join just to explain what's going on and what this means for other tech leaders in just a minute but first let's check some headlines. Walmart has laid off dozens dozens of its managers in India. The company is restructuring its India operations as it shifts towards e commerce in the region until recently Walmart's been operating as a wholesaler in India India because of regulations that limit foreign investment. But it's begun to pivot to better compete with Amazon and other competitors in the country in two thousand. Eighteen Walmart bought flip cart. India's India's largest e commerce company and person familiar with the company's plan says that Walmart is planning to use the connections and talented acquired in that deal to move away from physical stores. It wants to invest asked more heavily in developing an online customer base and delivery technology but just hours after the layoffs India's antitrust watchdog ordered a probe into both Amazon John and flip cart. The investigation will focus on allegations. That American tech giant's promote preferred sellers of goods on their platforms shutting out smaller rivals and the winter is net flicks at least an academy award nominations. The streaming service received two dozen nominations for its lineup including for the divorce. Drama marriage. Story and the epic. Martin Scorsese movie the Irishman but nominations don't always equal awards net flicks got seventeen golden globe nominations but at the awards earlier this month only to come one trophy and old against new. Hollywood won't be the only debate at the Oscars this year. The announcement of the nominees also renewed debate about racial and gender diversity in the academy especially in high profile categories like best director and best picture since the majority of the nominees were white and or men. This briefing is sponsored by Deloitte on podcast. You hear a lot about what's possible but one thing is certain. No business or city achieves their possible alone that's why Deloitte loyd collaborates with a vast ecosystem of alliances in everything from systems hardware to cloud platforms data migration to analytics. Ai I to VR collaboration. It's one key way to turn possible into actual learn more at Deloitte dot com slash. US slash only only see possible. You might have read the explosive article Nicole from the verge a few weeks ago. Which detailed a quote toxic culture at the online luggage startup away the story implicated co founder and CEO Steph Corey and? She resigned after the story came out but on Monday away reversed course and announced that actually corey would be staying here to talk more about that and how it fits into a bigger your story about. CEO's and Work Culture is columnist. John Stole John. Thanks for being here for having me all right. Let's start from the beginning. Walk US through. What led up? Not a Steph. Curry's departure from away. They're I mean they're they definitely had An issue where they were trying to build a bench in terms of executive leadership so it wasn't without any kind of planning meaning that they had already been thinking about succession and how they were going to bring along people who had more experience in the sort of space that they're in with luggage fashion fashion and trying to build with distribution chain so to Stuart Hamilton was on deck from Lululemon to join and they accelerated that plan and moved him into the CEO. Joe Job after this verge article emerged and create a lot of tension not only outside of the company but clearly inside the company where it indicated there was A bit of a of of a toxic culture and so steph had backed away in December at that time. What kind of allegations were they making in that story about her? You know I mean I think anything that we think. Think about when we think about startup culture probably was amplified in Steph Corey's management allegedly according verge article terse types of replies is Not a not a real empathetic leader by any stretch. Newt knowing what people go through to build a startup from iota zero to sixty in startup culture expecting people to work much harder than maybe they had signed on to work and making very demeaning comments about project managers and our people responsible ensemble for things that were falling through at the culture at the company so I would say behavior not becoming of a CEO is the shorthand for what was going on. And now they've reversed course. So what are they saying now. What's the new setup right The new setup is a co-ceo structure which is not completely atypical. This is what has been going on it. We work in the wake of Adam Newman's Departure comes from a company at Worby Parker which is also in the consumer products space less than attack And they also have a multiple Heads of of the company so it's not a typical in particular newer companies that they're going to employ this strategy. She so steph stays on. We'll work with Stewart. And they're going to have sort of a CO leadership structure but this reversal is a little bit different. Isn't it to say that you're going to step down and apologize on twitter and then all of a sudden to come back and say oh. I'm I'm all better now. This upon further review strategy is not typical it creates a lot of disruption in terms of the direction of the company the oversight of the board the decision making ability of key executives executives. You said you were leaving and now you say you're not leaving There's a lot left on the table now. My understanding is away. Wants to challenge the veracity of of some of that verge report. They looked far more apologetic a month ago. And now look a bit more defensive and so this this shows the the difficulty of a company founder trying to back away from something she built. You mentioned we work. And obviously Adam Newman's departure from we work has been one of the biggest biggest. CEO Departures of the last twelve months. Twenty nineteen We saw a lot of a CEO. Departures I think there was an increase of about twenty five percent. Now how does this fit into that. Larger trend right what happens at startups typically startups. That are a little older than away. Is the board the investors the VC firms. That are behind it. Often start pushing for maybe a more of a seasoned CEO or at least see oh chief operating officer President type of position -sition to come in and begin providing some adult supervision for a company that had a lot of creativity. A lot of spunk. Lot of PEP. They wouldn't have gotten as far as they had with without without that founder but the founder becomes a bit of a liability until you do see situations where there's a natural attrition from founder to a more professional. CEO But the precedent on some of the highly valued startups. That have now become the backbone of American Economy Look Amazon facebook Tesla on down Apple. They had very very strong. Founder driven executive teams the C. Suite was dominated by not only a founder but The largest shareholder. I mean we think Jeff Bezos he's not only profiting offering from the company's good fortune in terms of a paycheck or even stock options. I mean he is Amazon. Owns a bulk of that company. Same thing for Mark Zuckerberg so with Steph Corey oriented companies valued in the billions of dollars. Not only are you leaving some wealth on the table potentially by turning over the reins. You're also ceding control of a company that you may he had have had a very firm and Crystal Clear long-term vision for that maybe nobody else can execute. At least. That's what the story that you tell yourself. If you're in her position position right. I mean a lot of the people that you just named are also people who have almost developed kind of a cult of personality and that goes way back in tech in the tech world. Obviously actually Steve Jobs one of the biggest and in some of them don't don't have the best reputations as being the nicest guys on the planet I mean Elon. Musk and Jeff. bezos also have their own amount of baggage aged to carry around with them for creating cultures that are less than You know a playground to be an all the time but although we've seen a lot of stories about that there's never been a big call offer those people to get Outta town when they've Shown up and not been so nice right and I and I do think that that may have been. I think what could be going on it away. I'm not in the room is steph curry saying. Was this really necessary for me to step aside or do I need help. Do I need some management help and some tempering and somebody who's been in a bigger company like Lululemon. I'm in where you know. Stewart comes from it. I think it's pretty applicable to what happened at Uber with Travis Kalmyk and at first you know really A nasty headlines about his behavior and the culture and even his performance as as Uber User. And he said I'm GONNA get help. I'M GONNA get management help. I'm GONNA get counseling. I'm going okay I'm GonNa have somebody come in and help me figure out how to do this job better. That didn't last very long so it can become a ship that has sailed in the last person to find out is the CEO who's trying to cling onto leadership shippen so. This story is far from complete. Well I think it's also that they are taking guidance from those kind of big personalities but I think our work environment has changed a little button gotten our expectations of what what's acceptable at work has changed in those proliferation of of on the coast of startups. Where once upon a time? If you wanted to work for a hot start startup had to put up with a culture they could wear hoodies and and play Ping Pong but you also had to be there twenty four hours a day and that's changing as the you know Oh skills Shortage you can't find good help particularly if your luggage seller. That's trying to be kind of a tech company. I mean how does that work. You've gotta get specialized skills that you've got to pay a lot for him when those people walk in the door they do have somewhat of a messianic complex like hey don't push me around. I mean I've been at company X.. Company why I know how this is done. This isn't isn't often not their first Rodeo anymore. So do you think we're moving away this tech world from the idea that the vision and the visionary That crazy enough to get it done is good enough and that we need these companies. Need something more. You know the the interesting thing about away how young the company is. And so if you're for in the trenches like a AIRBNB and you're spending a decade under the not under the radar but not necessarily as a public company and you don't have a lot of eyeballs on you and you're kind of giving a a little bit more of a margin to grow there might be a little bit more of a margin for error and so the CEO can grow up alongside with the culture and the two are become inseparable. But you know there was a few things going on here when you start taking of venture capital money in particular in this era when it's not all roses and UNICORNS for these startups. I mean they're having struggles particularly in the case. We see that strong charismatic you know for firebrand of leader is not enough to earn the kind of VALUATION INTO INTO COM- investor fears about the maturity of a company that absolutely I think that these executives who have some or substantial experience France at more mature companies whether it be you know bricks and mortar or at least tech companies have been a long time they will have far more demand for their services and be able to probably step in. It's some of these younger companies and and help move along because there's so much money on the line these bist because they're not public doesn't mean there's not a lot of investor money behind these companies. Excellent thanks so much for joining us. It's my pleasure and that was your tech news briefing. I'm Caserio from the Wall Street Journal in New York. Thanks for listening.

CEO Steph Corey Amazon steph curry Walmart Deloitte India US John Stole New York Lululemon The Wall Street Journal Adam Newman company founder Jeff. bezos Stewart founder Deloitte dot US Terry Yokum
Tesla Defies Local Orders, Restarts Production

WSJ Tech News Briefing

14:41 min | 4 months ago

Tesla Defies Local Orders, Restarts Production

"Facts allow you to make decisions in unpredictable times. Get the facts you need. From The Wall Street Journal from Free Corona virus updates to daily deep dives and our podcasts and videos. Wsj is a trusted source in uncertain times visit. Wsj.com this is your tech. News briefing for Tuesday may twelfth. I'm Terry Yokum for the Wall Street Journal you on. Musk is making headlines again. And not just for naming his baby ex ash a twelve or whatever it is that his babies named California began reopening for business last week but Alameda County which is home to Tesla's only. Us factory decided to stay on lockdown for a little while longer. Now Tesla is suing. And Musk says they're going to go back to work anyway. Our reporter Tim Higgins will explain what's going on after these headlines. Twitter says it will Leibel Post that contain false information about the corona virus. Twitter joined several social media companies in this endeavour which have so far had mixed results last week conspiracy video racked up millions of views before the platforms. Were able to pull it down. Twitter's announcement comes after. A new survey found that seventy eight percent of Americans believed that misinformation about the virus is a major problem. As of today you can watch a news. Special episode of the unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt on net flicks and the special is interactive viewers will be able to press a button on their remote and control which gown kimmy wears to her wedding or what song. Her roommate's things are our reporter. John Jorgenson says this is just the latest way that streaming services are trying to disrupt the TV watching experience. They can do lots of things that we never really expected our TV to do things like you know. Show us all the episodes of a whole season one time which seems crazy when when? I introduced it. Interactive TV is kind of pushing it forward and I think a lot of people are wondering whether we're GonNa see a lot more of these or whether it's going to be sort of a novelty item and when the Badger snatched the the Black Mirror interactive so that came out a couple years ago showed up sort of set off a big discussion about interactive TV. Whether this was going to be the future and I think once people experimented and watched banner stage. They may be realized that. Oh this is something I wanna do. Every day this is kind of a one off novelty item. Maybe for some people. But what we're seeing with Netflix. Especially is that. They have the resources to plug into productions like this because they are expensive. You're creating several episodes within an episode. Their primary goal is just to keep people locked into the service of the they have viewers going back and rea watching parts of a show multiple times. That's that's engagement. On on a higher level and that sort of the coin of the realm for them and vast numbers of people stuck at home have been good news for those streaming platforms Netflix. Hulu and others have seen a surge in membership in the last few months but for cable companies. Not so much. We report that the largest cable and satellite TV companies lost more than two million customers in the first three months of twenty twenty. It's the sharp decline on record for the industry. When the world is at a standstill facts can move us. Forward facts help us make decisions and bring us together. Even were apart. The Wall Street Journal has the fax in these uncertain times. Get the latest on the corona virus outbreak with free coverage of the crisis and its impact on the economy politics culture and daily life. Find the clarity. You need with America's most trusted news source visit wsj.com and stay informed last week. California started phasing in the reopening of business including manufacturing so when that was announced Tesla CEO Elon. Musk sent out a memo to ten thousand employees at a factory in Alameda. County telling them to come into work the next day but just a few hours after that memo the local government in Alameda County said not so fast they were keeping tighter restrictions in place and Tesla's factory was not allowed to open yet in response. Tesla sued and Monday. Musk said they're opening their factory. Anyway here to tell us all about this lawsuit and what it could mean for businesses and governments across the US is our reporter. Tim Higgins Tim. Thank you so much for being here. Thank you all right. Let's start with Tesla. What is Tesla arguing in this suit? One of the things that you must angry about is that The California state government has to open up again including manufacturing and he's arguing that essentially that the local government has overstepped its authority by saying that. Tesla's factory cannot reopen that. The governor's office allowing for the state to reopen and that the US constitution allows for these sorts of things so really Arguments at the county. Government is overreaching and then he made a comparison to another facility. That is a nearby county. What's his argument? There Tesla has its has one assembly plant in the US but it has a number of facilities around California that help with the business. And there's a factory that is not that far from the assembly pant that has in a different county and the people there are not facing the same kind of shelter in place restrictions. Tassels reason the question of why are why isn't a uniform wise? They're pointing to figures. They say indicate that the rate of infection is very similar Why is one place stricter than the other so? Musk actually went a step further and reopened TUSLA yesterday. Right surprising a lot of people Monday. Tweeting out that He was opening the factory starting production that day in fact he said he's going to be on the assembly line and that if the police show up to arrest people he should be the one that's arrested so let's just back up a little bit. This sets tesla apart from many of its tag counterparts right. I mean facebook and others have announced that they're not bringing employees back to the office for months. Why is Elon? Musk and tesla wire. Wise Tusla's taking such a big stand here exactly facebook and Google and others. They can largely do their work at home on computers. Were Tesla makes cars. It needs an army of workers in the factory banging on metal to build these vehicles so they can sell them and without the Fremont Factory Online. It doesn't have anything to sell here in the US eventually. The cars that they made prior the shutdown. They're not gonNA have anything. So if Tesla is going to take advantage of any potential economic rebound that something might occur in the months to come as the country learns to live with the Corona virus. It needs cars. The shutdown came at a bad time for Tesla. It was just a ramping up. Production of its newest vehicle. The Model Y Compact Sport Utility vehicle is a vehicle that Elon. Musk has said could be. The company's top seller analysts expected to do very well. It's a good segment for this kind of vehicle and really there was a lot of enthusiasm among investors about the year ahead and so what the Krono virus has done is essentially. Put everything on ice and The problem for you on musk. Is that this. Factory has been sitting Essentially vacant for weeks. Now and he needs the lifeblood of the company to kick back on. I guess comparing to facebook isn't quite fair. I mean the better comparison might be to other. Automakers what are we seeing Michigan do for example and how our automakers they're responding. That's some of the frustration that musk has been. Venting is that Michigan announced last week and then that they were bringing manufacturing back online this week so Monday. As Yuan is sitting there unhappy that his factory is an open open. Places in Michigan could come back online and he knows his competitors have already announced. Gm for Chrysler others that they're kicking up production GM and Ford. They're a scheduled to start assembly vehicles again next Monday and here in California. That's that's not the case so elon. Musk has taken it another step further. He also has threatened to move production out of California altogether. He's saying maybe to Texas. What kind of impact could his departure have on? The state would smell something that can happen. Overnight it's not as simple as picking up his tools and going to Texas and starting to make cars and a new factory I. It's much more complicated. And it's something that probably would take years to do but the effect would be dramatic. Tessa wouldn't be the first car company to pull out of California Toyota. Its headquarters for the US. North America used to be based on your La and they pulled out over the course of several years starting in two thousand fourteen and they went to Texas because in emerged part it's cheaper to operate their California had just gotten to expensive the factory that Tesla owns and California used to be a factory that was jointly operated by General Motors and Toyota in when GM wind bankruptcy left to Toyota and Toyota. Didn't want to didn't want to be there anymore. I wanted to go to someplace. Cheaper the state of California has in recent generation or so struggled to keep a car manufacturing and the Fremont factory the fact that Tesla was able to buy in two thousand ten and resume making vehicles there in twenty twelve was seen by the the region him by Government officials is a huge win and is something very important for the economy states. Local leaders across the country prize car factories. These are things they want. It means jobs. It means economic investment. It means all the and things that go with with that so it's not just the car factory it's the suppliers and the ecosystem that creates and brings into the community so this kind of threat in some ways was almost going nuclear to say that he was going to pull out of of the state now a lot of people are saying or asking was was just because he lost his temper. And and that sort of thing. Well we'll see. He has said on twitter that he's not messing around and he's taking this very seriously. Some of this of course is also. He's in essentially negotiating in public. He's trying to push put pressure on on the local government to allow him to open up. Yeah I mean it's it's a very public lobbying effort if you can call it that I think the interesting thing is. We'VE SEE BUSINESSES. Do this all the time time right to get tax incentives or or other deals but in this case it's public health interests that are at stake. How HAVE OFFICIALS IN ALAMEDA? County responded to this very open threat And is the pressure that he's putting on them seeming to impact their decisions to reopen at all whether the mayor of Fremont put out a statement saying that she supports Tesla and the Mayor of Palo Alto or the company's headquarters is located. Put out a statement over the weekend about their support for the company. It's a tough position for some of these elected officials They want to see the company. Back Open. They want to see businesses back. Open him yet. Some are also weighing the health ramifications. Several people have died in the county from Kovic Nineteen and they have reported More than two thousand cases of Govan Nineteen and so the concern among county leaders is that they're not sure if there's going to be a spike as they start to re phase in business activity and they'd like to see it play out a little bit longer and be prepared and the idea of ten thousand people coming into a facility is concerning and so they have been working with the company to make sure that the safety protocols in place and the Tesla has Publicized some of these. Things are what they're working on. And that's where the standoff here is. It's not when we're unique to test so there are lots of places and companies around the country who are frustrated and want to get back to the way things were and we've seen state by state by state Different ways of handling this. But there's probably no higher profile company in the US The take this kind of stand to to sue the local authorities and to Defy a local shutdown order. Well we wouldn't expect anything else from Elon. Musk I guess. Our reporter Tim Higgins. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you all right before we go. There is still time to share your work from home and questions with us. Our senior personal tech columnist Joanna Stern. We'll be back on Friday to share her best tips and solutions. You can call us and leave us a voice message. We've put that number in the description or you can email Joanna Edwina dot stern at wsj.com and that was your tech news briefing. I'm Qatari Yoga. From The Wall Street Journal. Thanks for listening.

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Washington State OKs Facial Recognition Law Backed by Microsoft

WSJ Tech News Briefing

13:09 min | 5 months ago

Washington State OKs Facial Recognition Law Backed by Microsoft

"Take Your Business beyond fast with connective and network solutions from comcast business nationwide secure reliable powered by the nation's largest GIG speed network. This is your tech news briefing Tuesday April seventh. I'm Terry Yokum for the Wall Street. Journal facial recognition software has been used everywhere from unlocking your phone to tracking the spread of the grown virus. But there's still a lot of debate about how to regulate the technology and tech companies. Want to be part of the conversation. Our reporter Ryan Tracy will join us in just a moment to tell us about some new legislation out of Washington state and how that might influence facial recognition policy across the United States but first our senior personal tech columnist to Aniston is back with us with her tech tip of the day. Hey Joanna I'm back and this tip was inspired by yesterday's conversation really Tell me about it in my spin off. Podcast which is called. What Day is it and this this tip is all about well? Yes figuring out what day it is but trying to bring back some work life balance by using your calendar to manage your time so necessary so necessary right now. I think it is really necessary right now. So you can do a couple of things on your calendar your digital calendar. I use Google so some of these are pretty aimed at Google calendar but have a tip in here or two for outlook. First thing is sink your personal and work calendars. I'd always avoided doing this before. This whole thing happened because I just liked having both separate and I just felt like okay. If I have a personal thing I'll add it to my work calendar and I'll be fine but actually if you have a group family calendar you really want to have these two things sinked. So you know when you've got a home thing going on you've gotta work thing going on. It can be super helpful. You can do this for both of course if you've got all the calendars and Google. It's a lot easier to do but if you've got outlook and Google and different types of competing programs that's also possible Google around for that. You could find lots of tips on that one of the biggest things I've done is is change my working hours and Google calendar. Do you have that set in yours. Qatari well theoretically no. I don't but I know other people who do and I everytime I try to make an appointment with someone outside of their working hours. It tells me that. And it makes me feel like they've got a better work-life balance tonight for sure. I probably didn't respect these a lot when I was not working from home but now I've been super respectful of these. I think everyone should change. There's to the hours they're actually working. So for instance. I'm actually working earlier in the day now. I used to get to the office later in the day. I started my day earlier so I switched those. You can do that. In Google. Calendar by going to the gear icon than selecting settings and then the working hours area. My third tip is to well okay. There's a there's a small tip buried in here. I wouldn't say this is a full tip but it is put lunch on your calendar and also assume that lunch is gonNA take a little bit longer because you now have to make your lunch unless you have a robot at home. That's making you a launch or a very nice spouse or partner or friend. Who's making you launch? So yes put you're making of you're Baloney Sandwich in your calendar people. Don't schedule that and you actually get a break and you walk away from your desk at home and take a break to have lunch or by yourself vending machine. I missed the vending machines so much. Can I tell you? I haven't had a pop tar in like five weeks now. How many weeks have we been home? And Pop tarts. Were my guilty pleasure. So if anyone out there has a pop tart please email it to me or fax it or however you send things these days all right so my last tip has to do with installing an extension and I actually just started using this and find it super helpful. It's called clockwise. It's an extension for Google calendar and it analyzes your meetings and your time to help you find two to three hours of focused time or uninterrupted time. So you're not constantly going to meeting meeting meeting meeting and it sort of recommends to you when you should slot in those times and how you could find bigger blocks of time to just be focused on your work. The those all sound immediately wonderful and I think I'm going to do them all We also have a work from home. I'm sure a lot of people have slotted into their calendars when they find time to do things. One of things are going to slot in is call Joanna Stern and leave her voicemail with a tech tip or a question where can listeners call? Where can they right? They should email Joanna dot stern at wsj.com or they should call three one four six three five zero three eight put in your calendar. Send US tip a question. Anything story a joke. We could use a joke today. Oh Yeah for sure for sure All right thank you so much. Have a great day youtube up next. Our Puerto Ryan Tracy will join us to tell us how Microsoft influenced new policies around facial recognition software in Washington state. That's coming up after the break comcast business connectivity and network solutions help drive IOT devices. Ai and virtual network applications at peak performance to improve efficiency and customer experience for your business rely on comcast business for nationwide secure reliable performance powered a gig speed network comcast business beyond fast take. You might use facial recognition technology to unlock your iphone. But there's a controversy over the technology especially when it comes to the government or government agencies using it for law enforcement. There's been a big debate over. How facial recognition software should be regulated? Some cities have banned it altogether last week. Washington governor Jay Inslee signed a new law that places restrictions on its use by the government but doesn't outlaw completely and it was a law that Microsoft a maker of facial recognition software has been lobbying for our tech policy reporter Ryan Tracy has been looking into it and he joins us to tell about it. Hey Ryan how's it going very well? Thanks for having me excellent. So we've been talking about this push for facial recognition technology laws for a while. Tell me a little bit about this new legislation in Washington. What regulations does put in place? So the bottom line is it will allow use of this technology which is different than we've seen in a couple of places around the country that abandoned altogether and the bill in question specifically relates to how the government uses it so it doesn't change anything about how private companies may or may not use it and it attempts to put some guardrails around the way police and other government agencies could deploy facial recognition so for example if they wanted to use it to track someone's movement specifically as part of a criminal investigation. They would have to get a warrant for that but if they were using it simply to take a still photo from video as part of an investigation and run it through a database. They might not need a warrant for that kind of depends on the use case and the other key thing about this bill is that the public would have to be notified before their government starts using it and there would have to be kind of community meetings a discussion about that. I and that's really key for a lot of critics of this technology who feel like police around the. Us have started using it without any public notice. So that would happen on a municipal level. Then whatever government agency wants to use it would have to give the notice so that could be a state agency or local agency that that agency would have to write a report explaining how they want to use it. Explaining all the kind of pros and cons. And then they'd have to be public discussion about that. Gotcha Microsoft is You know obviously famously. Based in Washington it was a major driver of this legislation and has been pushing for similar types of legislation and other states as well tell us a little bit about their influence here. Sure so by herself as you know has a huge cloud computing business and part of the the way that they expect to make money official recognition as they will sell this as an add on. If you're using their their service you might use facial recognition to and they can charge more and they were since about the middle of twenty. Eighteen Microsoft has been advocating for facial recognition regulations. Saying that. You know there are some downsides to using this technology but we don't want it to be banned altogether so let's put some rules in place and let's have a discussion of what those are. They've started to be more aggressive in terms of pushing for specific rules and had a hand in drafting this legislation in their home state in fairness you know the people who support this legislation the lawmakers who are pushing this legislation say they talked to a lot of other groups too so it's not as if Microsoft exclusively wrote this bill but they certainly were involved the net and they certainly had a lot influence over it and you know they supported publicly. So that tells you they're okay with what's been put in place here and they don't think it's going to derail their ambitions and they've been pushing for this and other in other states as well right. I mean I know that. Lawmakers in California Maryland South Dakota Idaho or all kinds of introducing bills as well that are very similar yes. Microsoft has been very active in sort of saying to other state lawmakers. Hey look at what's happening in Washington. You might want to consider doing that too. If you're concerned about facial recognition and we've seen similar language very very similar language kind of copy and paste popping up in other states. The reporting on the story also led me to you know. Talk to some people in in Idaho or Hawaii or some of these other places where these these new policies are being considered and Microsoft. Lobbyists have been very active. They're sort of sending the bill to To state lawmakers or other groups and trying to trying to get a conversation started around this legislation that they've been supporting it home. I guess the question is and we've talked about this before. But why is Microsoft working so hard to regulate their own technology so I think they clearly see a business opportunity and they clearly don't want it to be banned? Altogether because that would foreclose that business opportunity analysts estimate that you know in total facial recognition market could be worth billions of dollars over the next five or ten years on the other hand. You know they were on this conversation. What Microsoft would say what they told us is that there are also concerned that there are some uses of facial recognition that aren't consistent with their values. That could be really scary and so they're trying to take a leadership role in their view in getting the right rules in place so that so that the technology can be used in a way. That's not super invasive to privacy or that is used against minorities or other people who tend to get targeted by the government when there's an overreach of power that sort of thing speaking of that I guess that's the other side of the story here right. There have been a lot of people pushing back against facial. The use of facial recognition technologies What's their stance on this new law? So the American Civil Liberties Union opposed the Washington law. They are strongly in favor of ban or moratorium on government use of this technology and they're concerned that while the supporters of this law. Say that it's creating a regulatory framework. There are loopholes in the language that will effectively allow the government to use it. However it wants so we'll have to see how that plays out in practice and we'll continue checking on this But certainly there was opposition from progressive groups in Washington to this law. Another interesting piece of opposition came from the Washington sheriffs and police chiefs. They oppose the law because they felt like it was going to be too bureaucratic every time every time. A local police force wants to implement facial recognition. They're going to have to write this report. They're going to have to hold these meetings. They're going to need to go before a judge a lot of a lot of cases where they might want to use. This and the police didn't like that they were. They said there were some. There was some version official recognition regulations that they would support but that this one was too burdensome our reporter Brian Tracy. Thanks for joining us. Thanks don't forget you can share your work from home at Tech Tips questions and stories with us. Our senior personal tech columnist Joanna. Stern will be sharing her favourite tips and solutions. Every day. Right here you can either leave voice message at the number and the description or you can email Joanna at Joanna dot stern at WSJ dot com and that was your tech news briefing. I'm Terry Yokum for the Wall Street Journal. Thanks for listening.

Google Microsoft government Washington comcast reporter Joanna Stern Ryan Tracy Terry Yokum Washington state Joanna I United States Joanna official Joanna dot Puerto Ryan Tracy Wall Street Journal Brian Tracy Aniston
Senate Republicans Break With Trump on Stimulus Plan

WSJ What's News

16:00 min | 4 months ago

Senate Republicans Break With Trump on Stimulus Plan

"Technology it's in your pocket your car. Your Business and the Wall Street. Journal's Tech news briefing is tracking all of it from consumer tech to cybersecurity from the giants to the startups every weekday. We bring you the latest stories about the companies and advancements that are changing the way we live and work tech is remaking the world will make sure your part of it subscribe to the WSJ tech news briefing from the Wall Street Journal. Wherever you get your podcasts Congress has allocated roughly three trillion dollars to stabilize the economy. But is it enough? The pandemic is not going away. It looks likely to be extended for quite some time. And there's going to be tremendous political pressure on Congress to do something to help so many people who are in pain and why we're seeing outbreaks flare up and Midwest states like Nebraska early. Stay home so people the food coming. Well those who keep the food coming can't stay home. It's Wednesday may sixth. I'm Terry Yokum for the Wall Street Journal. Here's what's news less than a day. After Vice President Mike Pence said the White House Corona Virus Task Force could be winding down. President Trump said this morning that the group will remain in place indefinitely. He said it will shift focus toward reopening the country and developing vaccine executives from the drugstore giant. Cvs are warning that the pandemic lockdowns could lead to a surge in non corona virus related problems. Wsj stay reporter. Sharon turnip says. The company is well situated to keep an eye on the trend. Pvs Also owns insurer at us. Oh CBS has a line of sight into not only what people are doing at drugstores but basically everything they're doing medically so they're seeing that they're not going to the doctor as much. They're not going in for elective procedures. One of the things that could potentially be more concerning is that they're they're seeing particularly with patients who have chronic conditions like diabetes and heart disease They said there's been a significant drop off in new therapies so people if they're already automatic Asian they're getting those medications refilled but they're not necessarily either starting on new treatments or switching to new treatments. And that could have long term ramifications. They said What we know about chronic conditions is is if those are not treated or if people aren't taking medications if they're not visiting their doctors regularly getting tested then that can make those conditions worse and more More acute down the road. The monthly unemployment numbers come out on Friday but they won't include some of the latest companies to announce cuts uber. Today it's letting go of about thirty seven hundred. Corporate Employees General Motors is among the few companies still turning a profit. Gm said sales of big pickup trucks rose twenty seven percent last quarter and we've seen some retail closures but gap says it plans to reopen about eight hundred. North American stores this month. Starting with you in Texas this weekend and in Non Corona Virus Related News the Department of Education released its final rules for how schools should handle allegations of sexual harassment and assault. The new guidance covers incidents that take place on campus but also at places like academic conferences and fraternity houses. The new rules give both the accuser and the accused right to cross examination life proceedings. They also require schools to investigate dating violence and stalking and they let schools choose which standard of evidence to use. The announcement brought an immediate backlash from victims rights advocates and the rules are expected to face. Challenges Court. I'm Jack how host the new baron streetwise. Podcast I'm business. Investing each week we hear from company chiefs analysts about profound changes facing investors. We've heard from Disney's Bob Eiger about the future of movies and theme parks. Cvs Is Larry Merlo about stores providing more health services. And Ford's Jim Hackett about how the pandemic might change the car. Business subscribed to baron streetwise on apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. The first few stimulus packages to keep the economy steady during the pandemic were passed pretty swiftly and almost unanimously. But there's been a lot more disagreement about what should happen next. Our Congressional reporter Xian Hughes has been following the debate in Washington and she joins us now. Chevanton thanks so much for joining us. Good to be here all right. Seven both Senate. Republicans and president trump have identified. Redline demands that they want in the next big corona virus. Bill tell us what they're looking for for Senate. Republicans led by majority leader. Mitch McConnell the most important thing is a liability shield some assurances for companies that when they reopened they will not be sued for how they have handled the corona virus pandemic for Donald Trump. That red line is different. Donald Trump wants to eliminate payroll taxes. It's something that he had pushed for last time. Republicans ignored him and he is not dropping that idea senate. Republicans seemed less concerned about budget deficits during the first round of stimulus. They seem to be pretty concerned about it. Now what's changed? Well we talked to Senator Ron Johnson today and here is what he says pretty much capture where the Republicans are trying to do something massively Andrew. Something quick we all can be far from perfect but we basically took a carpet bombing approach and obviously you're GonNa follow you. Find some pretty fertile ground for that money helping a lot of people but also what people that probably didn't even need Republicans. Have a couple of things happening number one. They saw that they have now spent a ton of money. It's almost three trillion dollars. That's been appropriated over two months number two that the programs that they have funded haven't worked all of that smoothly the P. Program. The one that provided aid for small businesses hasn't been able to provide as much aid to everybody as Congress would have liked on top of that. There's the six hundred dollars extra in unemployment benefits at the unemployed. Get and for a lot of people that means. The workers are making more out of work than they made when they were working. And they're just a lot of different problems like that that have caused both sides to reevaluate. What are we thinking? What's Democrats position and all this Democrats position is that the economy is going to need more assistance and that the important thing is for people to stay at home prevent another outbreak. And that that's the way to get the economy up and running quickly to do that. Democrats want one trillion dollars states and localities. They have other needs as well. For example they say money is needed for broadband. There are lots of kids in areas without any broadband so even if they have a laptop. They can't participate in online. Learning Democrats are also concerned about workers with they want is to force the Occupational Safety and Health Administration to require every single company to have a plan to control for infectious diseases. And so those are some of the democratic so to speak and what kind of expectations do for that actually going through at this point there are arguments on both sides for why this will happen and why it won't happen. The reasons it might not happen are each side is very very dug in on its priorities. For Republicans they want that liability shield for companies and a lot of Democrats balk at that because they say it's not fair particularly to workers to force people back to work and then leave them. Essentially unprotected in the event that companies are bad actors and don't provide safe workplaces. Republicans have again their own suspicions of Democrats for example House Speaker. Nancy Pelosi has called for one trillion dollars for state and local governments. That's just absolutely an enormous amount and so republicans don't seem to be willing to meet her in the middle why this might happen. The pandemic is not going away. It looks likely to be extended for quite some time. And there's going to be tremendous political pressure on Congress to do something to help so many people who are in pain we also saw a teensy little bit of movement today. Some Democrats have been saying they want the hundred and fifty billion dollars. That was previously appropriated for state and local governments. To have the rules be changed so that the localities can use that. Money to plug gaps in their revenue. And you're starting to hear some Republicans say we're flexible. Maybe we're open to that. So there could be a deal here to be struck on some way to help states and localities and some way to give Republicans that liability shield. They're seeking all we'll be watching congressional reporter Cheval huge. Thanks so much for joining us. Good to be here. We've been checking in around the country. About how different cities and states are dealing with a pandemic today we had to Nebraska Nebraska is one of just five states. That didn't issues statewide. Stay at home orders instead. The Governor Pete Ricketts urged people to practice social distancing and they issued guidelines for businesses and public gatherings on county by county basis. This week. They've started to ease. Those restrictions in most counties are mid. West reporter. Aaron elworthy traveled to Grand Island in Nebraska and she joins us now Aaron. Tell us a little bit about Grand Island. Sure so grand. Island is a place where the biggest employers are a meat packing facility J. B. S. USA. They also have industrial which is a maker of farm equipment. There's a big hospital there. So lots of medical workers and other types of manufacturing there's also a family owned Business Hornets. That makes ammunition and so there are just a lot of people who really can't work from home. I was talking to mayor router steele. Who Basically told me that because his city is so full of central workers. A stay at home model was a challenge. Us ALL OF US. Who have been told to stay on the side. We're not GONNA eat. The curious thing about the national directed isn't it? Everybody stay home except keep the food coming. Well those who keep the food coming can't stay home. I told the people of Grand Island Mrs Happening to us because our city is essential. This is happening us because our city is necessary. I'm not disparaging other cities but I mean our help to. Agriculture is necessary for the food supply. America it sounds like a grand island is really struggling right now. Balancing between economics and health We know it's also been a hotbed of corona virus. They've had more than twelve hundred cove in nineteen cases in the city. And it's only got about fifty one people. How are they dealing with the infections and keeping people safe right well? So they're very aware that their rate of infection is high in fact it's higher than New York state's rate of infection and so the mayor has been doing weekly broadcasts to the community where he encourages people to socially distance. Wear masks when out. Do things like send only one person to the grocery store so that you're not going with your entire family restaurants in the area have turned to take out and health. Officials are asking people that if they're not going out for an essential purpose to please stay home and you basically limit their social lives. Let's talk a little bit about the Essential workers food processing is something. We've been talking about a lot. It's a huge part of the economy in Nebraska especially the meat industry last week. President trump signed an executive order to keep meat plants open. There's been a lot of mixed responses to that and unions have been really concerned about the safety of workers. What are these companies in Grand Island doing to respond to that and to keep their workers safe? They've started to implement several new safety measures or enhanced safety measure that were already in place so bring in more cleaning crews and doing cleaning more often using plexiglas dividers where they have workers in close quarters staggering lunchtimes and work shifts to try and give people more space when they are performing their jobs and then reconfiguring jobs where they can so that. Say in close quarters with someone before. Maybe there's Dido a longer wrench for instance if you're building a piece of combine that you can use so that you know you can be a few few more feet away from someone also temperature checks before people even get into facilities. That's that's been a big health measure. So I talked to Tim Shell Pepper. Who is the president of the Fed beef division of J. B. S USA and he wanted to impress on on me how essential J. B. S.'s? Grand Island facility is a number of industry that had been given the title of federal. We see being on that list as really a responsibility and privilege closing facility. I think about for team members and keeping them safe in the plant I think about the farmers and the cattle theaters that rely on. Us depend on us for consistent market for their product and then ultimately I'll about the consumers those fourteen million people that we're taking care better grand island ever did and it sounds like you also spoke to some of the employees. There what are they saying about having to stay on the job. So when I was at Hornets. Eighty there was a moment where I was walking through the facility with Steve Hornets Eighty and his son. Vice President Jason Hornets and a worker stopped Jason and basically just wanted to thank him for the fact that the factory floor was still going and this guy could still pull a paycheck and support his family. The mood around town I thought was that everyone is conscious of the push. Poll of needing to stay in to flatten the curve but also of being an essential worker and needing to go to work to provide these goods and services that the rest of US depend on. And that's what's news for this Wednesday afternoon. We'll be back tomorrow morning. If you like our show please rate and review US wherever you get your podcast. I'm Qatari Yoga for the Wall Street Journal. Thanks for listening.

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A.I. Cameras to Monitor Social Distancing in the Office

WSJ Tech News Briefing

14:38 min | 4 months ago

A.I. Cameras to Monitor Social Distancing in the Office

"The Journal is your daily deep dive into the biggest stories and money business empower for a wider look at today's news the Wall Street Journal's got you covered our what's news podcast. It's concise comprehensive with context and analysis twice a day on the go. It's the news that shapes your world so you can take on the world subscribe to what's News From The Wall Street Journal. Wherever you get your podcasts. This is your techniques briefing for Friday may fifteenth. I'm Terry Yokum from the Wall Street Journal. What could going back to your office. Look like our reporter per meals and says it could include. Ai powered sensors that track people's movements to make sure they're properly social distancing. Parmi will join us to explain but first these headlines we spoke earlier this week about how the trump administration has been working to incentivize makers to open factories in the US. That semiconductor chips. They want to reduce the. Us dependence on chipmakers overseas. Now it looks like the world's largest contract manufacturer of silicon chips is on board. We report that. Taiwan semiconductor manufacturing company is set to announce plans for an advance chip factory in Arizona. Later today several consumer advocacy groups filed a complaint against Tick Tock Thursday for violating child. Privacy laws. They're calling for the Federal Trade Commission to investigate whether the social media company is illegally collecting personal data from users under the age of thirteen. A spokeswoman for Talk said the company takes privacy seriously and that is committed to keeping the platform safe for everyone and last but not least. It's Friday and that means our senior personal tech columnist. Aniston is back with her work from home tech tips of the Week. He Joanna. I'm back never left actually house week nine of working from home going for you. It's not called working from home anymore. It's just called working. We I thought I heard a kid in the background there. It's funny right now. I mean I'm just turn my head a little bit and I see my dog behind me and he is scratching at the door. And do you WanNa know how I see that. I look into a rear view mirror that I've installed on my monitor. Oh here is on live? Tv A couple of weeks ago and the way my office is set up is my desk is facing towards a window and behind me is the door and when I set up it was looking at my shot and you could see the door behind me. I was like Oh wow I could be the next. Bbc Dad which Frothy Remember. This was the viral video. Where the adorable kids kind of just came in the back and the daughter was dancing and she was the cutest thing but he had no idea it was going on and so. I was worried the same thing could happen so I set up my iphone and I use the front facing camera to see sort of a rear view mirror so I could glance down to see if I could see anything. Many people probably wondering why don't you just look at your screen? Well can't you just see the video but when I was on I was looking at some notes on my computer screen as I was talking so I didn't want to be looking at myself too because I find looking at myself as distracting so I did this and then I just wondered. Why don't I just get like a little rear view mirror and put it on the side of my monitor. Turns out they make such a thing. You can search for this on Amazon and you can buy it. And that's exactly what I did all right good idea. So we do have some actual high-tech tips of the day. Are you saying that wasn't a high tech? Well Yeah I am we're talking about VPN's first of all explain to everyone what VPN is if they don't already know yeah so VPN stands for virtual private networks and the simplest way that I always like to explain this. Basically it creates a tunnel between your computer and the service you're connecting to but it's a private tunnel this tunnel in crypts all the data. That's going through it. So if you are worried about hackers snooping on your activity this would make it much harder for them to see and what they could see would be. Just basically gibberish. That's what the encryption does. A lot of people use these for work. We obviously use them for work. Is there any benefit for people to use? Vpn's if they're not actually required to do so yes. I heard when we started this whole work from home tip thing. I heard from a lot of readers asking. Should they be using? Vpn's when they're working from home especially if they're company either doesn't offer it or should they be using their companies for certain types of activities. And so I'll answer that in two ways. The first is if your company offers it you really should just have it turned on. There's no harm in just having the VPN connecting to it and going about your daily business on your laptop whether that be emailing whether it be uploading or or working on documents or even just conversations. There's no problem just have. Vpn turned on. If you don't have one through your company and you are worried that maybe your home wifi network is secure. Or you're worried about the services not being secure you can get a VPN on your own look for what you think is could be a reputable VPN. I've also gotten a lot of questions about is this good. Is that good? My main thing is avoid free. Vpn's anything free when you're talking about security and privacy is usually not a great thing to that I like when it's called anchor freeze hotspot shield and the other one is called. Nord. Vpn Our right. Joanna thank you so much. We have a few weeks left for people to ask questions and tell us their stories. Where can they do that? Yeah we are going to start to wind down here so you have to get them in. Yeah so please. Continue to send tips or questions to me at Joanna Dot Stern at wsj.com or leave. A message on our hotline. We really would love some more messages. Number is three one four six three five zero three eight okay. Joanna have a great weekend youtube after the break. How some employers could be using AI to enforce social distancing in the office when the world is at a standstill facts can move us forward facts. Help us make decisions and bring us together. Even as we're apart the Wall Street Journal has the facts in these uncertain times. Get the latest on the corona virus outbreak with free coverage of the crisis and its impact on the economy politics culture and daily life. Find the clarity. You need with America's most trusted news source visit wsj.com and stay informed. Many people are still working from home. And those who are thinking about going back to work realize it may look a lot different than it did pre pandemic. We've talked a lot on this podcast about some of the measures that employers are starting to think about or even to implement to keep people safe things like plexiglass barriers and one way walkways. As many states begin to reopen some workplaces will also be repurposing some. Ai powered sensors also known as people counting cameras. To enforce social distancing in the office are reporter Army Olsen has been doing some digging into these and she joins us now to talk about it per. Thanks so much for being here. Thank you all right so party first of all. Can you just explain how these sensors work and what they're normally used for sure so these sensors are effectively light cameras? They have a computer vision. Technology working behind them through a lens that captures images and it's able through artificial intelligence algorithms to detect what it's looking at. So these sensors that are being used. Now to help enforce social distancing in the past. They were used to count people and just see where they were moving. So if a company wanted to get a sense of whether this twenty thousand square foot office space that it has they wanNA check if one particular part is being used or not than they can put cam these little cameras all over the office maybe twenty or fifty cameras and just detect whether bodies are actually walking into the conference room whether people are actually sitting in these chairs or not and if they're not then maybe they don't really need that space anymore. Maybe they don't need that particular lease so the idea till now has been to use the sensors to kind of. Trim realistic cost essentially. So but you're saying is the people weren't really the focus the space itself. It sounds like the technology is now being updated to focus the Lens a little bit more on the people that's right so companies who make these kinds of sensors all of a sudden in the last few weeks have been seeing this surge demand from employers. Who need to track social distancing in the office and make sure that they're complying with government guidelines for their stuff to stay two meters apart. And it so happens that this same technology that's counting people and tracking. How many bodies are in a room can also measure how far apart they are now these companies that make these systems will insist they don't track faces. They can't identify people. The images are very blurry but from what they can detect they can tell that there are these bodies in this room and there are perhaps five people in a conference room and there should only be three people in a conference room and these are the kinds of rules that employers are putting into place and the idea is with these systems these cameras they can now get a score for how well they're doing So one company I spoke to would give you a score out of ten with one being terrible and ten being great and if your office scored eight for the Week. Then you're doing pretty well on social distancing it sounds like the analytics for these were much more a long term. They were looking at use of space over a long period of time. It sounds like this might. This timeframe is getting a lot smaller where they could be pretty specific about about that use. Yeah that's a good point because I think these companies and employers were looking for was a sense of how much money we're paying per month or per year and so they didn't need this kind of data every week or every day. Now they do need this data much more frequently than they did before so it is. It's not only a kind of repurposing of the technology but also the people who buy these devices and UC analytic software are probably going to be using them a lot more frequently than they were before are we just seeing the surgeon demand here in the US or is this a worldwide phenomenon So I spoke to one company. Who's based in India and they have these same kinds of cameras that they're selling to the consultancies. It outsourcing firms across India Japan Singapore. I think over the last six years they had sold something like twenty thousand of these centers slash cameras and then just in the last two months or last month. Even they had sold another ten thousand. So it's it's been a huge jump and not just in the US but certainly in Asia as well. We talked about some of the other measures that employers are taking very specific to the corona virus. Like putting up plexiglass barriers or spreading desks. Apart in all likelihood a lot of those will go away when this is over and we found a cure even a vaccine for the corona virus. But your estimate is that these cameras might be here to stay. Why is that? Yeah and this is something that one of the employers I spoke to who bought a whole bunch of these devices said this was one of the reasons they're investing in. This is because the plexiglas isn't going to be there forever so that's a short term investment and they felt if we want to spend money on this. Let spend money on something that we can use for the long term so they could go back to using it for assessing real estate or as is one concern by privacy person that I spoke to from Stanford. There's a chance that companies could use these devices to track productivity. It seems to be kind of a gray area because one of the customers I spoke to did say we were previously already using these sensors to see how long people were staying at their desks and whether they were collaborating so it isn't just about real estate. There seems to be some wiggle room for already how you could use these kinds of sensors but that is the kind of mission creep. We've heard about a lot of the new technologies that are being used here. The contact tracing and surveillance as well. What are the companies behind these products? Say about those kinds of security concerns. Well they do say that their devices do respect people's privacy because for example they can't identify you. It's a much more passive way of monitoring an office than for example a centralized Bluetooth APP. That every employee has to download in order to get into the building. There are some companies that do this and with Bluetooth tracking or with Wi fi tracking. You can actually identify who the person is on their phone. That's sort of invisible but it's in a way much more invasive than than an actual tiny camera on the ceiling that can see you but see you in a very blurry way and not really see who you are. So another thing that the vendors point out is that the actual images that these devices are capturing typically would not get seen by an employer their entirely processed by algorithms either on the device that's capturing the images or on some cloud servers somewhere so you could argue this someone could come in and hack that but for the most part these vendors saying that typically a customer would never be able to see those images all rights are reporter Parmi Olsen. Thank you so much for joining us. My pleasure thank you. Don't forget you can share your tech tips and questions with Joanna. Our contact information is in the show notes and Joanna. We'll be back next week to share some of her favorites. If you like this podcast you can rate and review us in your APP store. And if you want more news about Wall Street Journal podcasts. You can follow us on twitter at. Wsj podcasts tech. News briefing is produced once again by. Amanda Llewellyn Caserio. Come from the Wall Street Journal. Thanks for listening.

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Tech News Briefing's Guide to Zoom

WSJ Tech News Briefing

12:32 min | 6 months ago

Tech News Briefing's Guide to Zoom

"Take Your Business beyond fast with connective and network solutions from comcast business nationwide secure reliable powered by the nation's largest GIG speed network. This is your tech news briefing for Friday April third. I'm Qatari Yoga for the Wall Street Journal. If you are seconds away from your next zoom meeting or maybe yours zoom cocktail hour than today's episode is for you that's right. We're talking with our Personal Tech Team. Video conferencing tools how to use them. And how to protect your privacy while you do and of course how to avoid zoom bombing starting with as always you guessed it our senior personal columnist Joanna Stern. What inspired us to talk about Zoom. Today Joanna. Well we're talking about soon because we're living in zoom world right now everyone zooming and everyone zooming including our listeners. And we've gotten so many voicemails from people using zoom offering ideas and how they're using zoom so we're going to play those right now first of all living your life and keep communicating with your co worker but just us instead of the water cooler tomorrow. We'll be doing the zoom a ton stretch quarantine yoga. We're calling it as a company and then later we're also doing a ritual happy hour. One of the things that I found extremely useful is operating what I call office hours. I've put aside a block of time on my calendar and I just leave my video room open and join in just to stop by to say hello to ask questions to throw an idea by me. helps keep a community of people together in environment where we're all working so far apart. Those are voicemails from listeners. Darren Murph Clara Kenny and Steve Fordham. Who called in amongst many many others you think are really a great person to give zoom tap. Because I'm going to tell our listeners. This we were on a zoom call with all of our colleagues and our boss and you made our bosses face the background of your so. He's in the middle of telling US giving us a motivational speech of. Meanwhile everyone is laughing because you have turned your background into his face. That's right that's right. I am Mizzou class clown. And that's why I'm here today to give you all and give you some ideas on how to look and be the funniest person in the zoom call. So that I did by changing the virtual background which many people may already know how to do. But I'll walk you through it real quick on the Mac and windows APP when you see the little you see in the bottom left hand corner the Stop Start Video. There's a little down. Arrow you click on that and there should be something there that says choose virtual backgrounds and you click on that and you're able to then see either some preloaded backgrounds or upload your own so in that case what I did was I took a screen shot of my boss talking. I then had it saved to my desktop and then I uploaded it and if you wanna go even further. What makes this really funny? I'm just going to say really quick. Disclaimer do not do this. Unless you're really sure that your boss is not gonna be upset about it. I mean I I was GONNA say that. I was definitely going to say that I was going to say. I don't WanNa get anyone fired if you if you get in trouble from this. I cannot take responsibility so you only want to do this with people. You feel very comfortable with and I will say that I've done it now. Two-three higher ups in our organization and I'm not GonNa say that they all loved it so but one other thing that I do find even funnier. Is that once you make that your background you can walk out of the frame or slide. Outta the frame so it looks like they are just another person in the chat so that sounds like you could actually take a picture of yourself and then just put that in the background and then just walk off and and you know make yourself a sandwich in fact you tear you could take up a notch and they have a video background option where you could record yourself like nodding or really like being very engaged in the conversation and upload that and then remove yourself from the background so again. I don't want to suggest that anyone does this if they're not in a position or in a video chat where this may not be appropriate. But you could do this. It'll be a fun thing to do with your friends on your happy hour or if you're watching a movie together or whatever fun stuff yes one. Other quick fund tip is touching up your appearance so zoom has built in feature which gives you a little filter on your face and you can do that by going to preferences video and touch up appearance. That is great so if you have literally rolled out of bed not wash your face. Brush her teeth jumped on that first. Zoom meeting it will make you look beautiful before you do that. Yeah and in fact my column coming out in a couple of days is about how our webcams on our laptops. Even the highest and best laptops are actually really bad and the lighting and the the camera qualities really bad so this helps with that nice all right well. Those are fun things for us to try out this weekend. People can still leave us. These fantastic voice messages. I just want to remind everybody were still taking your questions and comments and stories. Joanna is answering them if she can tell us where they can do that they can do that by either. Emailing me Joanna Dot Stern Wsj.com or leave us a message at our work from home hotline. Three one four six three five zero three eight eight and actually. Let's let's ask now if if you've been either a victim of zoom bombing or you figured out some tricks to get around that or you have others zoom tricks. We could revisit this next week. We'd love to hear from you so we're GonNa talk about Zimbabwe in just a second join us. Comcast business connecting and network solutions help drive IOT devices and virtual network applications at peak performance to improve efficiency and customer experience for Your Business Rely on comcast business for nationwide secure reliable performance powered by a gig speed network comcast business beyond fast before the break. We heard from our senior personal tech columnist. Joanna Stern and our audience about some tips and tricks for using video conferencing platforms but there have been some security challenges that have come to light recently using these platforms which is especially concerning given how much we are using them right now. Everything from zoom to facetime a- as part of our daily lives are new personal tech columnist. Nicola has been looking into this and joins us now. Hey Nicole hello alright. So Joanna mentioned something called Zoom bombing. Can you tell us about that? Yes zoom bombers video chat crashers that disrupt zoom chats with things like expletives or pornographic images and. It's a huge problem presume but there is a way to avoid all of that which is what. Which is. I always require a password for your meeting. So that randoms can't just jump into any zoom meeting that you host. The second is to turn on a feature called waiting room that requires attendees to be admitted by a host. You can also turn off screen sharing capabilities for for people in your room so that people can trust you know share whatever images that are on their screen and only you can present and the last tip is to lock the room when you know that everyone in the is in the meeting which prevents other people from joining that meeting if it is indeed a public link is this zoom specific problem to other video conferencing platforms have similar issues right now. Let's zoom specific issue. I think for two reasons one. Is that zooms. Popularity IS SURGING. Now that everyone is sheltering in place and so it's just getting more attention and more scrutiny. And it's where people are so it's where hackers and intruders are And the second is that zoom allows anyone to join zoom meeting. Including if you don't have zoom account or if you're hosting a meeting and a lot of people are hosting these sort of like live seminars or at a bookstore there live streaming a talk with an author that anyone can join and because those links are publicized on facebook or twitter. They're more visible. Gotcha so this is really. Is this mostly problem for those public? Ling's I'm thinking about you know. For example we do a lot of Zoom. Meetings at work is something that people are worried about. Not just in kind of this Disruptive manner but also other kind of privacy concerns. That could go along with that so right now. The zoom bombing is mostly affecting public events. But it also is affecting some private events because there's a feature in zoom called personal meeting. Id and everyone has this nine. Digit number and into one continuous long meeting. So if a hacker gets a hold of your personal meeting. Id for whatever reason they could be just guessing that personal id then they can jump into any one of your meetings at any time which is why requiring a password and using some you know another feature called General Meeting instead of using your personal. Id which creates a new number for each meeting that you create is preferable. Gotcha that makes a lot of sense. We also have been hearing reports that that the zoom APP was potentially sending data to facebook. Is that true? It was true zoom with sending information through. Its face log in with facebook capability which allowed you to log into your facebook account. It was sending information like you know a user's device it's mobile operating system your Ip address which can reveal your location and also other information about users who don't even have zoom account through this same. Facebook integration zoom has said that it didn't mean to and has removed the integration and in its latest IOS APP update removed that Facebook S. T. K. So if you are on your iphone and you use him on your iphone update it to the latest version of zoom excellent. Okay and are there any? I mean like you said Zoom is the one. That's most prevalent right now but I know there are lots of other video conferencing tools out there. Are there any others that are similarly affected or others that are even that are better to use and do they have similar protections yet? The APPS that are encrypted are facetime WHATSAPP signal and those have videotaped video chatting capabilities. But they're not really designed for work so they're they're more for for for casual conversation. Facetime can support up to thirty two people on one call signal is just one on one. What I believe is up to five and Google also has this new product called duo that's encrypted and can support up to eight people and that's a really good option for people who who don't want intruders in in their meetings. Okay our personal dot com this Nicole. No end thank you so much thank you. Don't forget to share your work from home tech tips with us or your questions. If you have things going into Monday that you want to know Joanna Stern our senior personal tacoma's we'll be answering those questions next week as well. You can call and leave a voice message at the number that we're leaving in the description or you can write to her at Joanna dot stern at WJ DOT COM tech. News briefing is produced by the amazing. Amanda Llewellyn production assistance. This Week came from Taylor Nakagawa and of course to Aniston Stern as our guest. I'm your host Terry Yokum from all of us at the Wall Street Journal have a great weekend. Stay safe and thanks for listening.

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Facebook Officials Shut Down Attempts to Make it Less Divisive

WSJ Tech News Briefing

16:15 min | 4 months ago

Facebook Officials Shut Down Attempts to Make it Less Divisive

"Facts allow you to make decisions and unpredictable times. Get the facts you need. From The Wall Street Journal from Free Corona virus updates to daily deep dives and our podcasts and videos. Wsj is a trusted source in uncertain times visit. Wsj.com this is tech. News Briefing for Thursday may twenty eighth. I'm Terry Yokum for the Wall Street Journal. After the two thousand sixteen election facebook took a look at itself to figure out if it was polarizing. People IT TURNS OUT IT HAD BEEN. But we. Now report exclusively. That executives scaled back to fix the problem. Our reporter Jeff. Horowitz will join us to tell us all about it after these headlines and Dragon spacex unfortunately We are not going to launch. Today you are gopher five one zero zero long scrub that SPACEX launch director. Mike Taylor postponing the company's long anticipated mission to send astronauts into orbit on Wednesday. They were forced to reschedule because of bad weather at Cape Canaveral Launch Site in Florida. The next opportunity for liftoff will be on Saturday. The flight will be the first from. Us soil in a while and make spacex the first private entity to send humans to the International Space Station. It will also mark a milestone in private public. That could mean more space travel than ever before we talked about it at length with our reporter Andy Pastor on yesterday show so go back and have a listen if you want to catch up if you've been looking forward to streaming titles like Harry Potter and friends. The wait is over. That is if you're willing to shell out fifteen dollars a month for HBO Max. The latest mega streamer from a and t launched on Wednesday and is now open for business. But they're still working out the kinks with several of their distribution partners including Roku and Amazon prime. Some of the tension boils down to where the content will live and who will have access to user's data if you have comcast you're in luck. Hbo Max Resolved Their Dispute. With the cable giant on Wednesday morning giving xfinity cable and Internet customers access to the new service yesterday. We reported that. Twitter had labeled two of president trump's tweets for containing false information on Wednesday. The president said he planned to take cope big action for the move and his press secretary told reporters that he would be signing an executive order related to social media we've reported that trump has been considering establishing a panel to review complaints of Anti Conservative bias on social media and speaking of social media after the break how facebook executives abandoned efforts to address polarization on their platform. That's next social distancing slows the spread of corona virus. So if you have a fever dry cough and shortness of breath call your healthcare provider before going in more info at Corona Virus Dot Gov. Let's all do our part because we're all Hashtag alone together brought to you by the Ad Council. According to polling data Americans views on fundamental policy. Issues have been drifting farther and farther apart for decades many believe that the popularity of social media has helped widen that gap even faster and they're pointing the finger at tech companies accusations like this reached a fever pitch as we all know during the two thousand sixteen election and afterwards partly in response. Facebook started looking into itself to see whether the platform exacerbated the problem of polarization and how they might be able to fix it now. We report exclusively that. Facebook executives had evidence that their platform contributed to these societal divisions but they chose to do nothing about it. Our reporter. Jeffrey Horowitz broke the story. He's been looking into it for a long time and he joins us now. Jeff thanks so much for being here. Thank you all right so tell us a little bit more about this internal audit that facebook dead. What did they do? And what did they find? So even before this push began. There were signs of problems one particularly memorable for research that the platform did a research by the name. Monica we looked at polarization and groups in Germany and over a third of all successful German political groups on the platform qualified is extremist. You know how did the number of get so high given the know? A third of Germany probably doesn't count as extremists. The answer was that facebook's groups you should algorithm was actively pushing people to join these organizations online and we can't say that they were radicalizing people but they were certainly suggesting people join forums where they were going to be exposed to radicalize content. I think I as you said. The aftermath of the two thousand sixteen election the realization that false misinformation had nearly overtaken real information on the platform in terms of popularity. There was for a company that had made connecting people. Its mission suddenly a bit of a concern to well. What happens when that isn't always for the best that organizing certain communities might be creating harm so at that point. Facebook began to look into this through a couple of different initiatives. One of them was this from the ground up. Kind of almost academic and sociological approach called common ground entirely separately. The people who just sort of are maintaining the platform and its algorithms basically doing content ranking work. The things that determine what what what are in your news feed primarily those guys also were doing something kind of similar. It was very much more hands on and just focused on trying to knock out bad content with that spam or click bait or hate speech or things from fake accounts and it sounded like this kind of bad behavior was coming from a very small group of users. Right that this wasn't of all across the platform there was one of the things that the folks on the integrity ranking which is kind of the content ranking side of the fence kind of realized. Was that a lot of the things that they were trying to battle individual. Sort of bad things. Click Bait spam fake news. All of these things correllated really highly to polarization. In fact they also correlated to a fairly small group of users that were just hyperactive and it kind of makes sense right the partisans. The sort of extremists are the ones who are willing to invest. You know ten twelve fourteen eighteen hours a day in some instances based on what these researchers were finding into spreading stuff on the platform zealots in terms of the political divide. Were they finding that this was happening? More on one side or the other more on the left the right or or was this pretty much the same across the board so the really interesting thing is that facebook doesn't have you know eye in terms of their own internal systems. They can't see sort of whether an account is left or right just automatically they kind of almost graph them out spatially that said yeah the research in the US. And I want to stress. This was not true across the world but in the US was the ecosystem on the far right was far larger than the ecosystem on the far left and so while you would find bad behavior on both sides just by virtue of the much larger ecosystem on the right. There was more bad behavior on the right. So I'm sure that the goal wasn't here just to find out what was happening right. They wanted to figure out ways to solve some of these problems. Can you tell me about some of the solutions that facebook came up with internally? Sure so these again the this sort of life occasion between the Common Ground Folks and the integrity ranking folks. Common ground was really focused on figuring out ways. Just simply to change how we talk to people and one of the primary Sort of foundational statements of this work that they were doing and their mission was not to get people to all agree on things that arguing is not was not a problem. According to the the researchers according to facebook sort of efforts here the problem is when people took their arguments and made them personal right so instead of disliking people. Because they don't show your opinions on vaccines or on global warming disliking them because they're bad people right so that's called affect polarization and that was really the thing that they were trying to target and what they looked for was ways that they could get people to interact that we're not going to be sort of fire and brimstone in terms of the the atmosphere and that would be potentially groups. They look for cross cutting groups groups where people with very different ideologies who weren't part of the same tribe so to speak would meet up and have civil interactions on the ranking side. And this is the sort of the other approach they were just really looking for ways to reduce the spread of content that was pulled rising or polarized. One way they tried to do that was to try to get the platform to be a little bit more equal in terms of you. Know your average run-of-the-mill user who is going to say like it engaged with maybe fifteen twenty pieces of content today versus your hyper sharer. Who is just going to flood the platform with links and tended to be more partisan. It sounds like almost a naive question. But why is polarization so concerning? Why was it something that they were so worried about? Shore I mean I think this is. This is obviously as you noted not a thing that is brand new facebook That said the arrival of the platform The sudden success of a whole bunch of publishers. That that basically catered solely to one side and another or another's worldview even at the expensive of basic facts. These were things that were kind of new under the sun and for facebook. There's been sort of on and on fights about how they should regulate political speech how they should regulate public figures who are perhaps fitting on the platform. Those are sort of their own separate questions. This is the question of how well that stuff does right at the question of how much of an audience is there for the red meat end. How much really vitriolic speech succeed? It's not the you know. The facebook folks who are working on this stuff. We're opposed people disagreeing on the platform. They realized that divisiveness in and of itself was a thing that that sold so sounds like facebook was really looking at these issues and looking at the very critically and putting a lot of effort behind coming up with some solutions and proposals happened to those actually undertaking. A lot of this work was pretty awkward. The first part that made it difficult is that this was gonNA involve facebook having to can acknowledge that things were not that great on its platform and if you call Twenty Seventeen Twenty eight team which is one most of this. Work was occurring was not an easy time for facebook in the media They were being blamed for a whole bunch of things from the decline of simple discourse to electing Donald trump to you know allowing Russians to take over their platform to failing to protect user that with Cambridge Analytica. That was kind of a hard thing to sort of acknowledge that stuff publicly now beyond that there was also sort of the disparate impact on conservatives because as I mentioned even neutral decisions say you know we wished to reduce Click Bait. We're going to have a larger impact on the conservative political ecosystem in the US than on the left. Just simply based on the size of that ecosystem so concerns about perceptions of fairness deal and the company ended up sort of running all of these changes through kind of a committee that was had a whole bunch of different members but The policy team Washington policy team which is led by Joel Kaplan of former deputy chief of staff from the George W Bush White House they kinda took the lead role and they objected to a lot of these decisions and sort of stalled a lot of them or if not stalled than weakened. Obviously we've talked about a lot of people at facebook. Mark Zuckerberg the CEO is the face of facebook and last year in a speech at Georgetown. He said this about free speech. You can't impose tolerance top down. It has to come from people opening up sharing experiences in developing a shared story for society. We all feel like we're part of that's how we make progress so tell me a little bit about Mark Zuckerberg's role after all of this analysis internally Came out what direction has he taken facebook. And since then sure so. He initially gave this effort. Kind of a pretty long leash. Really was a sense of apology. And and you know we're going to sort of have helped mend the social fabric over time. That desire seems to recede and kind of gravitated back. Toward kind of a more libertarian. Free speech approach now. The the really interesting thing. I think that that some of the folks who worked on this stuff would point out. Is that much of? It isn't a question of taking down content. It's not preventing people from saying their piece. The question is what content? Facebook is going to favor. Is it going to be stuff that is representative or is it going to be something? Where kind of the more you play. The more you can win in terms of Participation on the platform because that approach turns out to favor really active and in very partisan users right so the people who are allowed us to get the most attention and and that can be an interesting and and potentially problematic was what fallout was there from this analysis and then kind of rewind of some of the proposals that they put out there was there any fallout and how has facebook responding now to this analysis so I think facebook is under the impression that they've done a very good job about this stuff that in fact the process they set off worked exactly as intended and so the company. And Guy Rosen. Who heads sort of the current iteration of their integrity projects? Put out a statement stating that. They thought that that our work was cherry picked and that we missed the many things. They have done to combat bad behavior on the platform. Sometimes bad behavior is related to polarization. And that's absolutely true. Is the story gets into. There are many things. They did approve of But it doesn't change that the company basically disregarded its own engineers on this subject matter inside facebook. All of this stuff came to a head in late. Two thousand eighteen some reorganizations the common ground team was sort of permanently put to rest and everybody else a lot of them just simply drifted off either. They left the company or they moved to other jobs. Instagram in particular. Got A WHOLE BUNCH OF FOLKS. That had been very involved in this stuff. Just people sort of realized that the initiative had lost loss team and wasn't going to get it back our tech reporter. Jeffrey Horowitz thank you so much for joining us thank you and that was your tech news briefing. Don't forget that if you like this podcast you can rate and review us in your APP store and if you want more news about Wall Street Journal podcast you can follow us on twitter at WSJ podcasts. I'm Qatari Yokum for the Wall Street Journal. Thanks for listening.

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AI Hiring, Never Retiring: Working in the 21st Century

WSJ The Future of Everything

27:34 min | 8 months ago

AI Hiring, Never Retiring: Working in the 21st Century

"How's the world around US shaped by technological advancement and leadership join host Walter Isaacson the stories behind some of the biggest disruptions in history from lithium ion batteries DNA testing in forensics? Listen to trailblazers with Walter Isaacson from Dell Technologies on your favorite podcast APP if you start your career at twenty and retire at sixty five. Get about three weeks of vacation. Nations slid in each year. You'll spend ninety thousand hours or more working. That's about a third of your life the same amount as sleeping but what is that work going to look like ten fifteen or even fifty years from now from the Wall Street Journal this the future of everything. I'm Qatari Yoga today. We're GONNA talk about the future of work. The starting with how companies could use technology to get up close and personal in the hiring process and we mean very personal. You create the future. You place the individual in the future and present them with a variety of challenges and see how they do against those challenges. Then we'll we'll look at how once you land. That job TAT could help. Make sure you don't get lost in your work. Literally go straight for about thirty five feet turn left and finally as our work life evolves is it changing the way we think about the final stage of our careers. Our retirement one company. I talked the two calls employees entering the later stages of their careers elders and it offers them opportunities to stick around where work work. It's all coming up after the break. Are you a Henry. It stands for high earner not rich yet in means the despite earning a six figure income income. You're struggling to amass any meaningful nest. Egg are friends of the Motley. Fool can help. Since nineteen ninety-three they've been providing investment advice helping members build the financial future. They envision to Kick Start Your twenty twenty financial goals. They're offering five of their favourite stock picks for free realizing. YOU'RE A henry. Remember the not rich part you can do it. And the Motley fool can help visit full dot com slash. WSJ hunting for a new job is one of the resolutions. A lot of folks make starting off the year and many hiring managers have new budgets. And start ramping up recruiting after the holidays slowdown right now the way most people go through that processes not very different from how it was done in the past checking for job postings online sending and cover letters and resumes but with all the data out there about each one of us. What's the future of hiring gonNA look like reporter Hookah shellman found out? It's a New Year for many of us. Time to look for new job your update you're linked in scrappy social media. And then if all goes as well you get an interview hoping to make a first impression but turns out some companies already have very good impression of who you are the amount of information that people have on candidates before they actually arrive to the interview which can freak some people out because the idea of the for instance our digital footprints reputation could be processed and translated into an inside or an inference of your potential or talent more than than it is. Today is quite that creepy in a way. Tomas Chamorro premise is a professor of psychology Columbia University and the chief talent scientists that manpower group. He's not talking about programs. That pre filter resumes linked in for keyboards and skills. This goes much deeper artificial intelligence. This can be used to discern your personality through traces you leave online. And he says that our personalities embedded in almost anything we do for example apple the music that you listen to says a lot about your typical emotional states your personality your level of interest in different things your curiosity leveler intelligence level things like uber or lift ratings say a lot about how cordell agreeable friendly or pleasant you are basically. There's some is if you nice to driver you'll be nice to work with their already. Artificial intelligence based tools that can generate personality profiles from people's linked. It didn't in seconds. So why would we care. Tema says personality and cognitive abilities are becoming more important for employers compared to self-reported skills and work experiences. That's because companies keep changing their business models and they need employees. That could keep up. You really need to accept the fact that if a lot of the the jobs of the future don't exist today. The best thing we can do is not train people for specific hard skills or knowledge areas or expertise but identify if I whether they are likely to be good learners in the future and whether they're adoptable companies could of course use traditional personality. Test ask you might have heard of meyers brakes or disc or the big five you know choosing descriptions like people look up to me. I tend to be a kind person I accept live as it comes. Do you agree or disagree. These tests have been used for decades and most generally accepted as reliable measures of personalities now tech startups have developed algorithms that use artificial intelligence to create a personality analysis instantly without asking any questions like the company crystal analyzes. The words phrases and data points on someone's Lincoln profile and correlates with personality test results from people who have similar similar words phrases and data points. They used a bunch of the tests that we talked about another company. Humanistic used the disappointment and the big five. Both companies are using natural language processing tools. But do they work. We started by running mannix algorithm over Thomas Twitter feed this is you and this is based on your twitter so your analytical cautious deliberate and then we looked at Lincoln using the same companies tool so now you are influential energizing an impulsive in here. You were an analytical cautious and deliberate shortly so I would say more impulsive Paul Save than cautious and deliberate and the two are of the opposite extreme you know so same algorithm very different results for the thing. There is an element. amando throw everything against the wall and see what sticks here okay. So what does the other company crystal say about him. Based on his linked in this is one is better direct assertive and competitive. I think is better than court shows. Delivered speak very directly or bluntly yes stay. Stay focused on one point. Not necessarily I mean I'd like to jump from one to assert yourself with confidence definitely not as spent the last ten years in writing books on how we shouldn't mistake confidence for competent. So please don't assert yourself with confidence. There are trade-offs here right and I the thing that this doesn't seem as accurate as a traditional science based or validated assessment despite these inconsistencies Tomas still things. There's something here but other experts in the hiring field a less forgiving. There's no uh-huh science behind this. There's no real research that supports deriving personality from social media behavior. This is John Scott. He's he's an organizational psychologist bills assessment tools so companies can find the best possible hires. It's something that we can discuss it cocktail parties but I would would never in a million years attempt to derive someone's personality from that and then use that to make predictions beached out to crystalline. Human Tick Kris told told us that there are no independent studies but they're validate their tests internally. They say they ask every user how accurate the predictions are so when Iran Thomas Profile through crystal. The system asked me if it was accurate. She mandich said that the adjectives describing people's personalities in their reports are subjective objective that they could change on the fly and they said you can't judge the accuracy of the system by looking at one profile. They're also disputed. You did that. There are no vigorous. large-scale visas studies on the subject and pointed to a research article comparing computer judgments of personality to human judgments creating personality profiles with the help of. Ai Remains controversial. But John says that technology can help in a different way. He says one of the best ways to predict how well someone will do in a given job is to test them doing their job in a virtual reality simulator. How do you predict future behaviour? You create the future. You place the individual in that future and present them with a variety of challenges and see how they do against those challenges us so imagine instead of having an interview where you talk about how well you can do the job. The employer hands. You had said twenty of right into the deep end. You could take CNN applicant for a CEO save for a an energy company so one possible scenario is that they're holding strategy meeting and everybody in the room gets texts that there it has been a cyber attack on their nuclear plant. What are you going to do? How are you going to face that? And that's not just your stakeholders in your customers. It's the government that gets gets involved in that national security so you could set up a press conference have the individual present their ideas on how they're going to manage this John says this virtual virtual job simulation could be automatically scored by an algorithm just like video game. Technology could work for any job though you could see how you can scale back to new entry level jobs as well providing different sorts of challenges associated with their roles in immersive simulation kind of a way and and John says the tech wouldn't have to stop their companies could combine. The are based headsets with wearable technology. which could record a job? Candidates biometric metric data nervous and you hardest basing they had set would be able to detect that those sweaty palms registered eye contact measurable and all of that data about things citing stress. You feel will be used to assess how well you suited for the job. Since most of us have very control over our bodies we actions. This idea seems pretty controversial. A simple rule in my view is if the criteria or riveria bowls or fuck doors. You are trying to use for your decision whether to hire someone or not are completely out of somebody's control. It's probably not ethical. You get into areas where it may start to feel more like a medical test and you cannot use a medical test at the front door. For Selection election purposes an Illinois law takes effect this month requiring companies to notify job. Candidates may use AI based video interview tools And legislation mandating companies to inspect their algorithms for bias is under consideration in Congress so eventually lawsuits relations could put put the brakes on this new world of artificial intelligence and hiring that was reporter Milka shellman so technology may be revolutionizing the hiring process but it's also changing our workplace. Sometimes uh-huh getting your foot in the door is the easy part. Finding your way or work can be a lot more challenging just a few decades ago open offices came into play. They're supposed to break down down. Walls and hierarchies and encourage collaboration plus you could see where everyone was all the time but those assigned open office. Desks are giving way too on assigned desks quiet booths and community rooms where employees work at different times of day at the same time. Some offices are getting vigor a lot bigger. Well if you've ever walked in circles looking for a conference room or even the bathroom was an up. Tech startups have developed way finding APPS APPS to spare workers from getting lost at work but there are some trade offs like privacy. Our reporter Sara Solano's has more in in hospitals. A few minutes can mean the difference between life and death doctors. Nurses don't want to waste that time wandering around maze like corridors getting lost take the Jersey Shore University Medical Center. It's huge it. Covers about three million square feet for doctors like Ross. John a resident physician that means walking about two to three miles every day and each building has own like routes and directions so you might get lost so easily when you first came uh-huh here did you get lost so many times so I was finding hard times for the first couple months with finding my way out special for like outpatient patient setting the tap and so many times when I was like they call me like what are you at. That was like yeah. I'm still struggling finding out which elevate I should take doctor. John isn't getting having lost anymore. A few months ago a patient got sick in a wing of the hospital he had never been to. I was on the other side of the hostile and they have to be there and I just. It's never been to this place near there in three minutes three minutes and that was the first one got there. That's because Dr John was using an APP called Marinov. It's like Google Google maps but for hospitals. So you really literally holding your phone up and running through the hallway. The place that were telling you about was this way like you go right take clift and then. There's so many times that you have to make till you get there so without using there would be so hard rolled it out last year and it's not just for doctors. Doctors and nurses patients can also use it and there are staff workers like Ali our director of operations for parking services on hand to help them. So this is a HMO were standing at an. I'll just come here and I was just pushed resume and this kind of calibrates it to where you go Michael Straight there. You could have gotten very lost going to one one. One Room could end up in the lunchroom over there. There is a fork in Alabama and the OP doesn't just work for rooms it also lets doctors and other hospital staff search for equipment like the nearest wheelchair Gurney or IV pump. GO STRAIGHT FOR ABOUT THIRTY FIVE FEET turn list the many not op was created by startup called Mark Green. CEO of connection the abuses abuses small battery powered radio transmitters or beacons which transmit signals over Bluetooth from the hospital workers phone so it's actually the phone mobile device. Yes that's doing. All the calculations on taking advantage of the signals. It's receiving from those begins as well as some of the sensors on the phone like the compass and so forth and is able both of them position. Somebody within two or four feet of accuracy connects as one of several vendors making this kind of indoor navigation technology and workers workers and sprawling office campuses in companies as diverse as Exxon Mobil Aruba Networks Hewlett Packard enterprise and software maker. VM were are using them employers. Say these ops help employees find everything from conference rooms to restrooms and even the best routes to take to get there. Some APPs have an accessibility feature Peter and that can be helpful for people who have mobility issues and need to avoid stairs and the companies say. They're also clear security benefits both for employers lawyers and employees. They could use a workers location data to assist during emergencies. Like a fire or shooting and the OPS could also identify for worker. Worker has gone into an area where they don't have security clearance which means the OPS. Don't just help employees. They also track them and that brings up some major issues What if they're organizing with their labor union? What if they're meeting with the Labour leader that kind of tracking would be impermissible Samantha? Atari Hari is a lawyer at Kramer Levin who advises companies on Cybersecurity and data privacy. She says that exposing that data could violate worker protections and and could even result in some potentially embarrassing situations. You could think of scenarios where it could be very damaging so one could imagine imagine a situation where two employees ease are perhaps carrying on an amorous relationship but are married and would not want anyone to know that on every break they. They went to the same location every room day in day out year over year perhaps that data could if breached could somehow have implications on their home life as their personal life. And maybe not just their personal life in recent months a few companies have fired their CEO's for inappropriate workplace relationships so far far the companies say. They're not mandating that employees use these APPS and they only chuck workers while they're on company property. But there's no federal law that prevents employers from gathering and analysing worker location. Data and Samantha. Atari says there's another issue the trove of data could be ripe for cyber-attacks employees. The ease our right to be concerned as they should be with every vendor and application that collects their data what are the ramifications if the state is expose is because there is some chance at some point that it could be go straight for about thirty feet then turned right hospital operators that Run Jersey Shore University versity medical center say data generated from hospital staff using the meeting of is anonymous and can't be tied to a specific worker even if the data's breached and Dr John says he's not that concerned about data privacy issues some listeners and readers might wonder okay so you're using this location tracking up which which is great but that means my employer basically knows where I am at all times. Has that ever crossed your mind. Good question really. I you mean sharing sharing locations like somebody will know where you at right now. I don't think there's going to be a problem even if somebody no even if my employer Michalik will know I am exactly the hospital. I don't think this can be any issues and problem. It should be okay but for some workers occurs. It's not okay. Los Angeles began a pilot study of a way finding up twenty eighteen and some employees were worried about privacy. I talk to the person in charge of the program and even he admitted he wouldn't want his employer to know where he was every second of the day. Yeah that was our reporter Sara Castellanos so you get hired you work and at at sixty five. You have a big party and you retire right well. Maybe in an era when many big thinkers are lamenting the breakdown of our cultural institutions work is being floated as the new religion and columnist. John still has some thoughts about that. My financial planner and I do these annual asset reviews where we talk talk about fun stuff like my retirement savings. It took about six reviews to confront a big question. I spent my entire adult life socking away enough money so I could quit working by the time. I'm sixty five in my planner. His name is Joe. Wanted to know if I thought I'd even want to retire. It's a fair question. I'm a forty two year old writer with pretty engaging job being a journalist offers me travel opportunities intellectual challenge and lots of social connections. I've only got a few hobbies and I don't like to the sit still for very long. So Yeah Joe's right. My comfortable retirement may indeed more work than rest. Most people spend time wondering if they'll have the means means to retire but we often ignore the equally important question. Do we really have the will to retire. Our modern concepts of retirement Tirmizi forged around the Great Depression. The one starting in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine and lasting into the nineteen thirties. That's when social security was established as an insurance plan to pay guaranteed benefits benefit. Those who couldn't work after age sixty five at that time the majority of Americans who made it to adulthood could expect to live at least that long men eligible for social security typically drew benefits for almost thirteen years after that on average women a bit longer. By the time I was born in the late nineteen seventies sixty. I five was hardly considered elderly even if it fit to technical definition growing up in Michigan. We're automotive jobs. Disappearing and pensions were being taken away. The thirty year in out career in the car business was no longer automatic by the late. Nineteen Ninety S gold-plated retiree benefit plans were beginning to be phased out at the same time. Lifespans kept kept getting longer along with advancements in personal health today the average life expectancy in the US is seventy eight up from seventy one in one thousand nine hundred seventy. Aw consider my dad. He still sells cars three days a week at the dealership where he's been working for thirty years at age seventy four if there's a poster child for Sixty Z.. Being the new forty my dad's been candidate for quite some time to be sure. Many people do still leave the workforce by age sixty five but that's almost a luxury life insurance companies and pension funds are projecting that people entering the workforce right now could live to be one hundred twenty five and a popular demographer even says that the baby who will live to be two hundred years old has already been born. The government now considers sixty seven to be the official age of retirement for social security purposes and many economists arguing for an even even older threshold. So that the plan doesn't go broke. Americans aren't protesting in the streets about this in a recent survey by the TRANSAMERICA Center for retirement studies. Half of the more than sixty three hundred workers interviewed said. They didn't expect to retire before they turned sixty five. That's three times as many as nineteen ninety. Five and thirteen percent. said they'll never retire. That's especially true. For millennials. People who began reaching adult at the turn of the twentieth century. Aren't starting their careers with the end in mind. I talked to a lot of twenty. somethings thirty somethings who aren't yet planning for retirement. It's not because they're pessimistic or lazy for one. They may lack the resources. After racking up pilot student debt and two younger people are foremost among the Americans considering the lifelong benefits of work one twenty six year old I talked to for instance since expects to dice up his work life into twenty year increments potentially devoted to completely different areas of interest. He reckons take a sabbatical others. I talked to say they'll work work part-time or even go back to school later in life and it makes sense if you enter the workforce in the twenty twenties believing that you could very well be alive in the next century turns over. Shouldn't that shape. You probably think about planning your career or careers. I'm not in that category of people thinking I'll work until I die but I have no problem buying into this notion of working at least as long long as my father with five kids of my own under the age of fourteen I currently view my job is one of the responsibilities to tackle in the day at some point as my kids make their way into college. You can start careers. I reckon. I'll be able to revisit. Some of the professional goals that are currently out of reach their also benefits to sticking it out in the workforce. Of course you'll earn more if you work longer but you could also live more Boston. College research suggests even a few extra years of working beyond sixty five can extend lifespan and lower the risk of dementia depression and obesity. And there's another aspect the workplace is filling an emotional and even spiritual ovoid think of how often you've heard so and so having a work life or how many people talk about their work family. Many of the people I consider my closest friends are those icy and our midtown in Manhattan offices or people. I visit traveling report out stories or have standing lunch. Meetings with part of the reason for that is because people are working longer hours a half hour longer everyday redick compared to twelve years ago according to government data. US birth rates are falling and so as church membership. Our jobs are often taking the place. Once occupied by children religious it just institutions and community organisations so people want to stay in their jobs for the money for personal satisfaction and and to keep their social connections. Luckily that make it easier in the future partly because today is less well work working with computers on a smartphone or in some kind of artificial intelligence has replaced many of the manufacturing tasks or manual labor requirements that define the workplace. People have more gas left in the tank. Thank at the end of their careers. Don't tell employer but after twenty years of this journalism thing I feel like I'm just getting started. I use my brain a lot but like many Americans. I have the hands of typist artist. And not a tradesman. They're also technological developments. That will aid. In older workforce driverless cars could make commuting easier there will be more automated processes. This is that reduced physical or mental demands and there are an abundance of retraining programs being implemented at companies and employers are becoming more welcoming to their graying employs always one company. I talked to Patagonia calls employees entering the later stages of their careers elders and it offers them opportunities to stick around around on a so-called glide path. The company's longtime editor for instance has left her day to day role editing company materials and is now teaching younger charges. How to right in the Patagonia voice other spend time in the archive room at the company headquarters passing down stories traveling the world lecturing on the company's culture or conducting concessions on the environment? Okay so where does this all. Leave me I'm treating in worrying about whether I can retire at sixty five with a new strategy here it is. I'll pursue financial flexibility with JOE that financial planner. who asked me to think about whether I really want to call it quits instead? I want him to to advise me on how to achieve some wiggle room in my budget within the next quarter of a century by that point. I want to be able to do the work I like to do with the people. I like to work with on my own terms terms even if it means making a lot less money that was Wall Street Street Journal columnist. John Stole the future of everything is a production of the Wall Street Journal. This episode was reported by Hilton Shaman. Sarah Castellanos Lanos and John Stole. Jabeen is our senior producer. Stephanie Ilgenfritz is the editorial director of the future of everything and our technical director. Is Jacob. Gorski I'm Terry Yokum. Thanks for listening.

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