18 Burst results for "Tenzin"

"tenzin" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:06 min | 3 weeks ago

"tenzin" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"And they don't want to suffer so even a kind smile a kind word can change. Somebody's day and the fact that now we are closing away from people and everybody's interacting with the mobiles instead of interacting with each other. Is i think a major cause of people's depression nowadays because they're not interconnecting anymore. Absolutely i think that is absolutely true and we're seeing even before the pandemic big spikes in exile depression addiction suicide and the collapse of social interaction is huge part of that. It appears you said before that sharing the dharma's the greatest gift or something to that effect that just puts a fine point on my gratitude to you for having spent this time with me slash us at late in the evening india time and sharing so much incredibly good stuff so i i really appreciate it. Thank you thank you very lovely to have metro. Be by them but wonderful what you're doing. I think it's enormous benefit for people that in this time when people are often merely so lost and the kind of message is getting from society. Also misleading some opportunity to listen to some sanity is so useful. And i know you've been interviewing some wonderful wonderful people. And i think that's fantastic so welcome. Thank you thank you as i said before. We rolled this conversation. I loved talking to gemma. Think she's incredible. I'm sure now that you do too. And i have invited her to come back or i've told her i'm going to invite her to come back. And she tentatively seems like she might be willing so. We'll try to make that happen with some regularity again. Thanks again to jetson mon. And her whole team also want to thank everybody who worked so hard to make the show reality samuel. John's is our lead guy. Our senior producer. Dj kashmir is. Our associate producer are sound designer. Is matt poynton from ultraviolet audio. Maria were hell is our production coordinator. We get an enormous amount of incredibly helpful input from colleagues such as point. Nee toby liz levin and ben rueben ryan kesler josh cohen from abc news. We'll see well on wednesday for an episode with a fascinating psychotherapists by the name of dr richard schwartz. He designed something called. Ifs internal family systems and we talked a lot about how we can relate to be more difficult aspects of personality and he seems to embrace my little tagline of instead of slaying dragons. Hugging your dragons. So it's a great conversation. That's coming up on wednesday. We'll see them..

matt poynton ben rueben Maria wednesday samuel John Dj kashmir dr jetson mon ryan kesler josh cohen Nee toby liz levin abc news richard schwartz india
"tenzin" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:10 min | 3 weeks ago

"tenzin" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Jetson migrate to meet you. Thanks for staying up late in india to do this interview appreciate it. Thank you so really excited to talk to you. I think maybe a great place to start would be just a little background on your personal story. How did you get interested in buddhism in the first place. Well since. I was a child i had been. What shall i say asking questions i mean. I believed that we were inherently perfect. But that we had lost contact with our innate nature which was perfect so the question was what is perfection. And how do we attain it. So i asked many people i asked the priest sayas teachers. I asked my mother. I asked everybody. I could think of and they said you have to be rude. You have to be kind and even those a child. I recognize that merely being good and kind yes. Of course we have to be good. We have to be kind. But that's just the basis this perfection was something beyond all that but what was it. And how did we attain it. So i read the bible and we were supposedly high anglican. That's like a piscopo. And i also had many jewish friends and i ask them a net rabbis and i even tried reading khurram then i took yoga but none of them onset my question because all of them would dealing with the soul and its relationship to the creator and that just did not speak to me at all so i assumed i had to find my own puff them when i was eighteen. I read a very simple book on buddhism. The fall noble truths and the three signs of being and so forth and as i read it. I just knew. This is what i had always known. I just haven't known that there was actually a religion with said that. I read health book than i said to my mother. I'm a buddhist and she said. Oh that's nice dear. Then finished reading the book. Can you can tell me all about it. As i read it just was unfolding layers and layers of things which i already had known but the buddha gave a path and i was just so grateful he not only explained essentially what perfection was. You're gonna ask me. What is perfection but also. He should pass woods that. So you know i even as i read it. I recognize that. This is what i always known without knowing that i knew it. Let me pick up on. You're keen ability to read my mind. I was going to ask amd ask you. What do you mean by perfection. Because this is. I've spent a reasonable amount of time marinating in buddhism and would describe myself as buddhist for sure. Perfection is something. I haven't fully wrapped my head around and certainly in the west and you'll know this it's easy to get it. Tangled up with perfectionism strikes me as a problematic forced to say the least well essentially. I think all genuine spiritual paul's recognize that our true nature is something beyond our conceptual sort. It cannot be thought about it cannot be spoken about but it can be realized

india england twelve years dianne bible Today Perry dan harris jewish six mental skills six paramedic diego first eighteen fifty five years ago both six para meters three signs one point Jetson
A Deeply Healthy Kind Of Perfectionism With Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:10 min | 3 weeks ago

A Deeply Healthy Kind Of Perfectionism With Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo

"Jetson migrate to meet you. Thanks for staying up late in india to do this interview appreciate it. Thank you so really excited to talk to you. I think maybe a great place to start would be just a little background on your personal story. How did you get interested in buddhism in the first place. Well since. I was a child i had been. What shall i say asking questions i mean. I believed that we were inherently perfect. But that we had lost contact with our innate nature which was perfect so the question was what is perfection. And how do we attain it. So i asked many people i asked the priest sayas teachers. I asked my mother. I asked everybody. I could think of and they said you have to be rude. You have to be kind and even those a child. I recognize that merely being good and kind yes. Of course we have to be good. We have to be kind. But that's just the basis this perfection was something beyond all that but what was it. And how did we attain it. So i read the bible and we were supposedly high anglican. That's like a piscopo. And i also had many jewish friends and i ask them a net rabbis and i even tried reading khurram then i took yoga but none of them onset my question because all of them would dealing with the soul and its relationship to the creator and that just did not speak to me at all so i assumed i had to find my own puff them when i was eighteen. I read a very simple book on buddhism. The fall noble truths and the three signs of being and so forth and as i read it. I just knew. This is what i had always known. I just haven't known that there was actually a religion with said that. I read health book than i said to my mother. I'm a buddhist and she said. Oh that's nice dear. Then finished reading the book. Can you can tell me all about it. As i read it just was unfolding layers and layers of things which i already had known but the buddha gave a path and i was just so grateful he not only explained essentially what perfection was. You're gonna ask me. What is perfection but also. He should pass woods that. So you know i even as i read it. I recognize that. This is what i always known without knowing that i knew it. Let me pick up on. You're keen ability to read my mind. I was going to ask amd ask you. What do you mean by perfection. Because this is. I've spent a reasonable amount of time marinating in buddhism and would describe myself as buddhist for sure. Perfection is something. I haven't fully wrapped my head around and certainly in the west and you'll know this it's easy to get it. Tangled up with perfectionism strikes me as a problematic forced to say the least well essentially. I think all genuine spiritual paul's recognize that our true nature is something beyond our conceptual sort. It cannot be thought about it cannot be spoken about but it can be realized

Jetson Khurram India AMD Paul
"tenzin" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:17 min | 2 months ago

"tenzin" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Artists and arts venues have been strained financially and creatively during the pandemic depend. Democ has kind of taken the wind out of a lot of personal artists and the institutions. That are supposed to supportive of us. Even in our darkest moments but some federal relief for the arts sector could be on the way. I'm tenzin bega and that's today on the takeaway for wednesday december twenty third also on the show major league baseball is adding the stats of thousands of negro league baseball players to their record books but some see the move as a limited acknowledgement.

tenzin bega baseball negro league
"tenzin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"tenzin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is the takeaway with Tenzin Vega. The women's World Cup is underway. In france. The United States kicks off tomorrow against underdog. Thailand. But first, we turn to our neighbors to the south Argentina's playing their first women's World Cup game since two thousand seven today it's been a hard-fought journey for the Celestis to make it back to the tournament. In fact, all three South American teams. The other chilly in Brazil have recently taken drastic measures in the face of decades long systematic discrimination to get where they are today. Brenda Elsie is an associate professor of history at Hofstra university, and co host of the feminist sports podcast, burn it all down. And I sat down with her to talk about the troubles facing the women's game in Brazil Argentina and Sheila especially as those countries men's teams are so dominant those three teams historically have the greatest disparity between men's and women's national teams in the world meeting between resources and ranking between their men side. And they're women side, although women have been playing at least one hundred years in all three of those countries one hundred years. So why these disparities, well, the closer that football became connected with the national identity and the idea that soccer somehow developed proper masculinity the further that women were pushed away from it. And so as it became really important in social life, and cultural life, and even in local politics because the clubs there wield, a lot of power and by the nineteen forties and fifties. It was very evident that women were threatening women playing soccer with reddening threatening to who and why so threatening to the patriarchal football governing structures threatening in the sense of getting out of the domestic space and into the public space, and then the very idea that a woman player could represent the nation was absolutely radical. It is still radical. Soccer governing bodies have banned women until the nineteen seventies is that different than what happened in South America it, and how well so in the English case, for example, it's the federation that bans, women's soccer in the case of Brazil in, in South America, the only ban you have his Brazil, the only official ban, which comes in nineteen forty one under the authority government of TULIO Vargas. And what that means is that it's illegal in the country for women to play soccer. Even when they had invitations to play in order Wyan Argentina. The women went to the courts to seek permission, saying women's soccer is not illegal there, and they were still turned down and that ban stays in place until nineteen eighty one and, and that does pretty phenomenal amounts of damage since the twenty fifteen women's World Cup each of these countries were talking about Argentina, Chile, and Brazil have all taken diff. Approaches to protesting their federations. Can you tell us a little bit about what those were it has been nothing short of Donna sharing what the women have accomplished since two thousand fifteen in two thousand fifteen essentially the after the women's World Cup all three of those teams just sort of saying in terms of their activity in the case of Argentina, and she late they actually became unranked? So that means after the hundred twenty five teams they are at the absolute bottom, meaning that the federation doesn't accept invitations. They don't have official matches. They don't know if they have coaches, they don't know what's happening. And then in this has everything to do with the very dynamic feminist movement. And you may notice in Latin America, it became a sort of caused the lab among feminists. So in the case of Chile in two thousand sixteen they form what's called an coup which is in association that links up with the men's union. The men's players prof. National union which has a lot of support to give and then in the case of Argentina, they had a general strike in two thousand seventeen they make eight dollars and fifty cents a day when they train and the strike was not even to raise the wages. It was actually because the federation had not paid those wages when they won't listen to them off the pitch. They've started to protest on the pitch. So during the COPA, maybe of two thousand eighteen they did a very powerful sort of team photo where they're all cupping their ears and asking to be heard, and the Brazilians much much the same thing in two thousand seventeen series of protests in two thousand and sixteen they had actually had their first woman coach Emily Lima who was after seven wins and five losses fired and then quickly replaced with the their old coach. And the reaction was just like boy Ling over like this is just too much. And so there's a series of retirements protest letters and things like. That. Also, one of the things that you're hearing from women in South America who are fighting for this. They're calling it feminists football. What's different between feminists football and women's soccer or women's football. I'm sorry. Yeah. So, so the translation, there would be football, having Nino women's football or football in East Asia feminist football. And the reason for that is that as the women's started to gain traction over the last couple of years. Many of the grassroots women's organizers said, hey, this is all great. This attention is all great. We love the women's national team. But you know what? We don't want to start emulating the men's game what we want to do is find an alternative path to objectification of players. Mass export of players poorly run academies that have ended up with youth players getting hurt. You know, they've said, we need us not so corporate is model that just repeats patriarchal structure that. We've suffered from so things like including gender, non binary or transplant centers and addressing those really difficult issues, instead of just sort of inserting women into the global game. Brenda Elsie is an associate professor of history at Hofstra university, and co host of the feminist sports podcasts, burn it all down. She's also co author of the new book bull, ADA history of women and sports in Latin America, and the development lead for the Americas at.

soccer Argentina Brazil football South America Brenda Elsie Hofstra university Latin America associate professor of history Wyan Argentina Chile Tenzin Vega United States official Thailand france prof. National union Sheila
"tenzin" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"tenzin" Discussed on The Takeaway

"I'm Tenzin Evita in the wake of another horrific mass shooting. You share your reaction to these events. I usually avoid details as a bit much to take in, I try to find information out about the victims to honor them, but nothing about the perpetrators Probably this. with the small street shooting realized that felt a little desensitized, and I just kind of side like another mass shooting we look at the choices the media makes while covering shootings. And how efficient are changing the way they talk about suspects. Also on the show, what's happening in Israeli politics, and how it affects the Trump administration's plans for Middle East peace deal plus a dramatic rise in police killing civilians in Rio de Janeiro under Brazil's president will so not oh and the women's World Cup. Start soon we're talking about the US team. I in our coverage, let's get started. Friday afternoon in Virginia Beach, a gunman shot and killed twelve people at the city's municipal building eleven of them were city employees. There have been one hundred forty eight mass shootings in twenty nineteen where four or more people were shot, it's conversation. We've had with you before over and over, and your reactions from this weekend lead the show today is this carried from Pittsburgh? I think, oh, no, not again, then I heard the news for a period of days until the next disaster or mass shooting occurs. Take the headlines away this armor from Richmond. I'm no longer interested in details because they seem to be always the same someone snapped guns were readily available. People died out FOX and prayers with the victims families, blah, blah, blah. This is Richard from Hollywood Hawaii. You know, I used to get really upset and wonder what's happening to America. But godly with this most recent shooting I realized that felt a little desensitize just kind of side like another mass shooting. This is Frankie calling from Olympia, Washington. I usually avoid details as a bit much to take in. I don't really feel like feeding it with my attention helps anything. This is Mary from lake Stevens. I think about victims, but I definitely have details, no mass shooting, or every day shooting for that matter will lead to a change in gun laws. This Lucien is surely political will this is Sydney Elkin from multi Georgia. I tried to find information out about the victims to honor them, but nothing about the perpetrators. They don't deserve to be told. These shootings have become so commonplace in American life that many of you told us, you're becoming desensitized, you also told us that more attention should be given to victims than to the shooter and to address this city officials in Virginia Beach chose to identify the suspected shooter, only once by name referring to him after that, only as the suspect the focused, they said, should be on the twelve people killed Keita. Kita Seib round Terrel, wilt scalper. Mary Louise Gail Alexander Mikhail. Gustaf Catherine a Nixon, Richard, h nettleton Christopher Kelly. Rap Ryan Keith Cox, Joshua, a party, Michelle Missy language. Bobbi Williams, Burt smelling. Among academics. There's a growing consensus that when media outlets censured they're reporting on the shooter's themselves that coverage has the potential to lead to copycat violence. And that's just one area where the media's role in how we cover mass shootings takes on added responsibility today, a look at the way, we respond to mass shootings in this country and how public officials and the media could do it better. I'm doing now by Nicole dominant associate professor at the university.

Mary Louise Gail Alexander Mik Virginia Beach Richard Tenzin Evita US Kita Seib Rio de Janeiro Bobbi Williams Trump administration Pittsburgh Middle East Nicole dominant Ryan Keith Cox Gustaf Catherine a Nixon Olympia Richmond America FOX lake Stevens
"tenzin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:17 min | 1 year ago

"tenzin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is the takeaway with Tenzin Vega hours after the Easter Sunday bombings in Sri Lanka, the country's government blocked, popular social media sites, including Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. The government said the move is to prevent the spread of false information. Sri Lanka is the latest in a growing list of countries that have taken aim at social media for fomenting hatred and mob violence and who have flipped the off. Switch a major social media sites in the aftermath of turmoil or terror. Amanda tile is a reporter for the New York Times who's been covering this. And she's with me now. Welcome to the takeaway. Amanda, thank you so much for having me. So when I heard the latest in Sri Lanka. I just kept thinking what is the impact of something like that? I mean, does it actually curb misinformation or is it more of a tool for the government to sort of control? What's happening in the moment. I think the answer maybe both. So it certainly has a. Chilling effect on all kinds of communication in Sri Lanka because the social media platforms are really thick witness there when I went there to report a story a year ago, I was really struck by how much people were using social media for basically all communication. It was their way of messaging friends. It was their way of getting news. It was their way of getting entertainment. It was really everywhere. This is not the first time the government has blocked it. They blocked it a year ago as well for similar reasons. And one of the things that quickly became very clear was that a lot of people were able to get around the block. I heard some estimates that it was only about fifty percent effective because people got VPN's in order to circumvent. What exactly is our government's trying to do? I mean, we know particularly in the case of Sri Lanka here is the gold as they say to try and stop the spread of misinformation. But that almost and I say this all the time when it comes to this type of you know, really controlling. Information online. It feels like a game of wacky mole. I think that's absolutely true. So I think that the government was really drawing on the experience of a year ago when anti Muslim Bryant's broke out in the country. Several people were killed a lot of homes and businesses were burned on the violence was really horrible. And that seems to have really been I commended on social media by spreading rumors about Muslims trying to kill members of the Sinhalese Buddhist majority, and then actually planned and kind of instigated using these social media platforms. So, you know, maybe people would I become angry about what they saw on Facebook. But then they switched to these large groups on platforms like what's up, and that was where we saw photos circulating of what weapons people were gathering and things like that. So I think that the government was hoping to avoid repetition of the violence that happened last year after. The Easter attacks that just occurred there, and I think everyone would probably agree that when it comes to stopping misinformation. This kind of immediate response is probably a bit late because these bands are porous it probably also wasn't a complete stop. But it may have had an impact on people's ability to use these platforms to actually plan or instigate real world violence, well and also could have had an impact on people's ability to plan to leave or to get out of a dangerous environment. Is that right and also potentially journalists and getting information good information out to individuals or or does one outweigh the other. I guess so I think that that is absolutely the question here. I mean, it is the question with regulation of all speech is how much of the kind of what might be dangerous or bad. Do you allow in order to make sure that people? Have open channels to share good information. And I think that social media is a huge and unsolved challenge in that regard. Nobody has figured out how to draw that balance yet. And because it tends to come to the fore in dangerous emergency situations like this one I think that it's it's very difficult to set precedence that will kind of work across the board for non emergency situations. Amanda, Israel's is not alone. There have been shutdowns in other places like India and Indonesia, can you give us a sense of what those decisions were based on in India. There have been a number of shutdowns, particularly partial ones that affect certain platforms or certain regions. And they have often been an effort to kind of stop exactly this sort of, you know, process by which misinformation triggers real world. Silence particularly communal violence. So in India years ago, they they've been having this problem for a while of including some misinformation that spread here's ago about riots in Assam that then triggered communal violence in a completely different part of the country because of misinformation about what had happened elsewhere. And so I think that really what you're seeing is that because this kind of misinformation hate speech, sectarian conflict, really flourishes on social media when it happens to encounter some sort of real world event that can spark violence in a way, the problem has already occurred. So they can shut down the platforms at that point. But by the time, they know they need to do that the information is usually out there already. What's the responsibility of Facebook in this for temple or WhatsApp or any of these? Platforms to manage this on their own. So the thing that I always start with is that they themselves have terms and conditions that state that hate speech and instigation to violence and things like that are against their terms and conditions. It's actually not allowed on the platform. They have agreed to that. They're just not enforcing it. And that's certainly challenging problem. But it is a problem of resources and problem of priorities. And I think until very recently, this is not something that was seen as important enough to really get the resources and get the prioritization that things like global growth in users and user time have. Amanda Taub is a reporter with the New York Times. Thanks for being with us. Amanda, no problem. Thanks for having me. So it's big fun announcement time if you're in New York, and you wanna see the takeaway live join us at the green space here at WNYC studios on Tuesday may seventh at nine AM eastern. We're also going to stream this this. Well in case, you're not in New York City with us. It's the one year anniversary of my very first broadcast on the takeaway, we're going to have conversations with live guests and free giveaways. Tickets are free for reservations over quired. So visit.

government Sri Lanka Amanda Facebook New York Times communal violence India Amanda tile reporter New York City Tenzin Vega Amanda Taub Twitter WNYC studios Bryant Israel Assam Indonesia
"tenzin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"tenzin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Or could stay red. Mark Jones is a political science fellow at rice university's Baker institute. Mark thanks for coming on. The takeaway. Thank you. This is the takeaway with Tenzin bak-. Call eight seven seven eight nineteen or tweet us at the takeaway. On Wednesday, President Trump's nominee for deputy attorney general faced a barrage of questions from senators on Capitol Hill. Jeffrey Rosen is the current deputy director of the department of transportation and has no Justice department. Experience democratic senators were also concerned with how he would handle the Muller report. Here's Connecticut, Democrat Senator Richard Blumenthal. I want your commitment here that you will support full and complete release of that report to the United States Congress without reductions or at it's of any kind. So. Senator guess or no question. It's really not. We'll hear more on. How Rosen responded and get into some more questions with Sadie Gherman Justice department reporter at the Wall Street Journal Sadie welcome to the takeaway. Thank you. So we mentioned at the top that Rosen is the deputy director of the DOT, but has not worked in the Justice department. What other experience makes him fit for this role? While he said, you know, he's a longtime litigator in private practice. He worked at the same firm as attorney general Phill bar, and he said, basically that I would come into this position as an outsider, but not as a stranger because he worked in the George W Bush administration in senior roles there and has gotten to know Justice department employees in working with them in a courtroom context. So he was trying to sort of play up his experiences litigator. Now, what can you tell us about his relationship with Torney general William bar? They've known each other professionally for years for decades since the. Gee, was AG under George H W Bush, but this is somebody who associates say for relief trusts, and he said he took this job as a Torney general with the standing that he would be able to choose his own deputy. And this is somebody that he sees a skill that government hand and a good manager one of the things that came up in the hearing was how Rosen would deal with the ongoing investigation into the Trump campaign by the US attorney for the southern district of New York. Here's what he had to say. I am going to do the right thing in accordance with the law and the rules and the requirements Sadie, what was the reaction to that response. I think that the Democrats are in particular skeptical that he will be able to do that as that was one of the key points of contention for them and was partly a concern because of his background or his lack of experience in this area. That's right. It's particularly concerning to them that he doesn't have experience in criminal law because all of the top leaders at the Justice. Department right now, including bar himself. Have never worked day-to-day as federal prosecutor the line prosecutor doing the work. So they're concerned that he wouldn't know how to make these types of decision is there also a concern that that Rosen could bow to political pressure here. I think you know in the Trump administration. The Democrats have always had that concern. You know, Rosen said, basically, all he could tell them was that he would say, no when he thought he needed to say, no. And that he wasn't concerned about Bali depressure city is it unusual for someone who's never worked for the Justice department to be in the number two person there it is unusual. In fact, this is the first time in more than twenty years at the Justice department number two would be somebody who has never worked there before the last time. This happened was before the September eleventh attacks, actually, and since then the Justice department has become sort of a sprawling national security agency, and the deputy attorney general now plays a much greater role in national security matters. So. The last time. This happened was like in the Clinton administration, and it's a sort of different landscape since then he of course, was also asked about some landmark supreme court cases, including Brown v board, and he dodged which seems to be something that we're hearing quite a bit these days when it comes to these cases, let's take a listen to what he said, I have used lots of supreme court cases. But I'm not being nominated for this position to be the solicitor general, nor a judge what do you make of that response eighty? Well, I think just traditionally nominees for these types of visions have to give sort of noncommittal answers, just because they don't know exactly what cases are going to come before them. And so they don't want to box themselves into anything. But it certainly did not make the Democrats very happy. Sadie Gherman covers the Justice department for the Wall Street Journal Sadie..

Jeffrey Rosen Justice department Sadie Gherman deputy attorney general deputy director Senator Richard Blumenthal Wall Street Journal department of transportation President Trump Tenzin bak United States George H W Bush Senator rice university Mark Jones Baker institute George W Bush administration Congress Torney
"tenzin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:10 min | 2 years ago

"tenzin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"WNYC NPR. I public radio international in collaboration with WGN radio in Boston Venezuela's crisis of leadership continues governments including the US Israel Canada. And the UK are rallying around opposition leader why though who declared himself acting president last Wednesday. But amid the developing political chaos, president Nikolas my little hasn't gone anywhere. And even though the United States has led the charge in no longer, recognizing my judo's authority several powerful countries have come out against what they see as foreign interference. Russia. China and Turkey are among a group of nations opposed to regime change in Venezuela. Jon, Lee Anderson is a staff writer for the New Yorker, and he joins me. Now. John Lee, thanks for being on the takeaway. Very welcome Tenzin. Thanks for having me on. So this is a moving and very fluid story the US's involvement in this. I'm wondering. There were some new reporting over the weekend that show that was really had had secretive meetings with among others the United States before he got this took over what else did we learn over the weekend? Well, that's right. And I think that inserts a troubling element to this rush to recognize him and acknowledge him as the interim president of a country that has to be said, there's a lot of lot of foreign governments laying down ultimately comes to the Venezuelan government that it must acknowledge this young man who may have many good qualities, but who was real unknown three weeks ago until he became the president of the rump national assembly that is the opposition stacked national assembly in Venezuela. And the president of Venezuela. Doodo many believe had a sham election last may is being told essentially to leave power, and the fact that it's coming from Washington that is coming from. I have to say Trump's Washington, not exactly a model for democracy in these times, these troubled times is is I think is what gives the worrying element. The fact that. That made a secret trip, you know, had secret talks and laid down a plan in connection in conjunction with Senator Marco Rubio who sort of the pro Schiller Latin America guy for for the White House at the moment as well. As secretary of Pompeii on others to to pull this off does give it a bit of a coup ish feeling gives it a bit of a fated complete feeling it it brings back the specter of the US has this kind of imperial power, dictating terms in Latin America, and I think I think I share this observation and some disquiet along with a lot of other people who know the region and follow it and know that however dismal the performance of the Venezuelan government is however acute it's crisis. This doesn't strike one as a open and transparent. Way forward for the region to resolve. And as well as situation, there's another concern here another player in this. If you will Elliot Abrams has been named the envoy in charge of the US's response to Venezuela Abrahams for our listeners who may not remember has a very interesting past. If you will he is believed to have supported similar military coup attempt in Venezuela in two thousand and two among others. What is Elliot Abrams is role in all of this, John Lee? And is there concern about him taking over? Well, yes, I mean, you know, Elliot Abrams has a very tarnished reputation going back to the nineteen eighty s when he was fingered in the Iran contra scandal as as someone who lied. I believe there was a couple of he was indicted. He got off he was pardoned as I recall. It has to be noted that some of those Iran contra characters. Have a way of popping up like NAS Virata? He now as the Venezuelan for Donald Trump and Oliver North as the head of the NRA. So there is this kind of sense of a the most reactionary element within the Republican right now, dictating policy terms in south of the border as as cutouts for Donald Trump. You have a very very right wing. Group in western hemisphere affairs at St.. Marco Rubio, the Senator from Florida has been delegated much of the much of this operation, it seems and the fact that Elliot Abrams is being named his on voi- really really brings me for one right back to the Reagan era when sort of covert operations took took place of of regular took the place of regular of diplomacy. And it has to be set. The Trump administration has not really attempted diplomacy with nNcholas Maduro. He from the very beginning from the very first meetings. He had with Latin American leaders after taking office in two thousand seventeen the first thing out of his mouth was that he wanted to invade Venezuela. So that we go from trying to instigate coups to to delivering to complete. In this way, seems seems seems reckless and have Elliot Abrams of all people as the voice for Washington to the region to Venezuela for the Venezuela crisis. Gives it gives it a kind of sinister tinge to the honest. And I it makes it does make me worry for the way. This may play out. There are still countries who are backing muggles regime. There's russia. There is China wondering if you could help us understand a little bit about those two countries role in what we see unfolding right now. China and Russia essentially are Venezuela's main creditors ever since the crash in oil prices in two thousand fourteen which accompanied Dudas arrival in power and has caused this initiated this precipitous collapse of free fall of Venezuelan Konami. Russia and China have been the two countries that have have have bailed him out sensually with with bridging loans and deals for various resources, the country has its nonetheless an indication that there's you know, a a fracture line emerging for the first time on a global scale in the region again as we once saw him the Cold War the last.

Venezuela Elliot Abrams United States Donald Trump Senator Marco Rubio Russia president Venezuelan government Washington acting president WNYC WGN John Lee China UK US Israel Canada interim president Boston Nikolas
"tenzin" Discussed on Sports 600 ESPN

Sports 600 ESPN

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"tenzin" Discussed on Sports 600 ESPN

"Comes pressure MacKenzie back MacKenzie throws downfield again pass is going to be taught. Dixit ten it for a touchdown pass Tenzin, Milton thirty six. Ninety six nine the game. He would back it up the kids. He Milton three passing touchdowns. Another one on the ground UCF cruises to a thirty eight to thirteen win over Cincinnati and Bilton was joined by ESPN's Maria Taylor after that emotional victory. What do you think? It's been about our defense. They only offensive touchdown during the game. They played their butts off. Football tonight. It is what it is interesting because you guys you are the prime time game college game day came to your city, Saturday morning state your case to the committee right now, and why you belong. So we can why we belong all we can focus on is going to know. I'm just proud of our guys. Cincinnati played a hell of a game is a good ballgame onto your mom up in the stands the one word I came away with Ohana, and that's the family that binds you together. How does that affect the way the plan the person that you are on this field? Yeah. All the all the guys on the team. They're my brothers. I'd play for the name on the back of my jersey on carry with pride. My guys. Thanks for your time. It can now. Twenty three straight wins for UCF, the longest active streak in the F B S. How about the second ranked team in the nation. Clemson facing Duke, Lawrence hands it off. Ata breaks it out. Twenty seven. Clugston. Clemson Tigers.

Milton UCF Cincinnati MacKenzie Clemson Tigers Dixit Clemson Tenzin Maria Taylor ESPN Bilton Ohana Football Lawrence
"tenzin" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:30 min | 2 years ago

"tenzin" Discussed on KCRW

"On election day. Trust me other folks are showing up democracy continues with or without you and vice President Mike Pence was in Georgia last week with a similar message. I want you to decide right here right now. If you haven't already done it that you are going to vote. These elections are won by the people that show up friends. Don't let friends vote alone. Go out and find a family member a neighbor at worship at work and just grab a by the oboe and ask him have you voted yet? And if they haven't. Sure, they get to the polls before they close on election day. And it's true that in a democratically elected government where power is decided by the people there are consequences when those people are disengaged, and it's an argument that Roxane gay and associate professor at Purdue University and contributing opinion writer for the New York Times makes in a new op Ed and she joins us now. Roxanne? It's always great to have you on the show. Thanks for having me Tenzin. It's great to be here. So what led you to write the piece you start this piece with an anecdote, you share that anecdote with our audience. Yeah, I was at the university of Milwaukee during the Cuban a a young woman who is actually a community activist in Milwaukee. And does quite a lot of work in terms of immigration and sexuality and class. Asked me a question about disillusionment in voting, and I really understood her question. But as I told her a lot of what I wrote in my bed because I just recognize. Is that we're dealing with a really difficult time and a dangerous time for the most vulnerable among us, and we have a a very flawed electoral system right now. But because it's flawed doesn't mean we give up on it and do nothing. And so I was just really motivated to stay something to try, and at least get some of these disillusioned voters to get off there get to the polls on Tuesday, and in particular, I'm wondering are you talking about disillusioned voters who happen to be younger or disillusioned voters across the board. We we actually did a a show an entire episode on different kinds of people who don't vote or can't vote or won't vote. So who was the the audience you think for this message anyone who's disillusioned? It was not relegated to a specific age group and just deeply concerned with people who are disillusioned and think that not voting is an appropriate response to net. Disillusionment action is what? It always helps me when I'm feeling disillusioned. And quite frankly, right now, I am feeling incredibly disillusioned given everything that's going on. And I just can't do nothing. It's interesting because breed Newsome who I'm sure you. You know, she says she feels like she was talking about the civil rights generations are looking at comparing that to today, and one of the things that stuck with me was when she said, I feel like the civil rights generation, and I'm quoting here because they were so violently barred from voting better understood both inherent power of the ballot. And the reality of how power functions they knew they needed to secure vote and directly challenge white power structure at once no choice. Do you think that she's right there? Do you think that the disillusionment is just a lack of understanding about how the power structure in the United States really works for some disillusioned voters? Absolutely. But for other disillusioned voters, they very well know the sacrifices that were made to give women and people of color the right to vote, and they just don't care, and that's a very painful thing to confront, but I agree with what Brees said, I think that it's easier to. To appreciate the power of something when you had to fight for it. Than it is when it's something that you were given. I mean, how are we supposed to get through to a disillusioned or apathetic voter? I mean, do we keep focusing on that group and saying you should do this? You should do this. Or how do you even try to change the mindset behind that behavior? I think that we keep reminding them of what's at stake. I think that many of them have created some intellectual distance between their lack of motivation to vote and the very real atrocities that this country is facing and that the most vulnerable Americans are facing. And so I think when you have that distance it's up to us to close it for them. If they won't do it for themselves. There are lots of people who will say everything from you know, they feel disillusioned by the process they feel disillusioned by attempts at voter suppression. They feel disillusioned with the outcome. You know, they they may not be happy with the outcome. And therefore, they don't want to participate in that. Is there any empathy from your end for any of those reasons? Oh, I have a lot of empathy for any perspective that someone has. But I have more empathy for people who are being disenfranchised and who are being denied their birthright citizenship do are being murdered. You know what? I mean. Like, that's sad. Like, I I understand that. But like as a black woman in this country. I feel wiling disillusioned about all of the things that matter to me that are not being addressed by the government, but I'm still going to vote, and I'm not particularly raw raw, raw, you know. I'm not the most positive person in the world, I still feel this responsibility. And so I think that at some point, and I wrote this in the do you have to get over yourself a little bit. And recognized that sometimes we have to make decisions for the greater good. The reality is that we are living in a world with other people we share this planet in this country with other people and the better we are to each other. The better everything is because you know, just too many hands make light work. I don't think there's ever been a midterm more interesting than this one. Not in my lifetime. Not in my voting. I started voting in one thousand nine hundred eighty two and this is by far the most interesting midterm election and the one with the most at stake. I have to say I've been voting for around the same time. And I'd have to say, I agree. Roxane gay is an associate professor at Purdue University and author of hunger and a contributing writer for the New York Times Roxanne, thanks so much for coming back on the show. Thank you for having me..

Purdue University Roxanne New York Times associate professor writer Mike Pence university of Milwaukee vice President Milwaukee Roxane gay Georgia United States Tenzin Newsome government Brees Ed
"tenzin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"tenzin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Jamie Floyd. Protesters have been pouring into Washington DC all week and anticipation of the Senate vote on supreme court nominee, Brent Cavanaugh. Now, it appears likely he will be confirmed tomorrow, given the allegations against cavenaugh these demonstrators and many others see the confirmation process as a prime example of the difficulties sexual assault. Victims face in getting a thirties and other officials to believe them. The cavenaugh debate is coming to a head on what is widely considered the anniversary of the metoo movement one year ago today, the New York Times published it's explosive investigation of several sexual assault complaints against movie mogul Harvey Weinstein in the months since countless powerful men across industries have been brought down by women's allegations. And for those women and survivors of sexual violence. This year has been full of emotions pain relief, sadness, and anger Tenzin Abega is host of the takeaway on WNYC, and she spent part of this summer examining the ways in which we deal with women's rage Tenzin. Thanks so much for being here. Thank you, Jamie for having me you call to this moment last summer. So I imagine you are not surprised to see women's rage front and center right now. Absolutely. Not rage is all the rage as I say. One of the things I was watching. Of course, we were all watching the Cavanaugh hearing glued to the television. And one of the things I having to tell a lot of the men in my life. Was that women aren't just angry about what we're seeing on television. Right now, this is a culmination of I think years of or decade or century or century. I mean, we can go on and on of being treated unfairly of not being heard, this is a real thing. And it's something that I think has been cumulative. Well, let's drill down a little bit on the cavenaugh confirmation battle as you say Christine Blasi Ford, she's alleged that Cavanaugh tried to rape her when she was just fifteen years old. And as you point out, her voice trembled at points, understandably during this testimony, she's in an unfamiliar setting up, but she didn't cry. She didn't become angry or lose her. Her cool. Here's a bit of fat indelible in the hippocampus is the laughter. The LA the appraise laughter between the two. And they're having fun. At my expense. Now by contrast, judge Cavanaugh raged throughout his afternoon of testimony. This whole two week effort has been a calculated an orchestrated political hit fuels with a parent pent up anger about President Trump and the two thousand sixteen election, James cavenaugh, published a last minute op Ed in the Wall Street Journal, saying he quote might have been too emotional. And quote, it seems like you might have been trying to walk back some of his anger. But Tenzin the dynamics of the hearing were exactly what we're talking about. She was alleging and attempted rape. And yet he became the angry victim in the room. And I think one of the things as I'm listening to this. I think about, you know, Brett Kavanagh's use the word calculated in our national conversation. We often assume that any slight to people like Kevin who are white and male, and and professional is calculated. It can't be believed. Right. This is absolutely a calculation to just take that person down. At the same time. We're always questioning the motivations of women. Right. She's gotta be lying. She you know, she she can't be telling the truth this never happened. And I just think that that ended up itself creates a frustration. Another thing is women also can't cry right? So we really aren't allowed much emotional leeway in our professional lives. I think maybe in our personal lives a little bit more. But Brad Kavanagh cry throughout right throughout out. And so we tend to value men when they do get emotional. We tend to value what they have to say. Even if it's an emotion that shown after a violent event, we don't do the same for women when women act out of the norm. If you will when women say, okay, I'm not going to be this. Nice or polite person I'm going to assert myself say do a traditional male characteristic. If you will we're we're penalized for that. After a lot of foot-dragging the FBI has spent five days investigating these allegations. But only after this happened in the elevator of the Senate office building. Children. For the next fifty.

Brent Cavanaugh Jamie Floyd Tenzin Abega Christine Blasi Ford Senate rape assault Washington Harvey Weinstein New York Times Brad Kavanagh WNYC Brett Kavanagh FBI LA James cavenaugh Wall Street Journal President Kevin
"tenzin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"tenzin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You're listening to the takeaway mad cats here in. For Tenzin Vega in two thousand fifteen environmental activists Berta Caceres was presented the prestigious Goldman environmental prize in our world view we. Are beings who come from. The earth from the, land and. From corn protecting our rivers innings giving our lives for the. Good of humanity and this planet the service was an indigenous. Leader and land defender in Honduras she led the lend saw people in their fight against they, hydroelectric dam project on. A river considered sacred by the indigenous community this let us wake up let us wake. Up John kind we are out. Of time Our mother earth set of militarized a fenced. In and poisoned were basic. Rights are systematically violated demands that. We take action to succeed But a year later she was. Assassinated armed. Men burst into her home and shot her and in two weeks the trial of the eight men. Charged with their murder we'll begin Caserta story is emblematic of the threats and attacks environmental defender's, face throughout the world and environmental defenders and. They're basically people he being attacked and sadly sometimes killed and the simply protecting their. Land their communities and and crucially our global environment other ball is senior communications adviser for the environmental and human rights group Global Witness she joined us to discuss the latest Global Witness report which analyzes the targeted. Killings of land and environmental defenders twenty seventeen this year in two thousand seventeen two hundred and seven defenders killed. For protecting the land and essentially, what's happening here is land grabs which people resisting and while the west attacks can result in killings why did then then the large Tally of two hundred and. Seven defenders wish it is forty bagels the widespread use of harassment violence sometimes sexual assault threats and abuse from people trying to grab phase on from those communities you're just kind of speaking out protect why they. Left for generations are you said two hundred and seven defenders were killed in two thousand seventeen for protecting their. Land where did these killings happen So they actually happen globally Latin America remains the most dangerous. Place to be a defender Stacey percent. Of the deaths registered in. Two thousand seventeen took place across the? Region Brazil the most deaths ever registered in one year in. Any country with fifty seven And Mexico was. Also seeing a significant increase in killings a last year from three to fifteen Asia in the. Philippines that were more killings and recorded add. And in a single Asian country than ever before so is a global. Issue across different continents and we have seen a year on year rise since we've been recording these tax gives a sense of some of the industries involved here Say. For, the, first year and we've seen agri-business take that as the may stem. In an industry so large scale agricultural industries which have replaced mining as the sector driving the most fatal violence say that means defenders. Losing their lives basically protecting against and people. Wanting to plant palm oil and coffee sorry sugar cane mining is still. An industry that drives a lot of taxes while is is logging There are a variety of industries but I think it's significant agribusiness is taken. Over as, the most dominant sector particularly given that same any of those products consumers use every day businesses and not doing enough to tackle the root causes of attacks tax defenders and neither governments in some cases so it, is, a case of how much an industry can drive someone see cropland to make money and what businesses and governments need to do to take, responsibility for those reach causes example you know businesses need to make sure that they're doing. Ju- supply chain to ensure that there aren't people at penetrating these attacks. So that they can feed that industry and give them need to make sure that the right gee diligence done in some cases is, being made easier for industry to do business quicker without the write. Checks, of, the mental policies I'm says is a bigger responsibility by both businesses. And governments that we I can just see, across the globe to address these issues if you're just joining us I'm speaking, with Heather eek ball from Global Witness and. We're talking about targeted attacks on land and environmental defenders in the recent report that Global Witness released you highlight the story of her. None a Colombian man who was killed by a paramilitary group can you tell us his story and does hit by design on his arm and he was basically killed after protesting against palm..

Global Witness Tenzin Vega Berta Caceres Heather eek Asia Goldman Latin America Stacey percent Honduras Brazil Philippines palm John Caserta murder Mexico harassment
"tenzin" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"tenzin" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"In action yesterday loyola the regular season champion wrapped up a fifteen in three conference record by pulling away from illinois state at home sixty eight sixty one clayton koster of loyala one of the favorites for the larry bird player of the year buried a three with fifty nine seconds to go it gave loyal a five point lead he had been over nine before that shot cameron crushed wig their freshman senator led loyal in scoring with sixteen points in the ramblers fly and arch mad is with the 25 and 5 overall record and the number one seed a little a stake in the three seed will break down the bracket a just a moment other games yesterday valparaiso upset drake on senior day in des moines sixty nine 64 derrick smith said a careerbest 22 points and six rebounds for valvo the crusaders in their first season in the valley they came over from the horizon league they finished strong going into the term they are the tenzin drake led by read timbers 28 points yesterday go in as the four indiana state pulled off a road win at bradley sixty six sixty four key dr davis is put back with six seconds left gave the sick amour's the win greg lansing team always dangerous goes in arch madness as the sixseed bradley much improved this season gets the five southern illinois gets walloped on the road at evansville seventy five forty four this luque's ran into that motion offense smothering defense and couldn't get anything going ryan taylor a 25 points for the aces who are the eight seed in st louis sl you comes in as the 2 seed and then there's missouri state falling at northern iowa seventy one fifty six the bears were the preseason number one in the league northern iowa was the second pick they will both play on thursday in playing games at scott trade center tiebreakers set up by rpi we will reveal the matchups and times next after this word from the valley.

clayton koster cameron senator drake des moines derrick smith dr davis greg lansing illinois ryan taylor iowa indiana st louis sl missouri scott trade center fifty nine seconds six seconds
"tenzin" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

Anderson Cooper 360

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"tenzin" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

"Hi tenzin avega here hosted getting to eat in a new cnn premium highcaste were we explore the impact of inequality on our lives subscribe now on apple podcast stitcher or wherever you get your support for anderson cooper 360 comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans home plays a big role in your life that is why quicken loans created rocket mortgage the let you apply simply in understand the entire mortgage process fully so you can be confident you're getting the right mortgage for you to get started go to rocket mortgage dot com slash ac 360 good evening it's been a highly consequential weaken the russia investigation we're now one guilty plea into indictments into the probe in a neither looks like the end nor even the beginning of the end and where things go from here is anybody's guess would does seem clear tonight is that it as the amount of testimony documentary evidence grows it'll get harder and harder for anyone involved to tell flat out falsehoods or claim nesia when the accumulated evidence might say otherwise which hasn't stopped president trump from trying here's the president back in february can you say whether you are aware that anyone who advised your campaign had contacts with russia during the course of the election i told you general flynn obviously was dealing so that's one person but he was deal as he should have been during the election no no nobody that i know of since then we've learned that jeff sessions had on several occasions jared kushner had in trump tower paul manafort had with jared kushner that same trump tower meeting also george papadopoulos that's at least of all those we know about so far is the member of a pub dopoulos as the member than kennedy trump's foreign policy advisor panel who pleaded guilty to line the fbi of course here he is in march last year meeting with mr trump we now know according to another participant in that meeting the papa dopoulos pitched the idea of setting up a meeting with candidate trump and vladimir putin and mr trump quote hurt him out today though before leaving on his asia trip the president said he didn't remember.

papa dopoulos vladimir putin advisor foreign policy george papadopoulos trump tower jeff apple cnn tenzin avega fbi kennedy trump jared kushner paul manafort flynn russia president anderson cooper 360
"tenzin" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

Anderson Cooper 360

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"tenzin" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

"Hi tenzin avega here hosted getting to eat in a new cnn premium highcaste were we explore the impact of inequality on our lives subscribe now on apple podcast stitcher or wherever you get your support for anderson cooper 360 comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans home plays a big role in your life that is why quicken loans created rocket mortgage the let you apply simply in understand the entire mortgage process fully so you can be confident you're getting the right mortgage for you to get started go to rocket mortgage dot com slash ac 360 good evening it's been a highly consequential weaken the russia investigation we're now one guilty plea into indictments into the probe in a neither looks like the end nor even the beginning of the end and where things go from here is anybody's guess would does seem clear tonight is that it as the amount of testimony documentary evidence grows it'll get harder and harder for anyone involved to tell flat out falsehoods or claim nesia when the accumulated evidence might say otherwise which hasn't stopped president trump from trying here's the president back in february can you say whether you are aware that anyone who advised your campaign had contacts with russia during the course of the election i told you general flynn obviously was dealing so that's one person but he was deal as he should have been during the election no no nobody that i know of since then we've learned that jeff sessions had on several occasions jared kushner had in trump tower paul manafort had with jared kushner that same trump tower meeting also george papadopoulos that's at least of all those we know about so far is the member of a pub dopoulos as the member than kennedy trump's foreign policy advisor panel who pleaded guilty to line the fbi of course here he is in march last year meeting with mr trump we now know according to another participant in that meeting the papa dopoulos pitched the idea of setting up a meeting with candidate trump and vladimir putin and mr trump quote hurt him out today though before leaving on his asia trip the president said he didn't remember.

papa dopoulos vladimir putin advisor foreign policy george papadopoulos trump tower jeff apple cnn tenzin avega fbi kennedy trump jared kushner paul manafort flynn russia president anderson cooper 360
"tenzin" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

Fareed Zakaria GPS

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"tenzin" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

"Hi tenzin avega here hosted getting to eat in a new cnn premium highcaste were we explore the impact of inequality on our lives subscribe now on apple podcast stitcher or wherever you get your support for of reid's ikaria gps comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans home plays a big role in your life that's why quicken loans created rocket mortgage did let you apply simply and understand the entire mortgage process fully so you can be confident you're getting a rate mortgage for you to get started go to rocket mortgage dot com slash gps this is gps the global public square one come to all of you in the united states and around the world i've read zaccaria coming to you live from new york oh my god was start today's show with terror in downtown manhattan again what does this attack tell us about terrorists abilities today and should the suspect was shipped off to get more also robert muller catches former trump team members in his net manafort gates about the double us what does this week's big legal news me for the larger case michael hayden and pre barra will join me to talk about both terror and the russia investigation also visit trump goes to asia how does the presidency this crucial continent will the north korean problem gets all i have a terrific panel to discuss but first here's my take this week's tragic terror attack in new york was the kind of isolated incident by one troubled man that shouldn't need to grand generalizations in the sixteen years since nine eleven the city has proved astonishingly safe from jihadists and yet speaking about it to officials ten thousand miles away when i was in singapore this week the conclusions they reach our worry the home minister k shanmugam set to me the new york attack might be a way to remind us all that while isis is being defeated militarily the ideological threat from radical islam is spreading.

tenzin avega reid gps united states new york manhattan michael hayden trump singapore k shanmugam cnn apple robert muller russia asia north korean sixteen years
"tenzin" Discussed on CNN's The Daily DC

CNN's The Daily DC

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"tenzin" Discussed on CNN's The Daily DC

"Hi tenzin avega here hosted getting to eat in a new cnn premium hike gas were we explore the impact of inequality on our lives subscribe now on apple podcast stitcher or wherever you get your hello and welcome to the daily d c on this thursday november's second us zach wall filling in for the one and only david chaldean who's getting some muchneeded r and r n today we're going to have a little conversation here on the program featuring chris eliza he is a top analyst here at cnn and he has his own cnn product the point which chris i can't even keep track of the point it it so many different than you go to amazon echo gugo home or apple podcast and you can subscribe just type in the point i did it with my mom last night we went through the whole process she hadn't subscribe dad even though he's been doing it for like three months thanks mom thanks mom yeah so molly blew that one also i'm an only child scott got an audio product attacks product okay enough of the the plugging here on november second let's think about the news in the politics news and i was thinking we could go in a kind of two different directions today there's the death penalty direction and in the tax reform direction so dealers choice jet were taxes for oh i like that liz you taxes first okay fit with keep the other thing for dessert greg suggests her so into in tax reform news today the house republicans unveiled their long awaited sort of.

tenzin avega chris eliza cnn scott greg apple zach wall david chris i amazon the house three months