24 Burst results for "Tepco"

"tepco" Discussed on More than Abstract

More than Abstract

05:20 min | 4 months ago

"tepco" Discussed on More than Abstract

"Line starts three years prior to the accident in two thousand eight. Apparently the power company that runs fukushima. It's called tepco. They made a report that was like if we get a really bad earthquake nearby. They took the example of an earthquake. That happened about one hundred years ago. Then as army could be big enough to impact the power and gaza much damage but they didn't really submit this report to any regulatory bodies since. It's really unlikely that would happen since it was one hundred years ago and it wasn't really it hasn't been anything that was going to say. It kind of sounds like one of those of pigs fly if pigs. Laser beam is suddenly take to the skies like my house is not very safe. Well yeah that's true but like pigs with laser beam is flying through this. come on. just wait till the next episode bigs would later reunite kate i say we scrapped this. Hold nuclear power plant. And you just tell me about pigs with laser is all right so so people just went on with their day. maybe big Will come by when people get radioactive or something. So that's what's insure noble. Then the day of the earthquake hit it was march eleventh. Two thousand eleven to forty six pm so just a regular time of day..

tepco fukushima earthquake gaza army kate
Japan to start releasing Fukushima water into sea in 2 years

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:29 min | 8 months ago

Japan to start releasing Fukushima water into sea in 2 years

"Japan's government decided on tuesday to start releasing massive amounts of treated radioactive water from the wrecked fukushima nuclear plant into the pacific ocean in two years. An option fiercely opposed by local fishermen and residence the decision long speculated but delayed for years due to safety concerns and protests. Came at a meeting of cabinet ministers who endorse the ocean. Release as the best option. The accumulating water has been stored in tanks the fukushima plant since two thousand eleven when a massive earthquake and tsunami damaged reactors and the cooling water became contaminated and began leaking. The plant's operator. Tokyo electric power company said it. Storage capacity will be full late next year. The prime minister said the ocean release was the most realistic option and the disposing. The water is unavoidable for the decommissioning of the fukushima plant which is expected to take decades some scientists say the long term impact on marine life from low dose exposure to such large volumes of water is unknown onto the basic plan adopted by the ministers. Tepco will start releasing the water in about two years after building a facility under the regulatory authorities safety requirements. It said the disposal of the water cannot be postponed further as it's necessary to improve the environment surrounding the plant. So residents can live there safely.

Pacific Ocean Japan Cabinet Tsunami Earthquake Tokyo Tepco
"tepco" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:16 min | 1 year ago

"tepco" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And a nuclear power plant operator have appealed a landmark court ruling. The ruling holds them responsible for the country's worst ever nuclear accident. The 2011 Fukushima meltdown was triggered by a huge earthquake and tsunami. But as NPR's Anthony Koon reports from Seoul plaintiffs are concerned that justice is being delayed once again. Cheering broke out outside the high court in the city of Sendai, about 60 miles north of the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant last month. Too many people surprise the court's ruling held the central government and the Tokyo Electric Power Company, or TEPCO, which runs the plant equally responsible for the accident. Plaintiffs argued that scientists had warned the government in 2000 to that a major tsunami could hit the area. The court said in its caving verdict that the government failed to take actions. She'll sort of Colonel when you go on go The government, despite its position is regulator just let TEPCO do Is it pleased and let it put off safety measures? It was gross negligence, and it was an attitude Unbefitting a regulatory agency. That was Takashi Nakajima, paraphrasing the court's verdict. He's a leader among the nearly 3600 plaintiffs in the case. Sendai Court or did the government and TEPCO to pay them $9.6 million in compensation double with a lower court had ruled three years ago. Many people in Nakajima's community near Fukushima fled their homes. He says he filed the lawsuit. Basically, just to say, Give me back my former life. I was in a horny. Imagine how you would feel says if suddenly you get into a situation where you can never go back to your hometown because there's a risk of radiation. Nakajima runs a supermarket. But he says that fears about radiation and waters near Fukushima make it impossible to sell the local fish in which he used to take such pride. That's even more. The fishermen need him because they've been eating them for a long time, he says. And they're tasty. But their sons and daughters in law tell them that their grandchildren should not eat them. This is a situation which divides many families. Judges in the Sendai verdict appear to have been especially sympathetic to such hardships. The Osaka, a law professor at Tokyo University in Tokyo, explains Sendai Cool, hunky doesn't mind okay. The Sendai High Court judges actually visited the area and issuing the trial before the decision was made. It's very unusual that judges truly understand going hardships. The victims are experiencing some plaintiffs in similar lawsuits. Have not been. His fortunate is Nakajima and have lost. Professor Masafumi Okamoto, professor of environmental policy at Osaka City University, says the Sendai verdict could change that thinking the next course side a little bit. This's the first time a decision recognizing the government's full responsibilities they made at the high court level, he says, although it was partly recognized by a lower court. It's very significant and it'll clearly influence future decisions. That's why many observers were not surprised when the government and TEPCO appealed the verdict on Tuesday. Plaintiff Takashi Nakajima hopes that the Sendai court ruling will eventually pave the way for the shutdown of all dangerous nuclear power plants in Japan. But whether or not the ruling stands will now be up to Japan's Supreme Court to decide. Anthony Kun. NPR news soul This is all things considered on Sean Carlson earlier this week, we have a story about President Trump pulling his support for the Gateway commuter rail tunnel under the Hudson River. We'll spend some time now on the plan by Democratic nominee Joe Biden for that same tunnel and infrastructure in general. He's proposed spending $2 trillion on roads, bridges, tunnels, transit and green energy. If elected president, so here to tell us some details, including how he plans to pay for all of it is Laura Bliss, a reporter for Bloomberg City Lap. Hey, Lord, Welcome back to W. C. Thanks so much for having me so this do trillion dollar promise. It's not just about infrastructure. It's also about climate change. Can you tell us what the connection is? Absolutely So. Biden's plan, which was released in July, maps out spending $2 trillion over the next four years to significantly expand the use of clean energy across transportation, electricity and buildings on DH. That kind of is mapped out across a suite of proposals that would Increase jobs, strengthen the nation's infrastructure and also tackle climate change, and that really is at the core of some of the most aggressive and specific targets in the plan. Which includes achieving emissions free energy by 2035 nationwide and upgrading four million buildings of the next four years to meet the highest standards of energy efficiency. And there's also a heavy emphasis on how these plans would tie into ideas about racial justice, and the plan often kind of goes into how pollution is disproportionately impacted. Communities of color. That is quite a list. Is it pie in the sky? How realistic is it and has the Biden campaign said, where the money will come from to pay for? Yes. Oh, sort of part of the course. But you know these campaign proposals there. Stop the tide of details about how this plan would necessarily be paid for. The Biden campaign has pointed Tio this corporate income tax rate hike that he's proposed separately as being part of that. Revenue source. There's probably still some additional amount of stimulus money that would have to go into it. So you know a little hazy on those those funding details. One way to pay for this would be to raise the federal gas tax right. It's already source of transportation spending. But the tax rate now for listeners, it hasn't been increased. Since. 1993 is this whole situation a third rail politically. It is very much a third rail politically, There is not a lot of interest on either side of the political aisle on something of that tax rate. You know, there's also criticism that gas tax, which by the way is funding our highway trust fund, which pays for most of our roads and transit systems. This country, which is Almost always on the brink of insolvency. But there's critique that you know, as more of us are driving more fuel efficient vehicles that we should be looking at other ways of generating that muddy so back to Biden's plan here, how have people responded to it are their criticisms of it? Yes. So I think there is a high degree of satisfaction on the left that the Spider plan has accelerated the timeline of some of its clean energy targets. There was a Earlier infrastructure plan from last fall that the campaign release that was a little bit less aggressive on the right there. Certainly a number of Republicans in Congress who criticize this plan, it's just, you know, another boondoggle that would cost a lot of energy jobs right me. Think about it. This plan is calling for this major transition to zero carbon pollution from the electricity sector in 15 years. Currently coal and natural gas accounts for about 60% of the country's energy, so that would be a pretty major transition. So Biden when he was here a few years ago, he praised the Gateway project. So does he mention it in his plan? I don't believe the plan mentions the Gateway Project specifically, although the Gateway project is mentioned in the Invest Act, which is a major infrastructure authorization bill that was passed by House Democrats this summer. So Laura President Trump has made big promises on infrastructure, but he hasn't really gotten very far. Can you talk to us? Why not and will bite and run into the same problems? Yeah, it's a really important question, right. We're still in this very, very, very partisan political environment. On one level. I think that President Trump has kind of struggled to deliver on those original promises that he made on the campaign trail and then routinely throughout his presidency. There's this long running joke about it always being infrastructure Week. Not a lot happening, and then in Congress. The House actually recently passed a pretty significant infrastructure authorization bill, but the Senate has not taken up that Bill. So there's no guarantee that that would necessarily change much if I did won the presidency Laura Bliss or reporter for Bloomberg City Lab. Thanks so much, Laura. Thanks for having me. WNYC supporters include Sweeten a renovation service that can upgrade homes for the remote work in school lifestyle, matching each project with general contractors while offering guidance and financial protection. Moran s w e TN dot com Thes.

Joe Biden Takashi Nakajima Sendai Court Sendai Tokyo Electric Power Company Laura President Trump Sendai High Court Fukushima TEPCO Laura Bliss Congress professor reporter Japan Supreme Court Seoul
Landmark Court Ruling In Japan Holds Government Accountable For 2011 Nuclear Meltdown

All Things Considered

03:33 min | 1 year ago

Landmark Court Ruling In Japan Holds Government Accountable For 2011 Nuclear Meltdown

"The Japanese government and a nuclear power plant operator have appealed a landmark court ruling. The ruling holds them responsible for the country's worst ever nuclear accident. The 2011 Fukushima meltdown was triggered by a huge earthquake and tsunami. But as NPR's Anthony Koon reports from Seoul plaintiffs are concerned that justice is being delayed once again. Cheering broke out outside the high court in the city of Sendai, about 60 miles north of the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant last month. Too many people surprise the court's ruling held the central government and the Tokyo Electric Power Company, or TEPCO, which runs the plant equally responsible for the accident. Plaintiffs argued that scientists had warned the government in 2000 to that a major tsunami could hit the area. The court said in its caving verdict that the government failed to take actions. She'll sort of Colonel when you go Oh, God. The government. Despite its position is regulator just let TEPCO do Is it pleased and let it put off safety measures? It was gross negligence, and it was an attitude Unbefitting, a regulatory agency. That was Takashi Nakajima, paraphrasing the court's verdict. He's a leader among the nearly 3600 plaintiffs in the case. Sendai Court or did the government and TEPCO to pay them $9.6 million in compensation double with a lower court had ruled three years ago. Many people in Nakajima's community near Fukushima fled their homes. He says he filed the lawsuit. Basically, just to say, Give me back my former life Rising. Ah need. Imagine how you would feel says if suddenly you get into a situation where you can never go back to your hometown because there's a risk of radiation. Nakajima runs a supermarket. He says that fears about radiation and waters near Fukushima make it impossible to sell the local fish in which he used to take such pride even more. Fishermen eat him because they've been eating them for a long time, he says. And they're tasty. But their sons and daughters in law tell them that their grandchildren should not eat them. This is a situation which divides many families. Judges in the Sendai verdict appear to have been especially sympathetic to such hardships. The Osaka, a law professor at Tokyo University in Tokyo, explains hunk. It doesn't mean you can t the Sendai High Court judges actually visited the area and issuing the Trial before the decision was made. It's very unusual that judges truly understand going hardships the victims are experiencing some plaintiffs in similar lawsuits have not been. His fortunate is Nakajima and have lost Professor Masafumi Okamoto, professor of environmental policy at Osaka City University, says the Sendai verdict could change that in, you know, taking any next? Of course, this's the first time a decision recognizing the government's full responsibilities they made at the high court level, he says, although it was partly recognized by a lower court. It's very significant and it'll clearly influence future decisions. That's why many observers were not surprised when the government and TEPCO appealed the verdict on Tuesday. Plaintiff, Takashi Nakajima hopes that the Sendai Court ruling will eventually pave the way for the shutdown of all dangerous nuclear power plants in Japan. But whether or not the ruling stands will now be up to Japan's Supreme Court to decide. Anthony Kun. NPR news soul

Takashi Nakajima Japanese Government Sendai Court Tokyo Electric Power Company Sendai High Court Sendai Fukushima Supreme Court Anthony Koon NPR Seoul Japan Anthony Kun Osaka Tokyo University Osaka City University Tokyo
"tepco" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"tepco" Discussed on WTOP

"On Wall Street. Here's Jeff Kleber down today Down 166 points, the S and P 500 Index and the NASDAQ both lost more than a half percent. Money news in 10 Minutes on sports at 15 and 45, powered by Red River technology decisions aren't black and white. Pink red. A George Wallace, What's going on? Alright, Hillary, Let's talk Football. Washington football team practicing today, Brandon share of number 75 back on the field team has now 21 days to activate him off the injured reserve. I did go through practice today, Dwayne Haskins. No show yet again still sick. Says it's not covert related was sent home again today as the team gets ready to face the Giants on Sunday, and Kyle Allen are ready to go to face New York. Washington did claim defensive end Casey to will off the off waivers After being released by the Eagles yesterday. Cam Newton has been cleared to return to the Patriots to baseball games for you tonight, Braves up to over the Dodgers. That'll be the early game, followed by Tampa and Houston. As the Rays go for the sweet Alice You and 10th, ranked Florida at the Swamp postponed this weekend after a surge in positive cases for the Florida squad this week. The game tentatively rescheduled for the SEC built in by week on December 12th That'll be a week before the championship game Soccer Tonight, D. C. United and Philadelphia. George Wallace, deputy sports Thank you. George will get you the very latest on the Supreme Court nomination hearings of Amy Cockney barrel coming up. It's 5 17. TEPCO launched the capital Grid project to build a stronger, more reliable and resilient energy grid project provides safe and reliable energy in a modernized system that Khun better withstand unforeseen events such a severe storms. It will also support renewable energy and economic development across the district. We will install 10 miles of underground transmission cables from Tacoma.

George Wallace Dodgers Washington Football Dwayne Haskins Jeff Kleber Red River TEPCO Cam Newton Florida Giants Hillary Khun Tacoma Kyle Allen Braves Amy Cockney
"tepco" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"tepco" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On your it's not easy to get rid of nuclear power. Okawa is right. Taking apart. A nuclear power plant is not easy day CI has been in the Decommissioning process essentially since the disaster. And that means every day over 4000 workers stream into the plant, clocking in To tackle a vast array of problems. The radiation levels here are much lower than they were nine years ago. In most areas of the plant, you could walk around without special protective gear down by the reactor's, though the ones that exploded levels are still high, and visiting time to them is limited. Kozo Takahashi are TEPCO guide takes us down to see them, bringing into stark reality the challenges that TEPCO has faced here since the disaster. Crews of workers are bustling around in full protective suits. Takahashi points out each reactor, each with its own set of problems. He says a new robot had to be invented to get to melted fuel in one another had to be essentially rebuilt just to take it apart again. And then there's the problem of waste your time here at GH Eve, huge amounts of water pumped into the damaged reactors every day to keep them cool. In the end result is more than one million tons of that water piled up in storage tanks contaminated with radioactive trillium. Storage space is running out, and the Japanese government is considering dumping it all into the ocean, much to the dismay of local communities worried about environmental impact. This is all just a taste of what it means to decommission Daiichi, which will take an estimated 40 years and nearly $200 billion to produce no electricity. At all. The rest of Japan's nuclear power program isn't faring a whole lot better by 2011 nuclear power produced nearly a third of the nation's energy. But after the disaster, the Japanese government imposed new safety regulations that took every nuclear reactor off line. All 54 of them, and the Japanese public largely wants to keep it that way. Anti nuclear power sentiments friend rapidly after Fukushima. It was a very Great sense of betrayal. Alexander Brown is an Australian researcher in Japan. He studied the anti nuclear power protests that took off in 2011. He says that betrayal came largely from the fact that Japanese people had been assured that nuclear power was safe that no accident would ever happen. So it was much more than just about Ray, you have to pull out all the specifics of the accident itself. Huge protest broke out in Tokyo, tens of thousands of people marching through city streets and bright costumes, banging drums and Cymbals. And, of course, chanting the main slogans. Just give that one time we opposed nuclear power. The's big protests continued for months and spread to other cities. And even now, there's still protests everywhere. They're smaller, Brown says. And maybe not quite so eye catching, but it's sister and it's not going away. Which has left Japan in a kind of energy conundrum. With all those reactors offline, a lot more coal and natural gas had to be imported energy prices have gone up. As have greenhouse gas emissions. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his party have been pushing hard to restart the nuclear power program promising safety But needing to bring down costs and tackle climate change. The government on YouTube keeps saying you could apply the cheapest parcels. People don't trust it anymore. Tatsuo Suzuki is a former nuclear engineer and now professor at Nagasaki University. He says that the disaster and Fukushima made people completely rethink the cost of nuclear power. In broader terms, the social costs ofthe separation in the family. Losing the land losing their jobs. How can you measure all these impacts estimating the risk of nuclear power, But Suzuki says the choice is still a difficult one. When you factor in climate change and needing to reduce the use of fossil fuels, he equates nuclear power with a strong medicine that also has a potentially strong side effect. So which you will choose You may have to choose the nuclear power eventually means Clement chain is absolutely event for the world so the world may have to take medicine on nuclear power. But we have to very, very careful. And you have other choices. I would recommend the nuclear policy last Japan doesn't have a lot of other choices. Slowly, A handful of nuclear reactors in the country have restarted passing new safety regulations. Many more are held up in court battles as local governments refused to take the risk, and even more are slated to be decommissioned as utilities give up on them altogether. Back in Fukushima near Daiichi nuclear worker Kazu Okawa stops the car. And gets out to look at a site. He never thought he'd see tons of radioactive topsoil scraped from the Earth during the cleanup efforts being piled high next to the road. This is in Futaba, his old hometown, where much of the land has been slated as a storage site for this contaminated soil. Okawa says he'll never come back even if evacuation orders for the town are eventually lifted. Another guy who wants to live next to this. This nuclear waste. He shakes his head, almost in disbelief that I thought nuclear power was safe. Isn't thought it was 100% safe. But now, like a lot of Japan, he doesn't want anything to do with it. I'm afraid of nuclear power. In one moment it devastated our home is your home and now, Ochoa says he's 100% against it. Cat Langsdorf NPR NEWS Fukushima, Japan

Okawa Japan NPR Fukushima Brian Lehrer Daiichi TEPCO Fukushima Prefecture Elsa Chang Sonny Fidelity Brokered Services LLC Fidelity Wealth Management Lower Manhattan Tokyo Power Arthur Sasha Pfeiffer
"tepco" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"tepco" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The city, That's Brian Lehrer Show tomorrow morning at 10 on 93.9 FM or a 20. You can also ask your smart speaker to play W N. Y. C. Tonight. Here in our area, this sunny streak that we've been seeing rather the streak of clear whether that we've been seeing Sonny or not. Is going and showers and thunderstorms tonight Patchy fog cloudy skies through tonight. Loathe about 73. And then um Arthur's a chance of showers and thunderstorms through the dame or so in the afternoon. It'll stay cloudy high near 82 degrees and then more rain. More thunderstorms possible for tomorrow night. Mostly cloudy overnight. We'll have loads tomorrow night somewhere. In the mid sixties. Check out the window, though here in Lower Manhattan right now it is partly cloudy. It's 82 degrees at the moment, his WN my sea at 4 20. Support for NPR comes from W. N. Y C members and from Fidelity Wealth Management, providing perspective on a client's entire financial picture, investment minimum supply, Fidelity Brokered Services LLC. And see three c three dot software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence and enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable business problems. Learn more at sea three dot ay ay. From NPR news. This's all things considered. I'm Sasha Pfeiffer and I'm Elsa Chang. The 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan changed the country. In many ways, thousands died, many more are still missing and the resulting nuclear disaster in Fukushima left parts of the country uninhabitable. It also put much of Japan's nuclear power industry on hold and left one of the world's top energy consumers. Struggling to find a new way forward. NPR's Cattelan store went to Fukushima, and today she examines how the disaster affected energy in Japan. Kazuo cower trudges along the seaside cliff on the edge of Fukushima Prefecture in northern Japan. It's early March and huge waves crash on the rocks below. It isn't hard to picture what happened here roughly nine years ago, the tsunami covered everything, Ochoa says, gesturing around, including the Daiichi nuclear power plant owned by Tokyo Power and electric Company, or TEPCO. He points to it in the distance. The giant waves overwhelm the power plant and three of the six reactors overheated and exploded. Plumes of radioactive material were carried by the wind for Miles. Okawa was a maintenance man at those reactors in 2011. He lived near the plant, and he says he used to fish from this cliff on his days off. Now, All of this is part of the exclusion zone. Too dangerous for the public. Okay, one needs a special permit to visit here even for a few hours, and nearby towns remain largely abandoned. Okawa is whole life is different to he now lives hundreds of miles away. He's unemployed and the compensation money from TEPCO and the government has stopped looking at the power plant. He's a little miffed that Daiichi is still here and so much else is not Mother nine years later. And it's still standing on your it's not easy to get rid of nuclear power. Okawa is right. Taking apart. A nuclear power plant is not easy day CI has been in the.

Okawa Japan NPR Fukushima Brian Lehrer Daiichi TEPCO Fukushima Prefecture Elsa Chang Sonny Fidelity Brokered Services LLC Fidelity Wealth Management Lower Manhattan Tokyo Power Arthur Sasha Pfeiffer
How The Fukushima Nuclear Disaster Affected Energy Industry In Japan

All Things Considered

08:05 min | 1 year ago

How The Fukushima Nuclear Disaster Affected Energy Industry In Japan

"On your it's not easy to get rid of nuclear power. Okawa is right. Taking apart. A nuclear power plant is not easy day CI has been in the Decommissioning process essentially since the disaster. And that means every day over 4000 workers stream into the plant, clocking in To tackle a vast array of problems. The radiation levels here are much lower than they were nine years ago. In most areas of the plant, you could walk around without special protective gear down by the reactor's, though the ones that exploded levels are still high, and visiting time to them is limited. Kozo Takahashi are TEPCO guide takes us down to see them, bringing into stark reality the challenges that TEPCO has faced here since the disaster. Crews of workers are bustling around in full protective suits. Takahashi points out each reactor, each with its own set of problems. He says a new robot had to be invented to get to melted fuel in one another had to be essentially rebuilt just to take it apart again. And then there's the problem of waste your time here at GH Eve, huge amounts of water pumped into the damaged reactors every day to keep them cool. In the end result is more than one million tons of that water piled up in storage tanks contaminated with radioactive trillium. Storage space is running out, and the Japanese government is considering dumping it all into the ocean, much to the dismay of local communities worried about environmental impact. This is all just a taste of what it means to decommission Daiichi, which will take an estimated 40 years and nearly $200 billion to produce no electricity. At all. The rest of Japan's nuclear power program isn't faring a whole lot better by 2011 nuclear power produced nearly a third of the nation's energy. But after the disaster, the Japanese government imposed new safety regulations that took every nuclear reactor off line. All 54 of them, and the Japanese public largely wants to keep it that way. Anti nuclear power sentiments friend rapidly after Fukushima. It was a very Great sense of betrayal. Alexander Brown is an Australian researcher in Japan. He studied the anti nuclear power protests that took off in 2011. He says that betrayal came largely from the fact that Japanese people had been assured that nuclear power was safe that no accident would ever happen. So it was much more than just about Ray, you have to pull out all the specifics of the accident itself. Huge protest broke out in Tokyo, tens of thousands of people marching through city streets and bright costumes, banging drums and Cymbals. And, of course, chanting the main slogans. Just give that one time we opposed nuclear power. The's big protests continued for months and spread to other cities. And even now, there's still protests everywhere. They're smaller, Brown says. And maybe not quite so eye catching, but it's sister and it's not going away. Which has left Japan in a kind of energy conundrum. With all those reactors offline, a lot more coal and natural gas had to be imported energy prices have gone up. As have greenhouse gas emissions. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his party have been pushing hard to restart the nuclear power program promising safety But needing to bring down costs and tackle climate change. The government on YouTube keeps saying you could apply the cheapest parcels. People don't trust it anymore. Tatsuo Suzuki is a former nuclear engineer and now professor at Nagasaki University. He says that the disaster and Fukushima made people completely rethink the cost of nuclear power. In broader terms, the social costs ofthe separation in the family. Losing the land losing their jobs. How can you measure all these impacts estimating the risk of nuclear power, But Suzuki says the choice is still a difficult one. When you factor in climate change and needing to reduce the use of fossil fuels, he equates nuclear power with a strong medicine that also has a potentially strong side effect. So which you will choose You may have to choose the nuclear power eventually means Clement chain is absolutely event for the world so the world may have to take medicine on nuclear power. But we have to very, very careful. And you have other choices. I would recommend the nuclear policy last Japan doesn't have a lot of other choices. Slowly, A handful of nuclear reactors in the country have restarted passing new safety regulations. Many more are held up in court battles as local governments refused to take the risk, and even more are slated to be decommissioned as utilities give up on them altogether. Back in Fukushima near Daiichi nuclear worker Kazu Okawa stops the car. And gets out to look at a site. He never thought he'd see tons of radioactive topsoil scraped from the Earth during the cleanup efforts being piled high next to the road. This is in Futaba, his old hometown, where much of the land has been slated as a storage site for this contaminated soil. Okawa says he'll never come back even if evacuation orders for the town are eventually lifted. Another guy who wants to live next to this. This nuclear waste. He shakes his head, almost in disbelief that I thought nuclear power was safe. Isn't thought it was 100% safe. But now, like a lot of Japan, he doesn't want anything to do with it. I'm afraid of nuclear power. In one moment it devastated our home is your home and now, Ochoa says he's 100% against it. Cat Langsdorf NPR NEWS Fukushima, Japan

Japan Fukushima Kazu Okawa Japanese Government Alexander Brown Kozo Takahashi Tepco Daiichi Tokyo Youtube Prime Minister Shinzo Abe Suzuki Ochoa Tatsuo Suzuki RAY
"tepco" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:51 min | 1 year ago

"tepco" Discussed on KCRW

"The wind for miles, whole towns were suddenly abandoned for years. Since then has been stuck in an eerie freeze frame of tragedy. I'm gonna step foot in the town of Taba, it's officially open into It looks like a pretty quaint little city street, little buildings and shops. Of course, no one lives here, so it's a deserted city street that we're walking down. Nearly everything looks as it did on the day of the earthquake. Broken glass litters the sidewalks. The entrance to a temple is toppled into the street. Goods from shelves are strewn to the ground covered in dust and grime. Masato Suzuki is the Seoul police officer assigned of Taba. They think no one can live here yet, he says. There's no electricity, no water, no infrastructure. He says his biggest story now is the wild boar that roam the streets. Only these few blocks of downtown for Taba are open a tiny percentage of the town. The rest is still sealed off behind Gates. Steamed too unsafe for the public. Kaba, once lively now mostly sounds like this. Tall weeds that have pushed their way through every crack whispering in the wind. At 18 nuclear power plant, owned by Tokyo Electric Power Company, or TEPCO, was built straddling two towns tablet to the north. And, oh, come a to the south parts of Oklahoma reopened last year, and in a lot of ways that town is doing better. There's a lot of construction happening here. A beautiful new town hall in a planned community with dozens of identical one storey houses, 90 newly paved roads. And people are actually living here, too, like Kazuko Endo, whose gardening outside one of the new homes she used to live in a coma before the disaster, But not here. This used to be rice Patties, she says. Her old home is still behind Gates brought ing into everything is different now to go, but it's a different town. Even if it has the same name. Okay, Ma used to have a population of over 11,000. Now there are less than 200 also started. There are only old people here, which, I guess includes me. So, uh, one young family would want to live here. Any school hospital or grocery store is miles away. But It's not just the lack of conveniences that has kept people from moving back. The worry about radiation is constant. In this part of Fukushima, there are radiation monitors and parks outside train stations and flashing along highways. Radiation levels have generally decreased since the accident, both due to human cleanup and the natural decay of radioactive particles. But there are still a lot of hot spots places where radiation levels are worryingly high. The Japanese government insists that the area is being re opened are safe. But trust in the government plummeted after the disaster. A lot of people just aren't willing to take the Ritz. Instead, many who moved back have come to live out their final days like 98 year old Masato sake. Saki grew up here, and he remembers using candles and lanterns as a kid. Too much nuclear power did make life more convenient. There were light bulbs and appliances, the hunt and I'm not so sure it was worth it. He gets out a big scroll of paper and unrolls it on his kitchen table. It's a family tree sake now spends his time trying to track down nearly 200 members of his family scattered after the disaster. The construction company he owned, helped build several of the reactors at the G, and he nods sadly at his role, constructing the very thing that forced everyone to flee this town needed nuclear Coexisted with it, and I profited from it. But now look at the town will never be the same area. You quit the name. He gestures toward the old downtown Oklahoma to miles away behind a gate. It's abandoned and overgrown with weeds, rusted shutters clanking with every breeze. These two towns. O Koma. Taba once gained a lot from nuclear power. When Daiichi was built here back in the seventies, they shared a wealth of subsidies and tax revenue. This was a lifeline for them. Daniel P. Aldrich is a professor at Northeastern University. He studied the huge economic gains that nuclear power host towns originally got in Japan. I don't new roads. We've got new bridges they built old age, Hans I remember the community someone by the gold brick and put it in the local government offices to people to look at. That's how much money was coming in. People didn't even know what to do with this money. The incentives needed to be tempting for energy star of Japan to rises and economic power. Lots of town signed on. And over time, Japan built 54 nuclear reactors all across the country. But the money for communities didn't last long. And perhaps no one knows that better than 71 year old Kazutaka Edogawa. He was mayor of double during the disaster. Now he's retired and lives hundreds of miles away. He's turned the top floor of an old camera store into an office where he spends everyday meticulously documenting what happened to his town left much more people really believed that without nuclear power for Taba couldn't survive, and I thought that was a very dangerous isn't it says at the time of the accident. All that wealth had run out. I told you, he pulls out a big binder and flips to a page to show that when he became mayor in 2000 for Tebow was nearly bankrupt. He cut a salary in half and then half again. The town had just agreed to host to more reactors to get more money, more subsidies. They were being built at Daiichi. When disaster struck Minamoto Tebow was addicted to the nuclear money. But what were the consequences? We didn't get prosperity didn't issue Now it'll go, uh, works day and night, His wife left him. His grown Children have moved away, and he thinks every day about the hometown he lost, he says. Sometimes he can close his eyes and still feel the first warm breeze of summer there. I miss everything about that. If I start talking about what I miss, it'll take too long. We're going on a yoga ball points to an old picture of Futaba from before 2011. The streets are clean there. No weeds, And there's a big welcome sign to the town that reads nuclear energy for a bright future. That sign was quietly removed after the disaster. He looks at the photo and size. Jojo's Jason and I took that life for.

Taba Japan Gates Daiichi Minamoto Tebow Masato Suzuki Tokyo Electric Power Company Oklahoma Seoul Japanese government Saki Kazuko Endo Kaba TEPCO officer Kazutaka Edogawa
"tepco" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"tepco" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Have their handlers with them make sure they have filled their nebulizer fluids make sure that if they have an attack that they need to tell someone this is especially important right now because this is peak week for asthma season and suffers it's the most dangerous week of the year due to high ragweed pollen in the air nine eighteen sunshine fifty seven in Boston and to simply beautiful day today high temperatures in the lower seventies and some inland areas upper sixties on the coastline nerves rattled emotional sparks are flying in Hawaii once again after emergency sirens go off on a while who and Molly and once again it's an accident that's according to police officials who say someone flipped the wrong switch during training exercises on the island but for many enough is enough the false alarm sent shivers up the spines of those who recall a phony ballistic missile morning sent out early one morning last year islanders again taking out their frustrations on Twitter as officials begin their investigation into what went wrong. it is at nine nineteen today's loaded question topic how is your marriage turns out the success or failure just may be based on the way you scream at each other listen at what's the key to a happy marriage arguing a lot university of Tennessee researchers say couples who like to Becker tend to have a really good relationship overall that's because they don't let things simmer until the boil over the study looked at couples from two groups those aged in their thirties and those aged in their seventies happy couples tended to take us solution oriented approach to their disagreements couples that argued a lot also tended to choose their battles wisely and avoid more difficult subjects including sex Jim canopy CBS news in New Jersey the referee who told a high school wrestler to cut off his dreadlocks or forfeit his upcoming match has now been suspended himself for his actions the teenager given just ninety seconds to make that decision and ventrally did decide to cut off his hair it's all caught on a video that went viral last year Alan Maloney now ordered to stay off the mat for two years suspended the ruling also requires referees and coaches throughout New Jersey to undergo training for bias a Japanese court exonerates the executives in charge of the Fukushima nuclear power plant to the site of one of the world's worst nuclear accidents back in twenty eleven the former managers of Tokyo electric power company had faced five year prison terms for failing to prevent the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant disaster the executive successfully argued that they could not have anticipated that a massive earthquake would trigger more than thirty foot tsunami waves which flooded the plant and caused the reactor cooling systems to fail Lucy craft CBS news.

Boston Hawaii Molly Twitter New Jersey Alan Maloney executive university of Tennessee Becker CBS ventrally Tokyo Fukushima ninety seconds thirty foot five year two years
Japan court: TEPCO execs not guilty in Fukushima disaster

WBZ Morning News

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

Japan court: TEPCO execs not guilty in Fukushima disaster

"A Japanese court exonerates the executives in charge of the Fukushima nuclear power plant to the site of one of the world's worst nuclear accidents back in twenty eleven the former managers of Tokyo electric power company had faced five year prison terms for failing to prevent the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant disaster the executive successfully argued that they could not have anticipated that a massive earthquake would trigger more than thirty foot tsunami waves which flooded the plant and caused the reactor cooling systems to

Executive Tokyo Fukushima Thirty Foot Five Year
"tepco" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"tepco" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"This is gone seven thirty A. and this is a live sharks all of the downtown we at the at the center not all five managing a crisis Saudi Aramco the most valuable piece of land in the world has been battered by drones how can I. fifty percent of study Radko's overall production the question from markets is very very clear is this a five million barrels of oil a two day four day event was it a full week of and to get that level of production back into the system the United States Mr trump authorizes ask your release on so he tells the world he's locked and loaded in regard to what's happening and who is responsible so we'll talk about the geopolitics out of course the Saudi Aramco I kill people with my next gas is getting first what headlines around the world and about Jews as with the team in Hong Kong. thanks Dennis the latest data from China show you get more weakness in the economy and the government stimulus may not be enough to offset the effects of the trade war industrial output rose four point four percent last month from a year earlier well below estimates of a five point two percent gain retail sales also miss for constant expanding seven and a half percent against a projected increase of almost eight percent. the trade spat between South Korea and Japan is set to heat up this week was sold ready to exclude from its list of trusted export nations Yonhap says Japan we bundled together with nations that is still part of Kariz exploration but a broken ground rules for have adopted unsatisfactory policies Japan remove Korea last month from its own white list of favorite export nations. UK prime minister Boris Johnson insists he's working flat out on a break the deal telling the Daily Telegraph city can finalize an agreement at a later summit two weeks before the deadline yes the Brussels later today for talks with the EU commission president John called you guys warning against that is warning that hot split next month will create on a chaos the last four years. some Korea say Kim Jong un has invited president trump to pay only a fool would be this amazing the joongang Ilbo says the offer came in a less to live it last month and so as a separate night from came that the president made public earlier. working level talks in school since he sees summit in Hanoi ended without a deal it's not clear whether the president has applied to I the last. initial estimates of the damage caused by typhoon foss sign Japan for the build up to seven billion dollars the store will force the closure of Sony Nissan factories in Tokyo and stranded thousands of people in a race to apple's including the England rugby squad preparing for the imminent will come up foss I also a cop how along the east coast with local utility TEPCO saying almost half a million customers were affected. news twenty four hours a day on it and the tickets are going to adopt a more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries I met a vocalist this is one that gets the markets when watching..

Japan president Saudi Aramco South Korea Mr trump Boris Johnson Radko United States Daily Telegraph Kim Jong un Hanoi Yonhap Kariz Brussels UK EU China TEPCO
"tepco" Discussed on NutriMedical Report

NutriMedical Report

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"tepco" Discussed on NutriMedical Report

"Water systems. Bob is going to have a program. Let's talk about the pure water system. I we miss you. You're supposed to be on the last segment and we had a caller dollar call in and i guess he our board ops. Who's you but actually <hes>. Let's let's talk about the pure water system and how people need to have clean water if they want to detox. Don't be the filter get. A filter right for goodness sakes stopped being the filter. Stop letting your body be the filter to remove all these contaminants. It's not end well. We talked with we talked about. We talked about yesterday into something before you get going. <hes> doctor talked about this. Why do we have sexual perversion while we have a one sex and sixty three genders pushed by the united nations is because people are drinking toxic secure water with zanu astra jains with their mothers are taking aspartame which is formaldehyde and methanol insulted. They're affecting the baby. Reverend your acne modified edified foods. It alters the genes of the developing fetus. We have seventy three to seventy five percent plus dropping count and male hormone. We wonder why we have more breast cancer answer more other problems because they know toxins in our water and it's not just tap water is industrial waste. It's spread birth control pills chemotherapy. It's building materials trails. It's every toxin can imagine pleading fukushima daiichi and our water supply. We wonder why the biology of the human populations dropping if you're not filtering your water your the filter shelter and it's not gonna go well for us you accumulate these radio toxins chemicals doping agents and they're gonna feminine is you and destroy your biology jingu cancer. What are the four phases of the system tells them hey you know it's real simple. Dr bill we put together the four phases that are the most effective effective at removing all the different kinds of contaminants that show up in water unlike other systems that you can get on the marketplace that do a the they actually actually just target a different you know different classes of contaminants but if your water systems we think that's silly. Why would you target just a few of the types of contaminants eminence that show up in drinking water. You don't know what's gonna show up in your water tomorrow. You don't know what's gonna be there next year. You don't want to invest your money. In a water. Purification system only defined out it doesn't get rid of the latest most recent the most recently discovered contaminant and then they're discovering contaminants all the time in fact in almost every instance that they go out and say we are going to go study water samples across the country across the world to see if we can find old. Let's just just call it contaminant ex well every time they do that. They find contaminate x. appears appearance every single sample but they find it in the environment because it's out there in them by example introduced a new chemical in china and manufacturing nanoparticles within the three days it shows up in the air supply over california and with an another day or across the nation and circulates the planet time comes down and rain water and water vapor in an ice and snow and people say oh no how this happened. They had a back calculate for example radiation cloud. They said originated in russia. They knew it was was actually a russian. General steel reactor broke down a few years ago and caused massive radiation cloud. We've done nothing even during trump to actually fix fukushima daiichi also support companies companies for the <hes>. It's called the umbrella company called tepco. All the service companies are american and we've done nothing to stop at radiation. We're in the tailpipe of it. We're done nothing to stop toilet to tap water. In fact under donald trump he's actually recycling toxic water table recycled water including recycle water from places where they have hydrogen sulfide defied from hydro fracking in northern california areas where the creating thermal <hes> of steam will induce the power generation and actually taken the toxic water with hundreds and sulfide which when your kidneys concentrate you can even stall steel and porcelain your toilet and yet the knucklehead trump doesn't get it and so does mick mulvaney and all of the people advising around because they're devils and people don't get that genetically modified food is toxic and that donald trump authorizes tako crazy good genetically-modified. We've got food. We've got commonsense shortage. You don't wanna have mono crops. You certainly don't want genetically modified when it actually modifies human biology if you eat animals animal's reading genetically modified foods the same water. How can you possibly have healthy children. If the momma is drinking water lace with zina toxins are gonna feminine male l. fetus and cost females develop admirable biology leader that may get cancer i mean how can we possibly have a healthy human population. The i._q. Is dropping. We've got proof in the last few decades some point drop per decade and human i._q. North america did you know that it's a lot.

donald trump united nations fukushima Bob tepco zanu california Dr bill mick mulvaney North america russia northern california seventy five percent three days
"tepco" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"tepco" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Pitcher warmed up and stuff. And then you realize that obviously, I think everyone saw by the images and whatnot that just wasn't playable. Then all of a sudden the emerging thought that made it more rain was on the way. Definitely I think the right call to put this one off. So the Orioles play tonight, and then a double header tomorrow before Thursday's day off met seven plays in Saturday there in Washington tonight. The PGA championship tees off Thursday at Bethpage Black on Long Island live coverage on Bloomberg radio. Tiger Woods doing for back-to-back majors. Brooks TEPCO defending champion. Justin Thomas won the PJ two years ago. He's had to pull out with a wrist injury. With the Bloomberg NBC sports update. I'm Jon Stashower. Nathan. All right. John. Thank you in the PGA championship is just two days. Away. It's been hard to distinguish tour pros from club pros and major champions from major rookies the first official day of practice on long island's Bethpage Black. That's because all of them were bundled in dark, rain gears temperatures hovered in the upper forties. It should get better. By the time the tournament actually get started with temperatures pushing seventy by the weekend, and you can catch all the action, by the way right here on Bloomberg radio starting Thursday afternoon. As for the action on Wall Street futures pointing higher s and p futures up twenty points. Now, Dow futures up one hundred fifty four NASDAQ futures up seventy two points. This is Bloomberg. There are lots of ads out there for home security systems, cheap, install it yourself than hope it works systems. But that's not what I locked protecting my home and family, I want real security from real security.

Bloomberg Long Island Tiger Woods Justin Thomas Orioles Brooks TEPCO Jon Stashower NBC Nathan Washington John official two years two days
"tepco" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"tepco" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Our imagination news, it didn't mean, no gay newly Diaz we've lived all great movements. Footnote earlier in the day. President Donald Trump US weighed in saying officials might wanna use water tankers the head of Francis. Civil security agency posted in English only reply all means are being used except for water aircrafts, which if used could lead to the collapse of the entire structure of the cathedral. Not the first Trump suggestion of the day earlier, he weighed in on Boeing saying they need to rename the max jets when they are fixed for better, branding purposes. Bloomberg news is reporting the two house of representatives. Panels issued subpoenas relating to foreign influence on politics. House intelligence committee chair Adam Schiff says subpoenas to multiple banks one of them has Deutsche Bank. The Deutsche Bank has regarding loans made to Donald Trump and the Trump organization. Other banks include. Group J P Morgan Chase, Goldman Sachs and Bank of America. And the department of Justice says it is going to release the Muller report on Thursday U S Friday Asia, South Korean president, moon Jae and says he wants another Korea summit this days after Kim Jong UN seem to dismiss him calling his efforts. Officious Tokyo Electric assaying workers have started removing the first of five hundred sixty six used and unused fueled unit stored by the Fukushima pool and United three TEPCO says that will take about two years to remove them and US President Trump making his hardest threat to send migrants to sanctuary cities today saying if the detention areas become full, it should note that he has repeatedly said in the past few days, the country is full. But congressman Katie porter says he's creating part of the problem as he goes to the entire world. Like the country is full. We are not gonna take anymore immigrants. We're going to close the border down. Between Mexico and the United States that has the effect of simply causing more people who may sometime in their future. Want to try to come to the United States to try to come.

Donald Trump Trump organization Deutsche Bank US Kim Jong UN Adam Schiff Diaz president Boeing Goldman Sachs J P Morgan Chase Bloomberg Bank of America Tokyo Electric Francis department of Justice Mexico congressman TEPCO Korea
Tokyo Electric And TEPCO discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:14 sec | 2 years ago

Tokyo Electric And TEPCO discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

"Tokyo Electric is saying workers have started removing the first of five hundred sixty six used and unused fueled units stored at the Fukushima pool at unit. Three TEPCO says it will take

Tokyo Electric Tepco
"tepco" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"tepco" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Every step of the home buying process. Learn more at first Republic dot com. First Republic Bank, member FDIC and equal housing lender. Cloudy skies, increasing throughout the day today with rain expected. Area-wide by this afternoon. Now news headlines from NPR, then Tiffany will be back. With more local news from NPR news in Washington, I'm Lakshmi Singh. Well, this week attorney general William bars expected to give congress redacted version of the special counsel report on Russian election interference NPR's Windsor. Johnston reports there has been growing anticipation over the release, especially from Democrats who are demanding the findings in full Democrats have attacked bars for page summary of the nearly two year investigation and argue that they need to see the complete report in order to draw their own conclusions far who has pledged to be as transparent as the law. Allows says the findings are being scrubbed to exclude grand jury material and other details that may impede pending investigations. President Trump's dialing up his Twitter attack on congresswoman Ilhan, Omar one of the first Muslim women elected to congress. Trump calls or anti Israel for questions. Minnesota lawmaker raise about US policy affecting Israel, the pal. Palestinians and Muslim communities more than eight years after the nuclear disaster. Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant. Authorities are now taking a major step in its cleanup. Here's Abigail Leonard. In Tokyo are still over five hundred feel units that need to be removed from the plant's reactors. They're sitting in so called cooling pools, which are not enclosed. So they're vulnerable. If there's another earthquake or sue NAMI, Tokyo Electric Power company or TEPCO says its workers had started removing the first set of rods TEPCO estimates. That extraction of all the rods will take another two years. This is NPR news from K Q E D news. I'm Tiffany Cam high. San Francisco's top juvenile Justice official says the city for years sent dozens of boys to an east coast reform school. That's now being scrutinized for allegedly covering up decades of extreme views cake. Ted Goldberg reports Pennsylvania is closing the Glen mills schools after the Philadelphia Inquirer documented a culture of violence at the facility the school used to. Have a strong reputation, but staff members allegedly assaulted kids there for years and the facilities leaders are said to have ignored complaints and went to lengths to cover them up. Allen nets San Francisco's chief juvenile probation. Officer says in the last decade the city transferred some thirty kids to the school and it never received a complaint about it. Amongst are doing Justice practitioners Glen mills was one of the more popular placement sites for some of our most difficult to place youth net says the city stop sending juveniles Glen mills in two thousand sixteen when it cut back the number of out of state facilities. It uses. Ted Gobert kick, you news police are investigating a hit and run collision that killed a mother and her son and seriously injured a man in east Oakland over the weekend. It took place on foothill boulevard in twenty-six avenue, Saturday evening. Three people were walking in a crosswalk when a two door Mercedes-Benz struck them and fled the scene. A third. Thirty year old woman and her six year old son were killed the other victim a twenty year old man is in critical condition. Police say the vehicle involved in the crash, but not the driver was found in another part of the city. I'm Tiffany can high K Q E news. Support comes from total wine and more with hard to find microbrews and imported beers. Now open and Stevens creek support for Kiwi comes from visitors coverage, helping.

NPR William bars Glen mills TEPCO San Francisco Israel President Trump First Republic Bank Glen mills schools FDIC Minnesota Tiffany Lakshmi Singh Tokyo Abigail Leonard Philadelphia Inquirer Stevens creek Ted Goldberg Ted Gobert
"tepco" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"tepco" Discussed on KCRW

"Mississippi north to Ohio house speaker Nancy Pelosi says she's taking steps to increase security from Minnesota democratic congresswoman Ilhan, Omar this comes after President Trump re tweeted a video of Omar that appears to suggest she was dismissive of the September eleventh attacks since Trump's tweet Omar has gotten numerous threats to her life NPR. Susan Davis notes that Omar has previously angered some with her comments and earlier this year apologized for one social media comment. That was condemned as anti semitic. It's interesting on the democratic side. Because in this instance, I think you see so many more of her colleagues in our party coming to her defense. Sense that the president? And using these words and juxtaposing her image against the nine eleven attacks has in their words attempted to incite violence against her. And that her comments in the broader context of what she was saying with talking about overall, Muslim bigotry in the country following nine eleven, and that she sees herself as an activist against those forms of bigotry NPR's. Susan Davis this week attorney general Bill Vare is expected to give congress a redacted version of the special counsel's report on Russian interference in US elections NPR's Windsor, Johnston reports on growing anticipation of the report's release Democrats have attacked bars for page summary of the nearly two year investigation and argue that they need to see the complete report in order to draw their own conclusions bar who has pledged to be as transparent as the law. Allows says the findings are being scrubbed to exclude grand jury material and other. Details that may impede pending investigations NPR's Windsor, Johnston reporting more than eight years after the nuclear disaster at Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant. Authorities in Japan are now taking a major step in its cleanup Abigail. Leonard has more from Tokyo over five hundred fuel units still need to be removed from the plant's reactors. They're sitting in so called cooling pools, which are not enclosed. So they're vulnerable. If there's another earthquake tsunami. Tokyo Electric Power company or TEPCO says its workers had started removing the first set of rods using a remote controlled crane operating under water to prevent radiation leaks. The process had been delayed for years by mishaps, high levels of radiation and radioactive debris TEPCO estimates. That extraction of all the rods will take another two years. Then they'll have to figure out how to remove the melted. Fuel from inside the reactor, which is expected to be even more challenging for NPR news. I'm Abigail Leonard. In Tokyo this. This is NPR. Secretary of state Mike Pompeo will talk today about his visit Latin America, he just visited four South American nation's and talked with their leaders about the deepening crisis in Venezuela. He's again demanded that Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, leave power Pompeo traveled to Venezuela's border with Colombia. That's where some three million Venezuelans have fled into Columbia facing food shortages and political unrest at home more than one in four teenagers say they have received a sexually explicit text. According to research published in the journal, pediatrics NPR's, Alison Aubrey reports. The researchers say parents may not be aware of the legal risks of sexting. Authorities can prosecute texting between teens and more than twenty states in the US and is texting sexual images has become more common. The authors say teens don't get enough education or support to help them understand just how problematic. This can be definitely parents are usually out. Out of the loop on this. That's pediatrician Victor Strasburger. He says many states have passed laws to decriminalize sexting. And he says when it's consensual it should not warrant law enforcement, the authors say the issue is better addressed by parents, teachers and caregivers Allison Aubrey NPR news gopher Tiger Woods is one is fifth masters tournament in a one shot victory. It's his fifteenth major tournament victory and is a dramatic comeback from injury. Now, there is speculation whether with his titles woods can equal or surpass golfer. Jack Nicklaus's record of eighteen major victories..

NPR Omar Mike Pompeo Abigail Leonard Tokyo Susan Davis Allison Aubrey NPR President Trump president TEPCO US Johnston Windsor Victor Strasburger Nancy Pelosi Venezuela Japan Jack Nicklaus
"tepco" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

08:37 min | 2 years ago

"tepco" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"And Chris and Vincent in the studio here tonight. And before we go on with your calls. I wanted to just refresh myself and also continue to discuss briefly, this story concept because people are afraid a lot of folks out there are frayed of nuclear reactors. Understandably there have been some horror stories despite generally apparently having a pretty good safety record as an industry when the bad news comes. It's usually pretty scary and pretty bad. I mean, of course, a lot of people site Chernobyl and Three Mile Island as examples of horrific examples from the pass. Past. But you know, it begs the question what are the alternatives to nuclear within the nuclear power what what's the alternative to uranium? Well, it's thorium and Martin cut catava over at Forbes dot com has a story about this talking about the Fukushima disaster, which many of us remember from Japan. And it says here the Fukushima disaster reminded us all of the dangers inherent in uranium fuel nuclear reactors. And this was written a little while back several years back, but they say here back then TEPCO continued to struggle to contain and cool the fuel rods highlights just how energetic uranium fission reactions are how challenging to control. So, you know, the reaction just keeps going right? And it's so hot, and they can't really get in there. They couldn't get to do anything to it. Of course, the level of energies exactly why we use nuclear energy, it's incredibly efficient as a source of power in creates very few emissions and carries a lot -able safety record to boot the conversation nuclear good but uranium dangerous regularly leads to a very good question. What about thorium thorium sits two spots to the left of uranium on the periodic table in the same row or series elements in the same series share characteristics with uranium and thorough him. The key similarity is that both can absorb neutrons. And transmute into fissile elements. This means that thorium could be used a fuel nuclear reactors just like uranium and its proponents of the underdog feel will happily tell you throw him is more abundant in nature than uranium is not fissile on its own. And this is super important because it means they can stop the reaction when necessary if something's going wrong at the reactor, they can literally shut it down and everything's fine. It doesn't overheat. It doesn't continue reacting like happens with uranium. So you've got you end the nuclear meltdown problem. The biggest problem the biggest objection you ended by using it also produces waste products that are less radioactive which is the other big objection. Right. As you've heard these for years where they'll say this nuclear facilities shipping, it's you know, waste to this facility. And then it's leaking into the, you know, the earth, and it's going to be reactive for thousands of years or whatever. Right. Thorium is nuts. The the by biproduct is not as as dangerous, and let's see what else. Oh, and it generates more energy per ton. So it's more efficient more useful. So why yes, are we using uranium as you might recall research into the mechanization of nuclear reactions was initially driven monop- by the desire to make energy, but by the desire to make bombs the two billion dollar Manhattan project produced the atomic bomb sparked a worldwide surge in nuclear research, most of it funded by governments embroiled in the Cold War. And here we come to it. He says thorium reactors do not produce plutonium, which is what you need to make a nuke. How ironic the fact that thorium reactors could not produce fuel for nuclear weapons met the better reactor fuel thorium got short shrift today. We would love to be able to clearly differentiate a country's nuclear reactors. From its weapons program. And then he goes a little bit more into detail about thorium and uranium. I'll put a link up on the Twitter over Twitter dot freetalklive dot com on our mastodon at dot freetalklive dot com and our telegram at telegram dot freetalklive dot com, and you can get into a lot more detail on the differences between uranium and thorium. But I think that for a lot of people that have objections to nuclear power, it seems to me like their objections are primarily based in the fact of meltdowns and the the byproducts and this gives those those problems the natural development. Like, you know, we have clean coal. We burn in the US, you know. And I it was dirty and it wasn't particularly good for the environment. But as people were able to use it and make progress and make capital than they could use that capital to reinvest into funding cleaner research. So you know, I mean if somethings like nothing I encourage practices that cause mass amounts of pollution. But I mean banning it isn't always the best way. I mean, sometimes just right leading the market go. It's eventually going to have a solution and get. Better. This is this is an issue of liability. I think and if you liability of a nuclear power plant, especially more dangerous one you would find that. It's no longer cost effective. Now, the question is are they liability for the government, waives liability? So they don't have to deal with the costs, basically. Right. And nor the if a if they pollutant virement they don't have to pay to clean it up. But I think same thing would apply. Whether it's whether it's a, you know, your children for oil, you're drilling or you're doing nuclear, you know, you're going to take ten years to collect information continues to learn more and more about what has been going on there. So this is not a situation where you said, okay case closed. It's time to move on. Saudi Arabia has brought charges against several people. And we believe we're gonna let the judicial process take. Its course he continued to lever door open that the US will follow this wherever even if it means going straight to the top with the government there. So his messaging I found quite interesting suggested he still thinks that you know, things could take turn developing situation. Do we have any idea of what they're doing in that regard? I mean, he says we will continue to work to identify those responsible. Does that involve intelligence work? What what are they doing? Well, that's a great question. I think it would primarily be until it's work. And that that allows the secretary to turn around and say, it was I can't remember part of it was done, though, didn't intelligence community already decide rule that the that the sided mentorship is behind this. Right. It was more like. The crown prince would have been involved, but the secretary himself has at the same time taking different tax. We have no direct evidence that the crown prince was involved. Which gives him a lot of people room to to sort of digest the intelligence community incessant, but come to his own inclusion. So I think the most important thing you see is that the US still believe Saudi Arabia has not presented what it calls credible narrative for what happened. So do you Arabia's sort of narrative over this case has shifted your medically in the US still believes it is still pressing that Eurabia to fully explain it. So if I don't think they've steal it on the street definitive answer on what happened, Nick. Thank you. That's Bloomberg news national security reporter, Nick Waddams. Well, that wraps up this week show for more government or national affairs. News from Bloomberg. Visit Biegel dot com, you can also find political news analysis and commentary at Bloomberg politics. Peter Barnes and Bob moon. This is Bloomberg. This message is for all of us sitting in the passenger seat and apologies if it gets a little uncomfortable. But how does it feel to be at the mercy of someone who thinks a random text is more important than your life? Someone who takes their eyes off the road while speeding along in a three ton hunk of steel. Freaky, right? Well, why not just ask them to stop or better yet? Volunteer to text for them. It might be a little awkward, but believe me you'll live. Learn more at stoptextsstopwrecks dot org. Brought to you by the Ad Council and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration..

US Saudi Arabia Bloomberg Forbes dot secretary Nick Waddams Fukushima Twitter Chernobyl Three Mile Island TEPCO Ad Council Martin Chris
"tepco" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

10:08 min | 2 years ago

"tepco" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Show because after this is over we're going internet only we used to be twitch only I can't say that anymore because we're also going to be on D live. So that'd be internet only the after show with liked call freer talk lives to ground for that. You can find us over at twitch. Lauren dot FM or D live dot L R, N dot F, M E, and Chris and Vincent in the studio here tonight. And before we go on with your calls. I wanted to just refresh myself and also continue to discuss briefly, this thorium concept because people are afraid a lot of folks out. There are frayed of nuclear reactors. Understandably there have been some horror stories despite generally apparently having a pretty good safety record as an industry when the bad news comes. It's usually pretty scary and pretty bad. I mean, of course, a lot of people site Chernobyl and Three Mile Island as examples of horrific examples from the. Past. But you know, it begs the question what are the alternatives to nuclear within the nuclear power what what's the alternative to uranium? Well, it's thorium and Martin ca Tusa over at Forbes dot com has a story about this talking about the Fukushima disaster, which many of us remember from Japan. And it says here the Fukushima disaster reminded us all of the dangers inherent in uranium fueled nuclear reactors. And this was written a little while back several years back, but they say here back then TEPCO continued to struggle to contain and cool the fuel rods highlights just how energetic uranium fission reactions. Are how challenging to control the reaction just keeps going right? And it's so hot, and they can't really get in there. They couldn't get to do anything to it. Of course, the level of energies exactly why we use nuclear energy. It's incredibly efficient as source of power in creates very few emissions and carries a lot -able safety record to boot the conversation nuclear good but uranium dangerous regularly leads to a very good question. What about thorium thorium sits two spots to the left of uranium on the periodic table in the same row or series elements in the same series share characteristics with uranium and thorium? The key similarity is that both can absorb neutrons. And transmute into fissile elements. This means that thorium could be used to fuel nuclear reactors, just like uranium and has proponents of the underdog fuel will happily tell you three him is more abundant in nature than uranium is not fissile on its own. And this is super important because it means they can stop the reaction when necessary if something's going wrong at the reactor, they can literally shut it down and everything's fine. It doesn't overheat. It doesn't continue reacting like happens with uranium. So you've got you end the nuclear meltdown problem. The biggest problem the biggest objection you ended by using Dorian. It also produces waste products that are less radioactive which is the other big objection. Right. As you've heard these for years where they'll say this nuclear facility shipping, it's you know, waste to this facility. And then it's leaking into the, you know, the earth, and it's going to be reactive for thousands of years or whatever right thorium is not the the biproduct is not as as dangerous, and let's see what else. Oh, and it generates more energy per ton. So it's more efficient. It's more useful. So why yes, are we using uranium as you might recall research into the mechanization of nuclear reactions was initially driven by the desire to make energy, but by the desire to make bombs the two billion dollar Manhattan project that produced the atomic bomb sparked a worldwide surge in nuclear research, most of it funded by governments embroiled in the Cold War. And here we come to it. He says. Story reactors do not produce plutonium, which is what you need to make a nuke. How ironic the fact that thorium reactors could not produce fuel for nuclear weapons meant the better reactor fuel thorium got short shrift today. We would love to be able to clearly differentiate a country's nuclear reactors from its weapons program. And then he goes a little bit more into detail about thorium and uranium. I'll put a link up on the Twitter over Twitter dot freetalklive dot com on our mastodon at freetalklive dot com and our telegram, telegram dot freetalklive dot com, and you can get into a lot more detail on the differences between uranium and thorium. But I think that for a lot of people that have objections to nuclear power, it seems to me like their objections are primarily based in the fact of meltdowns and the the by products, and this those those problems is a natural development like, you know, via of clean coal. We burn in the US. And I it was dirty and it wasn't particularly good for the environment. But as people were able to use it and make progress and make capital the naked use that capital two. Reinvested into finding cleaner research. I mean if somethings like nothing I encourage practices that cause mass amounts of pollution. But I mean banning it isn't always the best way. Sometimes just right leading the market go. It's eventually going to have a solution and get better. This is an issue of liability. I think and if you have to factor in liability of a nuclear power plant, especially more dangerous one you would find that. It's no longer cost effective. Now, the question is are they wave liability for the government, waives liability? So they don't have to deal with the costs, basically. Right. And nor nor the if a if they pollute they don't have to you don't have to pay to clean it up. But I think same thing would apply. Whether it's whether it's a, you know, your children for oil, you're drilling or you're you're doing nuclear you're going to take more steps more precautions if you have that full liability to deal with if in event of tragedy, and you also have the issue of insurance, no insurance. Company's going to ensure you if you're not doing things in a way that reduces insurance liability. Right. So, you know, I think there are solutions to these problems, and it's not necessarily that we need to ban any of them. It's just we need to let the free Leno, right? Every market let the free market deal with the problem and hold people liable for their actions, including corporation. Exactly. So you wanna bring up whatever you want. Please do the toll free numbers. Eight fifty five four fifty. He's David in New Mexico. Your free talk live, David. You're talking about my cousin Ernest Orlando Lawrence. Manhattan project. Oh, okay. Yeah. You memories, you just mentioned Manhattan project. My cousin. I would argue the single most influential person in the Manhattan project because the one that recommended to general groves that general groves higher is friend and colleague Oppenheimer to run the Manhattan project and then Lawrence themselves went over to Oak Ridge. Refined nuclear material, and I see that Oak Ridge is doing studies on oriented that you mentioned and short on time. And you mentioned that I would bring that up. And. There's all kinds of if you go. Here's a picture if you Google Ernest Orlando Lawrence and any other keyword and Oppenheimer, for instance. And then look at the images associated there's all these guys out in Heimer, seaboard Heller will so. Guy guys, take your word for it. Hey, david. I appreciate it. So what else did we need to know Chris about this terrorist Bill in the EU that is apparently going to result in these policing agencies targeting the internet archive in likely a bunch of other with this basically something that I can't that just can't even work. But let me let me here. Here's what the internet had to say. So at at and as archive explains, there's simply no way that one the could have complied with the terrorist content. Regulation had it been law last week when they received the noses and to that they should have blocked all that obviously non terrorist contents. The internet archive has a few staff members that processes take down notices for Monfort Smith who operate in the Pacific time zone. Most of the falsely identified your ELS mentioned here, including the report from the French government worse than to us in the middle of the night, midnight and three AM Pacific. And and the law says they have to remove it within an hour. Right. And all of the reports were set outside of business hours of the internet archive, the one hour requirement especially means that we would have to take re reported your ELS down automatically and do our best to review them after the fact, meaning basically, you just have to everything we just have to be taken down on the the women of police or law enforcement tariff, and it could mean millions or an entire site even based on what they're saying here. How come they don't just say, screw Europe? We don't base there there in San Francisco question. I don't think they assuming I I don't know if they've any operations in Europe in they might, and that's the problem if they have any. Connection to Europe, whether it's Bank accounts or people or employees or anything, you know, remote workers, you could end up finding yourself. You know them having access to basically your Bank account and at that point. It's like game over even if you ignore it and tell me go pound sand and closed down any kind of European offices. They should I think more people should I actually wish more websites would been Europeans effectively. Just like many of them are already do especially new sites because they're now..

Manhattan internet archive Ernest Orlando Lawrence Europe David Lauren dot Chris Oak Ridge Oppenheimer Forbes dot Chernobyl Twitter TEPCO Three Mile Island
Mickelson has best 1st round at Masters since '10

Brett Winterble

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Mickelson has best 1st round at Masters since '10

"Casca? It is a who's who? It's up the leaderboard after round one of the masters in Augusta Georgia Russian into Shambo and Brooks TEPCO shares the league at six under par. Good evening. Phil Mickelson right there. Just one shot off ladies at minus five Dustin Johnson at minus four Tiger Woods at an up and down day finished the day at two hundred par. So he's just four shots off lead. Other notables local golfers. Charley Hoffman power high school finished his day, minus one just five shots back. Save your shop Aleve scrips ranch. High school and San Diego State university is one over par round two tomorrow.

Tiger Woods Augusta Georgia Russian Phil Mickelson High School Dustin Johnson Brooks Tepco San Diego State University
"tepco" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"tepco" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Industries and geographies Bloomberg's ever-expanding technology data news and media services foster innovation empower clients and offer nearly limitless opportunities for career growth. Visit Bloomberg dot com slash careers today to view our current job opportunities. Bloomberg LP is an equal opportunity employer. The address once again is Bloomberg dot com slash careers. From the financial capital of the world. Twenty four hours a day at Bloomberg dot com on the Bloomberg business app and a tick tock on Twitter. This is Bloomberg radio. This is Bloomberg daybreak Asia for this Thursday, February fourteenth here in Hong Kong. Wednesday February thirteenth in New York. Coming up this hour and makes picture for stocks in Asia. Even after US Equity's game bullish outlook from Cisco. Cheers, investors. Apple said to be planning to unveil a rival to Netflix and Amazon prime next month. Green land holdings is said to be planning to acquire land in Shanghai from China Minsheng investment, I'm Rishaad Salamat. I'll have the story. Donald Trump says he does not expect a government shutdown as all wait to see the completed Bill. He does say he's building a wall TEPCO is used a robot for the first time to touch move radioactive debris. Fukushima US warns NATO about allowing more and more China and Russia influence in Europe. I'm Ed Baxter global news rail Madrid and Tottenham with I like Champions League round of sixteen wins ten for Broncos have themselves a new quarterback. I'm Dan Schwartzman. I'll have those stories and more coming up in Bloomberg sports. That's all. All straight ahead on Bloomberg daybreak Asia on Bloomberg eleven three all New York. Bloomberg ninety nine one Washington DC, Bloomberg one zero six one Boston Bloomberg nine sixty San Francisco, Sirius XM one nineteen and around the world on bloombergradio dot com and via the Bloomberg business app. Hey, it's Valentine's Day already a very good morning.

Bloomberg Bloomberg LP Boston Bloomberg Asia Donald Trump New York Rishaad Salamat Sirius XM US Equity Green land holdings Twitter Hong Kong Dan Schwartzman US Shanghai China Minsheng San Francisco Ed Baxter TEPCO
"tepco" Discussed on Le Show

Le Show

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"tepco" Discussed on Le Show

"It was not designed to treat fifty six million gallons of tank waste. It's still might need to be expanded or other ways found to treat some of the tank ways. Yeah. Other ways like what to do with that blackbox? Find other ways the governor Nevada Steve Cecil has railed against the same department of energy foot. He described as unacceptable deception. The agency transported a half ton of weapons-grade plutonium to Nevada without the state's consent. I am beyond outraged by this completely unacceptable deception from DO. He said department of the state of Nevada to believe that they were engaging in good faith negotiations with us regarding a potential shipment of weapons-grade plutonium only to reveal those negotiations were a sham all along. They lied to the state of Nevada misled federal court and jeopardize the safety of net, Vata's families and environment. He didn't know how the Pluto. Liam was transported or the route took they provided us with no information. He said he said he would look into several options for the Tony. I suggest the black box think the federal government might have a couple, you know, just for testing, the International Atomic Energy agency, urged Japan to to spend ample time in developing a decommissioning plan for food, and to be honest with the public about remaining uncertainties. That's right. They need to be told those things by the International Atomic Energy agency. After a visit to the plan to November. They urged the operator TEPCO to secure adequate space if in Finnish plans for managing highly radioactive melted. Fuel before starting to remove it finish the plans, then remove it says, I e I a before the commencement of the fuel debris retrieval there should be a clear implementation. Plan TEPCO should ensure that appropriate containers and storage capacity are available before starting the fuel debris removal. Again, I suggest black boxes they report all sorts of the government and TEPCO. Oh to carefully consider ways to express the inherent uncertainties involved in the project and develop a credible plan for the long-term. Well, everybody does that right? Clean cheap credible. Our friend the atom..

Nevada International Atomic Energy ag Steve Cecil Liam TEPCO federal government Japan fifty six million gallons
In a First, Japan Says Fukushima Radiation Caused Worker’s Cancer Death

Japan This Week

01:38 min | 3 years ago

In a First, Japan Says Fukushima Radiation Caused Worker’s Cancer Death

Japan Officer Fukushima Daiichi United States Japanese Government Tepco Fukushima Lung Cancer Yaqub Kerr Official Asaka Jr Chiba Station Asahi Ricky Kaminsky