35 Burst results for "Tennessee"

Windows Down (MM #3865)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 d ago

Windows Down (MM #3865)

"The mason minute. With Kevin mason. During my formative youth when I started driving, we used to love driving around and cruising. I lived in Virginia Beach and we had the ocean area called the strip. You'd roll down the windows and have the stereo blasting. You'd have a good time. Even in the winter months, when it was cold and there could even be snow on the ground, which didn't happen often. We'd roll down the windows and turn the heater up and we'd be bundled up and still screaming and yelling and having a good time. We have that moment here in Tennessee, where the temperature is just right at night, where you can roll down the windows and it just cold enough that you've got to turn up the heat in the car, and you can have the stereo blasting. Now, of course, it all has to do with humidity, not necessarily the temperature, but there's just that rare moment of time where it's not too cold and not too hot not too humid in the nighttime is just right to roll the windows down and crank up the radio. Had that just the other night had to go out and run some errands and windows down, heat her up and man I was feeling good. From mere moment I was taken back to my teenage days. You can play some classic music from the 1970s, 1980s to get me in the spirit. I took me back in time.

Kevin Mason Virginia Beach Mason Tennessee
Windows Down (MM #3865)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 d ago

Windows Down (MM #3865)

"The mason minute. With Kevin mason. During my formative youth when I started driving, we used to love driving around and cruising. I lived in Virginia Beach and we had the ocean area called the strip. You'd roll down the windows and have the stereo blasting. You'd have a good time. Even in the winter months, when it was cold and there could even be snow on the ground, which didn't happen often. We'd roll down the windows and turn the heater up and we'd be bundled up and still screaming and yelling and having a good time. We have that moment here in Tennessee, where the temperature is just right at night, where you can roll down the windows and it just cold enough that you've got to turn up the heat in the car, and you can have the stereo blasting. Now, of course, it all has to do with humidity, not necessarily the temperature, but there's just that rare moment of time where it's not too cold and not too hot not too humid in the nighttime is just right to roll the windows down and crank up the radio. Had that just the other night had to go out and run some errands and windows down, heat her up and man I was feeling good. From mere moment I was taken back to my teenage days. You can play some classic music from the 1970s, 1980s to get me in the spirit. I took me back in time.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Virginia Beach Mason Tennessee
Titans stop Allen on 4th down, hang on to beat Bills 34-31

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 4 d ago

Titans stop Allen on 4th down, hang on to beat Bills 34-31

"The Tennessee Titans use their MVP caliber work horse to beat the Buffalo Bills thirty four thirty one at Nissan stadium Derrick Henry had twenty carries for a hundred forty three yards and three touchdowns in the win Henry seventy six yard touchdown in the second quarter turn the game around for the Titans but he credits the whole his office of line made for him it's a big big guys got good the number is is a great job walking in on my days seem to hold a hearing dot org or something R. T. buffalo's Josh Allen with an impressive thirty five of forty seven for three hundred fifty three yards and three touchdowns despite the loss in the waning seconds of regulation however is built on a fourth and one for the Titans three but he couldn't pick up the yard slipping behind the line of scrimmage and ending the game both teams are now for into and leave their respective divisions German takeover Nashville

Derrick Henry Tennessee Titans Buffalo Bills R. T. Buffalo Josh Allen Titans Nissan Henry Nashville
Chapter 4 of 'American Marxism' Is a Frequent Favorite

Mark Levin

01:27 min | Last week

Chapter 4 of 'American Marxism' Is a Frequent Favorite

"I went into a Barnes and no copies audiobook and I also got the breaking the news and four copies of that in an audiobook and I have to listen to it twice because I'm just a high school educated truck driver and it's got a lot of stuff that I have to research and find out what it means But my favorite chapter so towards chapter four and I'm actually on the second going through a second time on there But Alex Carlos book will answer some of your questions about who's at the media and stuff like that He's got a lot of stuff But Jonathan I've always said about this book Take your time and you may have to go through it once or twice There are twice And chapter four is on the CRT and gender ism and Marxism how they all relate and that seems to be among the favorite of a lot of folks too And you know I had a dirty Joe just FYI you know and to do my part to speak out and everything I had a dirty trailer I just went up to Boston and on the back of the trailer you know I wrote my glove and I wrote CRT equals segregation And on the other side I wrote read American Marxism by Mark Levin With Tennessee And nobody saw that yet Well thank you for that I

Alex Carlos Barnes Jonathan JOE Boston Mark Levin Tennessee
2 employees killed in shooting at Memphis postal facility

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last week

2 employees killed in shooting at Memphis postal facility

"Hi Mike Rossi are reporting a shooting at a postal facility in Tennessee leaves three employees dead authorities say three US postal service workers are dead after a shooting at a postal facility in Memphis Tennessee an FBI spokeswoman says two US postal service workers were fatally shot by a third employee who died from a self inflicted gunshot no motive was immediately released by authorities the shooting occurred in the east Lamar carrier annex in the historic orange mountain neighborhood it was the third high profile shooting in or near Memphis in recent weeks on September twenty third the franchise owner of a sushi counter inside a Kroger grocery store fatally shot one person and wounded fourteen others before killing himself a week later a teenage boy was shot and critically wounded at a Memphis school and police detained a second boy believed to be the shooter hi

Mike Rossi Tennessee Memphis Lamar Carrier Annex Orange Mountain FBI United States Kroger
Congressman Devin Nunes: People Are Voting With Their Feet

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:58 min | Last week

Congressman Devin Nunes: People Are Voting With Their Feet

"5 years ago, it was general Flynn. My former White House colleague, who has targeted by the FBI, now it's mothers at school board meetings. We have so much to discuss in this hour. So they've gone from a three star general to mothers, let me ask you, where does this end? What is the likely scenario? Does it become socialism? After the last year and a half with COVID and people, you know, genuflecting at the altar of fear that Fauci created, are we going to comply? You are the antithesis of the career politician, your farmer, your citizen politician, from that vantage point, what is your expectation? Where does this end up congressman Nunez? Well, if you look at what's happened throughout COVID, the socialist states, so called blue states have become more and more socialist bordering on total tailoring ism type of tactics that they're using, especially here in California where now you just had the governor come out after he narrowly escaped after spinning a quarter of a $1 billion to defend himself outside of that money coming in in the last month. He likely would have been recalled. Well, now he's still here. Newsom is here. And first thing he does is he says, well, we're going to go out and we're going to mandate that all your kids get these shots. And so this is and we expect more draconian measures to come in the future. So I think you're going to see more conservatives, Republicans independents who want to live in freedom are going to leave places like California every single day. You can't get a U haul truck here in California without paying an exorbitant price because you have to pay to bring it back from states like Idaho, Tennessee, Texas, et cetera. So people are voting with their feet. They're moving with their feet. They're setting up a very dangerous situation here where we have a series of blue socialist states and red free

General Flynn Congressman Nunez Covid Fauci FBI White House California Newsom Idaho Tennessee Texas
The Big Screen (MM #3849)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 weeks ago

The Big Screen (MM #3849)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason as everyone tries to get back to the way life used to be pre-pandemic, I've noticed a recent trend when it comes to movie advertising. And I don't know if you've seen it because it's pretty subtle. But as they talk about some of the movies that are available both on an app or on your cable box, and available in the theater at the same time, you'll always see an ad talking about you need to see this on the big screen because the movie companies want you to go back to the movie theater. They want you to watch it in the big screen because more people make money that way. I really noticed it over the weekend as my wife and I watched the many saints of Newark on our HBO Max app. Now of course we could have gone to the theater, but in all honesty, neither of us are still ready to go back to the theater, because I don't necessarily trust all the folks around me in Tennessee to wear a mask and do the right thing. So while I could have seen it on the big screen, it may have been cooler. I enjoyed it just as well in my 70 inch television set. And I know it's not quite the same thing as on a big screen movie, but it's kind of funny how we're trying to get people to go back to the theater when many of us aren't quite ready yet. I feel bad for the movie studios, but not that bad.

Newark HBO Tennessee Kevin Mason Nasa
The Big Screen (MM #3849)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 weeks ago

The Big Screen (MM #3849)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason as everyone tries to get back to the way life used to be pre-pandemic, I've noticed a recent trend when it comes to movie advertising. And I don't know if you've seen it because it's pretty subtle. But as they talk about some of the movies that are available both on an app or on your cable box, and available in the theater at the same time, you'll always see an ad talking about you need to see this on the big screen because the movie companies want you to go back to the movie theater. They want you to watch it in the big screen because more people make money that way. I really noticed it over the weekend as my wife and I watched the many saints of Newark on our HBO Max app. Now of course we could have gone to the theater, but in all honesty, neither of us are still ready to go back to the theater, because I don't necessarily trust all the folks around me in Tennessee to wear a mask and do the right thing. So while I could have seen it on the big screen, it may have been cooler. I enjoyed it just as well in my 70 inch television set. And I know it's not quite the same thing as on a big screen movie, but it's kind of funny how we're trying to get people to go back to the theater when many of us aren't quite ready yet. I feel bad for the movie studios, but not that bad.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa Newark HBO Tennessee
Senator Marsha Blackburn Rebukes General Mark Milley During Senate Hearing

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:54 min | 2 weeks ago

Senator Marsha Blackburn Rebukes General Mark Milley During Senate Hearing

"You have managed to do is to politicize the us military to downgrade our reputation with our allies. Nobody has resigned. Nobody has submitted their resignation. And we've got thousands of people watching this hearing today. That are looking at you. All and saying i can't believe they're sitting there and not answering the questions and are trying to punt a yell back punt the polite word for it. God bless marsha blackburn you while the three people who may have broken the american military that was yesterday during the senate herring with the centcom commander with the secretary of defense and with the most senior military officer in the united states mark milley. Who dodged questions who wouldn't answer the important questions about our surrender in afghanistan and somebody called them out and you know what she has more guts than most of all. The politicians combined on capitol hill was reading. The chiron is that was playing. Is that clip was playing us reading the lowest third of description. And what does it say about marsha blackburn. Yeah that's right perfect eric. It says right there. Marsha blackburn republican tennessee serving in the us senate since oh twenty nine so she's being there for less than two years vats why she has

Marsha Blackburn Mark Milley United States Senate Chiron Afghanistan Capitol Hill Eric Tennessee
Why Marsha Blackburn Is a Lone Voice of Clarity and Courage

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:56 min | 2 weeks ago

Why Marsha Blackburn Is a Lone Voice of Clarity and Courage

"Maybe we're going to remember you. Three is the three that broke the military incredible words. Every time i play. I'm just thankful that we have some patriots. A handful left on capitol hill. That is tennessee's marsha blackburn the senator who maybe is one of the most courageous and outspoken. Telling mark. milley the centcom commander in the sector of defense that you the guys probably broke united states on forces and we are honored to have her with us today senator blackburn. Welcome back to america. I i am so happy to join you. Thank you so much for having me. I want to go straight to the meat of the matter. Why is it so few of your colleagues. Just get to the heart of the issue the way you do. I i kind of of inspiration as i was watching you live. I sold the on on the tv footage. And it said marsha blackburn senator since twenty nine nineteen nine. And i thought well maybe that's it because she's still a citizen. She's not a politician. She tells the truth. So do you have any explanation as to why you're such a you know a lone voice of clarity and courage. Oh i tell you i just. This is my calling in life. I got up every day. Work to defend face family freedom and opportunity and i feel like i truly believe heartbreaker always told us that freedoms does not get passed along in the bloodstream. It is up to every single generation to fight for it reserve it and pass it on free to the next generation. So that is my calling and that is what i focused on every day

Marsha Blackburn Milley Senator Blackburn Capitol Hill Patriots United States Tennessee Mark
Rep. Steve Cohen Says Joe Biden Hasn't Been Seen Around in 9 Months

Mark Levin

01:42 min | 3 weeks ago

Rep. Steve Cohen Says Joe Biden Hasn't Been Seen Around in 9 Months

"I think the president should be involved Very few of them seeing the president 9 months he's been president And I think he should come to a caucus Now that's interesting for a couple reasons Probably don't recognize that voice offhand if you do I mean two points You are super super wonky That is Tennessee Democrat Steve Cohen Okay Democrat Steve Cohen This was before Biden did his dog and pony show Capitol Hill today the nothing burger as it has been described to which clearly as of now that's the case because here we are hours later at this point and still crickets on Capitol Hill in terms of any movement on any of the human fund the George upon see the human fund money for people Which of course the House progressive caucus the house Marxist they are demanding come to a vote before they vote on the so called bipartisan deal that passed the Senate So nothing's happening Nothing But Steve Cohen a Democrat member of Congress Think about this for a moment A Democrat member of Congress is saying yeah I think I'd be good because most of us haven't even seen the guy I mean what Joe Biden has been president of the United States For about 9 months he's a Democrat member of Congress And he's saying he nor must anybody they haven't seen the guy

Steve Cohen Capitol Hill Biden Tennessee Congress Senate House Joe Biden United States
As COVID-19 crush eases, Kemp urges more to seek vaccines

AP News Radio

00:59 sec | 3 weeks ago

As COVID-19 crush eases, Kemp urges more to seek vaccines

"The nation's governors are still grappling with the spread of the delta variant and handing out varying messages on Kobe it nineteen vaccinations the Republican governor of Georgia Bryan campus says he opposes a federal push that mandates vaccines for workers but he is urging residents of his state to get a covert shot camp says yes new cases are down but he's concerned about a fifth surge coming this winter in Connecticut democratic governor Ned Lamont has put the National Guard on standby to serve as replacements for thousands of state workers if they don't meet Monday's deadline for mandatory cope with vaccinations Tennessee's Republican governor bill leak is extending his order that allows parents to opt their kids out of school mask mandates while the Arkansas Supreme Court is blocking that state from imposing that type of band I'm Jackie Quinn

Georgia Bryan Campus Kobe Ned Lamont Bill Leak National Guard Connecticut Tennessee Arkansas Supreme Court Jackie Quinn
Ford Fortifies EV Bet With Four New U.S. Factories

WSJ What's News

00:39 sec | 3 weeks ago

Ford Fortifies EV Bet With Four New U.S. Factories

"Ford motor company plans to build. Its first new. Us assembly plant in decades along with three battery factories. Continuing its push into electric vehicles. The four new factories in tennessee and kentucky are part of an eleven point. Four billion dollar investment with south korean battery maker s k innovation ford ceo jim farley says it will lower the cost of electric vehicles. We have to bring this technology to lower cost. That's why were in sourcing are batteries so we can work sky and really push the cost. It's the largest. Investment in manufacturing ford has made the companies say the investment will create eleven thousand new

Us Assembly Ford S K Innovation Jim Farley Tennessee Kentucky
Third judge blocks Gov. Lee's mask opt out in schools

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 3 weeks ago

Third judge blocks Gov. Lee's mask opt out in schools

"Federal judges are blocking an executive order by Tennessee's Republican governor that allows families to opt out of school mask mandates governor bill Lee issued the order in August with Republican lawmakers demanding a special session of the Tennessee General Assembly so they could put a halt to school mask mandates and other covert nineteen safety measures many students have been attending classes without masks since in pediatric hospitals have reached record highs that's my parents and advocates to file legal challenges in separate decisions Friday judges blocked the order in Williamson County just south of Nashville and Knox County which includes Knoxville a week ago a third judge band please order after families argued it endangered their children I'm Ben Thomas

Governor Bill Lee Tennessee General Assembly Tennessee Williamson County Knox County Nashville Knoxville Ben Thomas
Everything we know about the Kroger mass shooting

Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

00:29 sec | 3 weeks ago

Everything we know about the Kroger mass shooting

"Will keep paying employees of the tennessee. Store attacked by a third party vendor. Sarah bartlett has more a kroger. Spokesperson says the caller vel store will stay closed while police investigate thursday's attack which left a customer identified as livia king dead ten workers and four other customers were hurt in the mass shooting. Kroger says counseling services are available to any associate who needs help. The shooter took his own life and a motive is still unknown. I'm sarah

Sarah Bartlett Kroger Livia King Tennessee Sarah
Pawpaw Trees (MM #3839)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 3 weeks ago

Pawpaw Trees (MM #3839)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. For years growing up in the Midwest, we used to play out doors and you were always dealing with pine cones and trees and even at owls we were dealing with, but we also had a lot of pawpaw trees. What I didn't realize at the time is the pawpaw trees that dropped their fruit, if you will, fruit was edible. And the reason I never realized that was because you don't see popov fruit in the store. The American pawpaw is a close cousin, if you will, to the papaya. But while it is edible, it's not very shelf sustainable. So the minute it falls from the tree, it starts rotting immediately. And of course, most of the time, the pawpaws we saw on the ground while we're rotten pawpaws and there were mushy in their gushy. And from what I've read, they're good to eat, they're great fresh off the tree, reason I'm thinking about this and I hadn't thought about pawpaws for years, was because I saw somebody the other day on Facebook or on Instagram, actually eating a pawpaw and it hit me at that point. We could actually eat those things. I never tried, but now I'm curious. The pop up doesn't grow much around Tennessee, but you can see them in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, and I'm going to try to find one because I got to try it out.

Kevin Mason Nasa Midwest Facebook Tennessee Illinois Indiana Kentucky
Pawpaw Trees (MM #3839)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 3 weeks ago

Pawpaw Trees (MM #3839)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. For years growing up in the Midwest, we used to play out doors and you were always dealing with pine cones and trees and even at owls we were dealing with, but we also had a lot of pawpaw trees. What I didn't realize at the time is the pawpaw trees that dropped their fruit, if you will, fruit was edible. And the reason I never realized that was because you don't see popov fruit in the store. The American pawpaw is a close cousin, if you will, to the papaya. But while it is edible, it's not very shelf sustainable. So the minute it falls from the tree, it starts rotting immediately. And of course, most of the time, the pawpaws we saw on the ground while we're rotten pawpaws and there were mushy in their gushy. And from what I've read, they're good to eat, they're great fresh off the tree, reason I'm thinking about this and I hadn't thought about pawpaws for years, was because I saw somebody the other day on Facebook or on Instagram, actually eating a pawpaw and it hit me at that point. We could actually eat those things. I never tried, but now I'm curious. The pop up doesn't grow much around Tennessee, but you can see them in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, and I'm going to try to find one because I got to try it out.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa Midwest Facebook Tennessee Illinois Indiana Kentucky
Tennessee Pastor Greg Locke Slapped With Lifetime Ban From Twitter

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:52 min | Last month

Tennessee Pastor Greg Locke Slapped With Lifetime Ban From Twitter

"We're talking my friend. One of the heroes pastor greg lock. He is in the nashville area in mount. Juliet actually tennessee. He pastors global vision. Bible church my brother gregg. Welcome to the program. Thank you eric. Thanks for having always a joy you You encourage me. And that's important because they're not a lot of wastes out there. It was just talking to my wife this morning about who who has been really bold Who is saying this stuff that other people you can't say that can't say that you've been one of them and For your boldness. I guess you were recently kicked off twitter. I guess i should take a badge on are always kicked. This program was killed off youtube because we must be saying something. That's bothering somebody. I know i'm not spreading disinformation or misinformation. And i know you're not but that's what they say. Isn't that what they said. Oh absolutely yeah you know. You're over the target dropping. The right bombs and i mean. I've been on twitter since two thousand nine and anybody. That knows anything about social media. Twitter's the hardest platform to build but it also has the most trolls and the most vitriolic pushback in so it really is a kind of a badge or one hundred and fifteen thousand followers verified platform at booms. They took it down and said lifetime suspension. I it's it's amazing. Because i had a similar thing we had. I don't know two hundred twenty thousand youtube subscribers and they gave us you know it's kind of like this creepy marxist standards community standards right and i think folks like you and me were being loud because we know this is. This is not just un-american. This anti american. This is evil. This is marxist evil. We shouldn't stand for it and by the way if you stand for it you're part of the problem folks. I hate to break it down for you but you are part of the problem. We're living in tough

Greg Lock Twitter Juliet Gregg Nashville Tennessee Mount Eric Youtube UN
"tennessee" Discussed on The Story Song Podcast

The Story Song Podcast

07:11 min | Last month

"tennessee" Discussed on The Story Song Podcast

"Taken from a letter. I don't what is your love. god is can. We'll get off my back. Do you mind if i just use this letter. I've got four these in honestly. I don't care i'd get it get it off a shoebox all two songs or downright i honestly i feel you're bullying me as this song is called size ten. Loafer this jerk for the record company right a folk song. Oh cheese i mean. It's it's great. It's gotta be a hit so it's fine but i don't. I don't know what i've least guy guy you say one thing. Oh he's so. Folksongs of the hills had some success upon its release but it wasn't like a huge hit a sense become a very well respected classic iconic album. It was an early example of a concept album and was added to the prestigious library of congress national recording registry in twenty seventeen if you're not familiar national recording registry preserves audio recordings for their aesthetic historic or cultural significance So his recording of sixteen tonnes is very. It's basically him in a guitar and he kind of explains the story in it. There's there's a bit of spoken word in song. You know it's funny. I feel like that's a big difference between like early folk music Like early sort of recording artists folk music and later folk music the if you listen to folk music from the forties and early fifties. There's a lot of you know i was doing this. And then saying line. And then i'm going to discuss it a little bit more as my guitar plays. There's a lot of that some folks down here in coal country. Okay here we go so. Here is a brief overview of Ernie ford He was born ernest. Jennings ford on february thirteenth. Nineteen nineteen in bristol tennessee. his name. yeah who would've thought of bristol. Tennessee is in the south of france. Yes yes yes by the late nineteen thirties. He was working as a radio announcer at first in bristol and later at various stations in the south and after serving in world war two. He returned to radio announcing at a station in san bernardino california. He was an announcer a dj for an early morning country. Music show where he created the character of tennessee. Ernie He was hired by cakes. La in pasadena and continued his morning show and joined the cast of alive country show called dinner bell roundup as a vocalist land. From from there he was offered a recording contract with capitol records by the early fifties tennessee. Ernie ford had several country. Hits and a few minor. Pop hits including. I thought this was interesting. A duet with case star If you're not familiar with star her famous her. Most famous recordings include wheel of fortune. Rock and roll waltz the huckle buck and a song that you actually hear every year. Everybody's waiting for the man with the bag so he was pretty well known but he received his first widespread recognition in one thousand nine hundred eighty four. When he made his national television debut and became the first celebrity guests on. I love lucy. He played cousin. Ernie ford from bent fort tennessee target. Do ma'am what's your name handsome. I'm ernest ford from bent Tennessee you do. You got quite a long season. Three episodes twenty eight and twenty nine tennessee. Ernie visits which aired on may third nineteen fifty four tennessee. Ernie hangs on which aired yet. He wouldn't leave which aired that is literally. The plot aired may tenth nineteen fifty four and in season four episode fourteen tennessee bound which aired january twenty nineteen fifty five to these all take place in new york or or they is one of them the la episode the episode. He's the season four episode is when they're on their way to la. They stop in tennessee and run into cousin ernie. Gotcha nice jim. It's lucy's cousin it is. there's a line about it in the show. And i should be able to tell you it verbatim. But i can't. It's like lucy's mother's sisters but it's relate into youngest he's related to okay so they're not really related but they're not really related no But their classic episodes and he's fantastic on them and i think that's sort of a continuation of the cousin. Ernie or another cousin ernie. The tennessee ernie character that he portrayed on the radio. I mean i'm impressed with the continuity of going back to cousin. Ernie like you'd have to remember. Yeah yeah there weren't really reruns at that point. Yeah so in the spring and summer of nineteen fifty five Tennessee ernie hosted a daily daytime. Tv show that aired nationally on nbc. And so as he could tell he's pretty busy. Between the demands of television radio and touring. He'd fallen behind on his recording schedule. And this led capitol records to threaten him with a breach of contract lawsuit so he needed to songs for an immediate. Single release jerks. See those means suits. Those are means. Yeah now not now. You're not the guy merle travis's guy guy was like listen. They don't speak for all of us. I mean although i mean the man signed a contract. He's supposed to release societies released. He's to a lot of stuff. But how does that help.

Ernie ford tennessee bristol Ernie Jennings ford Tennessee fort tennessee ernest ford lucy ernest ernie san bernardino congress pasadena france la La california jim
"tennessee" Discussed on Armstrong & Getty On Demand

Armstrong & Getty On Demand

06:03 min | 2 months ago

"tennessee" Discussed on Armstrong & Getty On Demand

"Drowning and paper for some reason today and i can't to organized myself need an assistant So this audio. You're about to hear david. French tweeted this out. Wait wait wait. i'm going to set it up. I gotta tell people what it is. david french. Who's been on the show. Many times worked for the dispatch. He tweeted out. This happened in my county last night. Pathetic so this is is his hood on his retweeting. Somebody named natalie alison. I don't know who she is but she said. This is the parking lot after school board meeting last night in franklin tennessee the wealthiest place in tennessee parents harassed medical professionals who had spoken in favor of masks in schools. You'll hear one guy say we knew where and we know where you are. You can live freely but we will find you. We keep calm. We're on these guys now. They're not they're not in town of calmed down. We we know we walk. We knew that we know a lot of you. Never know who you are so in the video the video is it's it's a pretty ugly scene you could call it not picking to a certain extent that is when you pick and nut and make them you know speak for tire group of people because one guy doing all the screaming. We know who you are and where you live and all that. It's not the most elegant term i've ever heard the way not picking but go on the bad habit People will stare but just just just now. There was the looks on people's faces. Anything they were. They were happy to have him. Speaking for them the crowd that was with him Outside the windows of the these people who are saying. I think we ought to wear masks in school. Maybe you disagree with that. But what is going on and i i what is going on. I just think people are feeling bulldoze now on on all sides you know i could. I could have gotten i would never get. I don't think i'd ever get to the point. Where i'd say i know where you live or know where you are. You can leave freely but wait till you get home or something like that. Not gonna actually threatened but i got that mad over closing the schools. Denying my kid in education. When i've paid for i mean that's a big deal but if you're gonna make my mascot school i'd rather you didn't put in. That's just where i am on that. I just i don't i can't get quite that worked up about it. The yeah i know people. I just the whole mask thing. It's crazy you can't. I can give me ten minutes. I will find you a well. Written scholarly article with citations and links. That has masks are useless. Masks are slightly. Full masks are medium. Useful masks are mostly useful massar wonderful. Yeah which one do you want. Because i can find it and y'all send them to us all the time say is. Why don't you do your research. Look yeah see we look at the broad range of stuff and there are several questions related to cova that. Hey you can find all those wildly varying so-called authoritative opinions and secondly you know a lot of the people who are the alleged authorities have been fudging the truth because they don't think we can handle the truth or they've had a particular 'cause they wanted to impugn a certain politician and it's just nobody i have no idea what's right news dylan the truth by the way we should talk about this more this college professor that they arrested in california college professor arrested saturday. They believe he started seven. Fires in california. Including maybe this big dixie fire which is now the biggest fire in the state's history this college. Professors name is gary maynard Some gary maynard. Gary made some people look into it and he's highly rated a whole bunch of of reviews. You know because you can review professors. A kid saying is the best professor. They ever hand but he was a sociology professor. Phd in sociology. Santa clara university in sonoma's state. He started the sweet firefighter bradley. Fire cascade a whole bunch of different fire seats started and getty switching to gyco is a good idea especially when you consider everything first off geico makes it easy to switch. They have licensed agents available twenty four seven online or over the phone. If it's so easy you might start thinking everything is easy even big wave surfing and it's not as actually quite difficult. Well if you switch to geico you could save hundreds on car insurance and you could keep saving bhai bundling your motorcycle bo and r v plus your home renter's insurance butts saving money might lead you to make some questionable purchases like a twenty foot feather boa and do you know how hard it is to clean a twenty foot boa well. They do have an industry leading mobile app. You can used pay your bill. Filer manage a claim or add. A new driver when life gets a little easier. It makes it too confident and you start calling everyone ace better well. Geico has a ninety seven percent customer satisfaction rating and has been saving people money for eighty five years. It's hard to be that switch to geico. It's obviously a good idea. Have you ever wondered what the media and big tech is hiding from. You like massive stories that actually affect you and your life that they don't want you to see because they make the left the administration look bad when now. There's a podcast dedicated to exposing all of that. Each and every day so download the fastest growing podcasts and the conservative movement. The ben ferguson. Show podcast right now. That's right you can listen to ben ferguson. Show podcast iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast. Download it right now..

natalie alison gary maynard tennessee david french geico franklin cova david california Santa clara university dylan sonoma Gary bradley Filer ben ferguson apple
"tennessee" Discussed on Horror Fictional and True Stories

Horror Fictional and True Stories

05:27 min | 7 months ago

"tennessee" Discussed on Horror Fictional and True Stories

"You go out in the woods today you are show off or a big surprise. I'm always one for spending time out in nature and enjoying the wilderness. But you always have to be a little bit careful of where you go when you get up to. And that's the theme of tonight's fantastic story. Nowhere near as gruesome as the one. I told you on monday just the same now. My dear friends. I think you know what time it is. It's hump day so please sit back and relax with your favorite drink is. It's time to listen to down here. In the south riding horses is still a fairly popular amongst many. There are many different types of writing. But i've always been keen to trail ride myself. Shell writing is just what it says. It is riding your horse through trails in the woods. Mountains hills and hollows as anyone from around here. Tennessee would tell you it gets hotter than the devils not sack especially during the summer months that is to say when summertime trail riding takes place at night often we wait until full to begin writing because the weather makes it easier but during the summer we ride these rights are always time and a half as usually just a small group of us get together we all gather at the edge of the woods find the trail head from that we set out together for a long night of trout writing through some of the south's last uncivilized land. This particular story and ride took place in august three years. My father and i met up with our friends. Jr and h apm at a place known to the locals as galley hill. It has this name because the trail head is behind the galley hill. Church of christ and cemetry. Yeah i know it sounds bad already but this has been the only trail to this ride for as long as i can remember and it's never cost any sort of problems so like i said we set off for a long night of horseriding and for everyone but me a long night of drinking. I never drank when we rode. Because i wasn't of age and i was our designated driver. I'm aware this all may sound very dangerous. So even strange. But i assure you it's not at least not to us gilly hale is full of well-traveled trails during the winter but during the summer people don't write as much. The trials grow up making it easy to get lost or at least turned around halsey smarter than most folk given credit follow. They have a tremendous sense of direction and can see well at night. The only problem with horses being able to see at night is that in all for them to maintain their vision. It needs to remain. This leaves you without anything to improve your own vision while you ride a thousand pound animal and the duck who the middle of a wooded. No the only exception to this one may use a dim light with a red bulb and redlands for whatever reason which. I'm sure someone hit and explain. These lights won't make your night blind weakland aside from that and the only light we have come from the glow sticks. Everyone ties to the front and back of their saddles. So we can keep up each other easily anyway back to that. All night house came and went with nothing out of the ordinary happening as we wrote and covered a lot of ground constantly putting more distance between us and the whole trailers. I guess. It was around midnight when i made the comment that i was hungry and brought food to cook implying. I wanted to stop for more than just a few minutes to build a fire and eat unsurprisingly. I was not the only hungary one because we immediately stopped him. Within a few minutes had fire roaring and hotdogs roasting when we stop period of time we would always tie horses to trees in a circle and gathering the middle to do our thing. This was done especially at night for more than one reason. I because everyone to relax a little as we could all keep an eye on the horses together and made sure they didn't run all this had happened before and it's nearly impossible to catch a wild in the woods at night. The second reason is because host is a very large animals have superb hearing by having them form circle around us. It served as a natural to any unwanted visitors. Viewing are not after all. We were in the middle of nowhere in the woods at night. The horses formed a circle and inside the circle. We all sat by our fire eating drinking. When carrying i suddenly had the urge to piss so i stood up and walked. Had a few yards to the other side of my horse to go.

today monday tonight Tennessee
"tennessee" Discussed on Ghost Town

Ghost Town

05:28 min | 10 months ago

"tennessee" Discussed on Ghost Town

"A playwright's final act. I'm rebecca leave. I'm jason horton and this is ghost town in muslims above ground which is rather grizzly idea personally. Identity buried. see the works of tennessee. Williams are conic from page to screen titles like a cat on a hot tin roof. A streetcar named desire and the glass menagerie are staples in modern literature. And the silver screen tennessee. Williams was celebrated but his personal life in his later years. Were anything but talk about the strange. Death of tennessee williams. Yeah something. I did not know figure something that i would no. I don't know why. Because i'm just always interested in strange. Yeah things in general. And i was like. Wow this is a pretty pretty interesting one and but really sad before gets there. Yeah i think what we know about tennessee. Williams like obviously accomplish writer and playwright. And i think there's also the the southern like drinking alcoholism kind of depression around that at southern gothic. Tormented artists trope certainly works With his story. But beyond that. I don't know much about him or his f. And you wonder what the art be the same if it were not for that. It's really hard to say now. But that makes it better or worse or judging that process you wonder like with the the thing that we are celebrating the person for be the same if they didn't have that and a lot of really sad and tormented people publicly privately make great stuff and also bad stuff and the people that have pretty chill existences also put out great stuff and also very boring stuff totally. It's like a conversation. I had a lot in art grad school where it's like. Can you separate the person from the art and it's really difficult. It's really complicated. And you kind of get to draw the line. You don't have to do that with us. Because there is no arch to separate just our shitty personnel separator bad personalities for are less bad personnel. You can't can in one in the same. So there's the tennessee williams of the up till the mid nineteen fifties. Let's say the late nineteen fifties. Where a lot of the plays and movie adaptations came from. And then once you hit the nineteen sixties is where things kind of start to apart for him In the grant sense his health was deteriorating sleeping pills not excessive drinking depression. Don't think all kinds of sometimes go hand in hand..

jason horton Williams mid nineteen fifties williams late nineteen fifties tennessee williams one nineteen sixties tennessee muslims rebecca
"tennessee" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"tennessee" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Tennessee four two two traffic related incidents one due to firearm related incident and one due to strangulation I'm Jimmy Tidwell and this is Tennessee matters our guest this morning is Marcia for Otto CEO national law enforcement officers memorial fund Marcia welcome the Tennessee matters how you doing today well Jenny how are you excellent so glad you taking some time to speak with us this morning can you share with us what the national law enforcement officers memorial fund does hello we are the leading authority on mine into the law enforcement deaths and we're talking to you today because we're reporting out on the two thousand and nineteen numbers we also Jenny the our goal is to honor the fallen make sure they are never forgotten we have a museum where we educate the public and our ultimate goal is to keep it safer for those who serve and ultimately for the communities they serve them very nice now I noticed in the S. stats that we see over a hundred officers have fallen this year in this country now how's that compared to two other years is it up or down so this year we're actually down by eighteen percent however we still lost a hundred and twenty eight one fourth in office and and and that is quite a few and and give me I have to tell you that unfortunately kind of see a lot share one due to a fire arm related and then or do you traffic related incidents and the other one was you probably read about a horrific situation where there was strangled yeah and you know talking about training set for the six were traffic related and I think that's something we need to really stress now and it's a law here in Tennessee that when you see an officer blue lights or any emergency vehicle on the side of say the interstate or highway you're supposed to yield that lane to them so an anagram granted sometimes in the traffic really heavy maybe you can't but you know we had leased gotta slow down but you gotta get away because mainly doing seventy miles an hour you know things can happen in this is a split second and then all of a sudden somebody loses their life and it just shouldn't happen that's right Indonesia says that.

Tennessee Jimmy Tidwell Marcia Jenny Indonesia Otto CEO officer
"tennessee" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

09:10 min | 1 year ago

"tennessee" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Welcome back to Tennessee matters it's one of the most difficult subjects to talk about an even understand and it's been on the rise nationwide in many states including Tennessee were initially unprepared for the growth of human trafficking in recent years Tennessee has adopted stronger laws and increase the fines for traffickers especially child sex trafficking joining me now to help us get a better picture of where Tennessee as is Linda Smith the former US congresswoman for the state of Washington and founder and president of shared hope international welcome to Tennessee matters Linda and to be with you will really appreciate your time on this Tennessee got an a in twenty nineteen is that correct absolutely for the third year in a row yeah I Tennessee is number one best grade in the nation we're number one yeah I feel like we should you are number one we should do a dance that's fantastic so how far are you that's correct yeah how far is he just a common fixing this problem every year are literally changing their grades this year we had ten states raise their grades that's hard to raise about an HMO season a but I'm still has some things that need to be addressed for the survivors and some system issues but and we won't get justice if we don't fix those but for this year ten more states raise the great I think what's really interesting is when we start started addressing this issue there weren't even any laws on domestic money sex trafficking Amanda bought sex with minors did not go to jail they were identified as misdemeanors of anything and so when you look at the base law that we didn't have lost about this so every state now has a law on child sex trafficking and every state have the penalty for the buyers sellers facilitators and our training day with that work with the children there's a lot of states like Tennessee about how about also also we're making a lot of headway I think the things that are shocking to me as some states are not following the great example of stopping the criminalization of the children they're still twenty states the rest the child or can rest atop the crime committed against them even though they have a lot are they have a prostitution along with the old finance this wall of discrimination that treat these young women usually and some boys criminals so Tennessee has been leading we send states to look at Tennessee's laws we write legal briefs on all the states we grade all the states and the states that her first a fact the other states so we applaud your AG's office we applaud your advocacy your legislature for the progress because it has been a steady steady drumbeat of progress that has been such a great example for the nation now just a little inside this is like grade school the forty one points of basics your basic law we will now issue a new template of a ripple of report cards that deal with everything from identification through the court process and procedures to the actually bring about justice so we want to assure the end of the day the child isn't or the use isn't real victimized in the system and that this victim of a crime is acknowledged all the way through from identification to trial as a victim and that they get justice never in court doesn't have to face their fender in most cases but courtroom procedures lots of lots of things we need to do got to bring that about but we also have to make sure this nation we don't have these procedures but let buyers out spend out maneuver because they have the money and the defense the victim by there's a lot of states are still have provisions to some extent the log on age difference or makes the child cruel they have a pound disclose well they shouldn't have to do anything they shouldn't be re victimized and we have to make sure the dolls are responsible so you'll be seeing more more rules more adding to the report card and again and this is a very strong state we intend to work continually with Tennessee and hope that all of these looked protections that we still need in the system DOT Tennessee will lead in those areas also we are talking to Linda Smith the founder and president of shared hope international on Tennessee matters I'm very tough a difficult subject but it's one that Tennessee has kind of excel that over the past few years and it dealing with its child sex trafficking and now is this Smith you been working for a long time at this but at one point you were in Congress is that where you got the idea to kind of start to do this well to begin with I didn't want to do any of that I did not even know what went on I was told about a group of children the insults for stocks in Mumbai India in between votes I got on the plane went locked privately funded was very confused by it and started network of services around the world where we have villages and long term restoration in about two thousand and six we were commissioned by the US government to investigate countries to take a look at the markets of this call trafficking market research we publish it we just said it's a demand driven market just demand and so it's on our side on shared hope dot org and you can go to resources you can actually find out and you'll see that we evaluated several countries in that I decided on America because I didn't understand for sure what we have I thought it before to cross borders what'd I surprised what we found were middle school kids being sold American man it was a domestic market and it was the biggest numbers an indicator of trafficking that we saw now I think that that shocked the nation that means that our whole movement about domestic minor sex trafficking came about in that revelation to Congress and the research that we did for them and I also said that our states don't have laws against buying a kick for sex and even if they could use other laws they're not by the very nature of that huge wall of bias that says these kids are the criminals and in all the states we have the kids being considered as criminals in five states a little bit of something but it wasn't being enforced and the men were walking away in the kids room put in jail so a lot of this you feel were old laws on the books that were just antiquated and not really dealing with the new way that people were doing this is that correct I think it's it's it's a very very old so when you look I just wrote a history book is called invading the darkness and when you go back to the early nineteen hundred you find that they were trying to find it for the girls brought from the rural areas a lot of the advocates and it was working out of New York and Chicago and what you found was that they were they were crying out to save our boys and save our girls well it was for the boys so they wouldn't get disease in their folly for the girls it was for total immoral fall so they label them as one state trick them into the city to work in a factory or something once they got it into the resort which is four Richmond bought them if they were rated the men would walk away and these once young teenage girls in the villages or the rural areas now became a fallen immoral woman some states she could not even testify and throughout the country there was a fight for allowing her to at least be protected but in those files to make prostitution the person being prostituted the criminal so was in those times that night we based not for long and so in twenty states we still have an old prostitution along that doesn't have any age definition and it or it's maybe for under fifteen they might give some kind of concession but now we have thirty states and DC could change that law they've actually taken the K. is on the prostitution long totally ring mold any provision that would allow them to be re victimized in the court systems and are now working as is Tennessee on making sure from the moment of identification that those kids are protected I think the biggest issue that we see is where there's strong public awareness campaigns like you were doing today by recording are by having this program that we find people waking up identifying around on the issues knowing.

Tennessee
"tennessee" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"tennessee" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Experience the soundtrack of American made in Tennessee brought to you by the Tennessee department of course developed in cooperation with the Tennessee association of broadcasters and the station from the Fox Sports studios in Los Angeles here's Brian and lay eggs dairy can read the blogs a one stingy and revered patriots defense going for over two hundred total yards of offense as the Titans take down the patriots twenty two thirteen on Saturday in the AFC wild card meanwhile Tom Brady fielded questions about his future is there any possibility that you would retire after this last season I would say it's pretty unlikely but full sound likely meanwhile the Texans known for their playoff let downs rallied to beat the bills twenty two nineteen and over time JG what in his first game back after that Peck injury had a sack along with two quarterback kids Houston heads to cheese territory next Sunday and in the NBA the box with a fifth straight after taking down the spurs Yanis had twenty eight points in the win the Tigers play here six hundred W. R. E. C. Memphis ninety two point one F. M. W. P. G. R. XP to Memphis and I heart radio station they attacked us and we hit back I'm Pam who sell fox news that in a tweet from president trump as tensions flare in the Middle East following the U. S. airstrike in Iraq that eliminated top a running in general because some stolen money his body return to Arron were a massive funeral procession is under way the president also tweeting that Iran will be hit very fast and very hard if it were telling gates Iranian leaders are vowing revenge saying at least thirty five U. S. targets including warships and even perhaps Tel Aviv have been identified for retaliatory strikes and the White House as an attack could happen within weeks I middle these tensions the U. S. another sponsor another three thousand troops to Kuwait and scale back operations in Iraq to boost their defensive measures fox's Benjamin hall in Amman Jordan fox's tray gangster also they're they're running into rocky parliaments are holding meetings today the Iraqis will begin deliberation on whether or not to allow US troops to continue operating in Iraqi territory the conflict is rattling markets in the Middle East stocks trading down in Kuwait Egypt to buy in Saudi Arabia oil prices are rising extremists in Africa attacking a military base used by US and Kenyan forces and the Pentagon has just said the situation is fluid as fighting continues the al Shabab terror group taking responsibility officials say US aircraft in vehicles were destroyed the military statement does not say whether any U. S. or Kenyan forces were killed vicious wildfires continue to burn out of control in Australia emergency officials are hoping people get out when they are told to evacuate the Australian navy press going around one thousand people by boat along the coast in the state of Victoria fox is Jeff Poland basin view Australia at least twenty.

Tennessee
"tennessee" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

08:52 min | 2 years ago

"tennessee" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Children I'm Jim heated well and this is Tennessee matters our guest is Joan algor executive director of the Georgetown University center for children and families here to discuss that report Joan welcome to Tennessee matters how you doing today I'm well how are you doing I am excellent thanks so much for acting I'm gonna jump right in why are there so many on insured children in this country well you know the sad news is that this is an area where a country had been making enormous progress for years the rate of uninsured children has been coming down and it reached its best level of run twenty sixteen but in the last two years that has turned around and we see more children who are uninsured just about four million kids nationally now are on insurance so what is change between the twenty sixteen to twenty eighteen the now yeah so there are few things happening of course this is the period of time when the trump administration and others for trying to repeal the affordable Care Act to cut Medicaid and also Congress to leave the extension of the children's health insurance program so families have been getting a lot of mixed messages about coverage going away and even though intentionally Congress did extension of that cause a delay in some of the funding for outreach grants to help his in rolling to get back to school so there have been a number of sort of smaller policies and changes that are under the radar I think of most folks but these kind of cut away at the number of kids getting Medicaid and chip and that's certainly true in Tennessee unfortunately Tennessee has actually seen the biggest jump in the country in your rate of uninsured children yes Tennessee was actually doing quite a bit better than the national average some years ago but now day falling backwards and Morris and thirty thousand children about twenty five thousand children excuse me lost her coverage in Tennessee during that period we looked at what specifically happened in Tennessee you for that increased to happen yeah so we think primarily what happened Tennessee is that fifty eight thousand roughly children I have fallen off your can care program your Medicaid program there's been a lot of confusion about this there's been a lot of red tape families have been kicked off an appropriately for the Medicaid program so this loss of Medicaid coverage has driven this very large increase in the uninsured children in Tennessee so what can be done to help lower these numbers a couple of things first another data point that we found is that states that have not expanded Medicaid under the affordable Care Act like Tennessee are saying my track more rapid growth three times as high and uninsured rate for kids so expanding Medicaid would be step number one of course that at the controversial decision but that would be the single most important thing that if they could do but secondly there's no question that Tennessee needs to take a look at its Medicaid program make sure that it's welcoming for families and making sure that one's family doing role their children that they don't fall off and and they're able to renew their coverage easily and they don't get tangled up in this red tape the best for you really got to do we got to reduce the bureaucracy around that and make covering children a top priority for the state Joan algor executive director of the Georgetown University center for children and families and we're discussing findings of a new report that shows the number of uninsured children in Tennessee is on the rise Joan loss of coverage is most pronounced for white children and Latino children why is that well we think the Latino children side that this is in large part related to a climate of hostility towards immigrant families we know that there are many children this country Latino children who are citizens but their parents are immigrants and there's a lot of fear in commission confusion in this community and they're scared to sign their kids up for a government program like Medicaid even though that won't have any consequences like deportation or affecting their immigration status understandably given the the crime and hostility right now they're worried that it might so dance a big reason why but but this is a bigger problem as you said white kids our singer and interest rates go up and children in families where the parents are earning between thirty and fifty three thousand dollars a year that's the income range where we saw the biggest jump so you know the economy's pretty good right now unemployment is low but for those families those jobs are not offering affordable health coverage for their kids and that's why they need to be able to enroll their kids and ten care so you know this is a serious problem because if a recession constantly no one well this number is going to get worse because we're seeing the number of uninsured kids grow at a time when the economy is relatively so the states that have not expanded Medicaid to patients and other adults under affordable healthcare act I've seen crate increases in their rate of uninsured children three times as large as states that have is Tennessee I'm guessing one of those states that's right Tennessee is one of those states and unfortunately Tennessee actually solve the nation's biggest increase in your rate of uninsured children there was a forty three percent increase in your number of uninsured children from twenty sixteen to twenty eighteen and it's a huge increase this is actually an area where Tennessee was doing better than the rest of the country in twenty sixteen but now they have fallen backwards very quickly and very dramatically is there anything else in this report you know that about Tennessee that you could share with us well again one of the main culprits for this problem that we point to you is more red tape at State Farm posing and and again the states are just not making it a priority in some cases to make sure kids get covered and unfortunately I think that's absolutely the case in Tennessee where we've seen fifty eight thousand children lose their Medicaid coverage many of these children are losing that coverage in appropriately so that's the bad news the good news is it state leaders make this a priority really make getting children's health back on track a priority they can do so yeah you know I remember when I was in in school as a school in college hi this is obviously a lot more for for health care but I was still in my my parents policy I want to say it's either by twenty one or as long as you're in college but then after that I was on my own and and I know the most of my mid to late thirty our twenties I didn't have any insurance at all now granted I wasn't a child but is that still kind of the case are children's don't recover usually until they're twenty one unfortunately not I mean as you pointed out is young adults because they often don't have access to a high paying job that offer coverage have hired injured rates and dance some of what we're seeing going on here which is these kids are losing coverage have parents who are working but they're working in jobs in the service sector in the tourism sector that maybe they offer coverage for their employees but they certainly don't offer affordable coverage to their children and damn slide film portents that we have these public programs to be able to cover these kids because you know not covering children is very short sighted from a fiscal perspective a health perspective children who have insurance have better health outcomes both when their kids but also when they're adults and they're more likely to graduate from high school so there's a whole series of negative consequences that arise when children don't have health insurance we learn more about this report do you.

executive director Georgetown University center Tennessee Joan algor fifty three thousand dollars forty three percent two years
"tennessee" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

08:11 min | 2 years ago

"tennessee" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Doctor tools to help you and that's all to the producers of a real housewives of Orange County because you know they didn't have to include that but there are no spotlighting in in bringing awareness to it so I think that's really great it's more about eight dot com so go check it out we appreciate you guys spending some time with the real housewives of Orange County star any judge and his doctor Andrea not always thanks so much guys thank. this is Tennessee matters from T. R. A.. welcome back twenty seventeen will be remembered as one of the deadliest years in Tennessee's history in the opioid crisis in that year Tennessee lost over twelve hundred souls due to opioid overdose at puts Tennessee and the ranking is one of the hardest hit states in the epidemic and the numbers continue to be staggering in twenty eighteen over six million prescriptions were written for pain killers and perhaps the hardest number to stomach the number of children born with neonatal abstinence syndrome that's basically where a child is born in drug withdrawal. there is a positive outlook in the crisis the new laws have helped but that's really only half the battle joining me now is doctor Lisa Pearcy she is commissioner for the Tennessee department of health welcome to Tennessee matters doctor fear see how large is the opioid problem in Tennessee the opioid problem affects every Tennessean whether it's family or friends loved ones or yourself one thousand two hundred and sixty eight Tennesseans died in twenty seventeen from opioid related overdoses I and so it's a problem that affects all of us in Tennessee all in recent years is been on awful lot of attention thrown at this epidemic and one would question at this point have we made any progress in really addressing it we have made a progress in addressing the crisis but you know that's been through a multifaceted effort one of those things is through changing are prescribing practices we've been educating prescribers and then enforcing those rules of marks prescribers to make sure that we're not adding to the problem from the medical system you know another thing we're doing is raising awareness of opioid abuse and waste that folks can get help and so we have made some strides but we still got a long ways to go well you mentioned awareness one of the new campaigns arrive understand Tennessee is involved in is called the Tunis he faces of opioids what is that Tennessee faces of opioids campaign is an exciting initiative that the department of health in partnership with the centers for disease control and prevention has undertaken to really put a face on the opioid crisis and what's the main goal and purpose of this campaign the goal of this campaign is to really say this affects us all in every county in every city in every part of Tennessee people don't really think that those can. things happen to me or my types of professions or my types of social class but that's the point of the entire campaign is to show that it does affect us all in many different ways on the website is T. in face of opioids dot com along with statistics and information or some very personal stories of people who have struggled with this crisis in some way how did you choose them we solicited all kinds of input for the campaign we've got people who have been affected personally by addiction we've got family members who have lost loved ones I we have professionals both medical professionals legal law enforcement professionals educators every person from every kind of walk of life is represented in the S. and that was to get a lot of different perspectives on how opioids affect each one of those people in their jobs and in their lives and it gives us a really broad understanding of the deep and wide impact that opioids half we are talking to doctor Lisa appears he she has a commissioner for the Tennessee department of health we're talking about the opioid crisis in the state of Tennessee in some of the ways the department of health is trying to help reduce the number of drug overdose stats what are some of the steps you guys are taking first and foremost our goal at the department is prevention and one of the ways that we prevent things in in any capacity but specifically in opioids is through education and a lot of people don't set out to get addicted to opioids they get addicted when they are had treated for medical procedures and even educating people on proper prescribing both on the physician side and on the patient's side educating them on the warning signs of what might be too much also education as far as it goes for treatment if somebody thinks they have an issue. to seek treatment and how to how to get help also we look at what we call harm reduction strategies so things that we can do if somebody does have an addiction issue and is struggling with opioid over use and things like overdose reversal agents and really ways to get people into treatment when they need it so is this part of the Tennessee together initiative. Tennessee together initiative was an effort first I started a couple of years ago and this is another iteration of that type of work it's separate from that but it is complementary to it Tennessee together it started out with some prescribing limits and some other regulatory changes and it really highlights the need for a multi disciplinary effort so we're hitting it from the medical front from the patient's side of things from the faith based and community portion it really takes all hands on deck to deal with a crisis this large so it's come a long way but it sounds like there's a long way to go what are some of the next steps for the program and for the department the next steps are to continue to educate of folks and make them aware of the issue we are continuing to promote our Tennessee faces of opioids campaign and actually still soliciting additional stories and the more stories that we have the wider audience we reach people look at the stories inside you know that really resonates with me and I can see myself in that story and and it internalizes it for them and help them to to seek treatment or or education even more so we'll continue with those efforts and all the other great efforts are there going on statewide the website again he is T. N. phase of opioids dot com if you'd like to know more there's a lot of resources at that site and a lot of information about the plans that the state has worked on how does all this get funded fortunately or unfortunately depending on how you want to look at it this has garnered a lot of national attention the good part of that is a lot of resources our resources are being deployed today as a both on a state level and a federal level and so there are a lot of grievance available and just says we've used for this for the centers for disease control but they're also state local and federal grants. being used to spread this message which is really important so be on the funding is there a need for help from people anybody who wants to contribute time or energy you know a lot of times people think oh well I'm not a counselor or I don't really know how to deal with this addiction but often times people that are struggling with addiction or have just gone into recovery need jazz some basic blocking and tackling help things like can you watch My Baby while I go to a meeting can you give me a ride to my treatment center in at you know bringing food over or just supporting people with a kind word or a Pat on the back can.

Tennessee Orange County
"tennessee" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

13:13 min | 2 years ago

"tennessee" Discussed on 600 WREC

"The exception of some northern or some southern counties yeah long behind we get a more yeah so but everybody yeah that is hearing the show is under the jurisdiction weather service office go to their website find out which amazing information come back we talked about be right back the National Weather Service on Tennessee matter Tennessee back welcome to Tennessee matters we are talking with Chrissy Hurley from the National Weather Service office in Nashville about some of the severe weather bands that occur across the state at this time of year and one of them one of the biggest areas flash flooding and this is a yearly concern and it is one that you should take very seriously Christy how it how we've been faring this year with comparison to other years well you know this year I think there have been more flash flood finality at looking at a whole across the United States I'm here locally out in the state of Tennessee we've actually had four and and we have one in February not far by from Nashville so you know we've been when we get those rainy patterns and when those the rains come down very fast in a short amount of time you know that's when we can get in trouble and you know I think most of the people are almost over half of the fatalities have been people driving in two flooded roads and you know I've never ever grasp that concept because you would never drive across the road I had a wildfire going across that unless you know you had No Way Out right so why do we drive across roads that are completely covered with rushing water you know the only possible explanation it's not a good one is a lot of people probably see the water got up I got that that that mode the but that's not the case in a water situation right any kind of any inconvenience to turn around you know if you don't know where you are you gotta read load your GPS and figure out you know a different way to go and you know at night it's really difficult to tell if that road has a whole lot of water on it or can I clear it so you know I I think that is that is part of the issues and that's why it makes flash flooding so dangerous and I think your your middle Tennessee I think we we do some of us that have been here for awhile we pay attention the flights I think we definitely pay attention to them we you know we are more cognizant of them since two thousand ten but you know you still see people who are going through these intersections plowing through we have reports in February people going through close roads were barricaded their get out of their vehicle move the barricades go through yeah back out of their vehicle the barricades back so close the road backs that was nice of them and they go on their way it is it's really difficult on that you know we have a little saying turn around don't drown and we really start with young kids with that saying and I tell them all the time and I do school talks you know go ahead and tell your parents turn around don't drown because sometimes as adults I think we think all well my my S. U. B. can make it through there but I'm telling you all it takes is twelve to eighteen inches of really fast moving water to take your tires off the road and that's really scary if it's moving fast enough you will lose control of your vehicle would you say water rescues in vehicles are the number one flooding it related instance here yeah yeah absolutely you know not as you know there are people that time you'll play in the creeks and streams and that we've had you know issues within your hiking and that kind of thing but the majority of a flood in says are driving and you know I think most the time you think well the fire department rescue squad they'll get there but a lot of times the water moves so quickly yeah there's no chance for them to come rescue me well that that is absolutely stunning to think about when big that you would be that people would actually go out and from the standpoint of somebody else and save me I'm gonna make this bad decision and somebody else will come to my rescue they're putting their lives in danger to do that absolutely I think maybe you know we it rains here all the time you know we have to understand is we have heavy rain all the time so I think sometimes it just it just doesn't think again and unless you're thinking about me and you know I don't know if the road still there underneath that your big water your area or or why it or the the and the water is moving really fast you just sometimes you just don't think about it and then you get in a routine if it's the same way you drive every day you think why can make it and unfortunately I mean flooding is I hear in middle Tennessee you know here lately has been the number one weather related killer lease over the past what probably ten years so it was something that we definitely stress over you know we have flies we have tornadoes and then the heat is the third and relate as far as tornadoes go our season for that we get two of them a year we get one in the spring and one in the fall is there one that wins out on statistically the worst usually it's the month of April but it's a you know it mother nature's she's she's a funny one for us lately and over the last I think it was like six or seven years we haven't had any needs big time severe weather in our traditional screen tornado season I think that the biggest tornado mind when we look at the stats heads in July you know it's been a very unusual around here and it's only a matter of time it is what we always preach but April may and March our top three twenty no mind statistically since nineteen fifty when you average it all out our secondary season our fourth most active twenty a month is November we get this summer June July August is typically tropical are related educating tropical storm if you think back to hard being a September two thousand seventeen it was kinda decaying over here we had a couple of tornadoes in around Nashville from that so usually the summertime tornadoes aren't as strong as what you would see in the spring and fall so the tornado threat is one of them but a lot of people also with the summer months you get sunshine and eventually you get into some some very intense heat and that takes its toll as well yeah you know me in the past couple weeks has been pretty brutal as far as he eats and luckily we got a nice repeat now but you know she is one of those things that can really sneak up on you you know growing up in the south what we're used to the heat humidity you know the people complain about it but we're used to it but I'm telling you no matter how much you can get used to it you over exert yourself and you don't hydrate then you can go down here all very very quickly you can start with you know he exhaustion which can rapidly deteriorate to heat stroke and we saw here would do what he struck the tally in the news I hear recently with the football player the X. tightened so I think that is you know something that you gotta pay attention with you know the elderly children even out cutting grass if you're not you're listening to your body and and you know you know it's one of those days then you know maybe take it easy way to the evening hours early morning hours and make sure you drink plenty of water typically what are the hottest months for Tennessee well for eyes you know man it's usually July and August you know it seems like June was a really really hot around here but I hate to say that we haven't seen the full summer just yet we typically I think is like mid August is our peak heating highest temperatures and then I'm a tall G. the temperature starts to go down after that I think it's about like August fifteenth or so and then things start cooling off statistically so you know we've had years where mid September we're still hitting your night low nineties with a lot of humidity so you know July and August are really are months where you have to watch out for heat and you know even if you have a working really speaks up on you is during the beginning of the season or if it's been kind of cool out and then you get this your own voice jury N. began begins to get really hot here you know if you haven't been used to it for a week then I can really impact you any not even realize it meteorology and so fascinating from the hazards all the way to the science of how old the atmosphere works and the National Weather Service actually offers some free services to kinda help educate and train and even be able to give back to the National Weather Service in times of need with severe weather right yeah you know I mean weather is one of those things that everybody talks about everybody always talks about in most of the time people have an interest in it and what we do here at the National Weather Service we have different programs that we set up most the time in the fall and then early spring other call this storm spotter programs the sky warn storm spotter program in where we go out of the community or we can also do an online where we train people to become stronger spotter so that way they know what they're looking at what to look for and it's really especially helpful if you have a family member that's really into whether that loves whether or that's terrified whether it helps them understand that every time we say a twenty of threat does not mean you're the worst tornado outbreak known to mankind that sometimes at twenty three I can just be weak brief tornadoes so it it we provide this educational opportunity for free during the spring and fall severe weather seasons and a lot of times if you go to our website will have a list a calendar list I win we provide this training weather dot gov and you click on on the map where national is and we provide this training and will even though into kind of a weather one a one class and you learn more about your forecast models satellite imagery how to interpret radar it is so if you're really into it our website is a great resource we have these classes listen no began in September and continue into October and they're free of charge and that is just one of those great resources to educate yourself and you know kind of make a connection in the weather community and learn in and meet some of the forecasters that's kind of each forecaster does one of these presentations and yours just isn't good to learn from us and try to spread the weather message about what to say well Chrissy thank you so much for joining us if you do have interest in that weather dot gov there are as I said three offices that serve the Tennessee as a whole actually for you include hunts fell and each office has its own spotter training program is that correct or that is correct yeah each one of them had so if your west to the sea they go to different communities and west as seen in East Tennessee as well we don't make it to every county I in a given year but we try to make it everyone maybe once every three years so you'll look out on social.

National Weather Service Tennessee eighteen inches seven years three years ten years
"tennessee" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"tennessee" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Tennessee matters for the final weekend of July twenty nineteen my name is scooter and it's a good show today because we're talking about well it's my favorite topic whether what can you do about it actually turns out there's a lot of the when it comes to severe weather Chrissy Hurley with the National Weather Service in Nashville will join us to talk about some of the threats that summertime brings to Tennessee I'm Jimmy ten well as a child she spent countless hours around animals and she would sneak in unwanted animals to the former she live she's the founder of proverbs twelve ten animal rescue will speak to von red fair in a show discuss pet adoption fostering and things to consider before taking on the big responsibility of owning a pet I'm Diane edgy put the phone down there's a new hands free law in a fax in Tennessee coming up we'll talk to a Tennessee state trooper who will explain the new hands free bell these stories and more coming up on Tennessee matters the matter on the radio network welcome back to Tennessee matters from about the time the winner thought begins until late fall more people find themselves in the great outdoors either recreationally or professionally and the spring and summer months can bring some of the most dynamic weathered the tendency of any time of year there are a few things you can learn about the hazards of spring and.

Chrissy Hurley National Weather Service Nashville Tennessee Jimmy radio network Diane edgy
"tennessee" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

13:13 min | 2 years ago

"tennessee" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Long for party unique. And you're tuned into Tennessee matters. I'm Robert want. It is the first week of April. And this month is a month that while there's something that's been going on that. I think my impact a lot of people that are listening to this program to talk about it in detail right now is the executive director of the Tennessee human rights commission that is Beverly wants Beverly. Thank you so much for joining us today. How are you? I'm doing fine. Thank you. Tell us about April and how it relates to fair housing. All right. Well, April fairhousing designated by the US department of housing and urban development. And it is based on the fact that the fair housing act with actually passed and find into law on April eleven nineteen sixty eight as you will recall in nineteen sixty eight there were marches going on in Memphis around the garbage workers strike, and Dr king was killed on April the fourth exactly week before right? One week before in Dr Chang had been working on Friday of issues employment issues title seven had been passed in nineteen sixty four he was working on a variety of fishes just to make sure that was access in the public arena. And then housing was another issue. He was working on along with his really quality of life initiative for lack of better time to make sure that every American have the right to quality of life. But how they fair housing that kind of thing. And when he died Lyndon Johnson. Marshaled all of his political resources and put force the fair housing act in and got some sponsors will all it was sort of languishing to be real honest, and that people push that Bill forward, and as a result eleven on April, the eleven been Johnson with his political power and might and they collaborations that Dr king had built was able to get that law passed and signed and that's up a nominal short time period for some have been in congress, maybe a year or two and couldn't get any traction. And it does at that one in time Member States like Tennessee and others had employment or Bishen was working on housing. But it was not as defined in some other places. So the housing just in the nation in housing based on race color, national origin, sex religion disability. And for millions status. Disability and familial status came into being in nineteen eighty eight and then some of the others came later, but this is really a core of what their housing or Hibbitt, and it says that everyone is entitled to fair and Basant housing. And then there is this connection with affordable housing that Dr king was talking about with as he was dying housing should not only be accessible, but it should be affordable as well. We are going to talk in depth about April twenty nineteen and how that the efforts this month will will benefit the cause of fair housing. And where we go forward from here. But I think it's pretty important to frame our conversation for me to at least give a thumbnail sketch of what your background is. I don't mean to embarrass you with with with your accolades, but certainly just knowing what you've done and how you are on this program today and. And your personal experience. It really is important. So just to kind of let our audience know that Beverly she did go to Tennessee states. And she is born in Nashville. So she is Tennessee native, which she's also had extensive experience in this particular topic. She was she went to southern Illinois for graduate work as well as completing an executive leadership program at Duke as well as at Harvard in the JFK school of government beyond that, she's her, and she's a combined thirty years of experience in this particular topic also talking about civil rights, and she was the first executive director of the national fair housing training academy in Washington DC, and again, I don't bring that up to embarrass you. But it's important. I think for our audience to know, this is not your first day on the job with this subject. Is it? No, it's not. And I think one of the most important things is so people understand their rights and their responsibilities under the law so much time at the fair housing training academy with actually trading investigators on how they could go about evaluating allegations of discrimination in determining whether or not that's the nation could be found based on the evidence win vested. So we've done that. But we've also done something else. And we do a lot of this doing April. And that is that we make sure that everyone the public in general, fair housing providers in particular, and anyone else understand what the law is with the rights are under the law, and then what responsibilities to have under the law complaining party. You come to us and any of the in all of the area complex with allegations. But they have to provide certain information to us for us to be able to pursue that on Vesta gate those playing for housing providers if they are providing it they have certain. Responsibilities and that's to make sure that the tenant. They're aware. Religion is using letting that that the sodas and we'd be more than anything else. But there's also some other areas that they understand and explain the law of their staff so that they don't invert inadvertently deny someone or give them bad information that could lead to omission, which can lead to discrimination. So so we do a lot of that. So we do a lot of programming during the month of April to make sure that the public knows what what their housing is. What is covered what the responsibilities are? And then we also like to talk a little bit about the issues that we're seeing as well. I'm going to read between the lines here a little bit and feel free to just let me know if I'm on the right track. Or if I'm way off but port of what you just described there as far as especially where you're talking about the element where you're dealing with housing discrimination. I think back especially talking about the roots with with this particular topic going back to Martin Luther King and in February. Of course, celebrate black history month and part of what we talked about during that that time was just a general thought of some of the things that the doctor was trying to accomplish that here we are in two thousand nineteen while we've come a long way in addressing the issues. We still have a long way to go. And that's that's the was leaning more in conversation that we were having more about civil rights, and certainly more just about social attitudes. And there was some socio economic types of dynamics that we were discussing. There is well am I going to be accurate in applying? Some of those same descriptions to the topic here of fairhousing today. Yes, they're housing today. We get complaints or allegations of discrimination. That says they wouldn't they would not rent to me because I'm black. They wouldn't let me because he no they won Russa me because I have children or they fail to accommodate my disability. I need a rent to get up to the to the sidewalk and they wouldn't provide one. So those are some of the things that we see today. Imos of the kinds of things that the public needs to know what is that that is covered under the law. Smoke kind of thing. Dr king was working on what he believed to be adjusted -ociety society one in which everyone regardless of income made a decent living wage had access to fair and affordable housing and also was afforded certain access to public accommodations. And those are the major issue that probably this still major issues because in some places people are still trying to not access to housing for variety of reasons, sometimes multiple reasons sometimes their families with children that have disabilities that are not able to find housing because of their child's disability for whatever reason if there is one dynamic of the population that may be has I'll say advanced as far as where some there's. There's been discrimination. Or there's been some marginalization with regard to to to getting fair rights. If there's one that perhaps has has improved. The most would be the disabled. Love to say that there is a group that has. But what I find is that of pushing a pole with you will when we find that. It's that it's that there are advances being made in some areas we find that they're not advances made in the other areas that the persons with disabilities. There's still a lot of disadvantages and a lot of obstacles to their full participation in full access to housing. So that continues to be an ongoing issue, and it can vary, and we're talking about a very vast a very large field of individuals who can have a variety of disabilities, some a visible some or not. But it does not matter can be just as as damaging if they're visible or invisible. And then there accommodations that have to be made physical accommodations to facility sometimes that are not made. And by the way, the physical facilities there necessary. The costs are born. By the individual leasing or renting the apartment, so that they dependent it would not necessarily be the on landlord that would have to do that. But they would have to at least allow them to purchase that if you will our assistant in the purchasing of that particular accommodation or making the accommodation and then getting reimbursement for that. So when we look across the board, we know that we get the most complaints from persons with disability. Followed by race followed back a million status that individuals with children, and that's the largest number. Now. This housing is the most under reported civil rights issue to that. Nationally. There are probably based on latest statistics and believe their latest statistics was twenty sixteen. There were sixteen thousand instances of reported, they housing discrimination. Allegations of discrimination. And then we in Tennessee last year in twenty eight teen at four hundred eighteen calls, alleging discrimination and leave. We filed close to a hundred and forty complaints, and we closed the hundred and twenty those numbers are pretty small compared to what we do in limit where the number is up with a four four hundred. Plus, so that gives you an idea a lot of times when I talked with individuals out say, well, they'll say, well, I think I was just gonna eight against, but you know, I didn't have time to deal with that. I needed to find a place to live for me or I needed to find a place for me, my children on my family to live. And so that here sometimes people don't buy because they're busy looking for the roof over their head. And that's that's the war. He just described. How it sounds like not only are the elements with the different groups of people that are looking for fair housing always changing the landscape of housing, always changing. And then just the situations of those same people. They're always changing there's there are a lot of moving parts in order to tackle this. And and you know, again, you know, my belief is that the best is to know the law and to do that. And so as a result, we're partnering with a number of visitations across the state of Tennessee to provide fair housing training and. Nothing with with the city of Memphis Shelby county in Memphis area legal services to name a few and in Nashville with a fair housing the Tennessee, fair housing council and a variety of groups through out kind of kind of the middle Tennessee region, including Murfreesboro Nashville, Laverne and Davidson and metro itself. So we'll be we'll be doing that. And then there's something going on in Knoxville as well. So we're we're.

Tennessee Martin Luther King US department of housing Nashville Memphis Beverly executive director Lyndon Johnson Robert Dr Chang Knoxville middle Tennessee Illinois Hibbitt Bishen Bill Basant
"tennessee" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

12:46 min | 2 years ago

"tennessee" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Party. And you're tuned into Tennessee matters. I'm Robert blond. It is the first week of April. And this month is a month that there's something that's been going on that. I think my impact a lot of people that are listening to this program to talk about it in detail right now is the executive director of the Tennessee human rights commission that is Beverly wants Beverly. Thank you so much for joining us today. How are you? I'm doing fine. Thank you. Tell us about April and how it relates to fair housing. All right. Well, April is fair housing. That's needed by the US department of housing urban development. And it is based on the fact that the fair housing act with actually passed and find into law on April eleven nineteen sixty eight as you will recall in nineteen sixty eight they would March is going on in around the garbage workers strike, and Dr king was killed on April the fourth exactly week before right? One week before. And Dr king had been working on a variety of issues implimented shoes title seven had been passed in nineteen sixty four he was working on a variety of fishes just to make sure that was access in the public arena. And then housing was another issue. He was working on along with his really quality of life initiative for lack of better time to make sure that every American have the right to quality of life. But how they their house as that kind of thing. And when he died Lyndon Johnson. Marshaled all of his political resources and quit sports the fair housing act in and got some concerts. They will all sort of languishing to be on. And that people push that Bill forward, and as a result eleven on April, the eleven Johnson with his political power and might and they collaborations that Dr king had built was able to get that law passed and signed and that's up the nominal short time period for some have been in congress for maybe a year or two and couldn't get any traction. And it does at that one in on a number of states like Tennessee and others had employment or Bishen was working on how they, but it was not as defined in some other places. So the housing act just in the nation in housing based on race color, national origin, sex religion disability. And status this ability familial status came into being in nineteen eighty eight and then some of the others came later, but this is really a core of what their housing at or Hibbitt. And it says that everyone is entitled to fair and housing. And then there is this connection with affordable housing that Dr king was talking about with as he was dying housing should not only be accessible, but it should be affordable as well. We are going to talk in depth about April twenty nineteen and how that the efforts this month will will benefit the cause of fair housing. And where we go forward from here. But I think it's pretty important to frame our conversation for me to at least give a thumbnail sketch of what your background is. I don't mean to embarrass you with with with your accolades, but certainly just knowing what you've done and how you are on this program today and. And your personal experience. It really is important. So just to kind of let our audience know that Beverly did go to Tennessee states. She is born in Nashville. So she is Tennessee native, which also had extensive experience in this particular topic. She she went to southern Illinois for graduate work as well as completing an executive leadership program at Duke as well as at Harvard in the JFK school of government beyond that, she's her as a combined thirty years of experience in this particular topic also talking about civil rights, and she was the first executive director of the national fair housing training academy in Washington DC. And I again, I don't bring that up to embarrass you. But it's important. I think for our audience to know, this is not your first day on the job with this subject. Is it? No, it's not I think one of the most important things are so people understand their rights and responsibilities under the law so much time at the fair housing train the cabinet with actually trading investigators on how they could go about evaluating allegations of discrimination determine whether or not that's the nation could be found based on the evidence win vested. So we've done that. But we've also done something else. Then we do a lot of this during April, and that is that we make sure that everyone the public in general, fair housing provider in particular and anyone else understand what the law is with the rights are under the law, and then what responsibilities they have under the law. Complaining party come to any of the all of the area with allegations. But they have provide certain information to us for us to be able to pursue that on Vesta gate those playing for housing providers if they are providing it they have certain. Responsibilities and that's to make sure that the tenant their own ever. Listen is using letting that facility that we do more than anything else. But there's also some other areas that they understand and explain the law of their staff so that they don't invert in advertently than I someone or give them bad information that could lead to a mission, which can lead to discrimination. So so we do a lot of that. So we do a lot of programming during the month of April to make sure that the public knows what what's their housing is. What is covered what the responsibilities are? And then we like to talk a little bit about the issues that we're seeing as well. I'm going to read between the lines here little bit and feel free to just let me know if I'm on the right track. Or if I'm way off port of what you just described there as far as especially where you're talking about the element where you're dealing with housing discrimination. I think back especially talking about the roots with with this particular topic going back to Martin Luther King. And in in February. We, of course, celebrate black history month and part of what we talked about during that that time was just a general thought of some of the things that the doctor was trying to accomplish that here we are in twenty nineteen while we've come a long way in addressing the issues. We still have a long way to go. And that's that's the was leaning more in conversation that we were having more about civil rights, and certainly more just about social attitudes. And there was some socio economic types of dynamics that we were discussing. There is well am I going to be accurate in applying? Some of those same descriptions to the topic here of fairhousing today. Yes, they're housing today. We get complaints or allegations of discrimination. That says they wouldn't they would not rent to me because I'm black. They wouldn't let me because they want me because I have children or they fail to accommodate my disability. I need a rent to get up to the to the sidewalk and they wouldn't provide one. So those are some of the things that we see today. And those kinds of things that the public needs to know what is that that is covered under the law. Smoke kind of thing. Dr team was working on what he believed to be justified if their society one in which everyone, regardless of income made a decent living wage had access to their affordable housing and also with a certain access to public accommodations. And those are the major issue that probably this still major issues because in some places people are still trying to access to housing variety of reasons sometimes multiple reasons sometimes their families with children that have disabilities that are not able to find housing because of child's disability for whatever reason if there is one dynamic of the population that may be has also advanced as far as where some there's. There's been discrimination. Or there's been some marginalization with regard to to to getting fair rights. There's one perhaps has has improved. The most would be the disabled. Love to say that there is a group that has. But what I find is if it of pushing a pole with you will when we find that. It's that it's that there are advancing thing made in some areas we find that they're not advances made in the other areas that persons with disabilities. There's still a lot of disadvantages. And a lot of obstacles to their full participation in full access to housing. So that continues to be an ongoing issue, and it can vary. And we're talking about a very vast a very large field of individuals can have a variety of disabilities, some visible some are not. But it does not matter can be just as as bandaging it, they're visible or invisible. And then their accommodations have to be made physical Dacians to facility sometimes that are not made. And by the way, the physical facilities. They're necessary or the costs are born by these individual leasing or renting the apartment so that they it would not necessarily be the on landlord that would have to do that. But they would have to at least allow them to purchase that if you will our system in the purchasing of that, but tickle accommodation or making their combination. And then getting reimbursement. For that. So when we look across the board, we know that we get the most complaints from persons with disability. Followed by race followed by status that individuals with children, and that's the largest number. Now, this housing is the most under reported civil rights issue to that. Nationally. There are probably based on latest Atip and believe their latest statistics was twenty sixteen. There were sixteen thousand instances of reportage housing discrimination. Allegations of discrimination. And then me in Tennessee last year in twenty eighteen at four hundred eighteen calls. Alleging discrimination. Another leave. We file close to a hundred and forty complaints. And we close the hundred twenty those numbers are pretty small compared to what we do in limit where the number is upwards of four four hundred plus so that gives you an idea a lot of times when I talked with individuals out say, well, they'll say what I think I was just went eight against, but I didn't have time to deal with that. I needed to find a place to live for me are needed to find a place for me. My children my family to live. And so that here sometimes people don't file because they're busy looking for the roof over their head. And that's that's where he just described. How it sounds like not only are the elements with the different groups of people that are looking for fair housing always changing the landscape of housing, always changing. And then just the situations of those same people. They're always changing there's there are a lot of moving parts in order to tackle this. Absolutely. And and you know, again, you know, my belief is that the best is to know the law and to do that. And so it was we're partnering with a number of limitations across the state of Tennessee. Fairhousing trading and. With with the city of Memphis, Shelby county and Memphis area legal services to.

Tennessee Martin Luther King Lyndon Johnson Beverly executive director US Robert blond Memphis Nashville Hibbitt Illinois Bishen Shelby county Washington DC Bill Atip Harvard
"tennessee" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"tennessee" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Like, man, I get it kinda go either way, but don't you with that all of it, and I sort of feel that same way except for the fact channel the games are already asking a lot of these officials to make the right call these in in rapid speeds. Can we really expect them to in the back of their mind also real type go, well, I would normally call this. But because it's end of the game. I'm not gonna call it. I think that's probably much to ask. And it's probably not the right way to officiated game. So, you know, if going alcohol there don't jump into the guy, you know, make sure you jump out of the way. So the only thing you can't do there is foul. Right. So I think he's just gotta be more careful. That's heartbreaker that was a really fun. Tennessee teen a really likable Tennessee team. A good deaf. Tennessee team to make the final four and good enough. A race in eighteen point. That's in the biggest game of the season and have a chance. It was too bad. They couldn't finish it off. But but really great and people will start saying Barnes can't, you know, as a choker, whatever maybe, but he's he's made Tennessee basketball, relevant nationally, you know, in short order, and that's not a not a small in Cali. I I want to piggyback off that. Because I mean, we we we've talked about this now for four years that perfect season going down in flames with with cow. And and when you don't get their the pain never goes away. And I wanna ask you to pick up on that. Because Rick Barnes Barnes's record in the tournament is not very impressive. Even though he has a final four, but he has a lot of lost opportunity with some of the best players that have ever played the game. This team was just such a great team. And I think that's why it is so hard breaking today. Yeah. And you you mentioned the one that you know, will probably haunt John cale and Kentucky fans forever. You know? They're two wins away from the the only for an invalid basketball history. And one of the most talented deepest teams anybody ever assembled. They couldn't get it done..

Rick Barnes Barnes Tennessee basketball John cale Cali Kentucky four years
"tennessee" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"tennessee" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"It was definitely a foul. Dan, another aspect of it. He costing Edwards is really close to the outbound. But he would I mean, it was probably an inch for its. But no, I noticed Tournus quote was while I did see take his leg out in just call him on on his leg. But now he did. It was hip to hip was foul. And to Rick Barnes credit. He he acknowledged out not that it really matters today. The season is over and I ask you after building this team from scratch after getting to a height that this program who had not really encountered in in a long time. And then only very briefly, whereas the Tennessee basketball program today now that there will be a lot of departures and a lot of disappointment. Yep. I don't know. How many Portuguese there will be? I mean, you'll lose Admiral Scofield us lose Cala. Like, Dan six eleven post gaffe Scofield's kind of been down at the end of the season at a waffle. I stab last night came back strong in the second half the other two guys. That's the that's the real question with grant Williams to time. He'd see player the SEC player of the year, Jordan, bone five point or I just don't really think those guys are gonna go. I would be surprised if they do for one thing. I don't see grant Williams make it in the NBA immense. But I just I just don't think he has the skill set for Jordan bone to me has a much better chance. But join bone to me is to stick around another year and really work on a shot. He's he's quick. He's big enough. Off. He knows how to run it off since they disseminate the ball. He can do all thing. Be a with the way the NBA still point guards gotta be scores to and I really think he needs to find June shooting. He's improved every year. And so why not take one more year and and try to improve some more. And if those guys both come back put on with LeMond Turner and join down you're gonna have nNcholas of a really good team again. John Adams was a show may ask you about Rick Barnes because you know, you want some national coach of the year words, and certainly I think any reasonable person would laud him for the the exemplary job that he has done. But sometimes pass history does come back to haunt you. And his record and games like this as we both know is not very good. The preparation for that game last night left. A few mystified in terms of the lackluster play early the opposite of what we saw last Sunday you give us an assessment of Rick Barnes right now. And I don't mean any of this take away. But what are you thinking about the way he prepared this team in the NCAA tournament? Call. Thank the NCAA tournament is such a difficult bent to try and draw conclusions from I think each game is unto itself. And what happened the week before the week before that doesn't seem to matter? I always feel like with a NCAA game. I just really don't know what you might get. So I kind of think I don't really blame blind. So what for what happened last night? I thought who do and I didn't know this going you when I saw the bracket out to the C would win that reach. But I didn't realize how Purdue how good Purdue was Purdue just dismantled. If any national championship Villanova beat them by twenty six points. I've thought Tennessee when you look at the season, I just think Tennessee out a little bit rundown there at the end. If you go back to the SEC tournament that great comeback against Kentucky. I think that was the peak and then came from behind in the last three minutes when the game next day gets waylaid by Auburn any wealth of the NCAA tournament games leading up to the Purdue game. They they just weren't that sharp Bill big leads in both games. But then lost them lost..

Rick Barnes NCAA Edwards Williams Dan Admiral Scofield Tennessee NBA SEC Jordan Purdue Tournus Auburn basketball LeMond Turner John Adams Kentucky three minutes
"tennessee" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

10:00 min | 2 years ago

"tennessee" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Of both. I think most Tennessee. They'll help make an exciting spring and Tennessee, we can we can be sure that sure. Sure sure will be Senator Alexander. Always a pleasure. Thank you so much for your time. And thank you for your time. Absolutely. I'm robin. This is the Tennessee radio network. Tennessee. On the Tennessee radio network. Lonzo part of your weekend. You're tuned into Tennessee matters. I'm Robert blond. Now. The global economy is something that is always changing that's something you're probably more aware of if you work in international business, but the fact is that whether you realize it or not it can affect all of us even here in the state of Tennessee. And that's part of what we're talking about with the guest who is joining us on the phone this morning. He is the ambassador to the US for the European Union. That is David O'Sullivan. Joining us David good morning to you. Thanks for spending some time with us. Good morning and good morning to Nashville. Yeah. You've spent some time here, haven't you? Absolutely one of my first summer's, I came with my family, and we spent that's probably four or five days in in Nashville, and then went down to Memphis. So we we really really enjoyed both those beautiful cities, and and such wonderful music, which was a real treat, your background your experience that gives you the opportunity and privilege to see just really how close we are as a global community. So that's something. That's clearly not lost on you. But for the majority of our audience, it's something that when you talk about the global economy, maybe it's not something they can wrap their minds around. Well, I agree. Sometimes these numbers can can seem very very abstract. I mean, in fact, the transatlantic corridor between the United States and the European Union is the single most important trade and investment corridor in the world European Union investment in the United States stands at about two point three seven trillion creating seven million jobs for American workers and the European Union is. The most important export destination for the US about five hundred and twenty eight billion worth of exports in in goods every year. But we've got a new study which enables you to see those numbers not just at the level of the US, but also at the level of of individual states. And so we can see that the European Union is the second largest export market for Tennessee and nearly eight billion dollars worth of goods and services explicitly. You fifty five billion dollars is invested in Genesee by the European Union companies and that supports over one hundred forty thousand jobs in the great state of Tennessee. So you can see that it's not just at the macro level. But also at the state level, they're huge benefits from this economic relationship. There are a lot of these stories that pop up from time to time. And and this is an opportunity for me. Even just I'm part of probably slant. More democratic with some my policy, but former governor has a Republican governor he put in a lot of work. And the auto industry with regard to some of the contracts that he signed over the past few years, bringing a lot of auto jobs in particular to the state of Tennessee. That's something that that's that's a big part of what we're talking about. I would think Volkswagen Volkswagen in in Chattanooga. Has it created over seven hundred seven thousand six hundred jobs and invested nearly nearly three billion dollars. So that's a huge investment. And they're they're very very happy with that investment in in in Chattanooga. What's your sense of is that is that unique to Tennessee as far as maybe that is the main industry that has a lot of interest in this particular state. What are is unique? You know, I I can give you know. That's a big example. I can give us molar example, less. A check company zoom international in in Franklin has grated. Over eighteen jobs invested nearly six six point seven million. So, you know, it's a spectrum from the very big names like Volkswagen that probably most of your your listeners have heard of to this very small company goes zoom international that maybe people people have Franklin probably know it. But so it's a very broad mix of investment from from big big big ticket numbers like BMW or Volkswagen to small very small companies who have set up a small investments, but which still create in this case, you know, achey really well paying jobs to say that the twenty nineteen landscape as far as the global economy is different with you look at the role that the United States place. I will leave would probably be accurate. Give us your sense of what the European Union how they look at the situation the United States understanding that perhaps while there's always change. Maybe the volatility is higher than. It's ever been do they look at this as something temporary? Well, we understand that President Trump was elected on a platform of disruption of challenging the status quo. Feeling that rightly or wrongly that America's partners and allies don't necessarily give America the right? Do. We might not share the analysis, but we respect to the the electoral choice of the American people than we've engaged with the administration to try and find ways forward and to continue this important relationship. That's why we launched when president younger of European Commission met, President Trump in the White House in July. They agree to an agenda of discussion on trade issues, which we're working our way through. And so I remain very confident that the fundamental interests of America lie in a good trading and investment relationship with Europe. As is as is the same case for the European Union. It's a mutually beneficial relationship for both of us that of course, is all happening at the same time that the European Union is also dealing with a sort of a fluid state of what's happening with Brexit, and and denied kingdom and not knowing exactly how that is going to. To come out not that we have time to really delve into all of that. But understanding that those are two major challenges that the EU hasn't really doesn't typically have to deal with our does that create missed opportunities for the state of Tennessee. Well, I think the, you know, we've you with great sadness. The fact that the United Kingdom wants to leave. The European Union is an Irishman I can only deeply regret the departure of our nearest neighbour. And as you know that grates some some some issues on the island of Ireland concerning the border. But I think the main thing is to try and make sure that to the extent this is going to happen because this is the democratic choice of the people we have to do it in an orderly and structured way, and that's why we invested heavily over the last eighteen months negotiating a withdrawal agreement with the United Kingdom, which would ensure that when they leave their is still certain continuity in the trade and investment relations, both between the UK, and and the rest of the EU, but also for our trading partners such as the United States, and the many American companies who are invested their this is proving challenging to to find agreement on in in the UK parliament. But we very much hope that between now and the end of March a. An agreement will be found. So that sad though, it is that the UK leaves. They will do so in a structured and orderly way with the minimum of disruption for ourselves as Europeans and also far most important trading partners, like the United States. What's the EU see as their role looking at the Paris accord, obviously, the United States has exited the Paris accord to this point most of the world is still in that what is the role in upholding some of the goals at the Paris accord is looking to accomplish. Well, climate change is undoubtedly one of the greatest threats, which which we the planet faces. I it. It will bring shoes changes, including the the risk of of migration of people as as parts of the Senate become uninhabitable or over overwhelmed by by water. So this is really a planetary challenge that we need to face together, which we see as the great advantage of of the Paris agreement. We regret that the the United States has decided to leave. But you'll be very honest. I travel a lot around this country. And I'm very reassured that in jeans and in states talking to mayors and governors actually Americans are very seized of this issue, and at the state and local level are acting in a way to try and combat climate change making very real choices in favor of a greener economy, a reducing the Archipenko on carbon emissions, which are the source of the problem. So I'm actually I'm disappointed that this administration has decided to leave. But I'm very optimistic about the commitment of of America Inc. If you like to embracing the the fight against climate change, also as a something that offers huge economic opportunities as we move to to a greener and more efficient economy. You mentioned some stats that at the top of our interview that perhaps maybe our listening audience wants to learn more about because it's fascinating to see how. How the European Union has direct impact on Tennessee? And it's all came from a report that was released that last week of February for our audience that wants to know more about that working they go online to to delve into that. We we have a dedicated website, which is called EU in the US trade all all one word dot org, and you can find all the information both at the macro level, and at the state level in order to to see really the mutual benefits of this trade relationship while swing by next time, you're in music city. We'll go check out some of that Nashville music.

European Union Tennessee United States Nashville Volkswagen United Kingdom President President Trump Senator Alexander David O'Sullivan Chattanooga Franklin Robert blond Memphis America Paris Ireland
"tennessee" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"tennessee" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"I mean, I know that sounds great in theory. But this this is a big time peration here. Do you see playing out like that? Or you think when the tournaments over next week or at some time before they go to her. Well, here here's a way to do it. I mean, you can. Yes. It's really semantics you're you're firing coach. But you go to her and say Holly. If you resign here. We'll be the settlement. You'll resign. We'll move on and make it maybe easier for her. I think that would be the way to go about it. Then one thing to remember about Holly Warlick is she really never pursued coaching jobs. She was all time assistant UT in didn't have a lot of ambition about being a head coach she was really content here. And she was an integral part of Pat summitt staff for many years. She was Pat summitt point guard and I live over the last season when Pat was coaching and that was extraordinarily difficult because Pat was not anywhere near one hundred percent the Alzheimer's without an effect. But she was still coaching. And she was on the bitch. And she was head coach at least in title, but Holly was really having to run the team, and she was also having in a way to kind of help manage Pat because of a very vicious disease. And I just thought she did a remarkable job because she's not just dealing with their boss. She's dealing with a very close friend. And I thought it was just an extremely difficult thing to get through. And she did that. And I think I think most fans really like Holly Wardi, they really do. She's a very likable person on the most likeable coaches of been around. But they're just comes at time. When you've got to let the wins and losses and what's going on with the program and make a change. And that's what they'll applaud when these did it John Adams many. Thanks, john. Appreciate it. Look forward to seeing you soon and talking more about this. Another subjects. Thank you for being on. Thanks. You're listening to the Paul finebaum show podcast and really excited to welcome Jordan Davis. So the program a big time country music star he hails from north west, Louisiana. In other words, he's an LSU fan and Jordan first of all thank you very much. What are what a pleasure to welcome you to our program. Good afternoon. Absolutely, thanks for having me on Palm Beach fame. Well, thank you. Let's let's just kind of take the I mean, obviously, a lot of people know, your music, certainly country music fans. No your hits, and and what you've done, but let's let's start with the beginning. I if I understand correctly, you grew up in Shreveport, which is a pretty good music town in and of itself. What were you always interested in in music growing up or did you have other go ahead?.

Pat summitt Holly Holly Warlick Holly Wardi Jordan Davis Shreveport Paul finebaum UT Alzheimer John Adams Palm Beach Louisiana one hundred percent