18 Burst results for "Terry Tempest Williams"

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

05:38 min | 5 d ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"Cake. Ratzinger bluff utah on the show. Today we're talking to congresswoman melanie stance berry. Who represents the albuquerque area in new mexico representative stance free replaced deb. Haaland after holland was tapped to lead the interior department earlier. This year. She grew up in albuquerque and served as a state legislator before winning her seat in congress. Melania's possibly the most qualified legislator in congress. Today she's worked on the national council on environmental quality at scindia national laboratories in the office of management and budget and a staffer for the united states senate committee on energy and natural resources. We'll talk to her about how climate change in public lands played into her campaign as well as the reconciliation process. Playing out right now but i some big news as you have. No doubt heard. President biden just restored to national monuments in utah. The president returned bears years and grand staircase escalante national monuments back to their original sizes undoing president. Trump's attempt to shrink those monuments by eighty five and fifty percent respectively. That is of course. Great news for the protection of both landscapes which contain some of the richest cultural and scientific artifacts in the country but the restorations may not be permanent utah. State leaders are already talking about challenging those new protections in court public land's journalists and recent podcast guest here jonathan thompson in his newsletter pointed to the text of the proclamations themselves which president biden rewrote to include much more detail than the language that was in the proclamation signed by presidents clinton and obama. The idea thomson. Speculates is that that could help. Justify the sizes of the monuments should the proclamations and being challenged in court. Another former podcast. Here professor marks school laci told e-e-eddie news. He thinks it's unlikely. The supreme court would take up the case since lower courts have consistently ruled that presidents do have broad discretion under the antiquities act but square. Lachey said that does not preclude another attempt to shrink the monuments. If or win the white house changes hands again. Yes so it was a busy weekend. Here in san juan county as you can imagine I was able to attend a very last minute gathering on cedar mesa on friday which was arranged by utah. Dna that's a group that's primarily navajo lead in his. Been pushing for the monument. They were actually the ones who came up with the original idea to push for a monument or a landscape level protection for the bears years region former interior secretary. Bruce babbitt was there writer. Terry tempest williams was there. And then kenneth mary boy the navajo county. Commissioner here in san. Juan county was there as well in a lot of navajo elders. Who are on the board of utah debka and advisors to the group so that was pretty amazing to get to celebrate that with people who have really been fighting for the monument for the past ten years. I imagine it must have been a pretty pretty big shifts for everyone in our broader conservation world and specifically in the indigenous advocacy world..

utah melanie stance berry Haaland Melania national council on environmen albuquerque scindia national laboratories senate committee on energy and President biden congress interior department jonathan thompson president biden office of management and budge deb new mexico holland Trump cedar mesa
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

01:53 min | Last month

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"In the Majesty of our coastlines. What would that be? Gulf Islands National Seashore. It was there in the The heat of the BP oil spill that I flew over those waters with the pilot who told me that when that water was on fire, he saw a part of dolphins so by side by side Treading water looking at the flames, wondering I want to be all alone and sometimes a guest at a party is Kind of just there in the corner and the classics Still, Waters run deep. Where is the place where I can appreciate solitude at your dinner table here? Gates of the Arctic showed me what silence Sounds like stillness. When we flew into gates of the Arctic, I felt like a moth among mountains. And it was there that we watched a grizzly bear with two cubs. Walk. In Ireland Tendra crossing a pass. This is travel with Rick Steves were at a national park dinner party with Terry Tempest Williams. Her book is the Hour of Land. And, Terry, This This is a party. I'm never going to forget, and They always say. Don't talk about religion and politics. But I know that you are just you've got a fire in your belly about politics and nature. And I'd like to meet one of your guests, one of your parks That's going to put a fire in my belly for the importance of waking up to where we're going with our environment. Who would I meet? And who would I talk to? You know, I would introduce you to Theodore Roosevelt National Park and there we would walk to the Elkhorn Ranch where Teddy Roosevelt said that After the death of his wife and mother. He went there to grieve, and it was in those three.

Rick Steves Terry Tempest Williams Teddy Roosevelt Terry Ireland Gulf Islands National Seashore two cubs Tendra three one Theodore Roosevelt National Pa Hour of Land Elkhorn Ranch Arctic guests
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

07:33 min | Last month

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Back to gettysburg every single season. Trying to get a better sense of who this guest is and in those furrowed fields of dried wheat. That voters still fly over. One can still feel the spirits of those who were fallen. I'd love to meet a park that that that just sweeps me away. In the majesty of our coastlines what would that be go. Violence national seashore. It was there in the heat of the bp oil spill that. I flew over those waters with pilot. Who told me that when that water was on fire. He saw a pod of dolphins side by side by side treading water looking at the flames wondering i wanna be all alone and sometimes a guest at a party is kind of just there in the corner and the classics. Still waters run deep. Where's a place where i can appreciate solitude at your dinner table gates of the arctic showed me what silence sounds like stillness when we flew into gates of the arctic. I felt like a moth among mountains and it was there that we watched a grizzly bear with two cubs walk in autumn tender. Crossing a pass this travel with rick steves. Were at a national park. Dinner party with terry tempest williams book is the hour of land. And terry this. This is a party. i'm never gonna forget. And they always say don't talk about religion and politics. But i know that you are. Just you've got fire in your belly about politics and nature and i'd like to meet one of your guests one of your parks. That's going to put a fire in my belly for the importance of waking up to where we're going with our environment who would i mean. Who would i talk to introduce you to roosevelt national park and we would walk to the elk horn ranch where teddy roosevelt said that. After the death of his wife and mother he went there to grieve and it was in those three years in the badlands of north dakota that he developed the character to become president of the united states. Who talked to about the whole issue of civil liberties as it applies to nature in. I would introduce you to alcatraz and the exhibit by the chinese dissident artist by way way and it was there that i began to appreciate. He showed me the relationship between confinement and creativity and how crucial it is to fight for the rights of of all humans and to recognize the structures of racism. That do exist. Even the incarceration of of people who were jailed at alcatraz and who later we saw the uprising alcatraz of native people and dynamic democracy. We have that is chronicled in our national parks. The issue of our day really in so many ways is climate. Change if ever. There was an existential threat. Who would. I talked with this party where i could gain that perspective. We would meet glacier national park and stand before her retreating glaciers with humility with resolve and with devotion to stand in the heart of change with as much resolve as we can to do what we can with the place where we find ourselves now. Is it conceivable that the day will come when glacier national park would be more properly named no glacier national park glacier national park will remind us of a world we once stood in the middle of and failed to recognize as holy and i think the gift of glacier national park around this dinner table is she gives us the courage to face the future uncertain as it is with the fortitude to face the sacrifices that are going to be required of us. We are at a crossroads. We can continue on the path we've been on in this nation that privileges profit over people and land or we can unite as citizens with a common cause. This is the hour of land and the time has come for acts of reverence and restraint on behalf of the earth. I would ask us to listen hands on the earth. Listen and remember what it means to be. Human one of the best ways to truly feel the majesty of the american west is on a mountain bike tour across the wilderness. Christopher solomon tells us about his outdoor adventure across utah in just a bit next. We explore way. New mexico and arizona can make you feel like you're in another world. We're at eight seven seven three three three seven four to five as we enjoy some special corners of the united states today on travel with rick steves mentioned the great southwest and there's no shortage of stereotypes that come to mind and nearly alien landscape of desert mesas and adobe settlements with some old style trading posts and. Maybe a ufo tossed in for fun. But did you know it also offers some of the oldest historical sites in north america. Right now on travel trick. Steve's let's check in with native born daughter of santa fe to examine how the region sees itself flannery. Burke teaches history at saint louis university and she's just written a land apart the southwest and the nation in the twentieth century in it she explores how images promoting the great southwest got started and how they stack up with. Today's reality flannery welcome. Thanks for having me. This is really fun. So alanna part. The southwest end the nation in the twentieth century When you say a land apart that really does sort of define what is something. That's unique about the southwest. How do you define the southwest. And how was it a part. Well i define the southwest both geographically and tim poorly so i say early in the book to ask where a place is also to ask. When and the southwest in the twentieth century i define as the states of arizona and new mexico with a little bit of bleeding around the edges into border towns like Nogales and el paso. Texas and juarez mexico and a little bit of reaching into i'd utah. Southern colorado so twentieth century was essentially arizona and new mexico. But if you looked at it earlier because goes way back. I mean we're so inclined to think of sixteen twenty or plymouth. Rock is the beginning of things. And then it's kind of astounding to to be reminded that sort of i don't know if ethnocentric is the right approach but it's it's gotta open-minded approach to the story of our country because the southwest goes way back it does yes. Although it wasn't called the southwest then it was the north or well. It depends like once. Again it depends. When will you talked earlier heritage. It certainly was.

glacier national park terry tempest williams roosevelt national park elk horn ranch arctic rick steves glacier national park glacier teddy roosevelt Christopher solomon cubs national park north dakota terry united states flannery arizona utah saint louis university New mexico alanna
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

06:59 min | Last month

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Feral spirit of the wild west like a modern day. Edward abbey on fat tires. Chris joins us a little later in the hour today on travel. With rick steves. And flannery burke explains what arizona and new mexico represent to the nation and to each other as a one of a kind region. We often call the great southwest. Terry tempest williams invites us to celebrate the land and the people. You'll meet at a variety of national parks across the united states in her book. The hour of land. She describes the park. She's visited as breathing spaces each with a unique personality that deserve our patronage our respect and our protection by the way our conversation was recorded before the global pandemic. Terry it's good to have you with us. Thank you read your book. The our land takes us not to the obvious parks but it takes us to some of the less famous parks. You chose about a dozen parks to introduce to us why these parks why not win at the grand and famous ones. Would you believe me if i told you that i saw this as a dinner party. You know my mother was a great hostess and she always said you know. Pick your dinner parties very carefully because who knows what will come out of them so you know here. We have fifty nine national parks in our country. How to choose a dozen. So i really did envision it as dinner party i knew who the heads of the table would be my mother park which would be grand teton national park. The other end of the table. I knew it would be canyon. Lands national park where we live closely to. I could count on them then. I thought all right who's gonna be on the other end of the table holding the space that are reliable and for me. It was a canadian national park in maine and teddy roosevelt national park. In north dakota. I had been to the many times and they were trustworthy. Then i thought okay. Who are the dream guests that i would want that. I don't know. But i know other people who do and we can bring them to the table and i thought of big bend national park. I thought of gates of the arctic national park and effigy mounds. And i thought those were my dream guests so they came to the party then i thought all right. Who's the guests that you just don't want to have their. It's a family member. You know their complicated difficult but you have to have them. That was glacier national park for me. I just thought. I really don't wanna get into climate change that glaciers are met you know melting and and the history with the black feet nation but glacier national park sat at the table and then there were the bad boys and girls. The ones who i knew would keep the conversation interesting and honest that would-be gettysburg issues of slavery that would be alcatraz issues of incarceration that would be gulf island national seashore bp oil spill. And then there's always the surprise guest. Who changed everything. And that would be cesar chavez national monument so that was my dinner table. My dinner party. Can i come to dinner party please. i. I'm just. I just walked into the dinner party. And i'm i'm rick. The travel writer. Can you introduce me to a couple of these parks. In a way that. I'll i'll better understand their personality and want to get to know them better. I think i introduce you to cesar chavez because he changed everything for me that national park you know. We hear that our national parks are best idea. It was cesar chavez national monument that said. It's evolving idea that you know here. We have in nineteen sixteen. Stephen mather the head of the national park service. Who looks at his donors Mrs astor coming to yosemite. Would she be comfortable camping. No she would. Not they build the awani hotel fast forward to twenty twelve. We have a black president who was a community organizer who chose to honor another community. Organizer cesar chavez. Okay evolving idea over there. There's grand teton. can you introduce me to grand teton. I understand that's where you've had so many childhood memories. Grand teton national park. This is my mother. Park this park that after september eleventh when i was in washington. Dc and felt that there was no solid ground beneath my feet. I went back to grantee thanh and put my hand on the flanks of her mountain and went up to amphitheater lake and rebaptized myself in safety wall. I wanna drink with grantee ton but wait a minute over. There is big bend national park. Clifford is really interesting. After dork. I made a pact with big band. Let me introduce you that. Should i ever disappear. That's where i'll be and you're right. It is a nocturnal park. Where the sounds of pechory of have alina under moonlight. Sound like the tiptoeing of patent leather hooves on sandstone. I wanna be there at midnight but but wait a minute. I remember last time. I was with you. You told me canyon. Lands was the most beautiful place on earth and also. The most vulnerable introduced me. Canyon lands if you believe. The earth is flat come to canyon lands to the needles overlook. Can you'll see the curvature of the earth it is an erosion landscape that reminds us. How young we really are. Who would you introduce me to to really connect with with native american culture. Come with me to effigy mounds on the banks of the mississippi river. And let's walk into this glenn where there's a two hundred fifteen foot wingspan of a mound in the shape of a peregrine falcon. And while we're watching this mound and swear that the wings move a red headed woodpecker drops down to right where the heart would be. And if you go a little bit further. There is a mound in the shape of a bear facing the direction of the mississippi river. Prayers held bones buried protected. Terry tempest williams has invited us to a most unusual get together in which we get acquainted with diverse collection of national parks. She describes her experiences at each of them in her. latest book. Called the hour of land. Personal topography of america's national parks. It's now out in paperback terry and her husband live close to arches national park in utah. Terry's website is. Coyote clam dot com. You know what's odd to me. Is our national park. System was born in wartime. And there's a battlefield. That's actually a national park. Can you introduce me to gettysburg. Gettysburg is the guest. I leased now. And i keep going to visit..

cesar chavez Terry tempest williams Chris joins flannery burke Lands national park teddy roosevelt national park glacier national park arctic national park Edward abbey rick steves gulf island national seashore grand teton national park Stephen mather big bend national park Mrs astor awani hotel new mexico Terry grantee thanh arizona
Terry Tempest Williams on Her New Book "The Hour of Land"

Travel with Rick Steves

01:55 min | Last month

Terry Tempest Williams on Her New Book "The Hour of Land"

"Terry tempest williams invites us to celebrate the land and the people. You'll meet at a variety of national parks across the united states in her book. The hour of land. She describes the park. She's visited as breathing spaces each with a unique personality that deserve our patronage our respect and our protection by the way our conversation was recorded before the global pandemic. Terry it's good to have you with us. Thank you read your book. The our land takes us not to the obvious parks but it takes us to some of the less famous parks. You chose about a dozen parks to introduce to us why these parks why not win at the grand and famous ones. Would you believe me if i told you that i saw this as a dinner party. You know my mother was a great hostess and she always said you know. Pick your dinner parties very carefully because who knows what will come out of them so you know here. We have fifty nine national parks in our country. How to choose a dozen. So i really did envision it as dinner party i knew who the heads of the table would be my mother park which would be grand teton national park. The other end of the table. I knew it would be canyon. Lands national park where we live closely to. I could count on them then. I thought all right who's gonna be on the other end of the table holding the space that are reliable and for me. It was a canadian national park in maine and teddy roosevelt national park. In north dakota. I had been to the many times and they were trustworthy. Then i thought okay. Who are the dream guests that i would want that. I don't know. But i know other people who do and we can bring them to the table and i thought of big bend national park. I thought of gates of the arctic national park and effigy mounds. And i thought those were my dream guests

Terry Tempest Williams Lands National Park Terry United States Grand Teton National Park Teddy Roosevelt National Park North Dakota Maine Big Bend National Park Arctic National Park
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Body of Wonder

Body of Wonder

07:22 min | 7 months ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Body of Wonder

"And they're both positive and people dying alone and not being able to see their their media gladly and the effects of this for example on healthcare providers. Something you know for decades is as you know. I said at the bedside dying people but also for decades have been working with healthcare providers with clinicians doctors and nurses and the moral suffering that clinicians are experiencing in having to be you know surrogates if you will Also a not being able to access adequate resources to even take care of their patients. So there's the sense of the loss of moral ground which is another Grief that people are encountering. So it's i feel that we're grieving the loss of a of a whole way of life. But it's also showing us many things including You know crew. Our friends really are who really care about how important our relationships are unfortunate for those of us who are currently Free the virus that we can have a relative health often because of privilege also showing us the racism in our country the classes in our country. So it's you know it's a time We're in you know this kind of limited a world. we're not out of this. I if and said Quite often In six eight months that it's like a global rite of passage that we're experiencing right now. We don't know what the outcome will be. But we don't think will be going back to the old normal so as someone who's been engaged in active buddhist not not sitting in a cave but rather taking all the teachings and Putting them into action in the world as we can out into the world are there steps. We can take to recover from what we've experienced and maybe to create a different world. You know. I remember a something. That terry tempest williams wrote. She said could've mind a good friend of mine. Said you are married to sorrow. And i looked at him and said i'm not to sorrow. I just choose not to look away. And i think it's really important that we not look away gone. This time that we're in is i doubt if in The lifetime even younger peeps one hundred years little over a hundred years since the great plague of nineteen eighteen dependent of nine thousand. Nine hundred thousand. This is so radical so wild. What were in it is global. Where so hyper connected and yet were distant are more talented is right in our face us. Uncertainty is now our way of life we have no idea what is the head and as a result of that on. But we're seeing and you know this is kind of wild you pies this beautiful very intensive place the practice here in this country but what has happened is that there are literally a thousands and thousands of people who have now opted into our community in order to practice in order to explore the truth of suffering in order to understand something about their relationship with and death and so forth. So you know it's it's bringing people if you will to the source of what it means to be. I feel truly human and you have spoken about how you learned about the one thousand nine hundred thousand flu epidemic because your grandmother told you stories about it and yet it mostly is not a story. We've told very often in our society. I know there was a book I don't remember now whether it's a decade ago or fifteen years the graded lorenza but we mostly actually didn't bear witness. I think mostly put the lid on it as fast as we could. Are you say You know i was. I don't know how but there's something in the realm of seven eight nine ten that my grandmother used to tell me stories of philadelphia which was the hardest city On the east coast and she told me these stories were strong. Cords of corpses going through the streets philadelphia. I that made a very strong impression on me. Sounded like something malaysia's ages nice boy tried to get information on that there was no it was as if this had been culturally repressed because it was such a heavy experience with people. Couldn't gosh andy that is such an interesting observation you know. I wonder what that did to on the generation. That came out of that pandemic whether you think you also bat. The pandemic was distinctive in that chills selectively killed young healthy people Intended to spare the old and berry yawn so that must have been especially frightening. It was people in their twenties thirties. Picture house at a headache in the morning. We're dead in the evening. must've been unbelievably frightening. And as i say. I think it was cultured. You're press for many many years and it wasn't really until nineteen nineties. That scientists began looking into the question why that was so deadly and think he was special about the virus. Nobody had paid any attention. But i'm also curious. Andy your thoughts on how this would affect the psychosocial landscape for example of the mid twenties to the mid thirties. Well remember this chain right at the end of world were want so double whammy and at four world for her to in the is that must have been very formative events. Were you know when our parents generation. Well i mean. Do you think there's any relationship for example about the presence of the pandemic hadn't a more. Well this might be too far out for us to talk about in this context. But you know what's happening in this country politically at this time. I think when people are afraid and these rate uncertainty news. A tendency to gravitate toward Those who tell you how it is and make sense of things and asking to represent order instability and. Maybe that does that is a you know something. That leads people toward fascism leaders. Who a spouse that kind of assistance anyway interesting observation. Thanks sandy. so.

terry tempest williams lorenza philadelphia flu east coast malaysia andy headache Andy sandy
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Show Voice of SAT here on Santa Fes, New TAC leader The Santa Fe Conservation Trust is having a virtual event on August 27th. It's gonna be great Jonno Manson in digit FIM, cowgirl drink recipes, delicious takeout meal packages, moving stories from the community and a chat with Terry Tempest Williams and Tom Udall. Get your $5 access pass at sf city dot org's and Please register for our paddle raise to help us raise $40,000 for conservation and trails. Work. Go to S F c t dot org's today. This's Matt, this is Rick and one from McParland Roofing. We know your residential commercial property is one of your most valuable assets and your is one of the most important parts of that investment. Poorly installed, a leaky roof can leave lasting effects. Even the smallest penetrations can cause unseen damages and major frustration as Santa Fes most trusted roofing company for over 35 years. Call today to schedule us for your complimentary roof assessment to make partner Rufin offers a variety of roofing insulation services from new construction. To roof replacements, including repairs, restoration, maintenance programs, inspections and more roof. Construction can provide improves structural integrity, lower energy costs and improve the cosmetic pill of your property. No matter what your roofing needs a La McFarlane roofing to sit down with you to explain and design a roof plan to meet the customer needs of your home or business. It is our tradition. Everyone. This's quite at Sutton, editor of Tumbleweeds Online newspaper with this week's Tumbleweeds Round up Highlights of events for Children and families. Los Alamos Nature Center presents Lifestream talks for all ages via zoom by pay what you can admission to stay August 18th. Meet the goats, mama turkeys, ducks and chickens off the Los Alamos County standards from.

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Out. $25 Gift Card to Color Number 4/4 Caller 505424 12 65 05424 12 60 calling number 4 18 minutes after two. You've been will be coming right back to the Richard. He'd show voice of Santa Fe here on Santa Fes, New TAC leader With the month of August heating up, it only makes sense to mosey on down to the curb side of 315 restaurant wine bar to grab some fully prepared whole French fried organic chicken. It's beyond finger licking. Good company with your tasty, juicy fried chicken will be a point of fresh Chilled green grave gazpacho, scrunches buttered green beans, mouthwatering, velvety mashed potatoes, all for a sizzling $60. Mori phone details on all great things and orders Just go online to 315 Santa Fe, The Santa Fe Conservation Trust is having a virtual event on August 27th. It's going to be great Jonno Manson in Digit FIM, cowgirl drink recipes, delicious takeout meal packages. Moving stories from the community and a chat with Terry Tempest Williams and Tom Udall. Get your $5 access pass at sf city dot org's and Please register for our paddle raise to help us raise $40,000 for conservation and trails. Work. Go to S F c t dot org's Today VERGER Center restaurants are all up and running and offer dining on lovely outdoor summer patios, curbside delivery and pick up and go. You're invited to discover the very best that Crisco Cafe, Santa Fe Bar and Grill, Marijuana seeds, etcetera. Subway Panda Express, Baskin Robbins, Starbucks had to offer and with over 50 specialty retail shops, free parking and a spacious, air conditioned interior Vargas center also offers a welcoming inside. For more information, see de Vargas center dot com. Fix my roof. Fix. My roof team would like to thank the community for keeping them in business. Not all businesses are able to stay open. During these trying times. Keeping workers and customers safe is a top priority for the fix my roof team in order to keep business strong. They've been working hard to negotiate better pricing on materials in order to pass the savings on to local customers. Fix. My roof is committed to Santa Fe. Hi. This is Carol Rose from Amanda's flowers feeling like they're someone you know who could use a pick me up right now. How about a surprise floral arrangement.

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Same website. Exactly Okay. And 90 minutes long. 90 minutes long. You can call the store. If you get confused about how to Sinan. We have. We will people working that night, But they're the stores also open today and tomorrow for any questions people have on people can always call me. All right. I I just want to tease people a little bit better a little bit more, because not better, but a little bit more. Because this is an amazing event. And you mentioned, you know Scott. Mama Days work with Jill and Natasha. You mentioned. You know, Rudolfo Anaya is going to be incredible. You have. I mean, just, you know some some riel as iconic as the bookstore. People are also participating. Like Jack Leffler, one of the greatest storytellers I've ever meant. Ah, Hampton, the man with the best in the business, that is, you're absolutely right. I mean, he is an elf or a troll, depending on his mood. Hampton sides of Riga. He's paired in adventure. Ah, with Doug Preston, Good and Doug Book. If you haven't had a chance to read it on the lost City of the Monkey God is nonfiction books. Never in my life. Scary is scary, scary, really scary. Giving away for people who are as I say, the ticket prices we kept Gladys, but people can adopt a section for a larger price. They will get books. Written by the author sign books written by the author representing that section. So we have an Hillman and Clark Johnson, who always packed the house. Who, Oh, Whose books the source for the lone heir Siri's TV. And Craig used to show up a little song, eh? With the cast and crew and it was invariably ability, but a wonderful, wonderful evening. We have Debra artist. We First lady of cookbooks, probably in the nation on Long supporter. Of course, the firm get paired with Min Klein. Who is kind of a local regular. We've got cartoons, Ricardo Ricardo. OK, Giants and Edwards and the Great, Patrick All you go. Oh, my God. Also political cartoonists. They're all on DH. Then we've got Terry Tempest Williams, Um It's a permanent environmentalist from Utah. And she is going to be with her body build a brief so many wonderful things about the viral. You also have the man with the best you have the man with the best voice in Santa Fe is going to read. James McGrath Morris like honey, Yes, indeed. Yes, indeed he is. He's amazing on he is paragraph transition from Colorado on DH. She's going. They're going to talk about biography and actually is going and do something on the books that we were going to be honored to present to Santa Fe in in In October. It's a book that she wrote with Amy Irvine called Airmail Letters of politics, pendant accentuation. That's That brings me just something that I really feel strongly about, which is Creative response of people whether their authors, poets, musicians, dancers the way that the creative people in this world have found. To deal with the confines and constructs of pandemic, having to stay in place, not being able to go to theaters and everything. This book, Pan and Amy wrote from They're sequestered confines during the pandemic when nobody was going out, and I don't think either one of them is still going out at all. But it's it's struck me so Stoneleigh, and I am so in all anybody involved in the creative world because they are continuing to create and not giving up on you Got Mama days grounding out. Poetry like Never before. It's just this wonderful. You also have somebody on north E. Somebody on who will was a guest of ours A couple days ago. Don us dinner and we had him on is a photographer for search like New Mexico. Hey, he mentioned he's written books. I said We'll talk about that. And he did and they're available. Your bookstore. Yes, indeed they are, and he'll be an important part of coming back with Carmela Padilla, and that's inspection is going to be on art and culture. Don is the chosen Photographer for nonprofits in the city of Santa Fe on Ah, it is going to be a delight to see its face because it's usually behind a camera, but he's a great friend of Cologne and has written Hello, sensitively, obviously about useful place home kind of Jen Ai O, where he has since he was born and his stories about his grandmother, His his latest one is called Chasing Chose. Truchi Myo with astounding photograph on the cover on all stories and teachers from his hometown. So we're thrilled to have been he and Carmela we could be talking art and culture and the only The only downside to the whole thing is that Each section only gets a representation of six minutes, so I always got a big job to sort of wrap up the minutes and introduce the most others so that we can get it all in in an hour and 1/2. She's going to have to get a bull whip out. She's going to have a prompter. OK, Ollie Before we're going to run out of time here in a second Georgie Dorothy Massey's Our guests owner of collective Work bookstore downtown..

Santa Fe Carmela Padilla Giants James McGrath Morris Amy Irvine Rudolfo Anaya Sinan Ricardo Ricardo Terry Tempest Williams Jack Leffler Hampton Don Min Klein Riga Doug Preston Gladys Scott Georgie Dorothy Massey Jill Jen Ai O
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Tara Brach

Tara Brach

14:50 min | 1 year ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Tara Brach

"Amnesty and welcome. This is the sixth of a series. And I have no idea how long it'll go on called sheltering in love and last week and this week the focus is on really facing the pain of separation and loneliness the vet Murthy was our recent surgeon general in the United States up until twenty seventeen I also a physician and he did a road trip across the United States. Talking to people. All different types of people now is written a book called together and I mentioned him because he's a key figure and bringing into our societal awareness. The huge huge suffering really. How loneliness is a major public health concern. And he talks about how for so many that he encountered whether it was drug addiction or poverty are arena fiscal diseases that the root suffering was a sense of isolation being stuck in struggle and all by oneself. He shared a number stories but one that struck me. He met with a man several years after this guy had won the lottery and this man told Murthy that the day he won the lottery was the worst day of his life and when Murthy said well explain please. He described how he had been working in a bakery and he had know he was needed there and appreciated for what he did. He had friends in his neighborhood and after winning he stopped working. He moved into a gated community. He got really really lonely. He developed diabetes. He felt pretty continuously angry at what he perceived snobbery of other people. That live there for many of you listening that this isn't hard to understand or imagine and what strikes so much is that loneliness is a disease that hits all classes people in all sorts of life circumstances. There's a really well known teaching story that I love were student asks a spiritual teacher. What's the difference between illness and wellness? The teacher writes those words up on a board any circles the eye of illness and the we of wellness. And we know it that we're not happy when the world is centering around I. Those are not the moments that were happy. The trajectory of the spiritual path is shifting from an identity and a self concern and focus where our fears and our thoughts and all our intentions and motivations really around furthering and defending a self. It's a shift from that. To really recognizing in a cellular way that were connected and then the experience of that is a caring. That's all inclusive. That's one of the definitions. I have of radical compassion. That it's that awake sense that we belong and of course we care for each other. We belong to each other. What's so interesting to me. Is that many evolutionary psychologists and philosophers. Also consider this the trajectory for our species that there's an increasing movement and capacity for collaboration and for compassion with the understanding that we belong to this web of life. What happens in this web affects? All of us sensing were part of Earth. Were part of what's described as guy at this whole system that's synchronized and self organizing on the same boat. So we claverie. 'cause the truth is we belong now of course as I say this you may be instead of thinking of the the long arc. Maybe more focused on a short stretch of time that we've been having recently and it certainly doesn't appear claver to give and embracing and caring of each other which is why this week and last week Really relooking at the suffering of separation and loneliness that many are calling an epidemic and we talked last week about how loneliness surely forgetting our belonging quite literally makes us sick it shortens our our life expectancy and that given where such a social species we have a longing to belong and very real pain of loneliness and it's in our DNA to feel that because for most of human history it was really dangerous to be separate or outside of the group not a member not feeling our membership So it's easy to see how in current days loneliness is exacerbated by this global crisis by the pandemic there's so much anxiety so much fear around health and economy. We see each other. Were afraid of of getting this. Potentially deadly virus from each other. So there's distancing and many are living alone it's a real setup one person Couple of days ago from our DC. Meditation Community who lives alone told me she said. I'm afraid I've had the last hug in my life and I wasn't even aware of it at the time and that really struck me just that sense of really. What if I never feel held again? There's so much suffering the comes with feeling lonely. It often appears as depression. You might not even be in touch with the loneliness. It appears as depression which is a pushing down that rawness. 'cause loneliness is so painful. I'm it appears as anxiety because the more separate we feel the more we feel vulnerable. The more we feel threatened. It's not as appears as anger blame because when we feel lonely really we feel rejected in some way and threatened by others that makes us angry and bottom line core. We feel shame we feel shame because to not belong translates to most of us as something's wrong with me lot of pain. Statistically it's shown that the loneliest age group is eighteen to twenty but it's really all ages now I heard a story that I love It's about this gentleman who knocks on his son's door and he says Jamie he says Jamie. Wake up and Jamie answers. I don't WANNA get up. Papa father shouts get up. You have to go to school and Jamie says I don't want to go to school. Why not ask the father three reasons this Jamie I? It's because it's so dull second. The kids tease me and third. I hate school and the father says well. I'm GonNa tell you three reasons you have to go to school and I because it's your duty second because you're forty five years old and third because you're the headmaster not everyone goes around like on lonely but we all have this existential tendency to feel separate. This is this is deep in us. I find that Rumi says the best on this. He says that everything that comes into being gets lost in being drunkenly forgetting its way home and what he means by lost in being is that we lose the sense of our belonging to the hall and we identified with a separate self this I and all of our thoughts and activities just circle around what I want what I need. I'm afraid of this furthering and protecting ourselves. Now what's kind of important to understand? Is that if in growing up. Our basic needs for safety and love and understanding are Matt. Then that self-focused is there. But it's a wholesome one. It's not exclusive versus sticky. So we can still remember in a very fundamental way are belonging but when our personal lives when in our personal lives. Sir Spin stress and trauma and very little healthy bonding healthy attachment bonding with caretakers by nature. We become more self fixated more self protective more aggressive in kind of defending. And that's where we get really imprisoned in the I That separate lonely feeling with so much suffering

Rachel Idaho Seoul Terry Tempest Williams depression East Coast Hospital Hans partner US Raymond writer Physician author
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

15:27 min | 1 year ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on KCRW

"It shows give peace a chance there was just a dream some of us one day he and so it is with I'm going to see them both said dig even his senses I needed to go well he gave me back my smile but he kept my camera sale because good omelets and student Ahmed is wrong with him make me feel good rock and roll band I'm your biggest fan so there were lots of pretty people there read in stone beaten both just tell my skin turns brown in will you take me as a strong this this this this this is morning becomes eclectic on KCRW Anand live only fifteen more minutes of the show the majority of today was taken up with news conferences from Gavin Newsom en LA mayor Eric Garcetti I have to say I was listening to what Eric Garcetti was saying and if you didn't hear it one of the things he talked about was all of us looking out for each other and helping each other out and taking care of each other and that means staying safe from what's going on with you know large gatherings and and keeping a safe distance between you and others and and considering where you've been and what you're doing before you go near as someone who might be at a higher risk but all of that to say is that the take away for me was that we just all have to watch out for each other so that's what we're gonna do all right I'm gonna play some music may get into a couple of spots here and play some more music for you this morning on morning becomes eclectic and now let's look after each other support for KCRW comes from film independent home of film independent presents a monthly series designed for movie lovers featuring preview screenings of highly anticipated films in depth conversations with top talent live reads of classic scripts and more film independent members enjoy priority registration and complimentary admission with the guest to most events become a member today at film independent dot org slash joined Casey R. W. is proud to partner with allowed a program of the library foundation of Los Angeles this March had allowed comedian best kalb joins TV writer Megan Amram to discuss her debut memoir allowed also welcomes conservationist Terry Tempest Williams to talk about her new essay collection rights night and lost and found at the movies also return this month for more info visit KCRW dot com slash events morning becomes eclectic I man lit it's Casey R. W. all she may be we the young girl they do can we but when she gets we you know she the way they yes and just now yeah well that wow see their weight is without them sure yeah.

Ahmed Gavin Newsom Eric Garcetti KCRW Casey R. W. partner Los Angeles kalb Megan Amram Terry Tempest Williams LA writer
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:31 min | 1 year ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on KCRW

"Los Angeles this March had allowed comedian best kalb joins TV writer Megan Amram to discuss her debut memoir allowed also welcomes conservationist Terry Tempest Williams to talk about her new essay collection rights night and lost and found at the movies also return this month for more info visit KCRW dot com slash events tension you to do go so do come with me the sun Zacks by the this yes for the sun six this opportunity dot com support for KCRW comes from film independent home of film independent presents a monthly series designed for movie lovers featuring preview screenings of highly anticipated films in depth conversations with top talent live reads of.

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on KCRW

"Is proud to partner with allowed a program of the library foundation of Los Angeles this March had allowed comedian best kalb joins TV writer Megan Amram to discuss her debut memoir allowed also welcomes conservationist Terry Tempest Williams to talk about her new essay collection rights night and lost and found at the movies also return this month for more info visit KCRW dot com slash events support for NPR comes from noon a personalized weight loss program designed to keep you people knowledge to set new.

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on KCRW

"He presided over some of the U. N.'s most turbulent years but as the choir held the U. N.'s top job for a decade he arrived in office in nineteen eighty two as a little known official from Peru having an organization that was struggling to be effective in a world divided by the Cold War and roiled by conflict in Afghanistan Cambodia and the Middle East he left with a reputation as a dogged peacemaker whose uncharismatic diplomacy helped secure many achievements a ceasefire in the Iran Iraq war the release of western hostages in Lebanon independence of Namibia a peace deal in El Salvador tributes are now pouring into Paris to quite yet the only Latin American to lead the U. N. he died in Peru where he's also remembered for his role late in life as a national politician that Reeves NPR news in Detroit prosecutors today charged the former president of the United auto workers with corruption alleging Gary Jones conspired with several others at the union to embezzle more than one million dollars Jones resigned back in November after a series of guilty pleas in the sweeping federal investigation of U. A. W. leaders living the high life non union officials have pleaded guilty since twenty seventeen but these are the first charges against the former UAW president himself the investigation began with the discovery that money from a fiat Chrysler UAW job training center was stolen this is NPR news Casey R. W. is proud to partner with allowed a program of the library foundation of Los Angeles this March that allowed comedian best kalb joins TV writer Megan Amram to discuss her debut memoir allowed also welcomes conservationist Terry Tempest Williams to talk about her new essay.

Megan Amram writer NPR Chrysler fiat UAW U. A. Detroit Reeves El Salvador Lebanon Iran Terry Tempest Williams U. N. kalb Los Angeles partner Casey R. W. Gary Jones
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

09:17 min | 2 years ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"You know there als I feel there is you know and then suddenly turn in you actually see those yellow is that could burn grasses with their stare great horned owls screech owls flam related owls burrowing owls. They're all around but it's always a gift when you see one and it always gives me pause you know also have night vision and more and more I think we're being called upon on to adopt night vision not be frightened by darkness and what may be ahead but to develop that so that we can stand in the shadows and not be afraid but to also make a commitment not to look away our guest on travel with Rick Steves is Terry Tempest emphised Williams Terry's a well known environmental activist in Your Home State of Utah. She's also been serving as writer in residence at the Harvard Divinity School and you'll see your byline articles close The New York Times she explores how to respond to recent anti environmental governmental policies in her latest collection of essays. It's called erosion. Her website is Coyote clan dot com Terry. We've been talking about the desert and the hidden wonders of the desert and the richness of the desert. Your new book arose in essays of undoing is a lot of thoughts inspired by your love of nature end your time in the desert. What's the connection with erosion? Listen and your concerns about our environment and how it applies to what's going on today with our society in regards to how we take care of our environment went. We'll just as we see erosion in in the narrative of the Grand Canyon or in a place like Castle Valley or Arches Canyon lands. I think we're seeing erosion of the different sort in our own democracy an erosion of decency and erosion of a belief in science and erosion of our collective empathy Kathy and to me it seemed a worthy metaphor to stay with. It could be said that this is a dark book. I don't see it that way because I think living in times of drought you know that there's going to be another cycle or you. Throw your tap root deeper. Just as you see the plants do or you know that there are seeds that are dormant but when the rains come when you smell that rain Petra core is the same for our spirit so I think it's a book about endurance. It's a book about patience and persistence. It's ultimately I think a book about love loving the open space of Democracy Z. really being committed to stepping to the side and letting native people lead. That's what's happening in the State of Utah and I am so humbled and honored and moved by the leadership of the dinner of the Navajo. The Hopi of Zuni of the mountain newt an aura mute cute. We have a lot to learn from them. I think that's what's happening. In the State of Utah You know the tribes are speaking and it makes those married and committed to the status quo very uncomfortable. Erosion is uncomfortable. It can be dangerous but it's what creates bare boned beauty now terry. I read in your book that you noticed president trump had a portrait of Andrew Jackson moved into the Oval Office. That sounds like a pretty strong statement. What does does that say to you well? He was known as Indian Keller. If you read history Andrew Jackson has a very dark shadowed history of Indian Indian removal the trail of tears it goes on and on and he you know to me that was the first thing I noticed is that you know each president can hand decorate their offices they want and after the Golden Curtains we saw the portrait of of Andrew Jackson I can tell you my native fans took that as a as an affront don't do to your knowledge has president trump ever visited bears ears or any of these places threatened never he saw it as a real estate deal he said when I here a place with a million acres perk up so if you visited this if you visited he might even harden his views and not changes views I would think if he could get them there and take come on a hike as will the great naturalist took Theodore Roosevelt on a hike right just your and then Roosevelt really saw the light about the preciousness and the eternal beauty of our natural spaces. I think we all fantasize of being able to take Donald Trump on a walk doc. I'm not talking about a cliff. I'm talking about a beautiful walk in one of the cultures there's enough optimism in me that maybe with a man under percents assault maybe he he would hear something. I know that some of the tribal elders would love nothing more than to have him. Come speak to them and and the thing that moves me so deeply about an organization like Utah. DNA became a where you have elders like Willie. Gray is who's now a county commissioner or Jonah Yellow. Men who is spiritual adviser forbears ears coalition or Mary Bonelli or Evanger Gray. You know they all saying bears years is about healing and we're not just protecting displaced for us but for all people what our public land. What are the big issues here? Is it like it shouldn't be public it should be we're free Americans. We should be able to do with it what we want or what the what is it every American citizen his land rich we have six hundred and forty million acres that belong to all of us and I think most Americans don't realize that these are public lands. Is there multiple use lands. There are forest our national parks refuges monuments is the open space of democracy and right now our public lands are federal ends are under threat because of oil and gas leasing. I just saw that in the fiscal year of twenty eighteen eighteen the United States government from oil and gas lease sales made one point one billion dollars and I think what people don't realize in these oil and gas lease sales sales we have oil companies executives that are bidding on these lands that belonged to all of us for as little as a dollar fifty an baker and that's what I think people don't realize and right now with this particular administration. It's open for business and Utah is at the brunt of it so you wrote broken down worn down cracked and dry and that can actually be good. That's a message of hope develop that that just a little bit because I know erosion can be a hopeful thing when we look at where our society is today. Water Breaks Down Stone. If you think about that if if people truly engaged in the democratic process beginning voting we can wear down stone on and that is powerful to me you know our erosion as a country could also be our capacity to evolve evolve so we are eroding evolving at once are doing is are becoming. It's holding these the full range of our emotions at once again at that night vision choosing not to look away from what is difficult and this isn't about belief. This is about engagement and I think ultimately this collection of essays is how do we engage in our communities with empathy the capacity to listen not judge I can tell you the name like tempest. It's hard for me not to get angry at times but I know they have their point of view. I want to know what that point of view is. The tribes keep telling US Joni yellow men. The Spiritual Advisor of bears ears. Keep saying bears ears is about healing. This is what we need in our country is to heal and we can only heal if we can and face each other and ask the difficult questions and not walk away and we need those tap roots that dig deeper when the soil is dry we need those is of owls and and we need to appreciate that erosion can be evolution and when the downpours com to just stop and say look at this we do it alone and we do it together other and that's also what the desert teaches me. You don't survive in the desert alone. Even though it's the solitude I seek you survive in the desert through community eighty and we will survive this democracy in the same way. I think you just summed up your calling in life both as a travel writer based in the deserts of Utah and as writer later in residence at the Harvard Divinity School Terry Tempest Williams thanks again for joining us. It's always great and inspiring to talk to you and congratulations on your book erosion as as of undoing thank you so much rick for the way you guide all of us the author of a guidebook to all. US National Parks takes your calls next at eight seven seven seven three three three seven four to five as we get inspired to get out into the American wilderness. It's travel with Rick Steves..

Utah Rick Steves Harvard Divinity School writer Donald Trump Andrew Jackson United States Terry Tempest Williams Terry Tempest Williams Terry Theodore Roosevelt The New York Times president Grand Canyon Kathy assault Mary Bonelli Willie Evanger Gray
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

09:32 min | 2 years ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Mickey lomax recommends more fun fun places to explore in the US national parks in just a bit but first Terry Tempest Williams tells us paying attention to nature is helping her cope with recent political disappointments. She tells us what the forces of erosion teaching her next on travel with Rick Steves Terry tempest tempest Williams has been noticing how the forces of erosion defined the landscapes of the Utah Desert near her home outside the lab in a different way she suggests erosion also seems to be at work in American society in in recent setbacks to environmental protections her latest book features essays and the thoughts for these times. It's called erosion essays of undoing Terry. Welcome back to travel with Rick Steves Hi ric. It's always a pleasure shirt travel with you on radio so terry you spend a good part of your year in Boston at the Harvard Divinity School as writer in residence and teaching there and the rest of the time. Can you right from your home base in Utah and you wake up in the morning surrounded by the desert. Why did you choose to live in the desert? It's a humbling privilege. Everything is changing all the time minute by minute. I love to rise with the sunrise on Sunday. It was at five fifty. Am I am so I went outside to say my prayers to just watch the sun. Come up in this one particular canyon by Adobe Mesa just outside our place and the sunrise didn't come until six twenty two and I just love knowing those details I love being able to watch the Ark of the sun that solstice it will be in that crease of Canyon whereas in the Winter Solstice it will becoming upright directly in one of the peaks of technique of its or in the La Salle's styles so to be able to see the full arc of a year just by where the position of the sun is it just feels like a great pleasure and privilege. It's so interesting. Can you say that because I live on a little bluff in town I look out across the puget sound and the sun sets on a different peak right through the season you know on the Olympic Mountain's and then right now. It's you know it's an a certain spot and I always imagined that native Americans who lived here two hundred years ago stand in the same bluff and they would be so much closer the nature to me that this would be the rhythm of their whole life and remind myself. It's so easy to ignore nature the way we live and it's such a beautiful thing in your travels in your daily life. Get up and say your prayers as the sun is rising right where you know it's GonNa rise and it's just a reminder that we're surrounded by nature but we can choose to be tuned and into it or not get another moment about being in nature where where you're connected and you realize that's beautiful ethic for your life. I remember ver- in March we were driving down the river road from Castle Valley where we live to Moab. It's about a half hour drive. Maybe forty five minutes depends and and we were just in this cloudburst you couldn't even see and we decided to just pull over and within seconds between the the time we left our home in the time we arrived in Moab. We counted fifty three waterfalls and pour offs. It was like the first day of creation and suddenly you know the Colorado River was running red. I mean people were just stopping taking pictures laughing. We were all drenched and you just think this is what matters and this is. What cleans our souls it was so thrilling and you just think I can't imagine living anywhere else and you know you're watching the world erode owed before you and I thought right the world may be eroding before us every day in the news but this is the kind of erosion that creates beauty and humility where you realize you know we're just one species among many and flushed with gratitude or the Grand Canyon is a good example sample of of the beauty of erosion isn't it? I mean the stratego fee of time deep time like whether it away I remember the first time I saw the Grand Canyon my husband blindfolded me and he walked me out to the rim and then took off my blindfold and I just gasped and I said why didn't someone tell let me about this and he goes Terri. I think people are aware of the Grand Canyon what struck me was not what remains but what had been weathered in Rhode routed away. That's what moved me was all that negative space thinking you know wind water time deep time carried through the Colorado River for so we can talk about climate change later but right now when we're talking about erosion that's a natural process that desert is kind of the triumph of erosion isn't it. It's it's a beautiful way of putting a wreck you know weathering is is the widdling away of stone in erosion is the process by which it gets carried away which which I think is really interesting then it's easy to get carried away in the desert. you're forced to stand in the center of extremes extreme drought route extreme flood fire wind. It's not an easy place to live but it's an intentional place to being. It's humbling is meant because it reminds you how Small Ellen insignificant we are in the big natural scheme of things that's right and without water you don't exist and we've seen that we've seen it on the land with the vegetation with the animals the birds in particular. Also you know we have not planned there have been times where Brooklyn I thought let's just go out and go for a walk. Can we haven't taken enough water. You have to be really conscious living in the desert or else your own peril. The desert seems like such a Arad Arad means lifeless lifeless but there's more life hiding in the desert than we realize in a lot of it is pent-up and ready to spring isn't the you know the funniest thing happened. We are now six hundred percent above above average precipitation last year drought in it's been an ongoing drought this year. It's just the heavens poured forth and if you can believe this us a couple of nights ago we heard frogs we have not heard frogs in twenty years and it was just so moving because somewhere in the royal those eggs have have held and but can I just listen to this choir a frog and just it was so beautiful this joy hiding out in in the desert can we tempest Williams was recently given a lifetime achievement award by the Los Angeles Times for her work that focuses on the American West her book doc erosion essays at the undoing will be released a few days. She's also written the hour of land personal topography of America's national parks. Thanks take us on a little walk from Your House that you enjoy and be our tour guide for a minute as you walk through the desert behind the home of Terry Tempest Williams. There's a canyon that I will not name nerve. I say where it is but it's one that we love we call it the circle trail you walk late in the afternoon mm-hmm afternoon light reflective light and canyon walls rise upward like praying hands you see Samak berries red knowing that they can be gathered and crushed and boiled and create a beautiful pudding with white cornmeal you also see ants taking those red berries pushing them up hill and you think how can they have that kind of stamina and determination you see juniper trees hundreds of years old shaped by the wind end with skirts of juniper berries the color of the clouds of an afternoon thunderstorm you keep walking and you see veins of gypsum white in bedded in the Red Sandstone You keep walking and you get to a particular pass on the trail and you can see for miles you swear that you can see the curvature of the earth and it's the stillness. It's the quiet and it's is the perspective that one is given with a walk like that so we all get a chance not to walk on your favorite secret valley but to walk into desert or walk talking to Erin vast landscape and feel that solitude and feel that silence as a travel writer give us just a practical travel tip for appreciating the desert. I think it's just being still and paying attention. I know that I'm in a good place when I can hear the wingbeats of Ravens flying over me or can feel the wind or watch clouds Passover and feel the shadow although of those clouds to me. The joy of being in the desert is is really just be not doing. I always take journal a small notebook with a pencil because something you know extraordinary might happen or there's a description that I don't want to forget but mainly I just love you've observing listening favoring the senses and just being quiet you write that the desert has you thinking about Alf now. What do you mean by that? You know to be in one of the canyons slot canyons or walking through a wash where there's cottonwoods woods on either side..

Terry Tempest Williams Grand Canyon tempest Williams Rick Steves Utah Desert Colorado River Moab writer crease of Canyon US Boston Harvard Divinity School Mickey lomax Utah Arad Arad Olympic Mountain Castle Valley Alf
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

11:59 min | 2 years ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"And unexpected ways coming up. We'll hear how beat writer Jack Kerouac couldn't cope with the solitude while working king as I look out in the Pacific northwest by the end of his stint he had developed several invisible friends and he was having a highly competitive poker tournament with the mole. Tom Terry Tempest Williams reminds us how the erosion and the Utah Landscape holds lessons for our times suddenly the Colorado River was running red people were stopping taking pictures laughing all drenched and you just think this is what matters and this is what cleans our souls and Becky Lomax Amax explorers more national parks she not the Wilderness at Theodore Roosevelt National Park. North Dakota has a fun site to the had. These silly prairie dog towns where the prey dogs are running around. I'm there so-social end their funding. It's all ahead on travel with Rick. Steves come along Terry. Tempest Williams has found that erosion has a lot to say about the times we live him. She explains what the desert has been teaching her likely a little later in the hour. Our plus Becky Lomax recommends ways to immerse yourself in nature at a national park. That's in just a bit. Dan Richards is the kind of guy who goes out of his way to experience the solitude of man-made shelters and some of the wildest ends of the Earth in his book outpost. He takes us to ten far-flung post including the CAIRNGORMS at the Scottish highlands frozen Arctic Ghost towns and Mountaintop Shrines Japan not far from my home he also also followed in the footsteps of beat writer Jack Carroll who spent a summer on assignment at an isolated fire watch lookout in the cascade mountains so damn. Where did you go would find this watch tower that Kerouac wrote about I visited desolation peak which is in Washington State and in Nineteen fifty-six Jack Kerouac expense sixty three days there on top of the mountain desolation peak as a file account so his job was to watch for smoke on the horizon where the forested slopes around him might be a light because of lightning striking or misadventure hikers things like that and his job was to radio so in the sightings and he had a turntable before him couldn't osborne fire finder which is really like a little turntable recross has so you could get a bearing breath on them where exactly this pyre smoke was coming from and then another look on another mountain would do the same and then you would have a triangulation and teams of firefighters laugh fighters could be sent to these places to try and put out blazes really before they started now? Jack Kerouac spent sixty three days there essentially working as of as a fire lookout. Why would he spent so much time up there was he was he there too right or was he there to escape? was He there to relax. I think all of those his friend Gary Schneider the pilots are prize winning poet and fellow Buddhist had spent a couple of summers up on Sour Dough Mountain which is a few miles from desolation peak aac although actually to get there would take you a couple of days of solid hiking such as remoteness of these areas and Schneider said to karaoke that fire lookout not it afforded great leisure to write but you had to keep your wits about you and you had to be on a good with your own company and Karak's saw this I think as an opportunity to get work done but also ever since he was a young child he really wanted to be an outdoorsman. You know to go and spend time by himself and discover who really he was. In solitude solitude had always been this great undiscovered thing for him but then when he actually went when his he actually spent these sixty three days he got fairly depressed and valley crazed and fairly Farrell very quickly klay by the second week he'd smoked all of his tobacco he was smoking coffee grounds by the end of his stint he had developed several invisible friends and he was having a highly competitive poker tournament with the mall. He's curled around in a tiny attic. You have to imagine this outpost is like a little shanty Belvedere sort of like almost a conservatory because he needed three hundred sixty degree views of all the mountains around him to do his job nope so he has his tiny little attic and he crawled up into the attic and he'd read all of the newspapers that were up there for insulation he had made made all these notes but he'd gone pretty crazy and I think as with so many people when they go to the wild places that idea of what they'll be like and the reality was vastly different for him but then later he wrote about his stay he wrote about the stay three times in three different books. It's in the dumb bombs it's in desolation S. elation angels and he wrote about it in his essay collection lonesome traveler and each time that he writes about it. He reframed himself as better at being being alone as a better outdoorsman I think than he actually was because he you know a year today that he came down from his mountain area on the road was published in his life changed overnight. You know he went from a position where he couldn't get arrested this guy you know everyone knew about Qarawat but nobody wanted to publish him and then almost overnight on the road comes out and he turns into this almost Proto Dylan TV radio age superstar where his time has his own anymore anymore. You know everyone wants to buy a drink. Everyone wants his unpublished material to publish and for a quite addictive personality to put it mildly of Karaoke Harak. This was the worst thing in a way that could have happened to him and I think he looked back on these sixty three days of solitude as both a missed opportunity in a way that he wished wished he'd been better suited for it but also is how c and time because he never knew that kind of silence again his life became overnight blaring loud he became public property. That is such a fascinating story. I mean this time on the watch. Tower really was a a threshold for him wasn't it it was the making king of him in a way but also it was the breaking of him and I put myself in Karak shoes and I imagine the shame that he felt when he had to radio in a plea for help for more tobacco so for some food you know because he wanted to be the guy who could own it. You know own his stint almost in a kind of military way. I don't think it's coincidence that a lot of the Look House that the US Forest Service have now they're veterans you know people who have been trained to look after themselves right and Karaoke imagined agent. He was like that but then when he actually got there when he actually set himself up he discovered he was not the man he thought he was. This is travel with Rick Steves talking with Dan Richardson isn't Dan wrote a fascinating book outpost a journey to the wild ends of the earth then work specifically talking of the ten outposts that Dan did visit in discussing cussing is book. We're talking about the outpost in my home state of Washington. It's desolation peak in the North Cascades and Dan you don't just call an Uber and go there. You have to earn earned these spots. What was it like getting to the desolation peak fire lookout we drove north to place Bellingham and then we turned off the main lane highway and we began to we went east fezzet tango concrete which was a Cadillac had pegged as the last five and dime before you know you really hit the Wilde's? I spent a night in a place called mob amount and that was where I had a motel and then the next morning I went to the ranger base back on a stir so it could store all oh my food away from my tent 'cause I was camping up there and then carried on a meal following the Scott River and you go up past the Ross Dams uh-huh there are three amazing dams there and you keep going and then you'll really really beginning to get over the kind of battlements and in to this kind Kamei's savage fortress of the cascade mountains and then in my case what I did was I had on my kit and I got a boat up Ross Lake with an amazing using Guy Code Malachy who you know he looked like a young neil young and he had this brilliant fast boat and so we rocketed up this lake and he really has the the monopoly on boats on the lake and Croats time he went up far slower than I did and then you get the foot of desolation peak itself and you spend the rest ed as so you're on your second day by this point zigzagging your way and foot slogging back and forth on these happen turn paths all the way up the mountain and and then you get your campsite and maybe pitch a tent and you put all your stuff in your back and you put it far away from your tent and in my case I carried on up over a false summit to the actual talk and it was there that I met the current fire lookout a man could jim heavily and it was amazing to me him because as you say I was imagining odeal my own up there but no there's Jim and he's I think he just missed Vietnam. He was in the hundred and first the storied hundred first Airborne Division and so I'm up there with Jim and he immediately offers me coffee and we're in this amazing glass paneled space of his fire lookout and it was such chip privilege to be there and talk to this man but then you went all that way and what a journey to get solitude and then you find Jim up there and I would imagine Jim Spin and stuck up there with nobody to talk to. You've ventured all the way there to have solitude and you're just like somebody to talk to for this guy. If he's interesting that would be maybe wonderful folk but if he's not interesting. Wouldn't it be a huge disappointment for you in your agenda to get away from it all absolutely in a way I think every book that I've written it. Has this crux point where things are either going to go really well or they're gonna go really badly and I knew I would get up to the top of desolation and I've may be meet this one individual and either he would be incredibly welcoming and he would say come on in and have a look. You know this outpost or he would say no. You can't come in. I don't WanNa talk to you. Go Back Down County attend. There's nothing for you all because you don't make an AIRBNB I mean you're you're. You're just not gonNA say hi and he'd go. Where'd you come from? Get outta here or come on in have a cup of coffee exactly 'cause the fire lookout is still in use. Jim is very much a working watchmen and also he relays a lot of radio signals in the area so he is an important guy in the area. Did he looks welcoming yeah. He left me alone. I left him alone being on a mountain. You know all you you have to do is walk twenty meters and a direction. You are entirely alone in that savage fortress of the North Cascades has such a beautiful way to put it so when you're up there and you have a magic moment. You've got your solitude. You've got your vast view in the sun's going down. What was the moment it was just bliss really it? It was happiness I was exhausted having hike tool that way and then to be in that particular building little shed the glass shed this pagoda owed style outpost with this excellent man Jim we had coffee and we watched the mountains turn from pink to blood red to the million and through all the pope was you can imagine and then night came on and we were talking and I went back down to my tent and halfway through the night I was woken up by a Ba- yeah I mean you can't get any better than that. I don't think that's the sort of thing I love. I just love this notion. That travel can be transformative. It must be transformative love to go to a place like that that is so pristine so alone and then when you come back home you are different. Let's your take on. What's the value of this and and why.

Jim Spin desolation peak Jack Kerouac Rick Steves Becky Lomax Tom Terry Tempest Williams writer Dan North Cascades North Dakota Pacific northwest Colorado River Dan Richards Gary Schneider Jack Carroll Tempest Williams Theodore Roosevelt National Pa US Forest Service Utah Landscape Mountaintop Shrines Japan
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on When We Talk About Animals

When We Talk About Animals

12:21 min | 2 years ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on When We Talk About Animals

"The the sorts of stories that you tell in this book and you know the reality of what we're doing too many millions of years into the future more immediately accessible to people <unk> such that they take into account and ask the question that you return to again and again of are we being good ancestors and how can we be better ones yeah this this is this is a great question. <hes> i'm going to ask it back. You've both <hes> just so you and i would be fascinated to know from you what writers and what kind of <hes> works responding to animals are doing this if you think they are and i'm going to slightly <hes> disappoint you by vice sidestepping advance into the vegetable by saying that that richard pauses the over story which which i don't know where you draw the boundaries of animal life. Where does your bed do your animals stop. Where did they stopping animals and plants reading this buckley a whole lot further but <hes> but i guess richards richards book <hes> the story is precisely about the difficulty of of drawing what henry james gould is the second relations round and and in that all manner of life is drawn into it's complex <hes> <hes> relations three three these trees which become the time keep his in the witnesses and to some degree agent so i for me that is the most powerful example example of a of a book that addresses itself to other than human life <hes> which <hes> which dramatizes both the kind of the tree time in past and the tree time features that that are forms of responsibility as well as just artifact. If that makes sense what about you to i would love to oh who you think that the important animal writers now i mean i think j m could see i remain haunted by elizabeth breath costello yeah and of course he's concerned with with what that question brings out about human communication communication and and what's at stake in in the ethical dimension of the question what we might have to give up if we were to look at it in the way his not his protagonist does there are two writers the new york times that come to mind for me there so many but two in particular who are writing now one is charles siebert and the guy who will hope to have on the podcast later this summer name ferrous jabber both right about animals among other topics the natural the world but in ways that really capture what i think is special about animals in terms of content. One of the things in terms of climate change has captured in a quote that you include in your book by <hes> jed purdy from his book after nature and both both deeper and jabber. I think accomplish this and they're working really extraordinary ways but the the quote by jed prettiest is this which is that people are best able to change their ways when they find two things at once in nature something to fear a threat they must avoid and something to love equality which they can do their best to honor. Either impulse can stay the human hand but the first stops just short of being burnt broken. The second keeps the hand poised extending it in greeting or an offer of peace. This gesture is the beginning of a collaboration among people but beyond us in building our next home yeah yeah that it's wonderful paragraph from from jet isn't it and i listened to your child's see but that is one of the episodes of this podcast that i listen to and i thought it was so good so humble double <hes> and inquiring and it was pretty embarrassed jabba now. This is the name i've met but would you just tell me what i should be. I can find this is working on the new york times website book that there's a forthcoming book and there have been several features one of which was about prairie dogs <hes> in the time curve and it will have a wonderful <hes> sonic artifact of a prairie dogs cry that it specifically means human than it calls when tears a human so there's a wonderfully over the prairie dog award for for what we are gone but he's written he's written on the guy concept on neuro neuroscience on the meat industry and i think a sense of implant identification on the mineralisation of animals also affect that is an i would throw reuben will cameras name in in in here and terry tempest williams <hes> and and he did and other writers from female writers and from and from different shows i've learned so much from encountering their encounters with we've and we were thrilled to learn online to that you have another book coming out with the illustrator jackie morris who did the last words with which will be called the book of birds and i wonder if if you could tell us a little bit about that project yes gladly. I worked with this kendra jackie morris. I have all the artists skill of of a prairie dog which i which i then realized he usually demeaning to the to the autistic work undertaken by prairie dogs so i didn't ah should i. I don't mean to be dismissive. It's all so i should shed to ever table. I know artistic. Skill whatsoever and jackie is jackie conjures creatures into being with a brush and water and some pigments. She's what color is astonishing abilities. We worked together on this book towards we have worked together on many things since and and one of the things we've just finished his released. Today's a song cold as sulky song. I'm soaking seals. <hes> it's scott's swift for the for the seal and <hes> there's a long tradition on the atlantic coast in in ireland and in northern take nick north west coast of scotland of sulky keys cross borders they they they are seal people effectively so they move both ways they step out of the water they shrug off the seal skin and become humans and as they crossed the water into the sea again they shrug on the seal skin and become seals so they've become these interstitial boundary crossing migratory on <hes> category unsettling presences that haunt folks story and folk song and there these there's an amazing njoro galaxy selke songs which are used to summon seals and i've seen it done is incredible. I've sat with my friend vinnie mcleod garlic. I orange county speaker and he's he's sung this haunting sulky. Song and seals have come. They've come so anyway. The disadvantage is that one's phone autocorrect correct. It's a selfie. I feel this is this is a comment but anyway subject up you on a cell keystone which which itself shiva's on the boundaries of the of the human and the and the seal that that the sad and that joyful the drowning in the summoning but we we are working on a book of beds <hes> which is about buds as they vanish <hes>. We have a red list in britain of species at most conservation concern. It's sixty eight species on it at the moment that includes nightingale <hes> <hes> <hes> turtledove lapwings skylark puff in some of and i think your most famous and conic and culturally significant eh that going and so we king on a new form of guidebook really a guidebook which instead of identifying the animal species in that in that sense of naming knowing and objectify which has its place <hes> we think there's another kind of identification which i guess interests you both both ways which is that more empathetic sense of feeling a knowing from the hot feeding a collapse of the space between kinds lanes of being so we want to we want to write a guidebook that helps people identify these reckless species. I thought if your book recently because we're very lucky to have a chimney swift connie now in downtown new haven. I had never seen this before. I was tipped off to it by someone told me that if you go to the top floor of a parking garage downtown on new haven and you look across the street. There's a particular chimney that's left uncovered and if you go at dusk or right before dusk effectively you'll see the birds fly out and they live in colonies. There must be five or six hundred minimum in this in this chimney and the fly out and they they circle and big loops hunting insects at dusk right as it turns black black reverse smoke go at once as they go in and for anyone who doesn't know these are little birds or sometimes called cigars with wings. I can't perch on anything of vertical like typical bird but but i had never seen gymnastics before and i'd never really even thought about lovebirds but never thought even thought about jimmy saw i saw that often and i have to one of the most magical elements of the summer so far won't get to. I've watched them. Multiple times is to see that happening and feel near the profound. Wonder that knowing that this thing exists that you don't even notice really from the streets because you know their high out. There's left st sounds fourth but they chatter nonstop as well floor. You can hear them and so i really eagerly look forward to your book to being introduced produced more than i should be looking out for. Well i came to new york from north carolina. A and i turned up that three or four days ago and we walked out and in the evening and i suddenly had this chattering that to me was the chattering of swallows i looked up and they were swift and i said to the person who's with you happen to be jed. Purdy eddie. I said what what are these these swift's and they signed like sweaters and he said there's a chimney swift and i loved him smaller than is still crossbows but cigars cigars with wings and making this very homely jittery chattering noise and then he said if you're really lucky if he's ever see a big roost you'll see them. Come dine like debbie dan plughole and the one bird. I've seen out of my twenty fourth window flow of twenty-fourth flow in their here in new york city. This morning was a chimney swift so this is great converge. It's interesting the moment in your book. When you talk about the cave paintings in what is now europe norway it reminded me of the observation by the critic and novelist john berger in his in his essay why look at animals that at the dawn on of language which historically been seen this this thing that we have in another animals don't there were animals and it was potentially this desire hire to represent them. That's present at the very beginning of this capacity that then helped us conquered the earth and drive the anthropocentric and i just and i i'm really thinking loud here but in the book you talk a little bit about one criticism of the concept of the anthropoids scene which is saying saying okay all humans did this basically exonerates the industrializing humans which is a very small segment of humans that drove the change. I i mean just so fascinated by this alchemy that you have with words and it occurred to me because it's like language has been invoked as this thing that oh oh you know you talk in the book about how the greek word for sign also met grave and there is this sense which language many many writers and thinkers have spoke have have written about language as a wedge between us in nature and is out of thinking about shamanism involves this idea of unburdening ourselves of the sign and so to speak and rian leaving ourselves occurred to me for the first time. I guess this is kind of a basic claude. Of course it's just maybe a way of using language that cleaves us and certainly the way that you're using language and the you know certain poets use language has the reverse effect and seems to kind of return us to almost musical stage in language and so i was i guess just curious about if it if you had ever thought of language as a distancing mechanism or weather in your own and in.

jackie morris the new york times richards jed purdy charles siebert jed prettiest buckley elizabeth europe henry james gould new york city terry tempest williams vinnie mcleod rian north carolina Purdy eddie britain debbie dan plughole new york