24 Burst results for "Teradata"

Exposing an FBI Bombshell With Congressman Jim Jordan

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:52 min | 4 months ago

Exposing an FBI Bombshell With Congressman Jim Jordan

"One of the best arguments for us to take back the house is to make sure Jim Jordan is in a position of leadership. Congressman Jordan, welcome back to the program. Good to be with you, Charlie and thanks for thanks for all you're doing for the cause of freedom. We appreciate it. Thank you. Well, you're fighting every single day. So congressman walk us through this new whistleblower. Seems like there's a lot of whistleblowers right now at the FBI and it's kind of it's hard to keep them all straight. Walk us through the one that you're kind of focused on right now that reveals scandalous push by FBI to pad domestic teradata. Please go ahead. Yeah, yeah. Your first point there, we've had over a dozen FBI agents come to us as whistleblowers. And think about it. They're coming to us when we're in the minority where we can't subpoena documents. They're just coming to us because it's so bad, the political nature of that place now is so, so egregious that they're willing to come to us just so we can begin to tell their story and tell the truth to the American people. And we had one come to us in the last few weeks who said that they are being pressured to label almost every case. The catalog or categorize almost every case as a domestic terrorism case as it didn't do it. Domestic violence extremism, I think, is the technical term they use. And you remember, they created this office within DoJ back as the start of this year. They stood it up a few months ago. And now they're being pressured to do it. And kind of the interesting thing about it is they said one of the key people who was doing the pressuring on the good rank and file agents is this guy named Timothy T bolt, who just happens to be the same guy who the other whistleblower, a different whistleblower who went to senator grassley, said was the individual who was responsible for suppressing evidence about the Hunter Biden story. So first thing evidence that would have disproved the whole disinformation campaign that we got from the left in the run up to the 2020 presidential election. So that's how political displace has become and it's why we're trying to tell the story and as you point out, hopefully if we get in the majority, we can do a little more about it.

Congressman Jordan FBI Jim Jordan Teradata Charlie Timothy T Bolt Senator Grassley DOJ Hunter Biden
"teradata" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

05:37 min | 7 months ago

"teradata" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Of other modern data tools that have different ways of unifying the data stack. And I think a lot of those tools are sort of modern ETL tools or data conveyance tools. I think of things like 5 tran or, oh, the open-source various open-source 5 trans. And there's also things like rudder stack or other customer data platform systems and I wonder if you see opportunity, you know, since you have in starburst basically a connection point between all of these different areas of the stack, basically all the areas of the data, the data layer, if you see an opportunity for not just querying, but movement and ETL. Yeah, absolutely. ETL just broadly, if I can make a comment, I think, on the role it's played in the industry for decades now. And going all the way back to informatica and teradata in the on prem world, a couple decades ago, has always been a pain point because of the time involved and not just the processing time. That's actually probably less of a concern, but more so the human time involved with creating pipelines, maintaining pipelines, you add a field and a source database. Now you get to add that field in your data warehouse. There's just a tremendous amount of work and friction that basically slows down the overall what we call time to insight. Like the amount of time it takes from data being created to one data can be understood. And so ETL has introduced friction in that process for decades. With the advent of cloud data warehouses, many of those ETL tools have just been basically reimagined and recreated in the cloud context, but the overall model hasn't necessarily changed all that much. And so our view of the world is one where the customer has the opportunity. The user has the opportunity to decide, is this something that I want to move. And again, what would drive a movement decision? I would say probably primarily economics, like I want to move this into a data Lake because that's going to be the lowest cost place for me to store the data just inherently. S three is going to be the cheapest place for me. Or perhaps a data quality pipeline, like you want to do some transformations and landed in a particular place where that becomes more of a gold standard. Okay, those might be reasons to do that. But we're giving customers the opportunity to say, actually, we're going to bypass that we're just going to go directly to the data source and query it where it lives. And so that's kind of the paradigm shift is really inverting the data warehousing model, which has always been about centralization and saying, actually, you can operate in a decentralized world. And that paradigm now actually has a name. I wish I could say we created it, but we didn't. There's a woman named Jamal degani, who coined this term of a data mesh, and that data mesh concept is now starting to gain momentum as a new way of just thinking about your data in a decentralized fashion and being able to skip ETL. The other thing I would say is it's probably important to distinguish between the E and L from the T, right? So ETL, of course, is extract transform and load. And the extract and load are probably not the highest value parts of ETL. It's really the T, the transform. And so some of these technologies are really focused on the transformation, like DBT, I would say, is plays in the T part of things, whereas some of these other tools are more focused on the extract and load. And that's the piece that we think is probably the most optional in world going forward. And I think what's core to our belief anyways is this notion that we just think centralization has never been possible in data history and why wouldn't it be possible now? I spent a few years at teradata teradata bought my first startup back in 2014 and teradata was the pioneer of the data warehouse model. They invented the single source of truth concept. And while I was working there, none of their customers and they were very big company at the time when I was there $2.7 billion in revenue. None of their customers had actually consolidated all of the data in the enterprise into one enterprise data warehouse. So if the leader in the industry couldn't do that over decades with its customers, what changes now when we have arguably even more fragmentation, even more heterogeneity in our data ecosystems, there's more tools, more databases, each one purpose built for a particular job. And I think that's kind of at the core of our thesis is that that's not going to change, that you're not going to be able to get your whole world wrapped into one particular data source to analyze it. So if we acknowledge that reality, how can we how can we manage that? How can we manage a decentralized world? And that's really what a data mesh is about. And that's really, I would say, what we believe the future will be. So even though we're really good at data Lake analytics, and that's a core use case, this notion of being able to extend beyond a data Lake and access different data sources, we think is going to be more and more important over time. Evan you,.

teradata informatica Jamal degani teradata teradata Lake analytics Evan
"teradata" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

05:45 min | 8 months ago

"teradata" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"They've been they have a lot more analytics features, a lot more analytics, ecosystem. There was one large hedge fund. The guy that was like, look, I really want to use single store, but all my data that I'm getting is in snowflake. And so it would have been difficult. Now, on prem, actually, single store, we find that people are migrating from on prem data warehouses into into single store. Some teradata vertica and et cetera and they do it as, you know, they do it on a two step modernization. So step one is you move to single store, and you can do that on prem, and step two, they move to cloud. And that way, you don't have to do you don't have to do all of the changes at once and often they have on prem hardware, et cetera, that they need to depreciate, or that they want to continue to use, or they want to make sure it's low latency access to their applications, or behind their firewall, so there's lots of reasons that people won't want to use single store on prem. I guess the last one is just, you know, I think that even most of the cloud, the cloud data warehouses, the redshift, BigQuery, snowflake, et cetera, don't even call themselves necessarily data warehouses anymore. They call themselves where data platforms, I used to talk about how data warehousing is not a use case and kind of what the people what customers needed was something actually broader than just data warehousing. And if you think about it as just sort of solving the same problems that you solved 20 years ago, then you were unnecessarily limiting what you could do with the with your data. Is there a work you could do over time to augment single store with like full on data warehousing? Functionality or do you think it's just prohibitive when you're trying to, if you were trying to do that much multi modeling? Great question. I think in the fullness of time, we'll get there. One of the difficulties of sort of being trying to be this broad multi model database is that you don't want to try to be everything to everyone, and you have to focus on certain areas. And so, you know, we have decided not to push too hard against directly competing with the data warehousing vendors. That said a big use case, one of our three main kind of motions is augment and sort of data warehouse augmentation because a lot of the time somebody is using a data warehouse or they're using a database and there's a subset of workloads that are not fast enough. Maybe they can't land data fast enough. Maybe they need super high concurrency. Maybe they need really low latency. And so we find a lot of customers using either a lambda architecture or land data in both in both places where they landed in single store because they can do the updates very fast and then they push the data back to another data warehouse. But we start out as sort of augmentation. In fact, augmentation, so when I was at Google, we were really, really focused on big takeouts. Like taking out teradata, taking out these kind of other big, big systems. And those are massive undertakings. They have to worry about people have 10,000 scripts that run against against teradata. They have all sorts of applications and you want to make sure those things don't fall over. They don't fail. And to try to do that all in one in one step is really, really difficult. So I think the better approach and the approach single story is taking is, hey, we're going to we will augment the thing that you're doing. With something that will help you either scale better or get better performance or latency or better kind of simplicity, and then over time, hey, if you like single story, I was working, you may find that more and more and more of your workloads, you know, stay in, stay in single store. And that is, it's also a pattern that we see. It is people find it more cost effective than some other some other systems, sometimes people complain that other systems, you know, it's easy to have other data cloud data warehouses are easy to have runaway costs, et cetera. And so single store is often a good option. If you're concerned about your TCO. As you look out across the newer database market, I think some of the more innovative and successful databases I've seen are rock set, a planet scale, trying to think of others, and then there's of course a variety of newer data warehousing technologies like presto has really been productized by starburst and you have Pinot being productized by star tree, are there any sources of inspiration that you take when you look towards the future of single store? We absolutely, but I think we're trying to take our inspiration from customers rather than rather than competitors. I think a lot of people are chasing the decay of the data Lake. I think there was a time when everybody needed to have Hadoop. And if you want to have to do, you have to have a data Lake. And the data lakes quickly became a data swamp. I remember when I was at Google, we had this customer advisory board with some of the execs like the CTOs of fortune ten companies, like some of these biggest companies. And we were trying to sell them actually on the data Lake idea. And I was like, what do you think about data lakes? And that was the one thing that all these people.

teradata Google
"teradata" Discussed on Data Skeptic

Data Skeptic

04:39 min | 10 months ago

"teradata" Discussed on Data Skeptic

"So we one of the main reasons why people move to it was there was a lot less risk in cost structure. It wasn't like you had to have this Big Bang. I went install in the teaser, teradata, Oracle. I have to get all the infrastructure ready. And I have to plan the story as you build it for Easter Sunday, the church so it can handle that high workload, but most of the time it's half that capacity being used. So going back to, I think the readers are anyone who's a data professional and looking at cloud databases and wants to move to snowflake. It's really, it has a getting started chapter. So it's really for people kind of new to this. And it really gives the essentials or the basics of snowflake. Let's talk about that getting started path. What's the typical on ramp? Is this a tool that an ambitious young engineer who wants to try some things out brings into a company or is this executive level down making a decision? It can actually be both. Like I said, the great part about snowflake and one of the things I just really loved about it was you know, you really couldn't bring big data solutions to any startups or smaller companies without serious money allocation. And so you can be an engineer and get started from it get some type of security approvals and show off what it can do. Most of the time, people incorporations they've been doing this for years is proof of concept. So they'll bring over a couple of different workloads and then they'll test it out and snowflake. And most of the time, it crushes the competition. And then they gradually move over to it. You know, that being said, there's plenty of places where the executive came from another place where they were using snowflake or nose about the performance of it. So the executive actually brings it in as well. You know, and most enterprises deal with setting it up with octa or some type of third party identity management tools. So while it's super easy to get started with a regular username password, typically when they want to scale it for an enterprise, it's going through some type of combination of security approvals, snowflake is encrypted end to end, at rest and when it's moving, but most larger enterprises, they need to go through that those testing and share some of the security tests penetration tests as well. So you raise a really good point about this kind of lowering the bar that's a typical startup was not about to sign a three year contract with a big company, making it accessible, what kind of workloads is that unlock? What are your smaller companies now able to do? Well, the biggest thing is if you have some massive data science workload, especially that before you'd have to run X amount of EMR instances or EC2 instances or larger RDS, like a data system, you can just bring it up for like 5 minutes on a 6 XL on AWS. I think only 5 XL and 6 accelerate are on AWS, but it's up to four XL and the others. And so that's like 512 EC2 instances cranking up for 5 minutes and running this massive workload. And you know, it's kind of like crazy, but you can do things like that that you can never do before. You'd have to spend a $1 million to even get a tenth of that kind of CPU horsepower behind it. So if I've got that much data, it's going to maybe be a challenge for me to get ingested. Do I connect snowflake to wherever I've got that data now and it's able to import it or how does that process work? So it does depend on the size of things. Ironically enough, I can't remember the thing off the top of my head, but AWS has another tool like snow. It's basically a big disk that comes to you and you unload it. So when you're talking about many amounts of terabytes, it's going to depend upon your network bandwidth. But you can load terabytes per hour into snowflake. It can handle it pretty well, but if you're like a bigger place and you have this on prem, or you had a data center, then you use is called snowball from AWS. And I'm assuming Google or Microsoft has something similar. It's basically they ship you out a desk and from this data center you unload it and move parts of it over. But if you have real bandwidth, you can just.

teradata Oracle Microsoft Google
"teradata" Discussed on eCommerce Fastlane

eCommerce Fastlane

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"teradata" Discussed on eCommerce Fastlane

"That's one of the things that i'd like to say is one of our biggest strength is really the automation capabilities. So we don't want to give people an extra dashboard pop into an extra tab digging. Stay open i have too many of them open anyway so we can work right right there. So basically we have a feature that will turn an email into a handwritten card so anywhere that you are able to trigger an email. We can actually insert handwritten note touch point. It so are in really all love stories. I mean i think it's just kind of the human nature of us and we're entrepreneurs were marketers. I don't know what it is. I think a little bit of the education and some of the inspiration from others. I think it really helps motivate us to think about. Hey there's opportunity for me to or am. I inspired by that answers. The answer typically yes hopefully not putting on the spot here but if you could share a journey of maybe a shop a fight brand who has recently implemented ignite post like. Where were they before ignite post. How did they find you. And then they run. Some campaigns or some automation can what was the end result. Sure sure yeah happy to. So i'll actually tell you a story about a distillery who uses handwritten notes and about a customer named endo who purchased from them so and made a purchase for her father for father's day. She bought her father's day gift from this distillery for her dad for father's day after purchasing the gifts so she received the gift from the distillery wrapped. It gave a teradata. Everything was great and then afterwards she actually received a handwritten card in the mail and in her own words. She was absolutely blown away by the gesture so much so that several things happened when she received a handwritten card. Because this is her first purchase with the distillery so couple things happened number one. She remembers exactly where she was when she received the card in the mail that day. Literally down to remembers what room in her apartment. She was in what couch she was sitting on. Which is crazy. Because he's such a mundane thing like nobody thinks about like. We'll what was i doing when i open the mail yesterday but she remembers everything vividly even though she no longer has that couch and no longer lives in that apartment so that one happened the second thing. She was so blown away that she took photos of the card and posted it all over social media so this small gesture now turned into a mini. Pr event and everybody else was privy to it and then third. The distilleries remained top of mind for her over the years because she returned and purchase gifts for friends family members when appropriate various times throughout the past couple of years. So baby showers birthdays. Like you name it so this goes back to what we were talking about in the beginning of the show where there's so many different options you have when it comes to okay. I need to get my friend birthday gift. What should i do so creating that kind of customer loyalty in that brand affinity that says okay number one. This brand is top of mind. So i know about it and number two. This is a great experience. I'm going to go purchase from this brand again. And give this gift to my friend for the birthday. So just by setting up a super simple handwritten card follow-up flow committed a.

endo teradata
"teradata" Discussed on The Drill Down

The Drill Down

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"teradata" Discussed on The Drill Down

"It took a header are coming up next. We're going to look at the world of online dating how that has changed. Interestingly in the world of online dating which is better. I'm lane dating for a quick hook up or is the business better when online dating focused on finding love and a partner that would spark as after and the ceo. Eric eichmann talks to us about the better business model sex or a lasting love affair. Isaac finding love in a hopeless place just told us. Let's find some love from our sponsors braintrust global talent network. We sponsor of drill down brain trust the global talent network that matches highly skilled technical freelancers with the world's most reputable brands such as bank of america goldman sachs porsche under armour and more braintrust helps these companies build agile teams fast at a fraction of the cost visit. Braintrust dot com. That's b. r. i n t. t-r-u-s-t braintrust dot com to learn more. We also love indeed because when you pay for a job site you should know what you're getting get indeed. Only pay for quality. Candidates meet your must have requirements. Don't just hope for the perfect candidate. Indeed hiring tools to help you cut through the noise to hire faster and smarter with indeed assessment in. Choose one hundred and thirty five skill tests to help. Make sure that you're finding applications and the people with the skills you need. According to talent nest indeed delivers four times. More hires than all other job sites combined one and a half times more eire's and even internal referrals so join more than three million businesses worldwide. That use indeed. The higher great talent fast get started right now drilled on listeners. Seventy five dollars sponsor job credit to upgrade your job post at indeed dot com slash drill. Down that's right. Seventy five dollars. Credit at indeed dot com slash drilled on trout indeed dot com slash drill offer valid only through september thirty go fast terms and conditions are. Welcome back to the drill down. Podcast we are joined right. Now by eric eichmann. Ceo spark networks. Which has one of the all-time stock tickers of l. o. V. and disclosure erica. I a- one. Point was a shareholder of spark networks And am not at the time of this broadcast but it. I'll just say it was a painful thing to own socking because it looked like the numbers are so good it looks like the business of online dating is so good stock has performed on and talk about the stock much but yet you wanna talk about the business that we can understand how it works and what could work better and what you're doing to make the business work so what so. What is the spark. I define it. Yeah so you you you read the ticker the at love right so l lovie against that. Yeah who could be against love. We're in the business of online dating for serious relationships Or or goal is really to be the leader in social dating for meaningful relationships in alex. Lean more that but as you know online dating has grown a lot and it's very common fee. Now was a matter of fact most of the people that meet through online dating report a happier more durable relationship than other me's in about forty percents of singles in the us me through online dating. So it's it's it's very common now very commonplace versus what used to be twenty years ago so when i'm at the apple model sitting cocktail party next to me. That was the that were doomed. I guess we didn't meet online but it doesn't mean it's not on mine fails but it's more likely that you have a successful relationship over time. He needs specifically. You guys have a lot of brand. People wouldn't yellow. Who wanted to london and wouldn't have spark but they would know the of forty plus world got zeus silver singles and elite singles. They might know the faith-based dating which was the funniest hell that you've got christian mingle and j. date under the same rela but why not. Why not why not is a matter of fact we say social dating for meaningful relationships meaningful relationships really refers to the fact that we catered for serious relationships in or properties tend to be forty plus and then also religious based each relationships which as you mention cousteau shamila indeed those five properties you mentioned are the largest for us right. We have thirteen brands for the really important ones that make up more than ninety. Five percent of our revenue are zeus. Ke- elite single silver singles. Christian mingle jaded. And you've got jay. Swipe and we do jake life for the later. Saints singles popular in Mostly mute that but yes we yes. Of course i'm sure. They are using online dating market. I will grant you very big. How do you capture that market. You know given that there are so some really big competitors out there in particular in with with match with with tinder with bumble. And so on. So i make a distinction in the market. 'cause they're serious relationships we cater to invite away that ends up the business model. That's more subscription based and then there's more younger audiences in the more of the casual that doesn't mean they don't become series but it's more of the casuals relationship side in when you think of tinder in bumble these younger and they tend to be in that segment And so those are people that are still sort of exploring. They're still being a lot of people and they can to be models that are more premium that tin to stay longer in those platforms right. So that doesn't mean again that they don't find. Many people have found the relationships that are among lasting but the segments are different so we tend to focus on that segment in. That's what mace us. A lot of the folks out there. We do compete with some of the match france so match dot com awkward. Those kinds of brands compete against a mobile properties. But we always stand her own. Were one of the four largest online. Dating brands matters. 'cause you do have to have scaled to succeed why why does how to scale help. Yeah so you know if you think about online dating. There are two things that are important. The product right so number one is you need to have people in the product right. So if you're in san francisco san mateo. If you're i don't know little rock. You wanna make sure that you find people around you. That are singles that are eligible that you can meet in achieving that what we call liquidity at local level but do that on a national level takes quite a bit of marketing dollars in the markets that you have brands that are pretty large and then a lot of smaller brands that were generally born out of sort of large metropolitan areas san francisco or new york city. They rarely go over. Twenty thirty million dollars They have a hard time scaling to achieve that local liquidity so there are some network effects if he can too serious in any place business right you wanna have a volume of offerings correct. I'd say i'll you obviously if you think of tinder or bumble. Because people stay longer there are stronger. Network effects because in our released enor- properties. If if you're successful customer you end up sort of in a happy relationship you probably cancel Sort of and and then you're off to another thing you might come back to work but generally sort of you know we have different turn profile than a tender or a different.

eric eichmann goldman sachs porsche l lovie cousteau shamila bank of america Isaac erica alex apple jake Saints jay london us san francisco san mateo
"teradata" Discussed on The Drill Down

The Drill Down

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"teradata" Discussed on The Drill Down

"Cory. What is your next drill down. Let's look at a firm holdings firm holdings affirm Trade center af shares jumped over thirty percent today so firm provides financial services essentially buy now pay later options that have become very popular with consumers with sort of a limited pay later thing. It's not put it on your credit card. Birds limited number statement although a firm had some new firm talked about a credit card offering firm also talked about their partnership with peleton. So they have a huge partnership with peleton that has been as much of a third of firms. Revenues come from peleton when peleton sales blew up during the pandemic of firms revenues follower pace so some people looked at this recently public company firm and said cheese. Pound sales are slowing down. And that's a third of the revenue may be affirms not going to be too strong going forward Enter today's quarterly results. We find out herbs doing just fine regardless of what's happening to peleton and they're extending to some really big retailers retailers like amazon retailers like walmart now It's super interesting for this company. Because those bigger retailers aren't as good margin wise but what a firm does is they gather this debt. They use what they say magic. They don't call. I'm calling a magic these technology to look through the data to say. Hey these credit risks are not as great as you think we're gonna pile them all together and sell them off to other investment institutions at wanna have people who are paying back their credit a steady stream of of money. Which is what you want. Any debt instrument durban great success for this and the reasons interesting for them is because the big partnerships like amazon walmart might not give them great gross margins but a will give them a lot more product to sell and create a break your stream of customers buying debt coming from a firm but the company still not profitable. And what's interesting. You max love chin. Isaac the the see our firm yeah For a pay pal guy. janka mafia it would refer to these guys at paypal. Mafia along with peter thiel and elon. Musk and reid hoffman and others So what was interesting. Really is what they talked about is their investment in technology right now as causing them to lose money but there will be profit soon and you could see it when you look deeper into the numbers or so says a firm. Cfo mike linford. -nology is change and we really are technology company and those who lives in yesterday. Get a sense of who matches and and how. We think about products marissa our to everything that we do and that means is we're building platforms that have substantial leverage and scale benefit and will almost certainly When you get to that. I i point not need the same level of new product building and so the way it is in the long run technology and did analytics fences and telemarketing. We'll have real leverage okay And then separately. We focused today because those investments are long-term focused on whether or not the asked for generating transaction processing our platform constitution. Take that revenue western national. So we just want to about being four and a half percent. That's a really healthy number. If you scale that number out to the kind of enterprise level scale that we're trying to build right now it's a lot of profit and there's there's real concern about are going to print out the when we did this go so again. That was a cfo. Mike lynch Deutsche bank conference this morning day. Afl reported earnings and Again the notion that this technology investment of front is going to create prophets down the line. We'll see what is your next showdown or look at teradata. Which company wouldn't talk about quite a bit but a big important technology company. Teradata trades td c. shares fell today but they've risen over one hundred thirty percent in a year. So tell me about. I've never heard of this company either. So it's a big company that does consulting services and they've they've changed as the technology needs the world of change very focused on helping porting company in the clouds to big corporate customers and helping move their process sees on the cloud. Whether it's google or amazon or microsoft zoar terror eaters. Teradata has kind of a multi cloud platform for big companies and does the analytics on top of that so helps companies not just put their data on the cloud but understand. What's happening that data where the value is in that data and run those analytics across the data. That's on the cloud or on premise. So the customers have hired them can start to figure out what the data tells them while they're seeing a big increase in their business they gave a business update today and they said that the annual amount of public cloud contracts. They've got one hundred fifty seven percent from a year ago. Two hundred and thirty nine million dollars. On a thirty million dollar average run rate there were during revenue they say as three hundred seventy six million across all of their products and the generating cash from operations a lot more than they were from ninety. Five million to two hundred twenty five million so this company going through this big turnaround in the midst of this digital transformation. There's are drinking game. It's a friday digital transformation glove mardi on my third drink this point As everyone listens podcast knows the tara data folks In the midst of this digital transformation. Look it sounds like it's working but again there were some hinson this as maybe it's not working great because there's very specifically their cloud They call it cloud visory whatever security one more so it's cloud it's a security and as a platform they call it p. That business they said it was going to be between fifteen and twenty million dollars and a quarter. It was fifteen million the very bottom of the guidance. They're saying next quarter. It's going to be fifteen again. So why isn't this thing. This cloud security platform at the heart of their business. Why isn't that better right now. Well a ceo says even said you know it's it's big business it's lumpy basis can be lumpy chewed to the long contracts that we execute We certainly we always want to Thank agents that we We are comfortable with that. We know that we don't want to disappoint or investors We do expect very strong. Fourth quarter again to to the point From earlier as we go through the year we have more difficult compares I in terms of the shape of the business We are pretty much in line with the marketplace in terms of distribution owed customers Restocking obviously earlier with aws and You know or gdp release was Was in third quarter from Last year and we're seeing good growth as well with With his you're so we're pretty happy with. We are being represented across each of She sp's I think the ps are also starting to see the fight time you know when they deployed teradata and are ecosystem. There is no corn impact in terms of their Spills of first party services. But she because we're well integrated in those environments now is it's given some momentum and focused from c. s. p. sales folks to carry into the proposals so they think those proposals are working. They think they're gonna make those sales and they think that over time that's going to work well for them but the stock as you mentioned sold off quite a bit Today isaac but they've still got a six point one billion dollar market cap so this business it's gone from you know it's basically gun two and a half times up in the last year hundred fifty percents should say hundred fifty percent increase last year. So real turnaround there. Even though today.

affirm Trade center Teradata max love chin amazon walmart mike linford reid hoffman peter thiel Cory elon Mike lynch durban Musk marissa
"teradata" Discussed on The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"teradata" Discussed on The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

"And i'm like okay. And i got damage. Look like from a hailstorm. Exactly because i have no idea. We've never had that kind of hailstorm before well basically the shingles on the roof get quite worn. I mean that's really it like shingles are weird. You know like It feels to me. Like i know they're supposed to last twenty years but why don't you just make them fucking steel or something that lasts fifty years or one hundred light on the west coast. It's like altera kata roofs and shit right. Yeah but wouldn't terra cotta. If there was a hailstorm with charakata wouldn't they bust or they don't do that. maybe. I don't know it's actually question. Maybe it's like teradata on the west coast is they. Don't get as much. We have a terrier carta we have but it's interesting are terror. Cotta tile only looks like teradata. i think it's terr- it's i think it's asked me to look like i think so. That's funny shit anyway. So i i asked my my realtor if she had a recommendation for did roofing guy so she made a recommendation. And i call the guys like okay. Cool and it. It's been so ridiculously casual the whole time. You know a new roof cost like fifteen grand. It's a lot of money so the guy comes and he looks at the roof and he's like yeah. Yeah there's damage. Here's an estimate. Let me know when you want to do it okay. Cool i'm good. And i said i'm ready. Whenever insurance approved it all good so he says yeah. I got you on the schedule to deliver materials on the nineteenth and install on the twenty s and he told me this like two weeks ago or something. I'm like oh okay. Cool do you. Do you needed deposit. Do you need me to sign a contract or something. And he's like no no. It's all good no worries. I'm like okay. You're going to deliver fucking five thousand dollars worth of materials labor. Just hunker so yesterday. Which was the day before it's scheduled for whatever they're delivering the I'm like hey. I just wanna make sure you know still on the calendar right. And he's like..

teradata west coast
"teradata" Discussed on Duct Tape Marketing

Duct Tape Marketing

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"teradata" Discussed on Duct Tape Marketing

"And welcome to another episode of the duct. Tape marketing podcast. This is john jansen. My guest today is brandy star. She's the chief operating officer at teradata a marketing consultancy specializing in marketing automation and strategy. And she's also the co author of a book. We're going to talk about today. C. m. o. to c. r. o. the revenue takeover by the next generation executive so randy. Welcome to the show. Let me first ask a since you are suggesting. There's a shift to occur. What really is a big shift. That you're suggesting take place in the mind of the reader going from cmo to cro right now in most organizations marketing sales support.

john jansen teradata randy
"teradata" Discussed on The RIFT Radio Podcast Network

The RIFT Radio Podcast Network

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"teradata" Discussed on The RIFT Radio Podcast Network

"Up your i guess psychic mind or or how your gift. So you're able to be more specific in that area. Is that how it works. Yeah so if they migrate towards for example the heart or if there's Really like he could like collection of the leaves around that symbol. Or even if you see a very dense hearts or like the shape of a hurting your key leaves you know that would indicate that there is a strong bond or a strong relationship like a love and passion in life So again in the beginning it was more towards where they migrated. And now it's more for me reading the actual symbols created by the tea leaves within the cop. If that makes sense i'm we're a big corn a crab. It was but we all know who that would allowing do not drink that t- thanks ship on it. You sip on the t. And then you throw it of course re times like teradata. I don wanna jump in like all started and walk you through it and one one more question when we're question And this kind of came. Because i was given a little bit of some bad news and i think the question tea leaves or anything is they wanna know. Well when is it going to happen. And how long do. I have to wait before it happens is there. Do you get any sense of like timeframe when you're looking at the t. or is it sort of. This is happening now. Oh i wanna know. I wanna know when it's over right like friday so how we read it feel. Hold the tea cup with a handle towards your left and we kind of go clockwise around the cup. So anything that's toward Like closer towards the handle that's happening in our immediate future and the further you get towards the other side of the cop. That's the further away. It's going to be With he leave readings. You usually don't want to do anything. That's like too far distant future Just because obviously the further things are more muddled. they are But also there are things for example like dot If you're asking you know. We'll i go on a journey or win. Will i be traveling. And let's say you see maybe three Circling the rim docket. Indicate you know three weeks or three months so we can get specific like when they're those symbols in the cup So yeah so. They're definitely indications up behind in their.

teradata rim
"teradata" Discussed on The Life Stylist

The Life Stylist

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"teradata" Discussed on The Life Stylist

"An end will your deck work in the same way where you shuffle the deck and i pull the polar bear and then i'm like oh shit. I pulled the polar bear for a reason and the one the one guy friend. I'm sure there are zillions of guys around the planet that do this. I just don't know them. But our mutual friend. Kyle kingsbury the other day. He's like bro. You're doing teradata. Are you pulling cards. I'm like what you have. No idea Alvarez yeah i mean he he really the way he described it to me. I mean it informs a lot of his decisions and he really works down. It's not just like a trick but well there's all sorts of different kinds of ducks. There's tarot decks and oracle decks and Yeah i refer to mind is a nation deck because i. I'm all about empowering people..

Kyle kingsbury teradata Alvarez oracle
"teradata" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"teradata" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Work right and the entire sales motion for cloudera and houghton works was preventative customers. Who had teradata and we said you have this very expensive product. Seventy percent of the capacity of paradise being used for the l. And you know for that. You don't need the it architecture. You don't need the cash. Is the indexing. So why don't you move. that workload. Grew up archie hype a product that is built for heights reporters and that was the entire sales motion so houghton works cloudera. As billion dollar companies were buried on. Offloading edna from colorado. Which is you know not as sexy right. But that's the truth of it now as we go forward and the other products in the produce stack you somewhat now. The people who did bill did not read as much research. I remember when i went into horton works. We had to throw away the query optimize earlier off hive because it was written as a hack and then it was like that's not how quickly optimize i didn't. This is twenty year old research so then then high was improved. Significantly map reduce was thrown out right and and the new engine was put in blaze. Which and it has evolved to be more and more like an empty database in of course with slightly different characteristics of starting those intermediate results are talked about but then if you look at the impact and today there is a consensus as we talk to large enterprises that hurdle is not the future people want to move from her huddle or hive to spark even though you know hives used significantly more and in the overall scheme of things they do standard as legacy product. Same as the on premise legacy products these companies never invested enough. You're not indeed the never had the margins to do that and they have fallen behind and they don't have been genetic cents to combat so they're slowly with away is take on that all right very interesting so you know i have been inspecting the data engineering space since the beginning and i have noticed is i've said before and a few different episodes the biggest surprise to me was the fact that snowflake became slovak and redshift became these sources of massive data gravity and a lot of people have built their systems around snowflake redshift and that surprised me because i always thought that the tr- the streaming systems looked like they were better abstractions for doing data engineering like the flanks of the world. The patchy storms of the world Even samsa really. Like i just see these. Things is very interesting. Glue for building distributed system. Or you look. You look even more nuanced. The apache beam project. I think but really the problem. Is that these things are hard to work with. And they're hard to reason about and so ultimately are fixed to that as an industry has been to move towards redshift and snowflake simply because it's easier to understand like what is the materialized view. You're getting in a given moment. Do you think that's accurate accurate perspective. Yes so i. I would say that. I am surprised that everybody's surprised right because the you agree everybody is surprised that right i agree. Everybody's surprise and i am hugely surprised by that because like i told you right so abney show and informatica. The etl tools industry was ten billion dollars and then the data warehouse was twenty billion dollars. And you had teradata and ibm db two. And that's if you look at the on premise footprint. It is one thing that looks like spark and one thing that looks like snowflake and that's what every large enterprise looks like and the larger enterprises run massive woke lords. They don't have like a hundred workflows that you can schedule with airflow. They have tens of thousands. Two hundred thousand plus. Yeah working with the forty four back. They have more than one hundred thousand workflows that run every day right so if you look at that basically what has happened in. The cloud is an exact replica of that. You got spark which is very much like ebony..

cloudera teradata houghton horton colorado ibm
"teradata" Discussed on Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"teradata" Discussed on Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

"Okay the fifth question. Gasoline and food price hikes are hurting working and poor americans right. We didn't have the country. Didn't have this rise in prices under donald trump. And then i was right correct and biden would have to say yes or no but the fact is there wasn't price rises in energy and food under president trump. That's the fact. Okay so then. Hopefully he tells the truth and say no. There wasn't those prices didn't go up under my predecessor. We'll why are they going up now specifically gas and food now. I'm sure he'd throw it in as what i anticipate. But he had to give me a cogent answer. Or i'm going to come in and say well what does that you know you shutdown pipelines He might go to the colonial pipeline. Hacky mike go there. But you know me. I'm on it all right and i have a baseline of facts in all my interviews. So the six question would be it. Looks like one point. Five million migrants will we apprehended by border authorities in the federal government's fiscal year. One point five million now. That's double last year and way more than the last ten years. So why is that happening under your watch. And before you answer mr president. Please consider that the president of guatemala's said this is your fault. Directly said that. Why would he do that. See that's the question on immigration. The seventh question is that a new poll has sixty one percent of americans want election reform in the states and some of the states are holding votes on reforming the election. Cutting down on fraud. You oppose most reform mr president. Why if sixty one percent of the people want it. Why don't you. And then i would follow up and say do you believe asking for a voter. Ide- at the polling place is racist. Yes or no and why simple. Simple question all right. The eighth question is finally quitting research surveys. Two million americans say they are not looking for jobs because they're getting money three sent to them by your administration. Does that disturb you. That two million americans are not looking to earn a living but want to live on the dole. Now he's never going to answer that but it has to be asked so those are my eight questions. Okay and i think they're all fair again if you don't think they're fair bill it bill o'reilly dot com. If you have other questions. I'll read them. But that's what i would like to hear tonight. But i will never in a million years here. Those questions posed on cnn. If i do. I'll tell you tomorrow i'll watch it. And if one of my questions or even close is posed. Then i'll i'll tell you be fair but i'm not expecting so prison biden's been in office six months. My grade after six months is d. as in terra dog. Holly the teradata d. Might be unfair to mr biden. But i thought about it a lot and outside of distributing the vaccine an orderly way which has happened under his administration outside of that. I don't see any benefit to the united states of america directly linked to joe biden. Again if i'm being do ours you let me know so. Let's bring in presidential guy. Guy who written a number of books about presidents. paul is coming to us from washington..

Hacky mike biden donald trump guatemala federal government dole mr biden cnn teradata Holly united states of america joe biden Guy paul washington
"teradata" Discussed on The Wisdom Podcast

The Wisdom Podcast

06:07 min | 1 year ago

"teradata" Discussed on The Wisdom Podcast

"And how they differ. Well yeah so in the tibetan tradition They talk about these. Two main forms of meditation. One is i think the term is placement. Meditation which is single pointed. Meditation focused remind on one single object to develop concentration sooner pointed concentration of mind. And then the other main type of meditation analytical meditation where you will contemplate a topic such as the formidable truths or emptiness or loving kindness said there. Your mind is more occupied with fought spit. It's not just any kind of thought all over the place but structured thoughts on a particular topic to understand better. Make your mind more familiar with it. Bring about a change. Transformation in your mind so So i don't know the loupe. Tradition says every kind. Meditation will fit into those to the dan. I've also had some experience reading. Also attending courses with a different kind of meditation for example in the theravada tradition of cautionary for mindfulness insight. Meditation and i'm really attracted to that. I really liked that kind of practices. Well so sometimes they teach that unit is there in the tibetan tradition. When i did some years ago i did. The masters program in limits on copy institute re-studied some of the philosophical texts like the amount. Kara be done cushions on so the four foundations of mindfulness are definitely. They're part of the body sought to path but they're not normally taught in at least to beginners and since so so then So you you're actually you've for yourself. You actually also do these like other types of meditation that you've learned from teradata teaches you've integrated that into your practices. Well because you found that beneficial is that right. Yeah yeah it's not that. I do them all the time regularly. That i yeah especially at certain times when i found my mind was more busy in hard to control. I found it really helpful to do that. Kind of practice. Because i think as westerners you know most of us are adults already by the time. We meet buddhism. We've had so many experiences and you know. Learn so much with the media. Tv movies and travel you know Quite full of stuff already. We start learning buddhism. And you know to just immediately start analyzing things visualizing things before we sorted out all that stuff in. Our mind doesn't doesn't work very well so i think it's really important to have practices for just kind of looking at your mind and getting a better understanding of what's there And sorting out. You know what's useful. What's not useful. What can what can bring into my practice and what. I can leave aside so for me that that kind of practice. Mindfulness practice mindfulness. Meditation is very helpful for that. It's like when member. Jay said dahmer's the mirror for your mind set of factors says. Yeah yeah but i like. I love the lumber meditations as well as the analytical meditations on precious human rebirth and impermanent in data and to that whole series of meditations in the long run those are those are wonderful. Fantastic to sometimes. You just need some space you know is thinking about something or visualizing them thing champing something just sitting with your mind and figure out what's going on in there and ending it out. One of the topics fanatical. Meditation is emptiness right and you know you have this talent for making concepts accessible and i was wondering how you when someone comes up to you and says will what is emptiness. How how how do you explain to someone you know. So that they can start to get their head around these high philosophical concepts. How how do you sort of explained start to explain that. Yeah well. I guess i would say that With their two truce we talk about two levels of truth. The conventional truth. Which is what i got ordinary everyday experience. But then there's the ultimate truth which is the actual way that things exist and that is not something that we normally cr normally experience instead whether they you know. We see things as existing in a way other than how they actually do. Things seem to have a very real solid concrete way of existing from their own side and we tend to just buy into that believe in that go along with that and act on that basis in get all caught up in our emotions and so on but the teachings on emptiness say no things don't exist that way that that for that way of existing is is false is wrong mistaken things exist in this other way. They're empty of that way existing. So i might.

teradata Kara dahmer Jay
"teradata" Discussed on The Cinematography Podcast

The Cinematography Podcast

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"teradata" Discussed on The Cinematography Podcast

"And i didn't answer because they don't really answer the phone on film sets book. I n got into car to go home and my brother said he was of my brothers. I was dodd and put. It was big brother and he doesn't really ring every often. Sit down share. What's happened and teradata. My father had been in an aircraft crash plane crash a plane that he built himself so. My dad is coy He was quite a genius and he was eighty four years old and he was the first flight of the year of the plane that he built twenty years ago. And it's called along easy. And he built it when my mom died because on her deathbed she said you'd better finish up lady playing because it's been in the back already built in the back garden so he made that finish for land and it's so kind of circular deal whole irony of his death was due to something that she told him to do so. It was very sad. Are there yet. I could've did not do as a shock so the car cargo luckily had a lovely guy driving me called monkey and he was really m such a good guy and he helped me through that journey and went to work the next day. And i'd that's a good idea. And i did and i because it was so shocked. I didn't know what to do. I just went or i'm going to go to work. 'cause like thanks dodgy just kind of left the world without saying goodbye and i went to work and then i did the whole day on tuesday and by the middle of the day. I was very very strange. I didn't know what was going on whether it's going in. And look at the producers who are amazing film pacific over send you home now. So is in england and ireland. And they're brilliant. They let me go back..

teradata dodd england ireland
"teradata" Discussed on Ask Me Another

Ask Me Another

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"teradata" Discussed on Ask Me Another

"Getting back together is now good question. That's a really good question. The great question is free therapy. Thank you for asking me that god. That's a good question. That's an interesting question but what fresh air interviews are really about are the interesting answers. Listen and subscribe to fresh air from whyy an npr. This is npr's asked me another. I'm jonathan colton. Here's your host of fear eisenberg. Thanks jonathan we're playing games with the host of the podcast couples. Therapy naomi compare again. And andy beckerman. Are you ready for another one. Oh yeah ask me another joke okay. So this is a fun quick. Aim this game is called real or faked chia pet. Okay so as you know. She is teradata figuring that is used to sprout chia seeds to give sort of hair. They come in all fun shapes and celebrities their pop culture characters there's landmarks etc so this is called real or fake. We're gonna give you a chip pet us. Tell us if it's real or something we made up. It's a speed round seal answer eight in a row and you'll have to be very quick because we're gonna put an amount of time on block. Okay okay okay. So we're going to go. We'll start with andy your we'll do your eight and then you'll you'll do the next set here. We go andy rupaul..

jonathan colton npr andy beckerman eisenberg naomi teradata jonathan chia andy andy rupaul
"teradata" Discussed on DUH:A Bangladeshi Podcast

DUH:A Bangladeshi Podcast

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"teradata" Discussed on DUH:A Bangladeshi Podcast

"Unlike the quotas. Jim consults. We'll be to are bullish full. Liberty should unaccountable completely cynical about. We're all a committee where argentina mastercard like without saratoga yard but as he does make it doesn't mean i'm adjoining reportedly internet billy but what i've already. Nothing would olivier in ballots. Brazil eye-popping a booth by detail in could say tabatha. Pretty sammy's end up. Seeing my mind. Booker ligaments jama root of benefit. And i can window the from from those Talk three tina. Internal nightmare beckham. Tv's but in do Windows instructor alarming at top perugini microsoft. Ge teradata the adapt how you typically. She worked harder about them. Okla heartbreaking ready for on the eastern.

saratoga mastercard argentina Jim tabatha billy sammy Brazil Booker tina microsoft Okla
A Brief History of Data Warehousing

Software Engineering Daily

01:39 min | 1 year ago

A Brief History of Data Warehousing

"I'd like to start by talking a little bit about the domain of data warehouses. So we've done a bunch of shows recently and in the past about data. Warehouses snowflake redshift and google big query. Can you just tell me about the history of the data warehouse and what role. It plays today sure. I think that's a great question. So the did warehouse. History goes pretty far back. It really began in the eighties when people began to design systems like teradata and sybase iq. So these were systems that began to address. What was turning into a new breed. Va- -plication where people needed to scan large quantities of data to answer open ended questions and by open ended. I'm meaning that you had for example sales data or customer data or some other kind of interesting information about your company and you wanted to ask strategy questions about it which would mean that you would come in. You wouldn't know exactly what you're going to need to know in order to answer your question and then you you'd like to play around with it. These are promised the traditional relational databases of the time which would be late. Eighties early nineties. For just not very well suited to solve so this new breed of application developed and has evolved over a period of decades so for example the first products like teradata introduce things like paralyzation across nodes extending to things like verdict With very efficient column storage and compression and then of course the cloud data warehouses that we see today. Which are things like redshift. Which was really the pioneer here. And then snowflake

Teradata Sybase Google VA
"teradata" Discussed on Pop Culture Leftovers

Pop Culture Leftovers

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"teradata" Discussed on Pop Culture Leftovers

"My favorite There are some people who are cat fishing. There's i jack who's playing emily There's this older gentleman leave. Who's playing river like. They're these characters that you just absolutely love and i also think there's a lot more drama in this now whether that s- as like a plan thing we'll you know we'll see obviously there's a lot of behind the scenes with reality shows but there's so much drama. It's so fast paced. I was disappointed. When there's only four episodes. I wanted to watch the whole fucking thing in one sitting and yeah i guess it's coming out like every week during the drop a couple of episodes. Yeah that's same thing last year. It's the same thing they did last year. That's the way they released it last year. And i yeah i'm gonna jump in like i i fucking love this show so much. It is super i think they they nailed it with casting again. This season i was really worried about the season. Because i loved i loved last season so much you know i was a big joey fan which i hated joey at the beginning and then he won me over. And i'm fucking. I love choubey. But i love the casting that they've done in this season so much i love the whole savannah versus teradata thing that they had going on and yeah. I tap aware this so so hard i love. I still love the circle. I'm a huge fan tristen. This is your first introduction. You've watched two episodes what it think. What are you thinking about the circle I'm just gonna maybe echo bit of would rebecca was saying it's kind of not my thing Like i just kind of reminds me of all the you know the reality. Tv that i used to watch in the early two thousands that i just got really sick of and you know. I'm just a person who prefers you know smart written material scripted series and stuff like that but now let me let me..

last year two episodes four episodes emily first introduction choubey two thousands one couple of episodes rebecca jack teradata joey much savannah
The price of rare plants

On The Ledge

06:08 min | 2 years ago

The price of rare plants

"Right. Now it's time to talk about rare plants and when this turned into a ranch, I wanted to be a reasoned argument but I hope that this will give you pause for thought about what's happening in the house blunt world right now, I guess I got really alarmed about plant prices. When applaud the I've been lusting after suddenly went up in price. As many of you know through the podcast I've been looking for a piece of Panteli sensation, a cultivar of tons of area. Correctly Justina As been moved to the dressier genus, the snake plant, I've been looking for. Peace or a plant of this particular offer longtime. Now, for some reason, while they're common in the US, they just aren't that common here in the UK and I haven't found a shop selling them I think couple of people found a plot shop in Poland selling them, but I still do not have one of these plants. So I. Put an Ebay search save out there. So that anytime anyone put one of these plants on Ebay. I. Would know a few months ago the last cutting that I had been watching the last pup that I've been watching when I think he has for about twenty five pounds and I missed out on time because I thought that's a bit expensive. Anyway another pop came up from the same seller I think very recently about two or three weeks ago. I was Kinda getting excited because the price was still quite low are and all watching the countdown and the price was still about ten pounds and I thought. The chance here? How much did it go for? It went for it went for about eighty seven pounds. For a tiny stick of a snake blunt. Thanks to the listeners by the way who offered to send me a piece of their bench Elson session from the US very kind of you. But I don't think it's a good idea given plant health and spread of diseases to be importing individual plants from the US plus. Don't think it's worth it for the air. BYLES. Of course, there are other house plants that are going for much much more. The headline in The New York Post recently was some sucker in New Zealand just spent five thousand dollars on a house plant. There was a variegated rafic for a test drive perma with variation, the basically split relief in half between the regular caller and sort of golden yellow. and. That plot went for eight thousand, one hundred fifty New Zealand dollars on the site trade me nuts about five thousand. Dollars in other words, a lot of money and there is a track record for plants on this trade me site going for a lot. There was a Hoya I think it was a Hoya compactor with the reverse fair Gatien the way for six and a half thousand New Zealand dollars. A before POPs a couple of months before I'm, and of course, we all know about the variegated monster at unsown. With those little holy leaves marked with cream the have also gone for some really interested. High prices recently, this has been building for a while. Now, this trend towards rare or Unicorn House Plaza cost a lot of money but I think that lockdown has exacerbated this desire for plants as lots of people who want to. Live and up their Home Office of got into the House plant thing during lockdown adjust desperate for these very, very rare loans. And I think we've really got to take the long view about this in that planck. Crazies are really nothing you. My first thought is back to the fern craze in the mid eighteen hundreds I wasn't there I'm not quite that old over my children would probably beg to differ. So in the mid eighteen hundreds around the world. There was a firm fever that really took of people and lots of women in particular were going out and bought an ising and looking for funds in the wild and buying. Funds from nursery such as the famous and now defunct lodges of London with the huge glasshouses, and these were really desirable things to own back. Then the talent teradata mania was coined by Sir Charles Kingsley and he wrote your daughter's perhaps I've been seized with the prevailing Tareyton mania and are collecting bind funds with wards cases where into keep them for it's you have to pay and wrangling over unpronounceable names of species which seemed to be different in each new book that they buy till the territory mania seems to you somewhat of a ball. So that might be familiar. Scenario of of wrangling over the names and buying the special equipment, the wards cases, which is just the original server terrariums plots in. So that is an illustration of the fact, this is not a new a new thing. Plunk raises a bit around forever I mean even Coleus those cheapest chips plants that you can buy very very easily are certainly not subject to a premium. These days were at one point something, very new, exciting and expensive. If you check out Dr Catherine, Horwitz Book Potted Histories, you'll find out that a dozen new coleus hybrids sold at auction by the RHS's one, hundred, sixty, eight when for three, hundred, ninety pounds. How much three hundred ninety pounds is worth today about thirty thousand pounds so As I say it's not new and equally even further back in history chilly fever and sixteen thirties same time citrus trees also massive status symbol mainly because you needed an orangerie to keep them in. So. Wild prices for applauds are nothing new

New Zealand United States Unicorn House Plaza Justina The New York Post Teradata Plunk Elson UK Sir Charles Kingsley RHS Dr Catherine Poland London Tareyton
Set the Right 3 Priorities

Daily Sales Tips

02:09 min | 2 years ago

Set the Right 3 Priorities

"Tip comes from a longtime member of the sales success community Andy off guy is an area sales. VP At teradata in Spain. He's also the founder of teams win championships, a project that will explain how to create and lead high performing sales teams here. He is today's tip. Is Volunteer Getting your priorities right? The problem is that most of us are struggling. Especially in the starting today was distractions. Just jump into the emails. Start reading social media posts are responding, and then did dragged into dynamic that is not based on priorities anymore, just getting into the stream of things that are small and not important so. How can we solve the issue basically setting yourself up for a routine? That means starting your morning with the planning. Activity! Basically sit down before you start anything. Make me with a cup of coffee. and. You'll ask yourself. What you? Want to do today, and it choose three things just make sure that these are the most important ones we'll take maybe some time in the beginning to figure that out, meant then just write them down. The optimal thing would be in the top three minutes until I have developed. You can find an Amazon so we'll find link section for you and then just do it. Do these things check them off, and then he will see you can do all the other things you want to accomplish, but without focusing on them without putting on a list. That doesn't mean that you shouldn't use your outlook calendar. We have your calendar entries already done. You have your meeting schedule. That's all good. Just make sure. Oscar said in the morning on these meetings. We have in this kid. Reading bought just routine meetings and they'll always scattered, so you don't have to think about them anymore, so that's minded for the so get Ryan's Ryan. Sets five to ten minutes aside before you start working on your computer. And set these three things. Set these priorities and then do them, and you will see how much will improve your review relieved, and you'll accomplish much more okay. Thank you very much and have a great day.

Founder VP Spain Ryan Andy Amazon Oscar
Where are we on impeachment?

AM Joy

04:37 min | 3 years ago

Where are we on impeachment?

"It is a very very dangerous time and there's really no oversight that can fix it. There's no judicial the I didn't know judicial means to stop and the only way is through impeachment and I think this report just puts puts the onus really front and center in front of the House of Representatives to take it goes articles up that was former Justice Department spokesperson Matt Miller on the Rachel Maddow show with meat last night making clear that of all the potential impeachable offenses offenses against Donald Trump. It really doesn't get any worse than what was revealed by a national security whistleblower this week trump not just for the whistleblower but also according to his own attorney. Rudy Giuliani is literally doing the same thing. The Muller reports says he did with Russia soliciting help for his reelection from a foreign country in this case Ukraine a country that has part of its territory under Russian occupation right now as we speak in an op Ed for the Washington Post former acting Solicitor General Neal Katyal and George Conway lawyer and husband of White House Counselor Kellyanne Conway wrote that if trump did that it would be the ultimate ultimate impeachable act unlike the allegations of conspiracy with Russia before the two thousand sixteen election these concerns these concerns trump's actions as president president not as a private citizen and his exercise of presidential powers over foreign policy with Ukraine moreover with Russia at least there was an attempt to to get the facts through the Mueller investigation here. The White House is trying to shut down the entire inquiry from the start depriving not just the American people but even congressional intelligence committees of necessary information and yet on Friday when House Speaker Nancy Pelosi was confronted with all the outrage surrounding trump and the whistleblower complaint that his administration continues to withhold from Congress in violation of law by the way she still didn't budge you're describing ving potential acts of law breaking and many people here that and say if Congress does not pursue impeachment. Does it forever change the standard of what is acceptable behavior by any president. I don't know about lawbreaking said we don't have the information. I don't want to suggest that I said that because we we don't have the information while others may speculate. I have to go on the basis of the law and the facts and that's we're decisions will be made so why even with people's heads literally exploding that trump is now committing same collusion Robert Muller investigators found but this time as president why why won't Democratic Leadership Support Impeachment now as I've said before on this show it comes down to the numbers to the question of whether Pelosi has the democratic votes to to get an impeachment through the house and the fact that the speakers clear sole concern is keeping the House majority in democratic hands and that means her only focus this is those conservative leaning House Democrats who won in trump district and whether they will give her the votes even now with trump define congress defying the law and in the position to meet out retribution to this whistle blower through his conciliatory and the Justice Department Attorney General William Barr now we on the show reached reached out to a number of conservative. Democrats some of them are on the record of posing impeachment and some who are not either way to see if they would come to the show today come on the air and answer the question of whether on this issue that is about national security which presumably is important to them and their right of center senator constituents whether they would now give their party the votes on impeachment they all declined to come on the show and by the way any moderate or conservative Democrat who's willing to explain Blaine to our viewers why they don't support the House Judiciary Committee's impeachment inquiry in the face of alarms about our national security raised about the president of the United States from from within the intelligence community. They are always welcome to come on this show and explain their opposition they can actually call right now because the question is if if national security is not compelling enough to garner enough democratic votes for impeachment of the President if defying Congress and defying the law are not enough within within what is joining me now political contributor Timothy l O'Brien Tar Dell Dell President of the Teradata del Group. MSNBC contributor in former US attorney Barbara mcquade Jeff houser founder and director of the revolving door project MSNBC contributor and former US attorney Joyce Vance and Jill wine banks former assistant Watergate special the prosecutor.

Donald Trump President Trump House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Congress White House House Of Representatives Robert Muller Justice Department Attorney House Judiciary Committee Rudy Giuliani Russia Msnbc Rachel Maddow Us Attorney Kellyanne Conway Neal Katyal Dell
Success is a Process

Daily Sales Tips

01:02 min | 4 years ago

Success is a Process

"Today's tip comes from Andy off Andy is an international area. Sales VP at San Diego based advanced analytics and data management firm Teradata. He is a proud father of three a passionate coach blog writer, a new author and long distance runner here. He is with today's tip morning design. The good full Madrid's. I'm Jomon expert and live Lewis since twenty UCF. So today's data sales tips, I want to show this something on fought. So mentioned my recently published book of yourself and this about the process. So if you want to be successful in anything life, especially in sales, you have understand that they'll two things Astur saints process. We have to plan we have to prepare. We have to practice and then we play and we might win. So I. Thing. Second thing prepare something practice rehearse and play and

Writer Teradata VP San Diego Lewis
Anchor shares podcast stats; The Guardian's daily podcast goes live

podnews

01:41 min | 4 years ago

Anchor shares podcast stats; The Guardian's daily podcast goes live

"The latest from pod news dot net entries for the two thousand nine hundred nine Austrailia podcast awards in our open and podcasters who enter in the month of November received both early bird entry discount as well. As a host of other benefits. They're twenty nineteen Australian podcast awards event will take place in Sydney on the eighteenth of March next year NPR training has just released to online training resources. The producers handbook to mixing audio stories. His a deep dive into every aspect of mixing from selecting your tools to using e Q and compression and tips on getting good balances. There's also a step by step guide as well. We've updated Google podcasts FAQ with a new video showing the app and play a working better explanations. And even some PHP code Logan poll, a former youtuber who was kicked off the platform earlier in the year is pivoting to podcasting reports vulture Spotify to give family plan. Subscribers a free. Google home mini speaker in. Promotion and ans- today radio embraces fluidity between broadcasting and podcasting. According to a piece from inside radio that pays highlights. How radio stations can improve their ratings with podcasts. Teradata consumer brands love advertising and podcast, but onshore whether these ads works has a story in digital. That story includes an interview with pod new supporters, Oxford road headliner has signed a deal with international German broadcaster, Deutsche Vanessa to create social video from Deutsche Avila's audio content at scale and women podcasters in solidarity planner season on gun safety. And they're calling for women podcasters to take part?

Google Deutsche Vanessa Deutsche Avila Austrailia Teradata Sydney NPR Spotify