10 Burst results for "Terry Yokum"

"terry yokum" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

09:15 min | 3 months ago

"terry yokum" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"We've seen. The biggest company is making changes in response to protest over the killing of George Floyd. They've announced massive donations to racial justice. Initiatives held town halls in their own companies and introduce new diversity and inclusion policies among those commitments Microsoft Amazon. IBM and others have said they're no longer selling facial recognition technology to law enforcement, and they've called on Congress to institute national regulations to govern its use. But I reporter. Jerry Council says that might not spell. The end of police use official recognition tech, and he joins us now to explain jared thanks so much for being with us. Forever Man. All right, let's from the beginning. How does law enforcement use facial recognition technology right now? Why is it so controversial so I'll start with the second part I this. This technology has been around for years, and it's not just us by law enforcement. It's used in airports and retail establishments stadiums on and so forth, but the reason it's so controversial is there's really two reasons one has to do with the accuracy of these systems you know these systems for the most part have a tougher time identifying darker skinned people and women than they do. <hes> white males. Males essentially the other reason has to do with privacy. Even if these systems are ninety nine point nine percent accurate, some people were concerned that they're being used to survey them and to uncover information about them. That otherwise may not have been known so those are those are the two reasons why this technology is so controversial I'd say in recent years a lot of law enforcement agencies have turned to this technology to help with investigations, so if someone commits a robbery or crime in public somewhere in there are cameras that got footage of the perpetrator, then they. They would use the technology to essentially take an image of person and compared with the database of suspects that they have to essentially fight crime. Right and we've obviously had that going on for a long time. We have cameras that pick people up. And then they go through databases of potential suspects people that have committed crimes in the past, and they try to match those faces. How is this technology different from that kind of eyewitness matching <hes> in the lineup? Yeah, yeah, yeah, so technology allows it that process to happen a lot quicker so if you are. are able to get a again. An image of someone <hes> you can just run it through a database of of suspects and get results in minutes. The other aspect about the technology is that it's also being used to not just search databases, but the really the entire Internet there's a there's a company out there called clearview that sees itself as a as a search engine for faces, so if the police were using this technology upload of face of it could be a suspect, or it could even be a witness to a crime, they can essentially find. Find out who that person is based on social media, posed and other upload, so that's new and different about it, the the risk of the technology and again this is one of the main reasons. It's come under such criticism in recent years is that let's say a law. Enforcement agencies is using it, and they are trying to figure out the suspect Hula suspect is a in a robbery or some other crime. They use technology and IT pulls up potential matches for that suspect if it's not accurate if it's not if it doesn't do well at making those. Those matches for for faces that are that are darker, skinned or for women. There's a chance that police go after the wrong person, and it even goes beyond that it's not just the police agencies that use it, but there are stadiums I'd use it, you know. Retailers say we don't want this person who has been accused of shoplifting before to come back into our stores. You know if these technologies send an alert that says hey, you know, look out for this person. He or she is on our watch list and ends up being a wrong person you. You know that could that could cause a lot of headache in a lot of you know undue harm for whoever the whoever that person is. Each spoke about clear view and the work that they do. We've now seeing big companies that are are household names. Amazon Microsoft IBM come out and say that they are not going to allow police forces to Hughes facial recognition technology anymore at least for a moratorium at least for a time <hes> your reporting seems indicate that might make a big difference in terms of police use of facial recognition technology. Why is that? That yeah, yeah, the big players from Amazon. Microsoft of IBM they all announced that they're pulling back from the market. The only thing about it is is that they're big names in the facial recognition market, but they're not the biggest players per se and the market is made up of other companies including a whole range of startups that focus on this technology, so with the big tech players pulling back. There are still going to be other providers out there. That are selling this technology to police departments. They have no plans to pullback. They see this as. Their bread and butter. If you will you know despite some of the concerns around the technology, they feel that their technology. Does a lot of good. They say that it helps with investigations to find suspects quicker than otherwise might be possible. They also say that their technology is is used to help. Find Missing exploited children. A lot of them do want regulations, but they don't see any reason. Pull back right now because they feel that their services are are essential, and that there is still a market for it, so Microsoft an Amazon are calling on Congress to develop clear national laws about who can use facial recognition technology and how they're using it. Is there any kind of legislation already in the pipeline? So at the federal level, not so much. Last week the House of Representatives introduced a police reform bill that provides or at least touches on a lot of aspects of policing the country, but there was a mentioned in there about facial recognition, and essentially said federal law enforcement officers think you know FBI, and so on and so forth they had. They're not allowed to use facial recognition software on body camera footage without. Without a judge's warrant again that bill was not all about facial recognition. It was just a small part of it, but that's all. That's taking place at the federal level, and there are initiatives around the country and states and municipalities. Some them have sought to ban or put a moratorium on the technology by police agencies. At least for the time being, there have been other. Bills including one in Washington. That seek to regulate the use of the technology, so there's there's really kind of efforts happening across the country in various fashions, but at the at the federal level there hasn't been anything there and just add to that I think that actually was was part of the reason why a lot of these these large companies from Microsoft and Amazon why they why they took A. A step back. They saw the recent police reform bill and say hey, y'all congress. If you're looking at doing something, we're going to wait for you to address the whole issue. You know instead back until then as we wait for legislation on facial recognition software specifically, we're also hearing calls to defend the police. Is that something that could have an impact on this market? Oh Yeah for sure. Yeah, we we. We are seeing a lot of those calls which again just to be clear about not eliminating police departments. At least that's not what everyone wants. It's more so diverting resources and funds away from policing in changing how it operates as those calls and increase obviously in the wake of the George Floyd protests. A lot of police departments may be forced to look at what they're spending their money on, and some of the most controversial elements of what they're spending. Their money on could be the first to go, so you know. I spoke to a fellow at the Berkman Klein Center at Harvard, and she mentioned that these protests are really putting a lot of public pressure on police departments, and some of them, not all of them, but some of them may say this is just not worth it right now, you know. Know where we're going to wait and step back until there are rules of the road for how to use this technology so again. This is by no means to say that police are still going to be interested in it. They're there still are a lot of them are still using it a lot of facial recognition companies still have business in the US. But some believe that that that these calls the defunding police could change that calculation. Our reporter jared. Council thanks so much for joining us right, thank you.

Terry Yokum Wall Street Journal Jared Council reporter Amazon IBM Microsoft
"terry yokum" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

04:36 min | 3 months ago

"terry yokum" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"This is your tech news briefing for Tuesday June, Sixteenth I'm Terry Yokum for the Wall Street Journal. Some of the biggest names in tack of announced that they won't be selling facial recognition software to law enforcement or talking about Amazon Microsoft and IBM, but that doesn't mean. Police aren't going to be using the technology. Our reporter Jared Council will break this down for us after these headlines. Lawyers.

Terry Yokum Wall Street Journal Jared Council reporter Amazon IBM Microsoft
"terry yokum" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

02:54 min | 4 months ago

"terry yokum" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"This is your tech. News briefing for Tuesday may twelfth. I'm Terry Yokum for the Wall Street Journal you on. Musk is making headlines again. And not just for naming his baby ex ash a twelve or whatever it is that his babies named California began reopening for business last week but Alameda County which is home to Tesla's only. Us factory decided to stay on lockdown for a little while longer. Now Tesla is suing. And Musk says they're going to go back to work anyway. Our reporter Tim Higgins will explain what's going on after these headlines. Twitter says it will Leibel Post that contain false information about the corona virus. Twitter joined several social media companies in this endeavour which have so far had mixed results last week conspiracy video racked up millions of views before the platforms. Were able to pull it down. Twitter's announcement comes after. A new survey found that seventy eight percent of Americans believed that misinformation about the virus is a major problem. As of today you can watch a news. Special episode of the unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt on net flicks and the special is interactive viewers will be able to press a button on their remote and control which gown kimmy wears to her wedding or what song. Her roommate's things are our reporter. John Jorgenson says this is just the latest way that streaming services are trying to disrupt the TV watching experience. They can do lots of things that we never really expected our TV to do things like you know. Show us all the episodes of a whole season one time which seems crazy when when? I introduced it. Interactive TV is kind of pushing it forward and I think a lot of people are wondering whether we're GonNa see a lot more of these or whether it's going to be sort of a novelty item and when the Badger snatched the the Black Mirror interactive so that came out a couple years ago showed up sort of set off a big discussion about interactive TV. Whether this was going to be the future and I think once people experimented and watched banner stage. They may be realized that. Oh this is something I wanna do. Every day this is kind of a one off novelty item. Maybe for some people. But what we're seeing with Netflix. Especially is that. They have the resources to plug into productions like this because they are expensive. You're creating several episodes within an episode. Their primary goal is just to keep people locked into the service of the they have viewers going back and rea watching parts of a show multiple times. That's that's engagement. On on a higher level and that sort of the coin of the realm for them and vast numbers of people stuck at home have been good news for those streaming platforms Netflix. Hulu and others have seen a surge in membership in the last few months but for cable companies. Not so much. We report that the largest cable and satellite TV companies lost more than two million customers in the first three months of twenty twenty. It's the sharp decline on record.

reporter Twitter Musk Tesla Netflix Terry Yokum Kimmy Schmidt Wall Street Journal John Jorgenson Tim Higgins Alameda County Hulu California
"terry yokum" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

02:48 min | 4 months ago

"terry yokum" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"Facts allow you to make decisions in unpredictable times. Get the facts you need. From The Wall Street Journal from Free Corona virus updates to daily deep dives and our podcasts and videos. Wsj is a trusted source in uncertain times visit. Wsj.com this is tech. News briefing for Friday may eighth. I'm Terry Yokum from the Wall Street Journal. Congratulations you've finished. Another week of working from home your award. Our senior personal tech columnist bannister is back to share some solutions to your work from home tech troubles. Today we've got some simple automation and how to take your to do list digital. That's coming up after these headlines. It's well known that China requires social media and messaging companies to censor its citizens messages that includes the country's most popular apple he chat but researchers at the University of Toronto have now found that we chat also closely monitors its international users activity. They say we chat analyzes messages sent over the platform and adds any taboo images and documents to its internal blacklist. The report found that human and automated sensors. Then use that blacklist scrub Chinese messages faster and more effectively. The new findings come as International. Governments are investigating Chinese APPS for Censorship and Privacy Violations tencent holdings which is the operator of Chad did not respond to our request for comment. Facebook expects the pandemic to affect their business for months to come a spokeswoman says the social media giant will not be opening many of its offices until at least July and that employees will be allowed to work from home until the end of twenty twenty. Facebook has already canceled events with more than fifty people through twenty twenty one. We're still in. The midst of season and Uber is the latest report. Uber's food delivery service eats was alone. Bright spot we talked about that yesterday but still reported a loss of nearly three billion dollars for the last quarter. The news comes as lift reported losses earlier this week. Both rideshare companies have laid off thousands of workers in recent days as depend takes especially hard toll on the GIG economy and normally the first quarter after the holidays is a slow time for video game sellers but Nintendo says people stuck at home have reversed that trend if only temporarily in earnings released on Thursday Nintendo reported that they'd sold more than three million switches and over thirteen million copies of the game. Animal crossing in the last quarter meaning. Yes it wasn't just you. There were a lot of people talking about their islands in the past couple of months after the break senior personal columnist Joanna Stern. We'll be back with tech tips of the week. That's coming up.

The Wall Street Journal bannister Facebook Nintendo Terry Yokum tencent holdings Joanna Stern China University of Toronto Chad
"terry yokum" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

03:12 min | 4 months ago

"terry yokum" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Economy. But is it enough? The pandemic is not going away. It looks likely to be extended for quite some time. And there's going to be tremendous political pressure on Congress to do something to help so many people who are in pain and why we're seeing outbreaks flare up and Midwest states like Nebraska early. Stay home so people the food coming. Well those who keep the food coming can't stay home. It's Wednesday may sixth. I'm Terry Yokum for the Wall Street Journal. Here's what's news less than a day. After Vice President Mike Pence said the White House Corona Virus Task Force could be winding down. President Trump said this morning that the group will remain in place indefinitely. He said it will shift focus toward reopening the country and developing vaccine executives from the drugstore giant. Cvs are warning that the pandemic lockdowns could lead to a surge in non corona virus related problems. Wsj stay reporter. Sharon turnip says. The company is well situated to keep an eye on the trend. Pvs Also owns insurer at us. Oh CBS has a line of sight into not only what people are doing at drugstores but basically everything they're doing medically so they're seeing that they're not going to the doctor as much. They're not going in for elective procedures. One of the things that could potentially be more concerning is that they're they're seeing particularly with patients who have chronic conditions like diabetes and heart disease They said there's been a significant drop off in new therapies so people if they're already automatic Asian they're getting those medications refilled but they're not necessarily either starting on new treatments or switching to new treatments. And that could have long term ramifications. They said What we know about chronic conditions is is if those are not treated or if people aren't taking medications if they're not visiting their doctors regularly getting tested then that can make those conditions worse and more More acute down the road. The monthly unemployment numbers come out on Friday but they won't include some of the latest companies to announce cuts uber. Today it's letting go of about thirty seven hundred. Corporate Employees General Motors is among the few companies still turning a profit. Gm said sales of big pickup trucks rose twenty seven percent last quarter and we've seen some retail closures but gap says it plans to reopen about eight hundred. North American stores this month. Starting with you in Texas this weekend and in Non Corona Virus Related News the Department of Education released its final rules for how schools should handle allegations of sexual harassment and assault. The new guidance covers incidents that take place on campus but also at places like academic conferences and fraternity houses. The new rules give both the accuser and the accused right to cross examination life proceedings. They also require schools to investigate dating violence and stalking and they let schools choose which standard of evidence to use. The announcement brought an immediate backlash from victims rights advocates and the rules are expected to face..

Wall Street Journal President Trump Terry Yokum Mike Pence Vice President Sharon turnip diabetes Congress CBS Nebraska General Motors stalking Midwest Gm reporter Texas Department of Education harassment assault
"terry yokum" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

05:57 min | 6 months ago

"terry yokum" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"Before the break. We heard from our senior personal tech columnist. Joanna Stern and our audience about some tips and tricks for using video conferencing platforms but there have been some security challenges that have come to light recently using these platforms which is especially concerning given how much we are using them right now. Everything from zoom to facetime a- as part of our daily lives are new personal tech columnist. Nicola has been looking into this and joins us now. Hey Nicole hello alright. So Joanna mentioned something called Zoom bombing. Can you tell us about that? Yes zoom bombers video chat crashers that disrupt zoom chats with things like expletives or pornographic images and. It's a huge problem presume but there is a way to avoid all of that which is what. Which is. I always require a password for your meeting. So that randoms can't just jump into any zoom meeting that you host. The second is to turn on a feature called waiting room that requires attendees to be admitted by a host. You can also turn off screen sharing capabilities for for people in your room so that people can trust you know share whatever images that are on their screen and only you can present and the last tip is to lock the room when you know that everyone in the is in the meeting which prevents other people from joining that meeting if it is indeed a public link is this zoom specific problem to other video conferencing platforms have similar issues right now. Let's zoom specific issue. I think for two reasons one. Is that zooms. Popularity IS SURGING. Now that everyone is sheltering in place and so it's just getting more attention and more scrutiny. And it's where people are so it's where hackers and intruders are And the second is that zoom allows anyone to join zoom meeting. Including if you don't have zoom account or if you're hosting a meeting and a lot of people are hosting these sort of like live seminars or at a bookstore there live streaming a talk with an author that anyone can join and because those links are publicized on facebook or twitter. They're more visible. Gotcha so this is really. Is this mostly problem for those public? Ling's I'm thinking about you know. For example we do a lot of Zoom. Meetings at work is something that people are worried about. Not just in kind of this Disruptive manner but also other kind of privacy concerns. That could go along with that so right now. The zoom bombing is mostly affecting public events. But it also is affecting some private events because there's a feature in zoom called personal meeting. Id and everyone has this nine. Digit number and into one continuous long meeting. So if a hacker gets a hold of your personal meeting. Id for whatever reason they could be just guessing that personal id then they can jump into any one of your meetings at any time which is why requiring a password and using some you know another feature called General Meeting instead of using your personal. Id which creates a new number for each meeting that you create is preferable. Gotcha that makes a lot of sense. We also have been hearing reports that that the zoom APP was potentially sending data to facebook. Is that true? It was true zoom with sending information through. Its face log in with facebook capability which allowed you to log into your facebook account. It was sending information like you know a user's device it's mobile operating system your Ip address which can reveal your location and also other information about users who don't even have zoom account through this same. Facebook integration zoom has said that it didn't mean to and has removed the integration and in its latest IOS APP update removed that Facebook S. T. K. So if you are on your iphone and you use him on your iphone update it to the latest version of zoom excellent. Okay and are there any? I mean like you said Zoom is the one. That's most prevalent right now but I know there are lots of other video conferencing tools out there. Are there any others that are similarly affected or others that are even that are better to use and do they have similar protections yet? The APPS that are encrypted are facetime WHATSAPP signal and those have videotaped video chatting capabilities. But they're not really designed for work so they're they're more for for for casual conversation. Facetime can support up to thirty two people on one call signal is just one on one. What I believe is up to five and Google also has this new product called duo that's encrypted and can support up to eight people and that's a really good option for people who who don't want intruders in in their meetings. Okay our personal dot com this Nicole. No end thank you so much thank you. Don't forget to share your work from home tech tips with us or your questions. If you have things going into Monday that you want to know Joanna Stern our senior personal tacoma's we'll be answering those questions next week as well. You can call and leave a voice message at the number that we're leaving in the description or you can write to her at Joanna dot stern at WJ DOT COM tech. News briefing is produced by the amazing. Amanda Llewellyn production assistance. This Week came from Taylor Nakagawa and of course to Aniston Stern as our guest. I'm your host Terry Yokum from all of us at the Wall Street Journal have a great weekend. Stay safe and thanks for listening..

facebook Joanna Stern Nicole Joanna Joanna dot Nicola Facetime Aniston Stern Wall Street Journal tacoma Amanda Llewellyn Terry Yokum Taylor Nakagawa Ling Google twitter
"terry yokum" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

WSJ The Future of Everything

07:59 min | 8 months ago

"terry yokum" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

"That was our reporter Sara Castellanos so you get hired you work and at at sixty five. You have a big party and you retire right well. Maybe in an era when many big thinkers are lamenting the breakdown of our cultural institutions work is being floated as the new religion and columnist. John still has some thoughts about that. My financial planner and I do these annual asset reviews where we talk talk about fun stuff like my retirement savings. It took about six reviews to confront a big question. I spent my entire adult life socking away enough money so I could quit working by the time. I'm sixty five in my planner. His name is Joe. Wanted to know if I thought I'd even want to retire. It's a fair question. I'm a forty two year old writer with pretty engaging job being a journalist offers me travel opportunities intellectual challenge and lots of social connections. I've only got a few hobbies and I don't like to the sit still for very long. So Yeah Joe's right. My comfortable retirement may indeed more work than rest. Most people spend time wondering if they'll have the means means to retire but we often ignore the equally important question. Do we really have the will to retire. Our modern concepts of retirement Tirmizi forged around the Great Depression. The one starting in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine and lasting into the nineteen thirties. That's when social security was established as an insurance plan to pay guaranteed benefits benefit. Those who couldn't work after age sixty five at that time the majority of Americans who made it to adulthood could expect to live at least that long men eligible for social security typically drew benefits for almost thirteen years after that on average women a bit longer. By the time I was born in the late nineteen seventies sixty. I five was hardly considered elderly even if it fit to technical definition growing up in Michigan. We're automotive jobs. Disappearing and pensions were being taken away. The thirty year in out career in the car business was no longer automatic by the late. Nineteen Ninety S gold-plated retiree benefit plans were beginning to be phased out at the same time. Lifespans kept kept getting longer along with advancements in personal health today the average life expectancy in the US is seventy eight up from seventy one in one thousand nine hundred seventy. Aw consider my dad. He still sells cars three days a week at the dealership where he's been working for thirty years at age seventy four if there's a poster child for Sixty Z.. Being the new forty my dad's been candidate for quite some time to be sure. Many people do still leave the workforce by age sixty five but that's almost a luxury life insurance companies and pension funds are projecting that people entering the workforce right now could live to be one hundred twenty five and a popular demographer even says that the baby who will live to be two hundred years old has already been born. The government now considers sixty seven to be the official age of retirement for social security purposes and many economists arguing for an even even older threshold. So that the plan doesn't go broke. Americans aren't protesting in the streets about this in a recent survey by the TRANSAMERICA Center for retirement studies. Half of the more than sixty three hundred workers interviewed said. They didn't expect to retire before they turned sixty five. That's three times as many as nineteen ninety. Five and thirteen percent. said they'll never retire. That's especially true. For millennials. People who began reaching adult at the turn of the twentieth century. Aren't starting their careers with the end in mind. I talked to a lot of twenty. somethings thirty somethings who aren't yet planning for retirement. It's not because they're pessimistic or lazy for one. They may lack the resources. After racking up pilot student debt and two younger people are foremost among the Americans considering the lifelong benefits of work one twenty six year old I talked to for instance since expects to dice up his work life into twenty year increments potentially devoted to completely different areas of interest. He reckons take a sabbatical others. I talked to say they'll work work part-time or even go back to school later in life and it makes sense if you enter the workforce in the twenty twenties believing that you could very well be alive in the next century turns over. Shouldn't that shape. You probably think about planning your career or careers. I'm not in that category of people thinking I'll work until I die but I have no problem buying into this notion of working at least as long long as my father with five kids of my own under the age of fourteen I currently view my job is one of the responsibilities to tackle in the day at some point as my kids make their way into college. You can start careers. I reckon. I'll be able to revisit. Some of the professional goals that are currently out of reach their also benefits to sticking it out in the workforce. Of course you'll earn more if you work longer but you could also live more Boston. College research suggests even a few extra years of working beyond sixty five can extend lifespan and lower the risk of dementia depression and obesity. And there's another aspect the workplace is filling an emotional and even spiritual ovoid think of how often you've heard so and so having a work life or how many people talk about their work family. Many of the people I consider my closest friends are those icy and our midtown in Manhattan offices or people. I visit traveling report out stories or have standing lunch. Meetings with part of the reason for that is because people are working longer hours a half hour longer everyday redick compared to twelve years ago according to government data. US birth rates are falling and so as church membership. Our jobs are often taking the place. Once occupied by children religious it just institutions and community organisations so people want to stay in their jobs for the money for personal satisfaction and and to keep their social connections. Luckily that make it easier in the future partly because today is less well work working with computers on a smartphone or in some kind of artificial intelligence has replaced many of the manufacturing tasks or manual labor requirements that define the workplace. People have more gas left in the tank. Thank at the end of their careers. Don't tell employer but after twenty years of this journalism thing I feel like I'm just getting started. I use my brain a lot but like many Americans. I have the hands of typist artist. And not a tradesman. They're also technological developments. That will aid. In older workforce driverless cars could make commuting easier there will be more automated processes. This is that reduced physical or mental demands and there are an abundance of retraining programs being implemented at companies and employers are becoming more welcoming to their graying employs always one company. I talked to Patagonia calls employees entering the later stages of their careers elders and it offers them opportunities to stick around around on a so-called glide path. The company's longtime editor for instance has left her day to day role editing company materials and is now teaching younger charges. How to right in the Patagonia voice other spend time in the archive room at the company headquarters passing down stories traveling the world lecturing on the company's culture or conducting concessions on the environment? Okay so where does this all. Leave me I'm treating in worrying about whether I can retire at sixty five with a new strategy here it is. I'll pursue financial flexibility with JOE that financial planner. who asked me to think about whether I really want to call it quits instead? I want him to to advise me on how to achieve some wiggle room in my budget within the next quarter of a century by that point. I want to be able to do the work I like to do with the people. I like to work with on my own terms terms even if it means making a lot less money that was Wall Street Street Journal columnist. John Stole the future of everything is a production of the Wall Street Journal. This episode was reported by Hilton Shaman. Sarah Castellanos Lanos and John Stole. Jabeen is our senior producer. Stephanie Ilgenfritz is the editorial director of the future of everything and our technical director. Is Jacob. Gorski I'm Terry Yokum. Thanks for listening..

Joe John Stole US Sara Castellanos Michigan reporter Wall Street Journal Jacob Sarah Castellanos Lanos Street Journal writer Boston Hilton Shaman TRANSAMERICA Center Stephanie Ilgenfritz producer
"terry yokum" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

02:07 min | 8 months ago

"terry yokum" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"This is your tech news briefing for for Tuesday January fourteenth. I'm Terry Yokum from the newsroom. Of The Wall Street Journal in New York. You're in you're out and sometimes you're back in. That's what happened to the CEO of the luggage luggage. Startup Away Steph Corey. The company's reversal comes just weeks. After an explosive article from the verge forced her to resign columnist John Stole will join just to explain what's going on and what this means for other tech leaders in just a minute but first let's check some headlines. Walmart has laid off dozens dozens of its managers in India. The company is restructuring its India operations as it shifts towards e commerce in the region until recently Walmart's been operating as a wholesaler in India India because of regulations that limit foreign investment. But it's begun to pivot to better compete with Amazon and other competitors in the country in two thousand. Eighteen Walmart bought flip cart. India's India's largest e commerce company and person familiar with the company's plan says that Walmart is planning to use the connections and talented acquired in that deal to move away from physical stores. It wants to invest asked more heavily in developing an online customer base and delivery technology but just hours after the layoffs India's antitrust watchdog ordered a probe into both Amazon John and flip cart. The investigation will focus on allegations. That American tech giant's promote preferred sellers of goods on their platforms shutting out smaller rivals and the winter is net flicks at least an academy award nominations. The streaming service received two dozen nominations for its lineup including for the divorce. Drama marriage. Story and the epic. Martin Scorsese movie the Irishman but nominations don't always equal awards net flicks got seventeen golden globe nominations but at the awards earlier this month only to come one trophy and old against new. Hollywood won't be the only debate at the Oscars this year. The announcement of the nominees also renewed debate about racial and gender diversity in the academy especially in high profile categories like best director and best picture since the majority of the nominees were white and or men. This briefing is sponsored by Deloitte on podcast. You hear a lot about what's possible but one thing is certain..

"terry yokum" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

02:07 min | 8 months ago

"terry yokum" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"This is your tech news briefing for for Tuesday January fourteenth. I'm Terry Yokum from the newsroom. Of The Wall Street Journal in New York. You're in you're out and sometimes you're back in. That's what happened to the CEO of the luggage luggage. Startup Away Steph Corey. The company's reversal comes just weeks. After an explosive article from the verge forced her to resign columnist John Stole will join just to explain what's going on and what this means for other tech leaders in just a minute but first let's check some headlines. Walmart has laid off dozens dozens of its managers in India. The company is restructuring its India operations as it shifts towards e commerce in the region until recently Walmart's been operating as a wholesaler in India India because of regulations that limit foreign investment. But it's begun to pivot to better compete with Amazon and other competitors in the country in two thousand. Eighteen Walmart bought flip cart. India's India's largest e commerce company and person familiar with the company's plan says that Walmart is planning to use the connections and talented acquired in that deal to move away from physical stores. It wants to invest asked more heavily in developing an online customer base and delivery technology but just hours after the layoffs India's antitrust watchdog ordered a probe into both Amazon John and flip cart. The investigation will focus on allegations. That American tech giant's promote preferred sellers of goods on their platforms shutting out smaller rivals and the winter is net flicks at least an academy award nominations. The streaming service received two dozen nominations for its lineup including for the divorce. Drama marriage. Story and the epic. Martin Scorsese movie the Irishman but nominations don't always equal awards net flicks got seventeen golden globe nominations but at the awards earlier this month only to come one trophy and old against new. Hollywood won't be the only debate at the Oscars this year. The announcement of the nominees also renewed debate about racial and gender diversity in the academy especially in high profile categories like best director and best picture since the majority of the nominees were white and or men. This briefing is sponsored by Deloitte on podcast. You hear a lot about what's possible but one thing is certain..

"terry yokum" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

01:58 min | 8 months ago

"terry yokum" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"This is your tech news briefing for for Tuesday January fourteenth. I'm Terry Yokum from the newsroom. Of The Wall Street Journal in New York. You're in you're out and sometimes you're back in. That's what happened to the CEO of the luggage luggage. Startup Away Steph Corey. The company's reversal comes just weeks. After an explosive article from the verge forced her to resign columnist John Stole will join just to explain what's going on and what this means for other tech leaders in just a minute but.

Steph Corey Terry Yokum The Wall Street Journal John Stole CEO New York