19 Burst results for "Terence Blanchard"

"terence blanchard" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

18:22 min | 7 months ago

"terence blanchard" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Devices that I did not use them in the book. So that was interesting to see how that all worked. And I think as a creative advice it did work. The thing about the opera, though, I think Terrence or someone told me this, Harris, did you tell me this about how much longer it takes to sing a word than to say it? Yeah. Opera is incredibly short. Relative to what the thing the whole book you'd be there all night, right? So you had to make artistic choices about what is included, what is not included. Also, it is a stage production. So you can't constantly change the scene as you might do. In a book, you can do it as often it's like, in movie format, you can do it a bit more on a stage, there's only so many times you can wield that scene off and bring another one on. So you are also an entrapped by how many scenes you can present. And so they had to make all those choices. And so I was very interested, particularly the first time to see which choices they made about which things the two exclude and to maintain story and to develop characters and the arc of the narrative. And I think it works as its own piece of art. I do believe that it does because opera also has to be dramatic. There are a lot of subtle moments that were important to me that just didn't make it, right? So that's just part of translation. So I try not to gauge it against the book, but to accept that it is a different new piece of art created by tariffs and cassian James and that I appreciate it for that. So let's talk about the nitty Gritty here because fire shut up in my bones is your second opera. Your first was champion in 2013, which was directed by my old friend James Robinson. You mentioned Jim earlier. That's what you were talking about. And James is the co director with Camille Brown of fire. But opera is not your first medium for musical composition. You are best known as a multiple Grammy winning jazz trumpeter and band leader and I'll add great musician great jazz musicians and musician anyone who has watched a Spike Lee movie over the last 30 years has heard and been moved by your stirring majestic scores. So, given that you're part of the jazz firmament, what inspired opera as the format for this specific story. Well, you know, one of the things a lot of people who know me, they know that my father was an amateur baritone. He loved opera. So I heard opera a lot growing up in the house. And one of the things that has always been curious to me, you know, about, especially in African American community is how there's so many people in our community who love the music and love opera, but there's not many formats or pieces actually created for them. I mean, we could talk about poor games. But still created for them by African Americans. I mean, you know, at least let me put it this way. They have pieces out there. The pieces that are gaining traction, you know, and to have the opportunity to do something at the Met. You know, on this scale, was a very intriguing thing for me. Now, obviously, we started in St. Louis. And one of the things that I really started to realize immediately was that African American opera singers don't get a chance to really fully bring to the table. Everything that they grow up with. Most of them grew up singing in the church or singing rhythm blues or jazz. And when it comes time to sync tosca, you know, a lot of them are turned off. They're told to turn those things off. You know, and for me, that's a big part of who they are. And one of the things that I love in being in this world is that I get a chance to create some pieces that allow them to bring all of who they are to the frame. I mean, when you listen to angel blue when she sings peculiar grace, she mixes her operatic voice, you know, with this gospel spiritual color that's very moving and very hearty. You know, and I think when you put that together with great acting great scenery, the entire art form is a very powerful way to tell stories. You know, I've been telling people to stop thinking opera. This is the highest form of musical theater that you can ever experience. And I truly believe that. And with the performances of fire, I think, you know, people were extremely moved by the entire production by seeing it all come together, you know? And there's nothing like that that I've ever experienced. Camille Brown, who's also the operas choreographer, she said in an interview that what comes with you being the first black composer on the Met stage is, quote, the black lens and along with that comes black culture spoken through or danced through the black lens. I mean, you talked about that just a moment ago. But Charles, I would love to get your perspective on that. How important is it that what Terrence was just talking about? One, allowing black opera performers to bring all of themselves to a role. But also to have a story such as yours, told through the lens of a black composer and told through the performances of black opera singers. Well, I've said this before. I was very happy that this opera bought brought opera to the black experience not black experience into the opera meaning it needed to come to any of the come to us understand that you can have a beautiful production, but also an amazing story that just is about us. It doesn't depend on it is not reactionary to other people, is not a response. It is an expression of the human condition as expressed by human beings. These humans happen to be black. And that was important to me because there are almost no white characters in my book because it's not about characters because these are just people in my life and I grew up in an all black town. Around, it went to all black schools. I was around black people. And that wasn't a choice to exclude anybody else. It was just the circumstance under which I grew up. And so to be true to that, that means that you do bring black culture in abundance. To this production. And can I add to that? Something real quick. It's really beautiful to hear Charles say that because one of the things that we kept thinking, we didn't know it was an all black cast. We didn't realize it was an all black cast. We were just doing an opera. We were doing Charles story. And again, it was somebody else that came up to us and said, well, man, this is all black cast. And we were like, oh, I guess it is. You know, so to his point, we want to try to exclude anybody. We weren't trying to necessarily statement on that front. We were just trying to tell his story the best way because. You know, one thing that came up in my research and all this, when was performed in St. Louis. It was I believe it was the dancers where it was a coed group of dancers, but fire on the Met stage was all men. What was the thinking behind that? Particularly on the fraternity, the step scene. Well, I think that was a choice that was made by commune and Jim, you know, the story was definitely about Charles. And Charles, you know, struggling with his own sexuality. And when you look at the ballet that opens up the second act of the opera, I think Camille did an amazing job of creating something that told his story. You know, so it was a choice. It was a creative choice to kind of help push along the narrative of what was going on in Charles's life at that time. You know, and then I think it makes it even more powerful a moment when he meets Greta in the opera. And then he starts to date her and then he saw she revealed to her, everything that happened to him. You know, but it was a beautiful choice because when you see the step shell, you know, when you see the ballet, those dancers did an amazing job. As a matter of fact, you know, I was kidding, you know, I said, man, I've never seen nobody get it stand innovation just for walking on the stage. You know, you know? At first time I've ever seen that. I wouldn't talk about one of the Arias. Ben don't break. And the powerful lyrics go, I sway, I sway my roots run deep. I draw my strength from underneath. I bend, I don't break, I sway. And to hear to hear, will liverman deliver those words is so powerful. But what just sort of not to be back and moves me to no end was when the eye becomes we. Towards the end of the aria. And I can't even begin to describe how much it moved me. What have you heard from others about that aria? Well, for me, you know, that's one of the pivotal moments that in peculiar grace, you know, when you say we've been we don't break, it seems to be the rallying cry for a lot of people, a lot of disenfranchised people. A lot of people who have suffered through the development of this country, you know, I look at everything that I grew up witnessed growing up in just trying to maintain daily life, you know, in my family. And the struggles that my parents went through to keep us afloat. And then keep me in music lessons and keep me pushing forward. And allowing me to have a dream, you know, there were moments, you know, that were very stressful for all of us. And I think everybody can really relate to that. It's one of the things that I kept hearing from a lot of people who came to the opera that thing was something that they started to chant, you know, outside of the performances. You know, it's one of the things I think that even some of the dances they would talk about before the show would start, you know? We don't break, you know. And it became a rallying cry for a lot of students that also have seen the broadcast of the Apple. You know, Charles, that phrase, we been, we don't break. We sway. It would be like a nice mantra for what you bring to your columns at the times. It's a perfect encapsulation, at least to my mind. Go ahead, Charles. This is one of those is where, you know, when you do something artistically, you come to it once it's ability. But the people who appreciate it, see something bigger than what you were intending. I first heard people talk about it as a metaphor for black struggle in America only in reviews of this opera, not even in the book. And that was not, and I could understand that. But it was not. It was not the intention. That idea came from, for me, a communion with nature. And that I spent many days. Meditating in a forested area that where the trees to me look like a cathedral. And so it became for me a metaphor for a religious space. And in that space, the way I described it, the trees spoke to me. And taught me things. About resilience and weathering the storms. And bending but not breaking about being deeply rooted. And that I had carried that lesson from nature from those trees out into my life and that I thought about them all the time in that way that if they can weather that hurricane, I can. And so it was very specific to me, I wasn't trying to make a statement about blackness in America, but then when other people made that connection, I thought, oh, you could say that, too, you know? But it's very interesting to me how art can speak to other people in other ways. You know, and that's what it's funny. I forgot to mention because it's plainly obvious that the reason why those lyrics hit me so hard in a beautiful way is that as a black man listening to the words seeing it seeing them perform just spoke to something that was just larger than the intention of those words in the 5 minutes that we have left real quick and go to an audience question for Terrence. Terrence, this comes from Scott in Iceland. Did the existence of large scale jazz works by Coltrane or Ellington have an effect on the composition where the things you were there things you avoided or things you referenced while I never really tried to reference anything directly because you know I'm always trying to find my own voice. But I'm always influenced by anything great. You know, and of course anything Duke Ellington has done a John Coltrane, those happened to be two of my favorite artists has had an effect on me. You know, but, you know, I studied with a guy named roger Dickerson who studied in Austria and came back to New Orleans and to teach. And he taught me composition from the time that I was 16 years old and he's the guy that whenever I have a major project or something to do. I still call him to this day. You know, and when I called him to do my first opera champion, I remember he told me he said, stop thinking about, you know, writing an opera. He said tell a story. Tell a story. And that's what I've tried to do. The difference is, is that I've tried to bring all of my background to bear. That's why we call it an opera in jazz and not a jazz opera. We don't want people to think that you're going to hit the bass band or the Ellington band when you come to the performance. But the DNA from all of those languages and both cultures will exist because I'm also a big fan of puccini as well. You know, label women is one of my favorite operas of all time. Like it is for most. So I'm trying to use everything at my disposal to tell this story in the most succinct way I can and also the most interesting and interestingly artistic way that I can. Well, I'm sorry, Terence. My favorite opera is tosca. And lions whose price will always be tosca to me. All right, in two minutes in the two minutes that we have left, I have a question for each of you and Terrence. I'll have you go first. What do you want people to take away from the work you've done in fire shut up in my bones? I want people to learn that no matter what it is you go through. You know, the old saying it's God never gives you anything you can't handle. You know, you have the strength to forge ahead and persevere. You know, this in Charles life, his life, his existence, is an example of that. And Charles, what do you want people to take away from your story? Well, first, you know, Terrence has got to have sometimes you're like, sir, ma'am, who told you that? I've been so beautiful. But I think that they take away for me is the realization that there are no small lives that every life is grand. And so it was the biggest thing about this being on the Met's phase to me was to hear references to my hometown. What did my church or whatever? Because I was back in my hometown for of 900 people for Thanksgiving and that and they just freak out because they were like, who would have thought that this town would be mentioned in anything? Because we thought ourselves living in a tiny space that that time and the world was passing over, but there are no spaces like that. Every life is an opportunity every life is a story every life is grand. Charles blow. Terrence Blanchard. Thank you so much for coming to Kay part. It truly has been an honor. Oh, thank.

Camille Brown Charles Terrence cassian James James Robinson St. Louis tosca Spike Lee Jim Harris James Camille Greta Arias roger Dickerson Ellington Ben America Coltrane John Coltrane
"terence blanchard" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

15:08 min | 8 months ago

"terence blanchard" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

"That's music from piano composer. Billy childs spotlight artists. Here in the second hour of return to the source is from his nineteen ninety six recording. The child within we heard his composition erin song composition that row for his son and in feature terence blanchard on trump along with dave holland on bass. Jeff tain watts on drums. Steve wilson on soprano saxophone and in two thousand child's arranged orchestrated and conducted for dianne reeves project calling celebrating zero von which won the grammy award for best jazz vocal album. He's also arranged for artists. Like sting yoyo. Ma chris body gladys knight and others in two thousand and one. He formed a jazz chamber. Ensemble merging classical and jazz music in two thousand and three. He received a new composition. Grant from the chamber. Music america organization fact. He's written a number of classical compositions in two thousand and five he The jazz chamber ensemble released its first album. Lyric and i was nominated for three grammy awards. Best jazz instrumental album. Best instrumental composition and best arrangement of course and in one for the best instrumental composition into the light and in two thousand and nine. Billy childs was awarded a guggenheim fellowship. Two thousand thirteen. He received the doors duke artists award and in two thousand and fifteen. He won another grammy award for his recording. Called new york t berry tendon. Barry i should say and of course that was his project with the music of lord niro in fact reimagining the music of law nero and we're going to End our tribute to billy giles. With something from his new release he has a new release out on mack avenue records and it's called rebirth. We're going to hear the title track. It's pianist billy childs on returned to the source too.

Billy childs Jeff tain watts sting yoyo Ma chris terence blanchard dave holland Music america organization grammy award Steve wilson dianne reeves soprano saxophone gladys knight erin grammy awards berry tendon lord niro billy giles Barry new york
"terence blanchard" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

08:45 min | 8 months ago

"terence blanchard" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

"Music from composer. Billy childs our spotlight artists. Here in the second hour of return to the source is from his one thousand nine hundred six recording the child within and we heard his composition erin song composition that he wrote for his son in featured terence blanchard on trumpet along with dave holland on bass. Jeff tain watts on drums. Steve wilson on soprano saxophone in two thousand out arranged orchestrated and conducted for dianne reeves project. The calling celebrating. Sarah von which won the grammy award for best jazz vocal album. He's also arranged for artists. Like sting yoyo. Ma chris bodey gladys knight and others in two thousand one. He formed a jazz chamber on somboon merging classical and jazz music in two thousand and three. He received a new composition grant from chamber music america organization. Fact he's written a number of classical compositions in two thousand and five he. The jazz chamber ensemble released its first album. Lyric and i was nominated for three grammy awards. Best jazz instrumental album. Best instrumental composition and best arrangement of course in in one for the best instrumental composition into the light and in two thousand and nine. Billy childs was awarded a guggenheim fellowship. Two thousand thirteen. He received the doors duke artists award and in two thousand and fifteen. He won another grammy award for his recording. Called new york t berry tendon. Barry i should say and of course that was his project with the music of lord niro in fact reimagining the music of lower niro. And we're going to End our tribute to billy giles. With something from his new release he has a new release out on mack avenue records. And it's called rebirth. in fact we're going to hear the title track. It's pianist billy childs on return to the source.

billy childs Jeff tain watts Sarah von sting yoyo Ma chris bodey terence blanchard chamber music america organiza dave holland dianne reeves grammy award Steve wilson gladys knight erin grammy awards berry tendon lord niro billy giles Barry new york
"terence blanchard" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

10:55 min | 9 months ago

"terence blanchard" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

"Man frisco role. But it was when i came home. down chair Shit called since you. Patty explained that you stop caring tab of spe- guide and show the way off job Pro A moment let's be honest. George cables with music from his latest recording. Two thousand and sixteen release on high. No records called george cable. Songbook we are this composition aka reggie with c. Cnn base victor lewis on drums. We started out to set with the title track from the recording by vocalist robert macarthur. And it's from his number coin as we said one called stranger in town listening to return to the source produce at the studios of wj a beat alabama university. I'm your host. Douglas turner in an hour number two. I'll be signing death spotlight on pianist. Composer billy childs. So be sure and keep you dial for that return to the sources brought to you by. The african american public radio consortium npr distribution and the public radio satellite system taking us into our number two. It's music from the recording by trumpeter. Terence blanchard it's on buono records called the comedian. In fact it's the original motion picture soundtrack with music composed and arranged by terence blanchard and this one features in with kenny on piano. Carl allen on the drums david pulps on the base on the tune. Written by terence called tit for tat knock. Turn.

george cable aka reggie victor lewis robert macarthur alabama university Douglas turner billy childs Patty african american public radio Cnn George terence blanchard npr buono Carl allen kenny terence
"terence blanchard" Discussed on Aria Code

Aria Code

01:50 min | 9 months ago

"terence blanchard" Discussed on Aria Code

"Writer. Roy hawkin met opera chorus master. Donald palumbo rabbi donald rottenburg and musicologist. Mark burford decoding. The vapin sierra chorus from verdi's noble you'll hear performance by the met opera chorus after the break area code is produced in partnership with the metropolitan opera each season. The met presents ten saturday matinees in movie theaters around the world. As part of its award winning live in hd series. I up mussorgsky's boris. Good enough starring renee papa in the title role. The mets cinema season will also feature terence blanchard's fire shut up in my bones and matthew aucoin z. Ritzy out more at met opera dot org slash hd. Hey it's rian and before we get to the rest of the show. I wanted to invite you to our first ever. Aria code live event whooped. It's a conversation between me. And terence blanchard about his new opera fire. Shut up on my bones and as hard as it is to believe. He's the first black composer to have his work performed at the met. So it's a pretty big freaking deal. I'm going to ask him about this. Milestone the process of writing it which as a young composer i'm very keenly interested in and we'll also have some video clips from the premier to share. The event is over zoom on friday october. Eighth at twelve noon eastern. It's totally free. And i'd love for you to join us you can. Rsvp at aria code dot org the ancient israelites are being held captive in babylon. They take a break from forced labor. Sit down by the banks of the afraid. He's river and seeing about their homeland jerusalem. Here's the metropolitan opera. Chorus singing fought in sierra the chorus.

Roy hawkin Donald palumbo rabbi donald rottenburg Mark burford terence blanchard renee papa matthew aucoin verdi mussorgsky rian boris mets babylon jerusalem sierra
"terence blanchard" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

07:13 min | 10 months ago

"terence blanchard" Discussed on /Film Daily

"Help neutralize the alien threat here on her. And i love in like the hangover state of this hotel room. We see rocket raccoon asleep in the sink and tweets all rocket previously and the guardians upset. Did we lose missing in action. There i think you are right. Yeah dennis revealed to jane foster that this is in fact not the first time the aliens visited earth that they had happened before and they show her this beepers cab. The captain marvel beeper the nick. Fury used to call. Captain marvel when you know The snap happened and I love the moment here. You're right the comedy. Here is a little bit stronger than the other episodes. There's the moment where like press the beeper in darcy's like something was to happen like it was like this big dramatic moment by one. It brings us up to you. Brad is as talking with david. Chen and he watches what he does. A podcast on his patron about it and he brought up. Why would they use the beeper for this situation. Where there's like people partying in vegas. But they don't use the beeper for the battle of new york. Well i mean seems a lot more serious than the other. Well i guess the way to explain it if you were to try to come up with an excuse is that this is something that maybe is as worrisome as the battle of new york but it's it's agent hill. Who's making the decision and not nakara. So maybe nick fury wouldn't have used the beeper for this. But he's not a inaction right now since he's knocked out and so maybe that's that's why it's used by like this a little bit more nonchalantly than nick. Fury would have used it. That's actually very good brad. Because i was also wondering why did they knock out nick fury because they have samuel l. to reprise the voice. It almost seemed like unnecessary to knock out nick fury in. Maybe that is the reason. Yeah i wonder if maybe that like everything like the way that they choose to deal with it. They decided it would be very uncharacteristic of nick fury especially because Hill is also the one who decides to have nukes on standby towards the end of this episode. Just in case captain mark can't keep four in line and a fury was very much against that happening In the battle of new york when shield decided to fire missiles on new york in an effort to try and stop the vision so it sounds like they probably realized they needed to have somebody. Who wouldn't who would make these decisions and fury wouldn't have been that person that's another good point. Are we also to assume that the avengers have not happened in this universe. Yeah it would seem like that are not offending. Because they don't show up and you would think they would have something like this was happening. Yeah okay gotta give credit. Where credit's due. The animation and design of captain marvel actually looks of captain. Marvel i think They did a good job. There thor and some of his buddies. Decide to go to france to get some crepes. They want some crepes to the good of france. Ganda this winfrey frosh diet. Low key shows up with his Frost giant brothers in these huge. And it's kind of interesting because cookie seemed to have more rural relationship here in the universe. The multi verse that they did not actually become brothers. They actually seem to have more brotherly chemistry than they did in the universe that they were actually brothers. Yeah they're not brothers but they're bros. Yeah but i actually really like this. There's actually made me wish that we could see some kind of alternate Universe where thorn loki. Aren't you know brothers. Who are at each other's throats but brothers who are cool with each other and you know are actually like not trying to Betray each other. I would have been really fun to see Hilton and hemsworth have this together in live action. Yeah for sure So kept marvel shows up to break up the party and Here we get this. This whole action sequence was as captain marvel versus door which i guess they're kind of answering the question of who would win in a fight or captain marvel you know they're both like the both have god level powers but i'm not sure if anybody is this a matchup that anybody has been asking for i mean i guess there was a brief moment in endgame worth or comes face to face with captain marvel calls for storm breaker in. It's kind of like this tension filled moment. But it's like a moment. Like i just felt like is if you have what and you have the possibility of having all these heroes fight each other. Is this the matchup. You would've chosen brad. I mean not right off the bat but at the same time. I mean we've seen thanks to captain america's civil war. We've seen a lot of the other match ups. And even vendraeil. Africa renders movie captain america and iron man and thor going at it so i think this is the maybe the most interesting one considering the strength that each of them has and seeing them go toe to toe because they're both powerful is very interesting however in relation to strength one thing i would like to bring up. Is that In this episode. We part as part of the romantic comedy side with thor meeting jane and falling in love and whatnot Thorin jane get Tattoos that go together and is able to get a tattoo. Because wouldn't you think that his skin is too strong for the needle to penetrate in in kim because remember in In man of steel when they try to take a superman to the hospital because he's been hurt by kryptonite. They tried to stab him with a needle and it just breaks on his arm. I didn't even think about that. These are the things that i think about. That's a good question brad. That's a good question. And of course that science and magic. That's that whole isaac. As math quote that i think isn't even actually quoted in thor one the whole any. Yeah there's something about magic and science technol- technology so advanced is is almost like magic or something like that. I'm butchering the quote. So i apologize. Apologized all the Asimov fans out there but So they go out they go at it in this fight. This fight is kind of fun. thor knocks. Captain marvel all the way to stonehenge One of the other looney tunes things that i actually enjoyed about this too is When four and captain marvel knock each other around and you see.

nick fury new york captain marvel jane foster captain mark Captain marvel samuel l brad darcy Chen dennis france Brad Ganda vegas nick winfrey david hemsworth Hill
"terence blanchard" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

07:55 min | 11 months ago

"terence blanchard" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"That's the elders from terence blanchard's new album absence it's a tribute to the legendary jazz. Saxophonist wayne shorter that mixes a few showers classics including the tune. We just heard with originals inspired by and dedicated to the eighty-seven-year-old jazz legend. joining us. To talk about terence blanchard my pal nature from jazz night in america and wbz in boston. Hey there it's great to have you nate. When i think of terence blanchard. I immediately think of movies. He's like spike lee's goto composer. And i think of that kind of cinematic sound here. He's working with an incredible assortment of players in jazz and classical music. Tell me about absence icy this album. As in one way of breakthrough and in another way. It's really just kind of an accurate reflection of where he is now. He's long had this kind of bifurcated. Sonic identity you know. He's an incredible jazz trumpet player. Who came up exactly at the same time as winston marcellus but has followed this. You know this much more hybrid approach and with his working band the collective you know he he really favors this kind of almost like funk and fusion oriented sound very aggressive very punchy and then at the same time as you noted. He's this celebrated film composer who often works with strings. And he's actually about to become the very first black composer ever to be featured in the metropolitan opera he's opening the met operas fall season and so he's had these two lives right and on this album. I really feel like more directly than i've ever heard before he's converging all of that. You hear beautiful writing for strings on this album and you also hear some pretty intense group interplay. I think that wayne shorter is is an appropriate totem for him. Because wayne is another one of those people who has never. He's never settled for any box. You know he's he's like what i do is it crosses all you know all boundaries all borders and that's a an appropriate lodestar here. I think this music is similarly beyond classification and you mentioned strings. He's working here with among other artists. The turtle island quartet which is very long running very sonically expansive strip. They played the tiny desk about a decade ago. And were amazing. And so you have like you said that mix of kind of a traditional jazz sound with elements of classical music and other sounds absolutely and crucially turtle island. There's string players who are not terrified by the prospect of improvising. You know and there's more and more of those kinds of musicians all the time you know Able who come up in the classical tradition. Who really have a handle on how to improvise both individually. And as a as an ensemble and you can just sense in this. That terence's is saying yes. These are my people you know and i can employ them exactly the same way that employ my jazz group. So you don't get the sense that sometimes creeps in In a project like this where the jazz rhythm section is doing one thing on one side of the room and the string quartet is doing another thing on the other side of the room. And let's just kinda mash them together. That's really not what's happening here. It's fully integrated. It's all breathing together. It has that beautiful kind of moonlit. Poignant emotional sound that terence blanchard is known for you know that he brings to so many of his soundtracks for spike lee. You know this this like deeply human strong but vulnerable character that so often shines in his work. It's it's really present here. That's absence the new album from terence blanchard. Nate i'm going to ask you to stick around for a minute. We've got one more great record to get on this week's new music friday before that. I wanna do a quick lightning round with more recommendations from among the very many new. Album's coming out this week. I off one of the biggest pop. Records of the season is from singer halsey. She's been all over the radio for years now. Her potent new set of bangers was produced by trent resin or it's heavily inspired by the experience of pregnancy and childbirth and it's got a great title in his called. If i can't have love i want power speaking of powerhouses in a packed release week. There's a new album from big red machine. bob. Boyle played a song on the show recently. It's an excellent record full of big names. Aaron data from the national justin vernon from bonnie there they formed the heart of the band the new record features guests like. As mitchell from hanes town plus folks like fleet foxes and a couple of songs with an up and comer by the name of taylor swift. It is a beautiful record. it's called. How long do you think. It's going to last the prolific guitarist. Steve gone has an impressive background. As an improviser a collaborator his works can be experimental. Rustic psychedelic gorgeous. He's got a new album out today. Called other you speaking of wonderful brilliant prolific guitarists to more of the best in the business. Have a new album out today. Marissa anderson and william tyler have each made beautiful guitar based records separately. Now have one. They recorded together. That's called lost futures. For more than twenty years the producer. Kevin martin has been pushing boundaries in his own intense noisy surprising music. He's best known for his work as the bug and the bugs first album in seven years features vocal contributions from the likes of more mother and floatin very potent record. That album is appropriately called fire. If you're looking for something far mellower than the bug. I highly recommend spending time with the french musician. Composer yon pearson. He's been making beautiful music for decades. Now still probably best known for the works. That form the soundtrack to the film emily. His new album is beautiful. Largely electronic record called kerber. It's based on his life on a remote island in france. If you are a fan of the tv show parks and recreation. You remember andy. Dwyer's band mouse rat. We're in chris. Pratt sang songs like sex. Hair and by by law sebastian. Now we are getting an actual official recording by mouse rat out today. It's called the awesome album. The singer songwriter ramona. Gonzalez spare chilled out electronic pop. Under the name night jewel. Her new record chronicles the aftermath of a divorce and songs that are dreamy and reflective but never sacrificed their edge that album her first in four years is called no son a great genre smashing blues rock album to recommend the memphis band. Southern avenue is a favorite of our own height. Their new record is called. Be the love you want and finally it is a packed week for jazz pal. Nature and can attest. In addition to the terence blanchard record and the last album recovering covering on this week's show mate. Wants to be sure you check out. Carlos and rica's he's a bassist and composer whose music mixes jazz and afro latin traditions on his new album. The south bronx story. And there's a terrific. New record by the veteran alto saxophonist kenny. Garrett it's an expansive detroit and other places from around the world that have influenced him throughout his life. That record is called sounds from the ancestors all those albums are out today. August twenty seventh and reminder as always bookmark the now playing blog. Npr music that is packed with great song recommendations. That will help you stay. Caught up on all.

terence blanchard Saxophonist wayne wbz winston marcellus wayne shorter goto trent resin nate Steve gone Marissa anderson terence william tyler boston lee spike lee wayne justin vernon halsey america yon pearson
"terence blanchard" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:35 min | 2 years ago

"terence blanchard" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is Terence Blanchard there's just a sense of longing in that sense of of of wanting how do you create that as a composer where you're from your heart you have to be honest you know you have to deal with your own our payments are current you know and one of the things are I thought about it and she knows you know what it must've been like for somebody to try to reconnect with us for and you just have to be honest and right are you feel not so for me it's about goals you know they're they're they're they're initial melody and reaching out to his father most losses during the second part is the reality of what the relationship is too large at what point is the nuts and bolts kind of question at what point in the course of filmmaking do you start to work well respected it's it's an interesting thing because he you know we've got work obviously we've been working together for years and you'll certainly stressful for his last year you know I also get a general sense of what the stores brown I try not to write anything in that moment because when I'm reading the script I'm I'm facing off markets my movie in my head you know it's not it's not a sparkly poker so I try to wait but I'll sometimes I'll come up with little melodic ideas I don't try to be too specific but then as he's shooting sometimes you'll send the footage and when his friends recruitments battle you could balk about connections to some kind of get a sense of timing and pacing when it looks like and then once you get your card you know will sit on don't have all the corresponding session will go click some tires from scene by scene and try to figure out which teams need music which soon do not and then he will take the teams that have sentiments on trucks trying to characters in the mix chemicals in their it's so interesting that you that you did you picture the movie in your head one way is are you think just thinking about it musically when you think about when you when you walk up well I think it's a normal dream you know when you read a script you're creating these characters you clean machines you're creating your own pace you know it could happen to me early on when I was working smarter can't remember which room it was what I got so excited I started writing just based on what I was reading from a script and relax okay during court letters to different rooms you know so I learned that you know everybody is interpretation computer disks and them you know of a script even though there's a lot are very descriptive writing you know they'll they'll kill you the centers or give you the time of day and all that stuff but still you know I try to wait to see something my guess is composer Terence Blanchard we're talking about the work he's done spike Lee's new movie the five bloods listen to another track there's a scene in the movie when the buzzer out in Vietnam and they learn over radio Hanoi that MLK's been assassinated and they start to question what they're fighting for what was it about this moment that you wanted the music to evoke well I grew up on modern and dispatcher Christine is one of those teams back kind of define who these characters on your not being certain user you just soldiers you know who put their lives on the line you know who wore risking it all every day while they were there and to hear from enemies radio that somebody was fighting for your rights was killed by an American citizen that you're fighting for you know you need that gross happy new year you know a devastating blow and I couldn't imagine what that has felt like in that moment in time but I try to do my best to myself in their shoes and it was a team of well let's take a listen to this track from the five bloods composed returns pleasure that's an okay assassinated from the soundtrack.

Terence Blanchard
Spike Lee: a new black wave of cinema

The Big Picture

04:04 min | 2 years ago

Spike Lee: a new black wave of cinema

"We've spent past two weeks in a collective state of horror and anger over George Floyd's killing at the hands of Minneapolis police, officer Dirk, Shaaban, just one thousand unjustly killed by police. It's hard to look at what happened. Floyd, and not think of Radio Raheem Bill. Nuns character from do the right thing. Or countries fucked up needs to change. No American filmmaker has had the foresight or insight about that need for change quite like spike has. Some directors interpret the past some capture the present spike does both and he sees the future. Spent some time in the past few weeks. Returning to some spikes movies in anticipation of his new film to five bloods, it's a staggering body of work as wide as it as deep as warm and inviting as provocative and laden with traps ever. Spike isn't the totality of the black filmmaking experience and I don't want to suggest that, but for forty years he's told stories about that experience that have been seen more widely and discussed more feverishly than anyone and they still haven't been seen enough. Of the conversations you've been having with loved ones this month about the problems that people are forced to look at more closely police brutality, systemic racism locally sanctioned violence gentrification, tribal loyalty, the failures of government, personal sacrifice versus public good hiring practices, power, art and money spike was ahead of most Americans for decades on these issues, but while the stories he tells are frequently polemical. His movies are quite nuanced. They rarely tell you exactly what to think. Instead foisting contradictions and crises, interviewers, laps and making them decide. He crafts extraordinary dilemma movies inspired by the new Orrin Westerns and social dramas that he studied at Nyu and even though he doesn't force a conclusion is movies are frequently an intelligence test over the years, critics and audiences have repeatedly shown their ass immediately upon exiting a spike movie. For person like me seeing his work at a young age me up, helped me see beyond my keyhole-size view of the world, but it's not like spike wasn't relatable. He was the Avatar of new. York Knicks FANDOM! He was a regular presence on TV and Jordan commercials. He was directing music videos and frequently according controversy in the movie world he consistently challenged fans and detractors to reexamine their beliefs, and he always destabilized our comfort at sixty three. He is still very much a vital filmmaker. Twenty eight teams Black Klansman was among his most honored films and marked his First Competitive Oscar win for best adapted screenplay. Spike is a hall of Famer on this show and his work accounts for some of my favorite movies ever made. This episode is dedicated to those movies and will include conversations with a couple of his key collaborators as well as a part of a conversation that was more than I had on the watchable last summer. About Lee's nineteen eighty-nine masterpiece. Do the right thing. That movie redefines the term remarkable. In it! You can see and hear the pain and conflict. We're talking about right now. Watch it again. If you haven't really later in the show, we'll have a conversation with jazz. Musician and film composer Terence Blanchard a longtime contributor of spikes. They've teamed up on fifteen films including two five bloods, and he is truly one of the great writers of music for movies. I also wanted to share a conversation I had with the film editor Barry Alexander Brown in February. Two Thousand Nineteen, after he received an Oscar nomination for his work on Black Klansman they've been together since spikes first movie. She's gotTa, have it? Like so many great filmmakers spike works with the same crew over and over again, not just Aronson Berry, but production designer when Thomas Costume. Designer Ruth Carter casting director Robby Reed, and that incredible troop you've seen over and over again in his movies Denzel Washington, of course, Johnsboro on Davis Samuel Jackson Roger One of Your Smith Arthur Nas. Kerala Delroy Lindo is Ahah whitlock junior Alleluia Debbie Masar Ruby Dee, the list goes on. Later this week will be back with a review of spikes, the five bloods, which will be available to watch on Netflix on Friday, it's the story of four black Vietnam veterans who return to the jungle for some unsettled business, its reunion of sorts of some of those actors, and for it's a kind of mission statement about missions. Lastly. We'd like to top five on this show. Spike is made more than thirty feature length films, many of which are indisputable classics to cover every style and format under the Sun. Drama Comedy Crime Films Romances Documentary Sports Movies farce satire musical. He's really done at all. I would recommend virtually every movie he's ever made, but before I share my five year a few places, you can watch his movies just in case you're trying to bone up on some of the ones you've missed. Overlook along the way.

Spike Black Klansman George Floyd Oscar LEE Raheem Bill Minneapolis Terence Blanchard Kerala Delroy Lindo Orrin Westerns Netflix Officer York Knicks Dirk NYU Debbie Masar Ruby Dee Ruth Carter Aronson Berry Shaaban Barry Alexander Brown
Marsalis jazz family patriarch dies of virus complications, son says

Morning Edition

02:55 min | 2 years ago

Marsalis jazz family patriarch dies of virus complications, son says

"Ellis Marsalis the pianist educator patriarch of the most celebrated family in jazz died Wednesday in New Orleans he was eighty five his eldest son the saxophonist Branford Marsalis said his father died of complications from the coronavirus Ellis and his wife Delores raised six sons four of them became jazz musicians including Wynton del fail and Jason he was also a mentor to Harry Connick junior and generations of other musicians when Tompkins is host of the program music inside out which airs on W. W. and in New Orleans when I mean this is just such a huge loss it is a tremendous loss for us in the world and for music lovers everywhere actually Ellis Marsalis was committed to being a teacher and she wants to be a musician so he can help people all over the world and Louis Armstrong we appreciate modern and you know the Ellis park center here in the night or are they called him a master educator you know he came up in the nineteen forties and the nineteen fifties when modern dress had no money in the world nothing there were no schools but by the end of his life you know nearly every jazz musician who's from here or the study had a story to tell about how Ellis Marsalis inspired we're talking about Terence Blanchard thank you your contact book now thank you for that finally Nicholas Payton list goes on and not including of course Marcella they have wonderful careers at I was gonna ask I mean how much did he pressure them to go into into music and jazz in particular well you know what I spoke with him he you know he said that he never rule breaking news out of it you know he said he would wait at if the music and if they wanted to learn to keep with that by wanting them I know pointing out certain artists that they should be listening to and he was also very good at keeping brutal but very useful advice to players you know and that runs an internet connection here but always remark on that in interviews you know come quite famous explain elements helps with with top but but you know but they were the better for it and and obviously carry on again and my fellow spokesman center named Ellis Marsalis center for music named after the great teacher you know Ron you know every great jazz musicians have one thing in common and that is that the person is equally our front continue elsewhere what's that and you know if you ever

Louis Armstrong Nicholas Payton Harry Connick Wynton Del RON Ellis Marsalis Center Marcella Terence Blanchard Ellis Park Center Ellis Marsalis W. W. Tompkins Jason Delores Ellis Branford Marsalis New Orleans
"terence blanchard" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:30 min | 2 years ago

"terence blanchard" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A great and distinguished song that would be exposed to maybe some new year's in the nineteen nineties when folks watched the very last live tonight show Johnny Carson was serenaded by Bette Midler with here's that rainy day we heard Vic Damone we heard Sarah Vaughan a ship without a sail and now Diana Krall and the page from the Joni Mitchell song book this is black crow docking ragged three he's back as a highly that's me now he's driving down to the shiny I lack that the way to the highly the plane to let taxi taxi I've been trying along I have a the life is illumination shin that being that and then the moon in the I love that my and Terence Blanchard was partners.

Johnny Carson Bette Midler Vic Damone Sarah Vaughan Diana Krall Joni Mitchell Terence Blanchard
"terence blanchard" Discussed on Christian Podcast Community

Christian Podcast Community

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"terence blanchard" Discussed on Christian Podcast Community

"Do you hear the Voice of God. The movie Harry. It provides a good foundation for discussion on slavery from both historical and spiritual perspective. Are you just watching episode ninety eight. Harriet welcome to the PODCAST. That shares critical thinking for the entertained Christian. I'm e Franklin. I'm Tim Martin. And we're going to go back in time a little bit with this movie or I guess it's more like a fictional version of beckon tie. Well everything everything. I read suggests that some stuff is fictionalized. But it's accurate inasmuch as the story of tells. Yeah Yeah I think that there's a lot of truth Bruce Senate and I think there's some fiction in it as well so it's I think the nice balanced we didn't go to see. A documentary. Went to see a movie. It's so it's not as accurate as documentary would be but it was more entertaining than a documentary so I think that it is best of both worlds granted. There are entertaining documentaries out there. We don't want to buy the art. Yes yes yes this movie was. I thought a pretty good good movie. It is actually fairly clean so I think that there would be a perspective where you could take. Maybe school aged children to cozy this to kind of open up a level of discussion on you know the history of slavery in the United States and an other aspects of the story I think get safe to take kids to. Because they kept the violence down there was teensy bit a language that plugged in online found. But I didn't notice it and there's there's really no sexual content. There's a you know some states of undress for Harriet but Other than that nothing. That's so horrible purpose that you couldn't have kids in the room to see basically a heriot's rated PG thirteen which coming out of A. I was a little surprised because there are much worse. PG Thirteen movies out there. As far as content much much I think this probably could easily have gotten a PG if not even and maybe even a g except for the the difficult content of it well the violence in and there was some language. And I don't Kaji would be a major stretch but PG maybe I could see a PG but pg thirteen is as a good safe rating for it. And I think that you could very well take school aged children to see this movie Obviously really young kids would not be interested in it but it would be a good discussion starter from an educational standpoint important for a school age children. In fact I I was talking to some people at work about this. And they said they'd actually seen whole classes of kids coming out of the theater and they. I thought that they'd gotten to see Harriet. So could see you know being a classroom exercise to see this movie. The music was by another new composer to I've never heard of fits His name. I'm assuming it's a him. Terence Blanchard is very atmospheric. And there were when you listen to it as kind.

Harriet Terence Blanchard United States Bruce Senate Tim Martin e Franklin Kaji
"terence blanchard" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"terence blanchard" Discussed on KOMO

"I was embarrassed. it was not something that represents the. the person I've become. I try to be a photo of the prime minister and races make up surfaced yesterday and he says there was another incident when he was in high school congressional Democrats are calling for an investigation after Washington post reports that the acting director of national intelligence stopped a whistle blower report against president trump from reaching Congress house intelligence committee chair Adam Schiff says it's possible the president himself is involved in quashing the whistle blowers report department of justice has been involved in the decision to withhold that information from Congress we do not know because we cannot get an answer to the question about whether the White House is also involved in preventing this information from coming to Congress the house intelligence committee will hold an open hearing next week with acting national intelligence director Joseph McGuire in as a liquid here at ABC news Washington a New Jersey man is charged with scouting locations for a terror attack Alexi sub join Hezbollah in Lebanon more than two decades ago receive training on how to use weapons and build explosives and once he entered the United States federal prosecutors city scouted locations for a possible attack he pretended to be taking photos like a tourist when the FBI city surveil the you end the statue of liberty Rockefeller Center in various bridges tunnels airports court records city also scattered high profile locations in Boston and Washington DC even calculated how strong security was and how big a bomb would be needed to maximize damage ABC's Erin to Turkey for the first time and it's a hundred thirty six year history the Metropolitan Opera we'll put on an opera by a black composer in New York the company says it'll present fire shut up up in my bones by the composer and jazz trumpeter Terence Blanchard you're listening to ABC news. stay informed como mid day good afternoon come on his time to to a tailor fansites with our top stories Seattle.

ABC Congress Adam Schiff Washington president Washington post acting director White House Terence Blanchard Joseph McGuire prime minister New Jersey liberty Rockefeller Center Hezbollah FBI Alexi director United States
"terence blanchard" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"terence blanchard" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Is great at the Caddyshack restaurant. The atmosphere is fantastic. The wait staff the management, everything about the places. Great and we've loved loved having this partnership with them. And then providing my listener, my my my club film club members with fifteen percent off all their food. So make a night of it. Go to Murray brothers Caddyshack restaurant. You know before the movie get some food get that. Fifteen percent discount and then just jump. Right over. It's only a couple of seconds away jump right over to the movie theater at AMC Rosemont eighteen and and you can you can see of the man who knew too much Jimmy Stewart's man who knew too much on the big screen. So there you go get your seats. Reserve now at at AMC theaters dot com. Let's see. Let's go to Diane on WGN. Hi, diane. Hi, really, enjoying your show tonight. Thank you. I've got a movie I don't know who did the schooler, but and obsessed with this movie and the music, it's that Spike Lee movie the twenty fifth hour. Yeah. That's my favorite Spike Lee movie of all time. Oh my God. They love it. It's an amazing movie. Terence Blanchard did the score Terence Blanchard and who's done the score for many of his movies, including just a black black klansman. He got nominated for an Academy Award for that black twenty twenty-fifth hours. My favorite Spike Lee movie of all time. It's a it's an astonishing astonishing everybody in that movie. It's great. Yep. Yep. In the late. Great Philip Seymour Hoffman is in it. And and Barry pepper needs to work more. There's not no he needs to be in more, movies and Edward Norton and Rosetta Rosario Dawson. I it's it is it is one of the tag wearing a pack on her in the nightclub. Oh my gosh. Beautiful movie. It really is. It's one of the was one of the first movies the first movie to to really deal with the scars that were left in New York after nine eleven. Oh, yeah. Yeah. So poignant. Yeah. That's exactly black the firemen. Yup. Absolutely. Like guys. It's a great movie. Diane, thanks for the call one more thing on the movie. Yeah, we outplay on the credits going out that great Springsteen's. Right. Yup. Absolutely. Okay. Diane take care. God. Yup. There's somebody else out there that likes twenty-fifth hours, much me think didn't think there was. All right. We have to break we get the news coming up, and then we'll go back to the phones and the texts and talk about your favorite movie scores and more right here on seven twenty WGN..

Diane Spike Lee WGN Caddyshack restaurant Terence Blanchard Rosetta Rosario Dawson Barry pepper Philip Seymour Hoffman Jimmy Stewart AMC Murray New York Edward Norton Springsteen twenty twenty-fifth Fifteen percent fifteen percent twenty fifth twenty-fifth
"terence blanchard" Discussed on Reel Chat

Reel Chat

02:52 min | 3 years ago

"terence blanchard" Discussed on Reel Chat

"And I think that people will watch favorite and then retrospectively go back and watch his words and the second jelly award for best adapted screenplay went to black klansman. This is the big one. That Spike Lee one. I love this. Yes. I kind of feel like black klansman should've been up for more. But I just that it wasn't going to win. So I'm really glad that that went to to these film. I think this is an amazing film. So it was up against the bell of Busta Scruggs from the Cohen's can you ever? Forgive me if Bill straight talk and stars born. Yeah. A star is born. I'm I I haven't seen in. I think that, you know, the full integration of it. I'm just not would take the performances to get me in there. I'm kind of looking forward to seeing that if Bill streak could talk I think that it wasn't brought to life as well. As it could have been is probably in amazing book, and I think that it's a wonderful film. But it's it really left me wanting can you have if you give me a definitely did want to say, but just couldn't get around to it. And I've also seen the ballot of buses Scruggs in terms of Cohen brothers kind of event. It was quite wonderful. But didn't have the hot in black klansman, actually made me cry. And I think absolutely moved by by that film. And I think that deserve to be saying by a lot of people, I think it is very challenging there's sort of two films that sort of pushing the same bent in a way, but black klansman think Spike Lee, he's just on an amazing amazing job with it or at the second mccaskill award. I'm gonna really interested to hear his thoughts. Here vista original school went to probably the youngest looking composer ever. Ludwig ranson for Black Panther this film. One also black klansman Terence Blanchard. If Bill straight could talk nNcholas Brazil, I'll of dogs from Alexander display and Mary Poppins returns from Mark showman thoughts on this one injury. It's getting tricky because John Williams. Involved as much anymore over James, sadly, all the rights. They're just getting a little bit old and the new generation little bit patchy. Yeah. A little it's films. I haven't seen. So it was hard to pick a win up. Just went for the the superhero view of the moment imagining that would be, you know, quite a interesting school. Have you seen the movie? No, you haven't actually heard the school non I'm have any of you is this where the winner of best original score. I things so. Yeah, I actually really is an interesting, so it's a lot of sort of African percussion and a lot of sound you wouldn't see an ala model movies. They basically ran with the cultural element of the film and really unique. So yeah, I mean, that's one of the few reasons I think Black Panther disease. It doesn't best picture for sure about that. And costume design yet struck out on a few levels. Interesting. The composer the regional Scandinavian of some background and composing Africa. Music. It's a very African Centric production. And then I got someone completely former more that's the cool thing..

Bill streak Cohen Spike Lee Busta Scruggs Terence Blanchard vista original school Africa Ludwig ranson John Williams James mccaskill Brazil Mary Poppins Mark
"terence blanchard" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:57 min | 3 years ago

"terence blanchard" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro, and Mary Louise Kelley the civil rights watchdog group, the southern poverty Law Center and says the number of hate groups in the US is growing the center attributes the rise to what it calls hysteria around the changing demographics of the country NPR's. Leila Fadel reports the annual year in hate and extremism report from the southern poverty Law Center says last year, the number of hate groups rose by seven percent. It's part of a four year trend that has seen a thirty percent increase. Heidi Baruch who heads the group's intelligence project says the majority of these groups are driven by white supremacist ideology. The other thing that we have seen in recent years is a wave of racist and antisemitic violence break out across the country at levels that we hadn't seen prior. She points to the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting among others. The report states that this rise of hate groups is being driven by the president's rhetoric and right wing media that plays on fears of a less white. Country the words and imagery coming out of the Trump administration, and from Trump himself or heightening these fears these images of foreign scary invaders. This is fearmongering, and it's making people feel like this country is changing in a dangerous direction. The report points out. There is a reaction happening the growth in black nationalist movements with extremist views. The key difference though. The report says is they have little support or political sway. The southern poverty Law Center has been a stalwart of civil rights work for decades. Really? It's been the subject of controversy. Critics question. Whether it's blurring the lines between its role as a watchdog and political activism in two thousand eighteen the centers president Richard Cohen, apologize to British activists measured. No ause of the Quilliam foundation for including him on a list of anti Muslim extremists. Although we may have our differences with some of the positions that Mr Watson billion if Dakin they are most certainly not anti Muslim extremists. We'd like to extend our sincerest. Policies to paid a settlement of three point four million dollars. The southern poverty Law Center is also being sued by three organizations on the hate group list, including the center for immigration studies. A conservative think tank that advocates for restrictive immigration policies. Virus says she stands by the decision to include groups that she says disseminate hate speech, one of their new reports key findings is that some of the fringe groups that felt emboldened by the rise of President Trump are starting to lose faith in him. She warns that if these groups don't feel there is a political path more people could turn to violence. Leila. Fadel NPR news crazy as this may sound Spike Lee is up for his first Oscar nomination for directing it's for black clansmen equally hard to believe lease longtime composer Terence Blanchard is up for his first Oscar to Tim grieving talked to both of them about what that means Terence Blanchard on the soundtracks of Spike Lee joins before he even started scoring them. And MO better blues, Denzel.

southern poverty Law Center Leila Fadel president NPR Dakin Heidi Baruch Terence Blanchard Spike Lee Ari Shapiro Trump US Oscar Quilliam foundation Mary Louise Kelley Pittsburgh synagogue Denzel Richard Cohen Mr Watson
"terence blanchard" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"terence blanchard" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro, and Mary Louise Kelley the civil rights watchdog group, the southern poverty Law Center and says the number of hate groups in the US is growing the center attributes the rise to what it calls hysteria around the changing demographics of the country NPR's. Leila Fadel reports the annual year in hate and extremism report from the southern poverty Law Center says last year, the number of hate groups rose by seven percent. It's part of a four year trend that has seen a thirty percent increase. Heidi buyer who heads the group's intelligence project says the majority of these groups are driven by white supremacist ideology. The other thing that we have seen in recent years is a wave of racist and antisemitic violence break out across the country at levels that we hadn't seen prior. She points to the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting among others. The report states that this rise of hate groups is being driven by the president's rhetoric and right wing meet. Idiot at plays on fears of a less white country. The words and imagery coming out of the Trump administration and from Trump himself or heightening these fears these images of foreign scary invaders. This is fearmongering, and it's making people feel like this country is changing in a dangerous direction. The report points out. There is a reaction happening the growth in black nationalist movements with extremist views. The key difference though. The report says is they have little support or political sway. The southern poverty Law Center has been a stalwart of civil rights work for decades. Lately, it's been the subject of controversy. Critics question. Whether it's blurring the lines between its role as a watchdog and political activism in two thousand eighteen the centers president Richard Cohen apologized to British activists was of the Quilliam foundation for including him on a list of anti Muslim extremists. Although we may have our differences with some of the positions that Mr. Nawaz billion if can there most certainly not anti Muslim extremist. We'd like to extend our sincerest apologies to a paid. A settlement of three point four million dollars. The southern poverty Law Center is also being sued by three organizations on the hate group list, including the center for immigration studies. A conservative think tank that advocates for restrictive immigration policies. Virus says she stands by the decision to include groups that she says disseminate hate speech, one of their new reports key findings is that some of the fringe groups that felt emboldened by the rise of President Trump are starting to lose faith in him. She warns that if these groups don't feel there is a political path more people could turn to violence. Leila. Fadel NPR news crazy as it. Sounds Spike Lee is up for his first Oscar for directing it's four black clansmen equally hard to believe lease longtime composer Terence Blanchard is up for his first Oscar to Tim Griffin talked to both of them about what that means. Terence Blanchard was on the soundtracks of Spike Lee joins before he even started scoring them and mobile blues,.

southern poverty Law Center Leila Fadel president NPR Terence Blanchard Spike Lee Ari Shapiro Trump US Pittsburgh synagogue Oscar Heidi Mary Louise Kelley Tim Griffin Mr. Nawaz Richard Cohen Quilliam foundation four million dollars
"terence blanchard" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"terence blanchard" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro, and Mary Louise Kelley the civil rights watchdog group, the southern poverty Law Center and says the number of hate groups in the US is growing the center attributes the rise to what it calls hysteria around the changing demographics of the country NPR's. Leila Fadel reports the annual year in hate and extremism report from the southern poverty Law Center says last year, the number of hate groups rose by seven percent. It's part of a four year trend that has seen a thirty percent increase. Heidi Baruch who heads the group's intelligence project says the majority of these groups are driven by white supremacist ideology. The other thing that we have seen in recent years is a wave of racist and antisemitic violence break out across the country at levels that we hadn't seen prior. She points to the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting among others. The report states that this rise of hate groups is being driven by the president's rhetoric. And right wing media that plays on. On fears of a less white country. The words and imagery coming out of the Trump administration and from Trump himself or heightening these fears these images of foreign scary invaders. This is fearmongering, and it's making people feel like this country is changing in a dangerous direction. The report points out. There is a reaction happening the growth in black nationalist movements with extremist views. The key difference though. The report says is they have little support or political sway. The southern poverty Law Center has been a stalwart of civil rights work. For decades relates been the subject of controversy. Critics question whether it's blurring the lines between its role as a watchdog and political activism in two thousand eighteen the centers president Richard Cohen, apologize to British activists measured. No ause of the Quilliam foundation for including him on a list of anti Muslim extremists. Although we may have our differences with some of the positions that Mr Watson William Dakin there. Most certainly not anti Muslim extremists. We'd like to. To extend our sincerest apologies to paid. A settlement of three point four million dollars. The southern poverty Law Center is also being sued by three organizations on the hate group list, including the center for immigration studies. A conservative think tank that advocates for restrictive immigration policies. Virus says she stands by the decision to include groups that she says disseminate hate speech, one of their new reports key findings is that some of the fringe groups that felt emboldened by the rise of President Trump are starting to lose faith in him. She warns that if these groups don't feel there is a political path more people could turn to violence. Leila. Fadel NPR news crazy as this may sound Spike Lee is up for his first Oscar nomination for directing it's for black clansmen equally hard to believe lease longtime composer Terence Blanchard is up for his first Oscar to Tim grieving talked to both of them about what that means. Terence Blanchard was on the soundtracks of Spike Lee joins before he even started scoring them. And MO better.

southern poverty Law Center Leila Fadel president Heidi Baruch Terence Blanchard Spike Lee NPR Ari Shapiro Trump US Mr Watson William Dakin Quilliam foundation Oscar Pittsburgh synagogue Mary Louise Kelley MO Richard Cohen Tim
"terence blanchard" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"terence blanchard" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Cursed cross burnings marches. This is fiction. It'll be a big year for the film, black clansmen. We meet police officers members of the KKK various characters. And then there's a different kind of character the score. Composed by Terence Blanchard. Role of the music is there like first of all to bring some of those intangible things to to the four. You know, if there they're things that we don't we can't put motions, you can't really describe, you know, but the music is is there to kind of helpless experienced that black clansmen directed. By Spike Lee tells the story of Ron stallworth the first black officer with the Colorado Springs police force who am I speaking. This David Duke played by John, David Washington. He infiltrates KKK chapter by impersonating, a white man over the phone my mouth to God's ears are really hate those black rats and anyone else really that doesn't have pure white area blood running through their veins, his partner Jewish officer played by Adam driver goes undercover to gather evidence against the clan. It said in the nineteen seventies. But Lee makes direct connections to today. And it's based on a true story. Which amazed Terence Blanchard when he first joined the project inspite, I told me first thing I thought was meant you need to put the bottle dot. Really? Like, where's this you're making this a black man infiltrates the clan in Colorado Springs, that Graham Blanchard has long been known as a top jazz musician with six Grammy awards. He grew up in New Orleans began playing the piano and trumpet is a youngster. Join the Lionel Hampton orchestra while still in college..

Terence Blanchard Spike Lee Colorado Springs Graham Blanchard officer David Washington Ron stallworth Lionel Hampton David Duke Grammy New Orleans Adam driver partner John