18 Burst results for "Terry Tempest Williams"

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

07:33 min | Last week

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Back to gettysburg every single season. Trying to get a better sense of who this guest is and in those furrowed fields of dried wheat. That voters still fly over. One can still feel the spirits of those who were fallen. I'd love to meet a park that that that just sweeps me away. In the majesty of our coastlines what would that be go. Violence national seashore. It was there in the heat of the bp oil spill that. I flew over those waters with pilot. Who told me that when that water was on fire. He saw a pod of dolphins side by side by side treading water looking at the flames wondering i wanna be all alone and sometimes a guest at a party is kind of just there in the corner and the classics. Still waters run deep. Where's a place where i can appreciate solitude at your dinner table gates of the arctic showed me what silence sounds like stillness when we flew into gates of the arctic. I felt like a moth among mountains and it was there that we watched a grizzly bear with two cubs walk in autumn tender. Crossing a pass this travel with rick steves. Were at a national park. Dinner party with terry tempest williams book is the hour of land. And terry this. This is a party. i'm never gonna forget. And they always say don't talk about religion and politics. But i know that you are. Just you've got fire in your belly about politics and nature and i'd like to meet one of your guests one of your parks. That's going to put a fire in my belly for the importance of waking up to where we're going with our environment who would i mean. Who would i talk to introduce you to roosevelt national park and we would walk to the elk horn ranch where teddy roosevelt said that. After the death of his wife and mother he went there to grieve and it was in those three years in the badlands of north dakota that he developed the character to become president of the united states. Who talked to about the whole issue of civil liberties as it applies to nature in. I would introduce you to alcatraz and the exhibit by the chinese dissident artist by way way and it was there that i began to appreciate. He showed me the relationship between confinement and creativity and how crucial it is to fight for the rights of of all humans and to recognize the structures of racism. That do exist. Even the incarceration of of people who were jailed at alcatraz and who later we saw the uprising alcatraz of native people and dynamic democracy. We have that is chronicled in our national parks. The issue of our day really in so many ways is climate. Change if ever. There was an existential threat. Who would. I talked with this party where i could gain that perspective. We would meet glacier national park and stand before her retreating glaciers with humility with resolve and with devotion to stand in the heart of change with as much resolve as we can to do what we can with the place where we find ourselves now. Is it conceivable that the day will come when glacier national park would be more properly named no glacier national park glacier national park will remind us of a world we once stood in the middle of and failed to recognize as holy and i think the gift of glacier national park around this dinner table is she gives us the courage to face the future uncertain as it is with the fortitude to face the sacrifices that are going to be required of us. We are at a crossroads. We can continue on the path we've been on in this nation that privileges profit over people and land or we can unite as citizens with a common cause. This is the hour of land and the time has come for acts of reverence and restraint on behalf of the earth. I would ask us to listen hands on the earth. Listen and remember what it means to be. Human one of the best ways to truly feel the majesty of the american west is on a mountain bike tour across the wilderness. Christopher solomon tells us about his outdoor adventure across utah in just a bit next. We explore way. New mexico and arizona can make you feel like you're in another world. We're at eight seven seven three three three seven four to five as we enjoy some special corners of the united states today on travel with rick steves mentioned the great southwest and there's no shortage of stereotypes that come to mind and nearly alien landscape of desert mesas and adobe settlements with some old style trading posts and. Maybe a ufo tossed in for fun. But did you know it also offers some of the oldest historical sites in north america. Right now on travel trick. Steve's let's check in with native born daughter of santa fe to examine how the region sees itself flannery. Burke teaches history at saint louis university and she's just written a land apart the southwest and the nation in the twentieth century in it she explores how images promoting the great southwest got started and how they stack up with. Today's reality flannery welcome. Thanks for having me. This is really fun. So alanna part. The southwest end the nation in the twentieth century When you say a land apart that really does sort of define what is something. That's unique about the southwest. How do you define the southwest. And how was it a part. Well i define the southwest both geographically and tim poorly so i say early in the book to ask where a place is also to ask. When and the southwest in the twentieth century i define as the states of arizona and new mexico with a little bit of bleeding around the edges into border towns like Nogales and el paso. Texas and juarez mexico and a little bit of reaching into i'd utah. Southern colorado so twentieth century was essentially arizona and new mexico. But if you looked at it earlier because goes way back. I mean we're so inclined to think of sixteen twenty or plymouth. Rock is the beginning of things. And then it's kind of astounding to to be reminded that sort of i don't know if ethnocentric is the right approach but it's it's gotta open-minded approach to the story of our country because the southwest goes way back it does yes. Although it wasn't called the southwest then it was the north or well. It depends like once. Again it depends. When will you talked earlier heritage. It certainly was.

glacier national park terry tempest williams roosevelt national park elk horn ranch arctic rick steves glacier national park glacier teddy roosevelt Christopher solomon cubs national park north dakota terry united states flannery arizona utah saint louis university New mexico alanna
Terry Tempest Williams on Her New Book "The Hour of Land"

Travel with Rick Steves

01:55 min | Last week

Terry Tempest Williams on Her New Book "The Hour of Land"

"Terry tempest williams invites us to celebrate the land and the people. You'll meet at a variety of national parks across the united states in her book. The hour of land. She describes the park. She's visited as breathing spaces each with a unique personality that deserve our patronage our respect and our protection by the way our conversation was recorded before the global pandemic. Terry it's good to have you with us. Thank you read your book. The our land takes us not to the obvious parks but it takes us to some of the less famous parks. You chose about a dozen parks to introduce to us why these parks why not win at the grand and famous ones. Would you believe me if i told you that i saw this as a dinner party. You know my mother was a great hostess and she always said you know. Pick your dinner parties very carefully because who knows what will come out of them so you know here. We have fifty nine national parks in our country. How to choose a dozen. So i really did envision it as dinner party i knew who the heads of the table would be my mother park which would be grand teton national park. The other end of the table. I knew it would be canyon. Lands national park where we live closely to. I could count on them then. I thought all right who's gonna be on the other end of the table holding the space that are reliable and for me. It was a canadian national park in maine and teddy roosevelt national park. In north dakota. I had been to the many times and they were trustworthy. Then i thought okay. Who are the dream guests that i would want that. I don't know. But i know other people who do and we can bring them to the table and i thought of big bend national park. I thought of gates of the arctic national park and effigy mounds. And i thought those were my dream guests

Terry Tempest Williams Lands National Park Terry United States Grand Teton National Park Teddy Roosevelt National Park North Dakota Maine Big Bend National Park Arctic National Park
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Conversations

"Here is an expert in pruning roses. And you have to know exactly which above which thorn which Knob to Prune it and you have to be vicious. You have to have no no sentimentality about it. Tell me what happened one night in the villa when you having dinner in April two thousand eighteen. Yeah I had cooked dinner in my memory because Thursdays was the cooks night off. So I made Ravioli mostly for the guests and I'd also been training her pug to wear some diapers. I'd order from from from China. That we're very chic. They had suspenders. So the dog wouldn't. I was training the dog because Margaret. Atwood was coming and I thought the dog was incontinent. I didn't tell you that part of it. I thought that's not going to do for Margaret. Atwood so I was trying to get the baroness used to the chic outfit and also the dog and I had successfully done that for the evening and brought it up the baroness's bad in the suspenders and went downstairs and a friend showed me his phone. That said say congratulations to Andy on the Pulitzer and I finally looked at my phone. Because I don't look at your phone at dinner that's something else of course and I had one hundred and fifty text messages. And they were all things like dancing lady dinosaur fireworks not very helpful and then I had one from a lot of calls from a writer Michael Chaban and so who won the Pulitzer Prize. I think in two thousand and one. It seemed impossible. This was true but so I called him and I said Michael. What is going on and he said what am I the one telling you and I said Yeah. You're the one telling me explain why the Pulitzer is such a big deal. Don't be humble does tell us well the other day there was a magazine saying what other. Pulitzer Prize winners photographs. Would you like next to yours and I said what do you mean like Hemingway Faulkner? Which would you like Mike? Oh crap it's you never know why some prize has more cachet Asha than another. It's impossible to figure out but in the United States that one for some reason I think because it's a tiny little committee of three people they can make some Kooky choices and they chose me. I think I think what's Nice about. It is that there isn't like a run up with a finalist list and where you sit and are announced and then people are mad at you. No one gets mad because it's just a winner that's announced and then to finals so everyone sort of gets happy about that without the bitterness. I hope what did getting that phone call means for your job with the baroness. It took me a while. Being basically is what I'm asking and economic there is a new director. Yeah Andrea by Yanni. Who is a much better director but not a great crooner I would. I would gas idea. It took a week for me to sort of figure out what was going on. It was so shocking and I sat her down and I said I think I'm going to have to go and she said and you won't be back and I said no I won't be back and she said you were too expensive anyway. Let us wish each other. Good luck and that was our. She knew she. I mean because here's the thing in her mind I think she's like her taste is so excellent that she chose a Pulitzer Prize winners director. And I you know it happens to her all the time even before the judges chose when it came to going to the ceremony to get your prize. What image did you have in your mind of the kind of look the kind of suit that you'd like to have for that award well? It is the most Augusta occasion of my career. And so in my mind I was. You know something for for meka would not do. I wanted to order like a really sharp. But subdued austere suit that would show the seriousness of the occasion. And it's important to me as I've grown up writer gravity tests. Providence is what I was going for advised against that. Look they're not the bear. Nasa there was a writer in residence. There Terry Tempest Williams. Who's an American naturalist and activist Mormon divinity scholar like a saintly person and I thought she would be a good person to advise me on what to wear. It is such an important occasion. She looked at my choices. I was looking online for something. And she said no Andy No. You mustn't wear one of these businessmen outfits in times like these and she's very serious. She took my hand in times like these. The most important show of protests is a defiant expression of joy. Get a red suit and I take advice when it's given freely. I did it I wore at last night. This something here. I have to say described this suit for us. It is what I'm saying. Read your. You've got it wrong in your head. It's the kind of thing thing that like. There's an after image after you look at it and close your eyes. It's so bright. It is a carneil alien thing with like stripes on the it's it's so vulgar it's absolutely vulgar and I loved it. I showed up to the ceremony and by God everyone was in grey or a black suit and had a double extras. There's about one hundred people to win the Pulitzer Prize because it's teams of journalists and take a picture of US. Altogether you could share picked me out. And then they played a little joke on. They didn't know it but they were like as an extra honor to our winners. We have hired a professional photographer to take photos of you to replace the photo on your wikipedia page to be the photo all time to represent you feel free later to look up my wikipedia paves. I lied I've got a clown suit on off fillets who is the hearers. If I can use that of the novel lace which which one you the Pulitzer suits of very important to him to. What is the suit that gets offer through many adventures and misadventures? He's got it is also of ogre suit. It's a suit that he ordered in Vietnam made for him any picked out the fabric. Sort of still maybe an jetlag Hayes and then at arrives in his house and it's much brighter blue than he expects with Fuchsia Interior. It's it's more blue than the cover of the book and my mind but he he loves it and he doesn't realize it's vulgar or too much and so to me. It's a symbol of his his innocence. That he can wear it and carry it off and it looks like confidence. Because he just doesn't know what's going on with him and his life winless begins. He's he's a sort of middle aged mediocrity. Aren't we all and on the edge of turning fifty single? His Ex lover is getting married. He's invited to the wedding and in order to neither say yes or no. He answers yes to all the invitations in inbox to half-baked events that writers get invited. To what kind of success had he as a writer there parallels with way you were at a point in your career. I had had more success than than Arthur. But I think when you're a writer you you don't know where you stand in some. We have some.

Pulitzer Prize writer Pulitzer director Andy No Michael Chaban United States Atwood Margaret China Terry Tempest Williams Nasa Hemingway Faulkner Augusta Mike meka Andrea Vietnam Arthur
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Unreserved

Unreserved

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Unreserved

"Why no was a slower process so I would smart and then sometimes it would be like. Oh I'm just slide right here so on my maternal side leg. I have memories of damper using fungus. I much that was the one that he is and telling these stories that I was learning to my mom too and then eventually it was like okay. You can do this inside the house. Okay you know I'll be around it also much so it was that slow progress in with an everything where it was like inch by inch by inch and having these conversations about what. I was learning and growing in the family in that way and then my mom kind of took her own interests at the time. Sign up for like medicine. Taking classes back in our community started doing things like that on her own. And how did it make you feel to to see this This returning of with with you know with people that maybe weren't so open to it. Before I thought it was really beautiful to watch them within their journey in to embrace that especially knowing where we had come from. And it's interesting because my dad will now talk about some of his family members. That are still very much in that mindset and how they still have this. This fear almost When it comes to anything with traditional practices and he's baffled sometimes. I wow really weird that I was in that mindset before that. That's where I was at. It's strange how much growth can take place over a number of years. Is there a particular Story that you can recall that would have illustrated. This returned to culture for you. I can remember. This is a number of years ago and there was something that was happening. Believe the community was called. Elsie pod tug in New Brunswick and I remember feeling a little bit distraught by the news and I was living in America at the time and my mom had moved to help me with my son who is willing to school. Up is in my fourth year my Bachelor's program and and she said you know what why don't we go down to the river and will do an offering and we can smudge in pray together and that was the first time that she had ever suggested that and it was so bizarre and I was like. Oh okay like we can go do that. I remember going down to the water with my mom and doing that offering and she prayed. What an amazing moment that was That's beautiful image Your mom has since passed on to the other side since. Then how do you think she would see how turned out the success that your book has has met and and the rave reviews and so on my would have been happy always put in a lot of work for me and even like? I said she moved down with me so I could finish my fourth year in social work. And so for her. She pulled in a lot of sacrifices so that I could make something of myself. She always wanted more in a part of me. Always wanting more was that I would be able to give that back to her. Not necessarily having had made it set face before she she passed on but knowing that she could see some of those things that that happened because she actually pass on two months after the release so that was big for me and I think within our family elmo seems like every time someone passing away does usually a birth that follows. It's a we've been blessed that way because then there would be a death at but a burswood would and we could celebrate that new life and this time that didn't happen was looking at it and it was like okay. Well maybe it's maybe it's the book you know. Maybe the the new you have right now with with the loss of him and such a beautiful birth. It was with this book. Now right now. As we're all social distancing and spending lots of time at home a lot of returning to art drama and of course books for Comfort. What have you been reading? I've been returning to some of my favorites because they give me some inspiration in regards to writing. So one is when women were birds by Terry Tempest Williams. That win is like a long time favorite and the other one is the lonely hearts hotel by heather. O'neill who's the same author who wrote lullabies I little criminals and when you say you have found inspiration. What has been inspirational about these particular books? I I'm often bonds. The books that make me WanNa be a better writer and there are some books as well that are in opening like they open me up further than where I'm at and even I read. Let's say the when women more birds have read it about three or four times already when Obama. It feels like there's different parts that hit me differently.

writer Obama New Brunswick Terry Tempest Williams O'neill America
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Tara Brach

Tara Brach

14:50 min | 1 year ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Tara Brach

"Amnesty and welcome. This is the sixth of a series. And I have no idea how long it'll go on called sheltering in love and last week and this week the focus is on really facing the pain of separation and loneliness the vet Murthy was our recent surgeon general in the United States up until twenty seventeen I also a physician and he did a road trip across the United States. Talking to people. All different types of people now is written a book called together and I mentioned him because he's a key figure and bringing into our societal awareness. The huge huge suffering really. How loneliness is a major public health concern. And he talks about how for so many that he encountered whether it was drug addiction or poverty are arena fiscal diseases that the root suffering was a sense of isolation being stuck in struggle and all by oneself. He shared a number stories but one that struck me. He met with a man several years after this guy had won the lottery and this man told Murthy that the day he won the lottery was the worst day of his life and when Murthy said well explain please. He described how he had been working in a bakery and he had know he was needed there and appreciated for what he did. He had friends in his neighborhood and after winning he stopped working. He moved into a gated community. He got really really lonely. He developed diabetes. He felt pretty continuously angry at what he perceived snobbery of other people. That live there for many of you listening that this isn't hard to understand or imagine and what strikes so much is that loneliness is a disease that hits all classes people in all sorts of life circumstances. There's a really well known teaching story that I love were student asks a spiritual teacher. What's the difference between illness and wellness? The teacher writes those words up on a board any circles the eye of illness and the we of wellness. And we know it that we're not happy when the world is centering around I. Those are not the moments that were happy. The trajectory of the spiritual path is shifting from an identity and a self concern and focus where our fears and our thoughts and all our intentions and motivations really around furthering and defending a self. It's a shift from that. To really recognizing in a cellular way that were connected and then the experience of that is a caring. That's all inclusive. That's one of the definitions. I have of radical compassion. That it's that awake sense that we belong and of course we care for each other. We belong to each other. What's so interesting to me. Is that many evolutionary psychologists and philosophers. Also consider this the trajectory for our species that there's an increasing movement and capacity for collaboration and for compassion with the understanding that we belong to this web of life. What happens in this web affects? All of us sensing were part of Earth. Were part of what's described as guy at this whole system that's synchronized and self organizing on the same boat. So we claverie. 'cause the truth is we belong now of course as I say this you may be instead of thinking of the the long arc. Maybe more focused on a short stretch of time that we've been having recently and it certainly doesn't appear claver to give and embracing and caring of each other which is why this week and last week Really relooking at the suffering of separation and loneliness that many are calling an epidemic and we talked last week about how loneliness surely forgetting our belonging quite literally makes us sick it shortens our our life expectancy and that given where such a social species we have a longing to belong and very real pain of loneliness and it's in our DNA to feel that because for most of human history it was really dangerous to be separate or outside of the group not a member not feeling our membership So it's easy to see how in current days loneliness is exacerbated by this global crisis by the pandemic there's so much anxiety so much fear around health and economy. We see each other. Were afraid of of getting this. Potentially deadly virus from each other. So there's distancing and many are living alone it's a real setup one person Couple of days ago from our DC. Meditation Community who lives alone told me she said. I'm afraid I've had the last hug in my life and I wasn't even aware of it at the time and that really struck me just that sense of really. What if I never feel held again? There's so much suffering the comes with feeling lonely. It often appears as depression. You might not even be in touch with the loneliness. It appears as depression which is a pushing down that rawness. 'cause loneliness is so painful. I'm it appears as anxiety because the more separate we feel the more we feel vulnerable. The more we feel threatened. It's not as appears as anger blame because when we feel lonely really we feel rejected in some way and threatened by others that makes us angry and bottom line core. We feel shame we feel shame because to not belong translates to most of us as something's wrong with me lot of pain. Statistically it's shown that the loneliest age group is eighteen to twenty but it's really all ages now I heard a story that I love It's about this gentleman who knocks on his son's door and he says Jamie he says Jamie. Wake up and Jamie answers. I don't WANNA get up. Papa father shouts get up. You have to go to school and Jamie says I don't want to go to school. Why not ask the father three reasons this Jamie I? It's because it's so dull second. The kids tease me and third. I hate school and the father says well. I'm GonNa tell you three reasons you have to go to school and I because it's your duty second because you're forty five years old and third because you're the headmaster not everyone goes around like on lonely but we all have this existential tendency to feel separate. This is this is deep in us. I find that Rumi says the best on this. He says that everything that comes into being gets lost in being drunkenly forgetting its way home and what he means by lost in being is that we lose the sense of our belonging to the hall and we identified with a separate self this I and all of our thoughts and activities just circle around what I want what I need. I'm afraid of this furthering and protecting ourselves. Now what's kind of important to understand? Is that if in growing up. Our basic needs for safety and love and understanding are Matt. Then that self-focused is there. But it's a wholesome one. It's not exclusive versus sticky. So we can still remember in a very fundamental way are belonging but when our personal lives when in our personal lives. Sir Spin stress and trauma and very little healthy bonding healthy attachment bonding with caretakers by nature. We become more self fixated more self protective more aggressive in kind of defending. And that's where we get really imprisoned in the I That separate lonely feeling with so much suffering

Rachel Idaho Seoul Terry Tempest Williams depression East Coast Hospital Hans partner US Raymond writer Physician author
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

10:40 min | 1 year ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Things you'll see when you hike in the Swiss Alps. If you time it right you can even watch the cows being paraded down from their grazing meadows. They got their bells on and to really the bigger. The bell is the more prestigious. That cow is. They're all pedigree for warmer vacations. Kiki dear says you can't beat the Philippines. It has some of the best diving in the world. You can go swimming with Welsh shocks. You can track in Angel of rice. Terraces do can even hike up. Active volcanoes and Terry Tempest Williams explains how she bought oil leases on Federal Land Near Her Home Mixed Arches National Park at rock bottom prices. We purchase them at a discount of one dollar fifty cents an Acre if you can imagine that are public lands for sale to lease oil and gas for less than a cup of coffee. What'S THE UTAH worth to you. Let's explore together in the our head on travel with Rick Steves. It's looking like the government is declared war on America's public lands at least that's how Terry Tempest Williams sees the trump executive order that rescinded federal protections. In her home. State of Utah. She tells us what's at stake and the innovative ways. She became what she calls a conservation buyer to prevent drilling near where she lives. Just outside of MOAB. We'll hear her story in just a bit on today's travel with Rick Steves and a British travel writer tells us why the Philippines is one of her favorite places anywhere in the world. Where at eight? Seven seven. Three three three seven four to five. If you only ever get to visit one place in Switzerland I'd recommend the Berner Oberland. It's the high country round. Enter some of the most famous mountain peaks in the Alps. There are dozens of hiking trails. That take you through glacial valleys to enjoy wildflowers and waterfalls Golo. It's my favorite place for taste of traditional Swiss mountain living in some of the most stunning scenery. You ever see when he lived there. Don Camera wrote a detailed guide to the hiking trails of the Bernese highland. He's here to help us get ready for an afternoon. Hike in the mountains done welcome pleasure dumb. I understand you know the trails of the region so well because you actually lived there for ten years in a little village I Decided to go traveling in one thousand nine hundred sixty and I made Switzerland my base. In fact a little town called Gimmel. I ended up staying at the youth hostel. They're often on for about three years. And then they ended up going up the hill and Managing Walters Hotel Mitha Gorn for about six years and when I first discovered Gimmel. You're already there. I think and I was still at the youth hostel. Utah's blend there's some graffiti on the wall upstairs in the Hustle says if Heaven's not what it's cracked up to be send me back to gavel. Yes people just fell in love with Gamma fault. What what are your memories of just away from the tourism but just living in this little community high in the Swiss Alps without any traffic or where almost everybody has the same last name. Well it was kind of what I was looking for this little quiet small village. Nobody spoke English back there. Twenty years ago. It's a little bit different now. There's people that speak English because of of the tourism that's in the area But it was just a small dairy farming community. The youth hostel run by Lena. Remember Lena Lena she's like human goat. Lena yeah she She charged I think three or four francs for the youth hostel. So people didn't really come to stay for the night or tune as they stay for weeks and sometimes like myself and you could cook for the price of groceries. Alpine commute ten cents to cook To Cook Food. And then moving up to Walter's. Walters was an inexpensive hotel with about thirty eight bids but it had a million dollar view hotel mid dog horn. If you have the of the Doug Horn and much more. When people go to Switzerland a lot of people go to the famous towns. So they'll go to interlocken. I want to Interlocken for several years before I realized all the magic is up. The Hill town says you know. They're they're utilitarian there. That's where you can pick up your groceries or validate your train pass or whatever but then you go to the high country and south of Interlaken which means between the two lakes Lake Tune. In speeds south of interlocken is a valley in at branches in left and right to the left is Grendel gold and that's famous in so many ways and all the big tour buses go there and there's all the resort hotels but to the right you've got louder Bruin Valley and that's the value fell in love with and that I fell in love with describe loud to Brunen valley and even the name Louder Brennan could mean lauhgter. Mitch means many and Brennan or springs or or water sources and in the value. Got Over seventy waterfalls. That are kind of falling off the side. Now I've I've driven up that valley in a sunny dry times and I kinda go. What waterfalls but then if you come there after a big rainstorm. It's just thunderous with waterfalls. All around you. Yeah those seventy become a hundreds. It's busy in the ski time and busy in the hiking time When you're there in the hiking time you still use all the ski lifts to get around. Describe some of your lift options from the valley floor. There's two ways that you can go onto the ones that you can take a cable car up to grew chump Hike or take the train to Marin. And if you want to go up higher you're going to be taking funicular to almond who will maybe or a cable car up to the chiltern even across the valley. You've got the Ume Frau Yolk incredible tunnel through the EIGER. All the way up to the top of the saddle below the young fro yum. How tall do you have any idea how tall that is? How something like ten eleven thousand thousand feet? It's above ten thousand because you can feel the attitude. You get a little bit dizzy when you get up. There's nothing to be concerned about. I always feel a winded. When I go up there climb the steps and I just feel like I got to get in shape but then I remember. Oh I'm at eleven thousand feet. I can cut myself a little slack. Exactly I mean. They have a written all over the place. Don't you feel like this? Don't worry about. It is normal natural. Just slow down sit down and slow down and then this mountain lift tunnels through the Eiger. It actually stops halfway up the north face of the EIGER and the ultimate challenges for rock climbers. And you look out halfway up this cliff. You're looking down on the lower horn. Which is where they have the World Cup almost every year. You're looking out towards interlocken. So you're looking northward so you can kind of see the lowlands and then you can see you can see burn from those little windows at you're looking and you may now nowhere to look but there are probably rock climbers frozen hanging on the. I was going to see. Some of them are really with US anymore. They're just hanging there and they can't get to them the helicopters inaccessible so they know that there but they can't rescue them. This is travel with Rick Steves. We're talking with John Kamara about hiking in the burner overland in the burner overland. You can really experience a lot of amazing folk culture. The traditions survive very well in these high community at least survive. I don't know about very well. I understand the Swiss government recognizes the value of some of these traditional industries. And doesn't just let it die. The death of this small family farm in the United States but but subsidizes. So it's it carries on what's the case there? Why would they do that? Well they like to have the dairy farming industry for example to to continue a tradition It's a way of life and there are people that are many bulow still in the dairy farming industry. But it's not. It's not a living that you can really make a living at considering the economic situation of Switzerland when everybody's making much more than a farmer would so the farmers need to be subsidizing needs to go to the big city and become software programmers exactly so they're struggling but they're surviving these small family farms and we can see that business metabolism and we can actually sleep in some of these places because many rent out beds done commercials. Our guest right now travel with Rick. Steves Michael in Chumsford Massachusetts joins us on the line at eight seven seven three three three rick. He has a question about hiking in the Swiss Alps. I Michael decided as a monk to take my summer trip to Switzerland and I'm going to spend a couple of days in Bernie's open land. I'm really excited. And I just want to know what are the some of the best Hiking trails one can take to get the most iconic view of the young crowd among the Eiger That is the ultimate sort of Panorama. The memo canoe the three great peaks. What is it done? The Immune Val Mahnken Ogre. What does that mean in Swiss German the monk and the Froth Eiger is an ogre an ogre yeah and the monk is a monk a religious monk and the young fellas young maiden so got the monk protecting the young maiden from the older the ogre. Exactly Oh what. A charming frozen. Ice Glacier filled a scenario now Michael wants some of the classic views in the Burner Orlando. You lived of the algorithmic in the for. Yeah you can get that a couple of different ways. Downloadable evaluators the shelter inside and then. There's the vague insider the the client shedding side that would be where the rallies I can young really right in front of the clannish. I dig right but you don't have to get the client to get the view of the of the monk and the young crowd. It is a fantastic view. And the right in front of you when you get there which is taking a train from Lauder Brunen to hang on and then you can continue on by train to climate. And that's where the train starts if you want to. That goes up in the mountain into the eiger through among young frog. Or you can look at the views and I sometimes think they might even be better from the other side Schilthorn side in louder bring you take the cable. Corrupt grew job train or walk to Muren even just a train ride or walking to Muren. You see the monk in the young for the training. Self you take the funicular up to good shop and then this it's built for the view in fact what's the name of that train the Panorama fart that part is the German word exotic journey Panorama journey. And that's the Panorama far trained that goes from Grachov to Mirren And just on a sunny day. There's nothing like it but Michael. You you're going to be there and you're going to be bathed in views everywhere you look. There's views and there's famous views there's less Amos views but there's a little place game of all the DINU may remember. I just loved when there was a moon rise going just a couple hundred yards away from hotel. Duggan sitting a bench but thank the is like the farmers in the village place to these three or four benches right there and you could sit there and it's just it's silent it's twilight and there's a village below you. And there's a few farmers to puttering around and you know the cowboys are happy. And then you see the moon rising over the peaks. It's just is something magic about that view. I just got a lot of therapy out of that view. I think Michael you've got to go over there and check it out. Yep Thank you by the Berner. Oberland in the middle of the Swiss Alps is our destination. And Don Camera is our guide right now on travel with Sixty Kathleen joins us on the line from San Francisco. Hi Kathleen.

Rick Steves Swiss Alps EIGER Switzerland Steves Michael UTAH Interlocken Terry Tempest Williams Philippines Lena Lena Don Camera Alps Gimmel Swiss mountain Walters Hotel Mitha Gorn Froth Eiger America Louder Brennan Home Mixed Arches National Par Kathleen
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:31 min | 1 year ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on KCRW

"Los Angeles this March had allowed comedian best kalb joins TV writer Megan Amram to discuss her debut memoir allowed also welcomes conservationist Terry Tempest Williams to talk about her new essay collection rights night and lost and found at the movies also return this month for more info visit KCRW dot com slash events tension you to do go so do come with me the sun Zacks by the this yes for the sun six this opportunity dot com support for KCRW comes from film independent home of film independent presents a monthly series designed for movie lovers featuring preview screenings of highly anticipated films in depth conversations with top talent live reads of.

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on KCRW

"Is proud to partner with allowed a program of the library foundation of Los Angeles this March had allowed comedian best kalb joins TV writer Megan Amram to discuss her debut memoir allowed also welcomes conservationist Terry Tempest Williams to talk about her new essay collection rights night and lost and found at the movies also return this month for more info visit KCRW dot com slash events support for NPR comes from noon a personalized weight loss program designed to keep you people knowledge to set new.

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on KCRW

"He presided over some of the U. N.'s most turbulent years but as the choir held the U. N.'s top job for a decade he arrived in office in nineteen eighty two as a little known official from Peru having an organization that was struggling to be effective in a world divided by the Cold War and roiled by conflict in Afghanistan Cambodia and the Middle East he left with a reputation as a dogged peacemaker whose uncharismatic diplomacy helped secure many achievements a ceasefire in the Iran Iraq war the release of western hostages in Lebanon independence of Namibia a peace deal in El Salvador tributes are now pouring into Paris to quite yet the only Latin American to lead the U. N. he died in Peru where he's also remembered for his role late in life as a national politician that Reeves NPR news in Detroit prosecutors today charged the former president of the United auto workers with corruption alleging Gary Jones conspired with several others at the union to embezzle more than one million dollars Jones resigned back in November after a series of guilty pleas in the sweeping federal investigation of U. A. W. leaders living the high life non union officials have pleaded guilty since twenty seventeen but these are the first charges against the former UAW president himself the investigation began with the discovery that money from a fiat Chrysler UAW job training center was stolen this is NPR news Casey R. W. is proud to partner with allowed a program of the library foundation of Los Angeles this March that allowed comedian best kalb joins TV writer Megan Amram to discuss her debut memoir allowed also welcomes conservationist Terry Tempest Williams to talk about her new essay.

Megan Amram writer NPR Chrysler fiat UAW U. A. Detroit Reeves El Salvador Lebanon Iran Terry Tempest Williams U. N. kalb Los Angeles partner Casey R. W. Gary Jones
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

09:32 min | 2 years ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Mickey lomax recommends more fun fun places to explore in the US national parks in just a bit but first Terry Tempest Williams tells us paying attention to nature is helping her cope with recent political disappointments. She tells us what the forces of erosion teaching her next on travel with Rick Steves Terry tempest tempest Williams has been noticing how the forces of erosion defined the landscapes of the Utah Desert near her home outside the lab in a different way she suggests erosion also seems to be at work in American society in in recent setbacks to environmental protections her latest book features essays and the thoughts for these times. It's called erosion essays of undoing Terry. Welcome back to travel with Rick Steves Hi ric. It's always a pleasure shirt travel with you on radio so terry you spend a good part of your year in Boston at the Harvard Divinity School as writer in residence and teaching there and the rest of the time. Can you right from your home base in Utah and you wake up in the morning surrounded by the desert. Why did you choose to live in the desert? It's a humbling privilege. Everything is changing all the time minute by minute. I love to rise with the sunrise on Sunday. It was at five fifty. Am I am so I went outside to say my prayers to just watch the sun. Come up in this one particular canyon by Adobe Mesa just outside our place and the sunrise didn't come until six twenty two and I just love knowing those details I love being able to watch the Ark of the sun that solstice it will be in that crease of Canyon whereas in the Winter Solstice it will becoming upright directly in one of the peaks of technique of its or in the La Salle's styles so to be able to see the full arc of a year just by where the position of the sun is it just feels like a great pleasure and privilege. It's so interesting. Can you say that because I live on a little bluff in town I look out across the puget sound and the sun sets on a different peak right through the season you know on the Olympic Mountain's and then right now. It's you know it's an a certain spot and I always imagined that native Americans who lived here two hundred years ago stand in the same bluff and they would be so much closer the nature to me that this would be the rhythm of their whole life and remind myself. It's so easy to ignore nature the way we live and it's such a beautiful thing in your travels in your daily life. Get up and say your prayers as the sun is rising right where you know it's GonNa rise and it's just a reminder that we're surrounded by nature but we can choose to be tuned and into it or not get another moment about being in nature where where you're connected and you realize that's beautiful ethic for your life. I remember ver- in March we were driving down the river road from Castle Valley where we live to Moab. It's about a half hour drive. Maybe forty five minutes depends and and we were just in this cloudburst you couldn't even see and we decided to just pull over and within seconds between the the time we left our home in the time we arrived in Moab. We counted fifty three waterfalls and pour offs. It was like the first day of creation and suddenly you know the Colorado River was running red. I mean people were just stopping taking pictures laughing. We were all drenched and you just think this is what matters and this is. What cleans our souls it was so thrilling and you just think I can't imagine living anywhere else and you know you're watching the world erode owed before you and I thought right the world may be eroding before us every day in the news but this is the kind of erosion that creates beauty and humility where you realize you know we're just one species among many and flushed with gratitude or the Grand Canyon is a good example sample of of the beauty of erosion isn't it? I mean the stratego fee of time deep time like whether it away I remember the first time I saw the Grand Canyon my husband blindfolded me and he walked me out to the rim and then took off my blindfold and I just gasped and I said why didn't someone tell let me about this and he goes Terri. I think people are aware of the Grand Canyon what struck me was not what remains but what had been weathered in Rhode routed away. That's what moved me was all that negative space thinking you know wind water time deep time carried through the Colorado River for so we can talk about climate change later but right now when we're talking about erosion that's a natural process that desert is kind of the triumph of erosion isn't it. It's it's a beautiful way of putting a wreck you know weathering is is the widdling away of stone in erosion is the process by which it gets carried away which which I think is really interesting then it's easy to get carried away in the desert. you're forced to stand in the center of extremes extreme drought route extreme flood fire wind. It's not an easy place to live but it's an intentional place to being. It's humbling is meant because it reminds you how Small Ellen insignificant we are in the big natural scheme of things that's right and without water you don't exist and we've seen that we've seen it on the land with the vegetation with the animals the birds in particular. Also you know we have not planned there have been times where Brooklyn I thought let's just go out and go for a walk. Can we haven't taken enough water. You have to be really conscious living in the desert or else your own peril. The desert seems like such a Arad Arad means lifeless lifeless but there's more life hiding in the desert than we realize in a lot of it is pent-up and ready to spring isn't the you know the funniest thing happened. We are now six hundred percent above above average precipitation last year drought in it's been an ongoing drought this year. It's just the heavens poured forth and if you can believe this us a couple of nights ago we heard frogs we have not heard frogs in twenty years and it was just so moving because somewhere in the royal those eggs have have held and but can I just listen to this choir a frog and just it was so beautiful this joy hiding out in in the desert can we tempest Williams was recently given a lifetime achievement award by the Los Angeles Times for her work that focuses on the American West her book doc erosion essays at the undoing will be released a few days. She's also written the hour of land personal topography of America's national parks. Thanks take us on a little walk from Your House that you enjoy and be our tour guide for a minute as you walk through the desert behind the home of Terry Tempest Williams. There's a canyon that I will not name nerve. I say where it is but it's one that we love we call it the circle trail you walk late in the afternoon mm-hmm afternoon light reflective light and canyon walls rise upward like praying hands you see Samak berries red knowing that they can be gathered and crushed and boiled and create a beautiful pudding with white cornmeal you also see ants taking those red berries pushing them up hill and you think how can they have that kind of stamina and determination you see juniper trees hundreds of years old shaped by the wind end with skirts of juniper berries the color of the clouds of an afternoon thunderstorm you keep walking and you see veins of gypsum white in bedded in the Red Sandstone You keep walking and you get to a particular pass on the trail and you can see for miles you swear that you can see the curvature of the earth and it's the stillness. It's the quiet and it's is the perspective that one is given with a walk like that so we all get a chance not to walk on your favorite secret valley but to walk into desert or walk talking to Erin vast landscape and feel that solitude and feel that silence as a travel writer give us just a practical travel tip for appreciating the desert. I think it's just being still and paying attention. I know that I'm in a good place when I can hear the wingbeats of Ravens flying over me or can feel the wind or watch clouds Passover and feel the shadow although of those clouds to me. The joy of being in the desert is is really just be not doing. I always take journal a small notebook with a pencil because something you know extraordinary might happen or there's a description that I don't want to forget but mainly I just love you've observing listening favoring the senses and just being quiet you write that the desert has you thinking about Alf now. What do you mean by that? You know to be in one of the canyons slot canyons or walking through a wash where there's cottonwoods woods on either side..

Terry Tempest Williams Grand Canyon tempest Williams Rick Steves Utah Desert Colorado River Moab writer crease of Canyon US Boston Harvard Divinity School Mickey lomax Utah Arad Arad Olympic Mountain Castle Valley Alf
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

11:59 min | 2 years ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"And unexpected ways coming up. We'll hear how beat writer Jack Kerouac couldn't cope with the solitude while working king as I look out in the Pacific northwest by the end of his stint he had developed several invisible friends and he was having a highly competitive poker tournament with the mole. Tom Terry Tempest Williams reminds us how the erosion and the Utah Landscape holds lessons for our times suddenly the Colorado River was running red people were stopping taking pictures laughing all drenched and you just think this is what matters and this is what cleans our souls and Becky Lomax Amax explorers more national parks she not the Wilderness at Theodore Roosevelt National Park. North Dakota has a fun site to the had. These silly prairie dog towns where the prey dogs are running around. I'm there so-social end their funding. It's all ahead on travel with Rick. Steves come along Terry. Tempest Williams has found that erosion has a lot to say about the times we live him. She explains what the desert has been teaching her likely a little later in the hour. Our plus Becky Lomax recommends ways to immerse yourself in nature at a national park. That's in just a bit. Dan Richards is the kind of guy who goes out of his way to experience the solitude of man-made shelters and some of the wildest ends of the Earth in his book outpost. He takes us to ten far-flung post including the CAIRNGORMS at the Scottish highlands frozen Arctic Ghost towns and Mountaintop Shrines Japan not far from my home he also also followed in the footsteps of beat writer Jack Carroll who spent a summer on assignment at an isolated fire watch lookout in the cascade mountains so damn. Where did you go would find this watch tower that Kerouac wrote about I visited desolation peak which is in Washington State and in Nineteen fifty-six Jack Kerouac expense sixty three days there on top of the mountain desolation peak as a file account so his job was to watch for smoke on the horizon where the forested slopes around him might be a light because of lightning striking or misadventure hikers things like that and his job was to radio so in the sightings and he had a turntable before him couldn't osborne fire finder which is really like a little turntable recross has so you could get a bearing breath on them where exactly this pyre smoke was coming from and then another look on another mountain would do the same and then you would have a triangulation and teams of firefighters laugh fighters could be sent to these places to try and put out blazes really before they started now? Jack Kerouac spent sixty three days there essentially working as of as a fire lookout. Why would he spent so much time up there was he was he there too right or was he there to escape? was He there to relax. I think all of those his friend Gary Schneider the pilots are prize winning poet and fellow Buddhist had spent a couple of summers up on Sour Dough Mountain which is a few miles from desolation peak aac although actually to get there would take you a couple of days of solid hiking such as remoteness of these areas and Schneider said to karaoke that fire lookout not it afforded great leisure to write but you had to keep your wits about you and you had to be on a good with your own company and Karak's saw this I think as an opportunity to get work done but also ever since he was a young child he really wanted to be an outdoorsman. You know to go and spend time by himself and discover who really he was. In solitude solitude had always been this great undiscovered thing for him but then when he actually went when his he actually spent these sixty three days he got fairly depressed and valley crazed and fairly Farrell very quickly klay by the second week he'd smoked all of his tobacco he was smoking coffee grounds by the end of his stint he had developed several invisible friends and he was having a highly competitive poker tournament with the mall. He's curled around in a tiny attic. You have to imagine this outpost is like a little shanty Belvedere sort of like almost a conservatory because he needed three hundred sixty degree views of all the mountains around him to do his job nope so he has his tiny little attic and he crawled up into the attic and he'd read all of the newspapers that were up there for insulation he had made made all these notes but he'd gone pretty crazy and I think as with so many people when they go to the wild places that idea of what they'll be like and the reality was vastly different for him but then later he wrote about his stay he wrote about the stay three times in three different books. It's in the dumb bombs it's in desolation S. elation angels and he wrote about it in his essay collection lonesome traveler and each time that he writes about it. He reframed himself as better at being being alone as a better outdoorsman I think than he actually was because he you know a year today that he came down from his mountain area on the road was published in his life changed overnight. You know he went from a position where he couldn't get arrested this guy you know everyone knew about Qarawat but nobody wanted to publish him and then almost overnight on the road comes out and he turns into this almost Proto Dylan TV radio age superstar where his time has his own anymore anymore. You know everyone wants to buy a drink. Everyone wants his unpublished material to publish and for a quite addictive personality to put it mildly of Karaoke Harak. This was the worst thing in a way that could have happened to him and I think he looked back on these sixty three days of solitude as both a missed opportunity in a way that he wished wished he'd been better suited for it but also is how c and time because he never knew that kind of silence again his life became overnight blaring loud he became public property. That is such a fascinating story. I mean this time on the watch. Tower really was a a threshold for him wasn't it it was the making king of him in a way but also it was the breaking of him and I put myself in Karak shoes and I imagine the shame that he felt when he had to radio in a plea for help for more tobacco so for some food you know because he wanted to be the guy who could own it. You know own his stint almost in a kind of military way. I don't think it's coincidence that a lot of the Look House that the US Forest Service have now they're veterans you know people who have been trained to look after themselves right and Karaoke imagined agent. He was like that but then when he actually got there when he actually set himself up he discovered he was not the man he thought he was. This is travel with Rick Steves talking with Dan Richardson isn't Dan wrote a fascinating book outpost a journey to the wild ends of the earth then work specifically talking of the ten outposts that Dan did visit in discussing cussing is book. We're talking about the outpost in my home state of Washington. It's desolation peak in the North Cascades and Dan you don't just call an Uber and go there. You have to earn earned these spots. What was it like getting to the desolation peak fire lookout we drove north to place Bellingham and then we turned off the main lane highway and we began to we went east fezzet tango concrete which was a Cadillac had pegged as the last five and dime before you know you really hit the Wilde's? I spent a night in a place called mob amount and that was where I had a motel and then the next morning I went to the ranger base back on a stir so it could store all oh my food away from my tent 'cause I was camping up there and then carried on a meal following the Scott River and you go up past the Ross Dams uh-huh there are three amazing dams there and you keep going and then you'll really really beginning to get over the kind of battlements and in to this kind Kamei's savage fortress of the cascade mountains and then in my case what I did was I had on my kit and I got a boat up Ross Lake with an amazing using Guy Code Malachy who you know he looked like a young neil young and he had this brilliant fast boat and so we rocketed up this lake and he really has the the monopoly on boats on the lake and Croats time he went up far slower than I did and then you get the foot of desolation peak itself and you spend the rest ed as so you're on your second day by this point zigzagging your way and foot slogging back and forth on these happen turn paths all the way up the mountain and and then you get your campsite and maybe pitch a tent and you put all your stuff in your back and you put it far away from your tent and in my case I carried on up over a false summit to the actual talk and it was there that I met the current fire lookout a man could jim heavily and it was amazing to me him because as you say I was imagining odeal my own up there but no there's Jim and he's I think he just missed Vietnam. He was in the hundred and first the storied hundred first Airborne Division and so I'm up there with Jim and he immediately offers me coffee and we're in this amazing glass paneled space of his fire lookout and it was such chip privilege to be there and talk to this man but then you went all that way and what a journey to get solitude and then you find Jim up there and I would imagine Jim Spin and stuck up there with nobody to talk to. You've ventured all the way there to have solitude and you're just like somebody to talk to for this guy. If he's interesting that would be maybe wonderful folk but if he's not interesting. Wouldn't it be a huge disappointment for you in your agenda to get away from it all absolutely in a way I think every book that I've written it. Has this crux point where things are either going to go really well or they're gonna go really badly and I knew I would get up to the top of desolation and I've may be meet this one individual and either he would be incredibly welcoming and he would say come on in and have a look. You know this outpost or he would say no. You can't come in. I don't WanNa talk to you. Go Back Down County attend. There's nothing for you all because you don't make an AIRBNB I mean you're you're. You're just not gonNA say hi and he'd go. Where'd you come from? Get outta here or come on in have a cup of coffee exactly 'cause the fire lookout is still in use. Jim is very much a working watchmen and also he relays a lot of radio signals in the area so he is an important guy in the area. Did he looks welcoming yeah. He left me alone. I left him alone being on a mountain. You know all you you have to do is walk twenty meters and a direction. You are entirely alone in that savage fortress of the North Cascades has such a beautiful way to put it so when you're up there and you have a magic moment. You've got your solitude. You've got your vast view in the sun's going down. What was the moment it was just bliss really it? It was happiness I was exhausted having hike tool that way and then to be in that particular building little shed the glass shed this pagoda owed style outpost with this excellent man Jim we had coffee and we watched the mountains turn from pink to blood red to the million and through all the pope was you can imagine and then night came on and we were talking and I went back down to my tent and halfway through the night I was woken up by a Ba- yeah I mean you can't get any better than that. I don't think that's the sort of thing I love. I just love this notion. That travel can be transformative. It must be transformative love to go to a place like that that is so pristine so alone and then when you come back home you are different. Let's your take on. What's the value of this and and why.

Jim Spin desolation peak Jack Kerouac Rick Steves Becky Lomax Tom Terry Tempest Williams writer Dan North Cascades North Dakota Pacific northwest Colorado River Dan Richards Gary Schneider Jack Carroll Tempest Williams Theodore Roosevelt National Pa US Forest Service Utah Landscape Mountaintop Shrines Japan
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Becoming Wise

Becoming Wise

05:48 min | 2 years ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Becoming Wise

"Becoming wise is supported by the fetzer institute. I've had hundreds of big conversations and my conversation partners, share wisdom. I carry with me wherever I go, Terry tempest Williams. It's a beloved naturalist raised Mormon in Utah. She calls herself a citizen writer rooted in the American west. I love the connections. She draws in the natural world, but also the human world between fierce love and hard work. This is becoming wise. I'm krista. Tippett. You have been part of. What I would say has been a growing. Movements awareness about the natural world image, even speak dinner, I think from from childhood, I just wonder if you think about if you'd reflect on how that whole sphere of waking up to the natural world and our place in it, which has many dimensions, what that experience is teaching us, that might be useful in this political moment, this cultural moment. You know, I think about. Great Salt Lake growing up, as child, you know, you went to at once Iranian, you screened in Iran out and you drove home pickled you know hits have scratches on their legs. And you know, it was a horrible experience today in fifty years in my lifetime crates out like is being celebrated and every year in may. We have a great Salt Lake bird festival. You know, that would have been unthinkable, then, you know, and the connective that's being made of the birds in great Salt Lake. You know, are coming down from the Arctic or going down to Mexico even into the Gulf of Mexico, so that when we see tragedy like the oil spill in the Gulf, you know, that, that doesn't just affect people who live in Louisiana, or Alabama action. But yeah, those are, you know, I heard one of my nieces say, you know, those are pelicans to. So there's that connectedness that is local that, that extends beyond our home. Ground. I think there's something that we are losing that. I, I really grieve and I worry about. And that's where I think it does come back to education. You know, I think we're losing an ecological literacy, biological literacy that we no longer know the names of things, you know, great blue Heron, long billed curlew, cinnamon teal blue wing till green wing teal, if we don't know who we live among then when they vanish, there's no one to mourn that loss. I think it's very important that, that we establish a phonology so that we know that when the coyotes are howling, you know with their young in August. It's also when the young medal larks are hatching, you know, the interconnectivity again, we go back to the same thing of how the it all comes down to relationships to place to pay attention to stain to listening to learning. Of a heightened curiosity with other, and we can go the route of love of other or we can go the route of fear. And I think too often, we go the route of fear, and we shut down because if we open to love, then we're going to get hurt and we're going to get angry. That's a really important point to make that love is not something squishy in romantic its fierce. It is absolutely fierce. But the other side of love is that empathy and. You know, I always wondered why when someone died in my father's neighborhood in his community. He always went the next day to their house. He didn't call. He just showed up. I thought what an amazing thing because I think, often when you hear someone's died or we want to give them privacy, or we don't want to bother them impose. And it was only last night. I heard him say, you know, yes, today's the anniversary of my wife's passing but tomorrow is the hard day because when I woke up I was alone and there was no in there. You know that's love. And the other side of that love and loss, is the empathy rooted in action. What my father is there on that next day to with his friends, you know, that's what I'm talking about. And so I think it's about making commitments to do the real work, the hard work because ultimately, that's where I have found the. Most joy. Terry tempest Williams, newest book is the hour of land a personal topography of America's national parks. Becoming wise is produced by Marie samba Lilley, Percy, and Chris eagle at on being studios, which is located on Dakota land. And our theme music is provided and composed by Zoe Keating. This podcast is produced on studios in Minneapolis. Ms so.

Great Salt Lake Terry tempest Williams writer fetzer institute Gulf Zoe Keating Utah Mexico Tippett Iran Minneapolis Marie samba Lilley America Arctic Louisiana Alabama Dakota Chris eagle
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Same. Few people. A few people cried. Most people were silent. So there were many of us here living in Utah. And the American southwest, you know, along with native peoples the people the Shiva's people and people from Kazakhstan who are sisters and brothers of nuclear testing. When I crossed that line at the Nevada test site in the name of civil disobedience, I not only crossed the physical line, but a metaphorical line of political line. And yes, when I was first pen and pad of paper weapons, she let me keep them. Remember, she discreetly, you know, left them in my boot put my trouser down. And and I was able to take notes where you were speaking out a writing out and interest of what you call the clan of one breasted women. Yes. Nine women in my family have all had messed ectomy seven or dead half of my family's been diagnosed with cancer from radioactive fallout. It is a story one story in college of thousands in the state of Utah and the atomic commission. They had a booklet he wrote about it and said your best action is not to be worried about followed. And then you talked about silenced. And in your mother in this context said just let it go. And and then you. Just realized this is sort of a breakthrough moment, I are not breakthrough moment, but a chance to really step out of that jacket and just be honest. I remember one sentence in particular shaking as I wrote it blind obedience in the name of patriotism or religion, ultimately takes our lives. And after that sentence. I couldn't go back, but I can tell you, you know, my father who's who's still alive. He's seventy nine years old members of my family. My uncle who served in the Utah state Senate. Politics is changing in Utah because the people are changing because we see our relationship to the land here, and what it means to us. But it's it's not easy. And it takes revolutionary patients and picks people who are written off as what was the word virtual uninhabited. Isn't that amazing amazing that the government call you and all the people that lived in that sort of corner of our beautiful country virtual unin habitants, right? The bombs were tested. Never when the winds were blowing toward Los Angeles. Always when they were blowing toward Indian lands and warm and country because we are God fearing people people that they perceived that didn't have voice -is. It was fascinating to read. How you remember a flash that you thought was a dream? But it actually when you look back on it didn't happen to. I do my rhythm to correctly when you were two years old. That's exactly right, Rick. And you know, after my mother passed away I kept having this reoccurring dream this nightmare. This flash of light in the night in the desert Aloom. Reneging beauts and mesas over and over this flash of light in the desert, my father, and I were having dinner. He said tell me how you are. I said not not well, I keep having this nightmare. This flash of light in the night in the desert, and he said Terry you saw that. I thought you knew that I was so stunned. He said I remember the day. It was September seventh. It was a day before your birthday on. We were driving home from California. You were two years old. Diane was pregnant with Steve you're sitting on her lap. We were driving toward Las Vegas. It was an hour or so before dawn this explosion. I thought the oil tanker in front of us had blown up we pulled to the side and then rising from the desert. This golden stemmed cloud could the mushroom. This was the flash that killed indirectly overtime half the women in your beautiful family. Yeah. And my brother and others in. I think it was then I realized that deceit. We'd been living under as children growing. Up in the American southwest drinking, contaminated milk from contaminated cows, even the breast milk of our mothers members of the Klein of one breasted women. I'm Rick steves. This is travel with Rick steves were speaking with Terry tempest Williams, who's an author and naturalist outspoken environmental activist and Terry's book when women were birds. That's. In

Utah Rick steves Terry tempest Williams Kazakhstan Nevada Senate Los Angeles Las Vegas Klein California Diane Steve two years milk seventy nine years
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

08:04 min | 2 years ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"How do you feel about the place you call home? Hi, I'm Rick steves growing up in Utah. Terry tempest Williams grandmother taught her to use field guides as a kind of sacred text this love of nature shaped how she looks at the world today. I love great Salt Lake. I think it's a magical place. It's our Seren geddy. It's a beautiful reflective mirror that calls birds home. I think it's heaven stay with us as Terry tempest Williams shares lessons that are mother her grandmother and even the land itself have imparted and its bedrock. Truth, let us be conservative. Let us be prudent. Let us protect these lands that define us as Americans and protect what protects boss, plus a tour guide from Italy tells us what it's like to be alone with nature at night in the Sahara desert. You have to put the sunglasses because even without the moon that assume any stodgy so white there's wisdom from the desert in the hour ahead on travel with Rick steves. We'll get a few of the world from a motorbike in the Sahara desert in just a bit on today's travel with Rick steves. I Bill I have the good fortune to talk with Terry tempest Williams. She's hard to classify. But there's no doubt. She's a remarkable Boyce whose intelligent passion, end compassion are inspiring. She's an intellectual a naturalist in an outspoken environmental activist on behalf of her native, Utah end, the western United States her books often read like poetry as she explores themes of spirituality conservation of natural history, women's issues end of the impact of her family's Mormon heritage on her own identity today in her or Quin women were burns, Terry tackles, a mystery her mother left behind after her death. And she explores how that puzzle influences. Her own voice, many years later, Terry, thanks for joining us. Thank you so much rickets and under to be on your program Utah's just a place that that just has such drama in. It's so vast and magnificient so many ways in your family is spending in Utah since Mormon pioneer days, hasn't it? That's right, five six generations. Now, you wrote a book when women were birds jer latest book, tell us what is the premise of the book? And and how does that relate to your value of your your heritage and your homeland when women were birds focuses on my mother's journals? My mother was diagnosed with ovarian cancer, she was dying. I was lying on the bed with her rubbing her back. She was facing the window is a wicked January day. And she said Terry, I'm leaving you on my journals that you have to promise me, you won't look at them. Until after I'm gone. I gave her my word. We continue talking about other things a week later. She passed a month later, I found myself in the family home. And I thought now now Finally I can now what my mother was thinking feeling. She was very. Private woman. Rick the journals are exactly where she said. They would be three shelves each beautifully cloth bound unique I opened the first one it was empty. I opened the second one. It was empty. The third was empty the fourth fifth sixth shelf after shelf after shelf all my mother's journals were blank. So that's what this book is about. Why what was my mother trying to say what couldn't she say? Was she saying fill them was it inactive defiance Mormon women are expected to do two things. Keep a journal and bear children. I don't know it felt like a cruel joke. It felt like a second death. I remember just picking up the journal's putting them in my car, driving them home putting them on Michelle's. And through the years, you know, just writing in them and ceremoniously. So it's really a book about voice. What is it? How do we find our voice? How do we keep it? If we lose it. How do we retrieve it? And I think each of us struggles with that. This was your mother's gift to you. Then was just a reminder of to speak, your voice to find your voice to Philip the journal of your life. Is that the idea, you know, I, I don't know. I yes, I mean, it definitely has been a gift was she bequeathed to me. But I'm not sure I will ever know when she was really trying to say, but what I love is that she gave me a mystery almost like a Buddhist Kohn a kaleidoscope that I just keep turning toward the light. And it always reveals a different configuration when when young people are going to Europe, and they want one piece of advice for me. I say right adrenal, right attornal. You'll treasure it for the rest of your life. I love I have to tell you. I'm a fan of your packing list. And I love that on that list is a hard bound journal. When you say, it will be a treasure that, you will keep always the most important thing. And I believe that I personally keep journals simultaneously a notebook a day book, a more formal journal field notes, and they are precious they serve as a sketchbook for me. But none are as precious as my mother's empty journals. And I still have some that I have not written. Eaten in? And I think it is in our culture and Mormon culture in Utah. There is a silencing that occurs from the dominant culture. And you know, I hope that that's changing but silencing you mean by that Terry. Well, you know, I think has a woman I can only tell you that you know, I was raised not to speak out not to rock the boat make waves and suddenly because of the land that I love and the threat that it is under this beautiful red rock wilderness. I have spoken out with many, many others. And I think there are some people that wish that I hadn't or wouldn't. And I I just think if we care about the land if we care about the open space of democracy, if we care about citizenship, then we do speak out, and my mother spoke out very strongly to her family. But. Outside. She was she was much more reticent tonight think her empty journals speak to that that if she had written the truth of her life. She might have you'd it as a betrayal to though, she loved or or you know, perhaps she was trying to protect those she loved because if she told the truth it would hurt. Terry tempest Williams reminds us that beauty is not optional. It's a strategy for survival. We're talking with her today on travel with Rick steves about a book, she wrote after her mother left behind a mystery following her death. It's called when women were birds fifty four variations on voice Terry's, also a scholar at Dartmouth College and has been a writer in residence at the Harvard divinity school where she's been writing about the spiritual implications of climate change, you'll find links to our earlier conversations with Terry in our radio archives at Rick steves dot com slash radio. I was fascinated by the at the end of your book, you were arrested for demonstrating for the environment, and they frisked you and they found a pin and a pet of paper and the person who arrested you said what's this new said weapons. Yes, that was in nineteen eighty seven a long time ago and in subsequent years eighty eight eighty nine ninety ninety one ninety two in Utah, and this is part of our atomic history and the west nuclear bombs were tested above ground in the desert in Nevada from nineteen fifty to nineteen sixty one then they went underground and were repeatedly tested until nineteen ninety two. The world would not be the same.

Terry tempest Williams Rick steves Utah Sahara desert Salt Lake Europe Michelle Boyce Philip Italy United States Harvard divinity school Dartmouth College Quin writer Nevada
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Harry Potter and the Sacred Text

Harry Potter and the Sacred Text

05:01 min | 3 years ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Harry Potter and the Sacred Text

"So we're going to invite up the reverend dr stephanie paul sell to come up and tell a story stephanie told me to make her her bio is short is i can so i will just say this she is my my favorite person in the world and she's perfect and if you disagree i will fight you stephanie please come up aren't they wonderful they are wonderful they are the ideal students who they hear some random thing you say in class and they make this whole amazing thing out of it it's great to see you all great to be here at the medicine i just spent a week with podcast listeners walking in the footsteps of virginia woolf together so we're we're stretching or obsessions to include more writers so i'm supposed to tell a story about love and three minutes so here it is thirty three years ago i fell in love i fell in love really hard i was twenty two years old and i'd lived in north carolina in the southern part of the united states for those of you who aren't familiar with our geography my whole life and i was moving to chicago i moved to chicago to go to graduate school and so my world was just opening up and my first day in chicago i met the sky he was tall and skinny and red headed and funny and as smart as her miami and he was also a really good basketball player he walked as one of our friends said like someone who's looking for the basket all the time he was also such a mystery to me we lived in the same house with a bunch of other students and he would we would all have supper together and then he would go to bed and he would get up at one or two in the morning and he would write these incredible papers and i'd never met anyone like this i didn't certainly never met anyone my age who was devoted to his work in this way so i fell in love with him the first afternoon i met him which was the day i moved into this house with my suitcases i met him in a library and my heart just went out it just felt like it went out of my body to him he didn't notice that for what but eventually and one year later i found myself standing in the back of a church in a long white cotton dress looking down the aisle at at him so this was very much a do it yourself kind of wedding i found my wedding dress my mother who lived in lexington kentucky went around to sale racks and bridal shops and tried unrest and took polaroid of herself and i chose from that and and my kevin were an old blue suit that he'd had forever so i looked down at the other end of the church at the skinny guy in his old blue suit and for the first time in my life and i was twenty three years old and many people who are twenty three years old have already figured this out but i had not i truly had not and i know i hadn't because it hit me like a thunderbolt i looked down that aisle at him and i thought i am going to die one day this is just a crazy thing to be doing i'm i'm about to walk to the other end of this church and say that i'm going to accompany this man to the end of our lives which means our lives are gonna end on our pilgrimage this week terry tempest williams shared a quote from hemingway love it always ends badly but it was it was a revelation to me and i was so shocked by that i kind of charge started charging down the island my mother who was walking me done i'll head to whisper slowdown but i think that is what love does they say love is planned and certainly love ken show you things that aren't there and make you not say things that are there that is true but love also confers a vision not just of the other person but of the world and of yourself and of your life and i think that these practices that vanessa and casper have been teaching us on the podcast are practices day selects semi davina and have route two they were all created because of this because if you can get close to.

dr stephanie paul twenty three years thirty three years twenty two years three minutes one year one day
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Harry Potter and the Sacred Text

Harry Potter and the Sacred Text

03:04 min | 3 years ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Harry Potter and the Sacred Text

"Saw something new this is what's so cool about re it seems silly to read the same sentence like eight hundred times let me read it and really stressed the words that like suddenly noticed when everyone had once again resumed their seats dumbledore continued the try was at tournaments aim was to further and promote magical understanding like all of this language is in that and i haven't even picked it up yet and so i'm sunny thinking like the secret is that i may see one word focused in on resumed yet underneath as this whole riffa that's like in the same direction as as the point of the iceberg that's a mixed metaphor every one but you know what i mean like this so much that's underneath what we see that's working in that same direction and i don't mean in like the gift way where it's just like let me be a millionaire tomorrow and then i wake up a millionaire but it's like there's something about not seeing the full the fullness of an intention until you sit with it and you read it you know eight nine times that was great too many sewed yes it was lovely do if it didn't it didn't yes if it didn't it didn't i want things to be called by their proper name i got tripped up again on the tri wizard tournament wolford's flurries a witch not wizard this is actually we just went on a pilgrimage for a week and this wonderful writer in poet and just amazing woman named terry tempest williams was on the pilgrimage with us and we had these lovely people lead us for a day walk and they were from a company called the school of the wild interiors burder into she kept asking the guy from the school the wild like oh what's that bird and he didn't know and he's a terry i'm sorry but i'm not a burder and she said to him you really shouldn't call your school the school of the wild if you don't know the names of the things then order to be in the wild you have to know what things are called and i just think there's such wisdom in that right because we're more than our names but you can't your student isn't gonna feel loved if you don't know their name right if you're not calling them what they want to be called or what they are called i guess the so to me is i mean i feel called to call things by their name and no more facts and then you can let them go but i do wish he had started calling it the international student competition right like just something truer of the great point natalie thank you i love you so arianna we are very lucky and we get to try some of the products at the advertise i have a complaint to issue about my casper mattress though i actually have two complaints okay let's hear them i is that my dog loves it so much that she now takes over the whole bed second complaint is that now when i travel i miss home more because i have such comfortable bed when you travel though i get to stay at your apartment and i get.

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"More of them adjacent to urban landscapes and that we open up the process as bears years national monument has been opened to native people said that five intratribal nations who do not have a history of the green have come together saying bears ears is the home ground of our ancestors this is where our ceremonies are where our medicines are found and where our prayers are held and at any given moment you can still hear the voices of our ancestors singing this is what i think we have to celebrate and then when you hear online and say it is no longer about the color of our skin but the color of our blood i hear joni yellow a man who's a medicine persson in the dna the nomination who says if we protect bears ears if we protect these lands they will protect us and that's where i believe these are inclusive and go beyond racism and privilege this is travel with bricks deep soup and talking with terry tempest williams her book the our blair to rethink he's so much for inspiring us too to gain a better appreciation of who we are in the value of our wilderness thank you reckon thank you for extending senses travel with reach deeds is produce network steve's europe in edmonds washington by tim to happen sarah mccormick and isaac kaplan wilner special thanks to our colleagues at kgon you in boulder colorado and w effort d in hanover new hampshire for their help this week listen again whenever you like and find out about our guests in the notes for each week show it's at rick steve's dot com slash radio.

blair tim colorado hanover new hampshire rick steve joni edmonds washington sarah mccormick isaac kaplan
"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"terry tempest williams" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"She's been called a poet a modernday saint a citizen writer for her country inches appeals to our petr nature as americans terry tempest williams distills the lessons of her journeys from aimed to alaska the san joaquin valley to the gulf shore in her book called the hour of land the personal topography of america's national parks she writes about some of the many ways the park serve as breathing spaces and why they deserve to be protected as sacred land terry welcome back thank you vacant since great to be with you again what is the purpose in your in your mind of our national park service i believe that our national parks are beating spaces in a society increasingly holding its breath and i really believe rick that it isn't the job of just environmentalist to protect these public land's but really the privilege of all americans one of the things i think we forget is the our national parks and monuments are really the open space of democracy it's where our identities as a people reside it's where we have charted and honored and celebrate the american psyche if you will our character in all its diversity so i think this idea of public land's national parks belonging to all of us is a really key concept terry when you talk about that and then we think of the title of your book the hour of land what does the hour of land mean in regards to what you just said i believe this is the hour of land i think we're in a bottleneck not just in the united states and north america but around the planet given the severity of climate change you know thinking about biologists such as yeltsin saying that if we are to thrive and flourishes a species half of the planet must be protected as open space we are not the only.

writer san joaquin valley america open space united states north america climate change yeltsin terry tempest williams alaska rick