35 Burst results for "Ten Years"

Texas sheriff indicted after probe into Black man's death

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 8 hrs ago

Texas sheriff indicted after probe into Black man's death

"A Texas sheriff is facing criminal charges in connection with the death of a black man that ended up being filmed by a police reality TV series Williamson County sheriff Robert Chody was released shortly after posting bond he faces a third degree felony rap as part of the investigation into the death of habia Ambler who died after a traffic stop in Austin Texas that stop was filmed by the reality TV show live PD the sheriff is charged with destroying or concealing video connected to amber's death if convicted he could get up to ten years in prison and he never aired the video because it involved the death and it destroyed the food it just says once an investigation cleared the officers involved however another probe is looking into the use of force than employees death I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Robert Chody Habia Ambler Austin Texas Amber Texas Williamson County Oscar Wells Gabriel
Why you should take more photos, not less

Talking Tech

01:37 min | 2 d ago

Why you should take more photos, not less

"And you know what you need to take more pictures really you do. I learned this the hard way believe it or not I've been going through my closets. This weekend I was trying to find some photos from the pre digital era. And all I could find was of a specific instance, one roll of black and white triax film. There was snapped during this specific place that I want to get pictures of. And Shame on me for not being, more proactive. So I should've taken more a lot more but I started thinking about it and realized look at how far we've come folks back then I'm the nine hundred and eighty s you had a choice of pro level thirty, five millimeter cameras which were hard to operate for most people disposable cardboard cameras had just begun appearing, but they were only used for special occasions places with great light. So for everyday life, most of us never bothered and compare that to now where everyone you know has a camera in their pocket and you can ask anyone to grab a shot of you with no issues they know what to do. And the smartphone cameras are so darn good. They can shoot in pretty much any kind of light and they have exif information built into the file. So when you look up stuff. You know exactly where you took it. You knew what time you knew what day I mean it's pretty amazing. So. For those of you listening today who might be in this position maybe ten years from now where you want to get pictures from twenty twenty some friendly. Where's the vice take more photos? You can never take enough and back them

The road to electric vehicles with low sticker prices

Clark Howard Show

03:19 min | 3 d ago

The road to electric vehicles with low sticker prices

"About five percent of vehicles being purchased each month or electric and the United States I think it's only around two percent but we're getting very close to the tipping point where the actual purchase price. Without any government incentives or subsidies will be cheaper for an electric vehicle. A gas engine. Tesla. had. Their much over hyped battery day recently where they talk about the things that they are planning and how they're going to get the cost down and one of the things that was headlined is that a five thousand dollar electric vehicle will be available in about three years time but Tesla. You believe it when you see it, but generally I must tends to over promise but not under deliver over promise on timeline. But the trend line is clear that the cost of batteries down eighty, five percent in ten years and the price curve keeps bending all around the world. And so once you have an electric vehicle, I can tell you it's much much much more fun to drive than a gas engine vehicle, the range getting better and better the new. Tesla. An model goes five hundred miles on a charge or will go five hundred miles on a charge. Yes. That's early next year right now the best they have is four hundred miles to charge, and so the range anxiety people have had will go away. Although the focus has been on. Mostly, what Tesla's dine in what others are chasing behind them with passenger vehicles? The big market place. In the big effect on people's wallets going to be with businesses that are going to electrify their entire fleets. You're going to see that Amazon in particular. is going to be way out front. With their massive fleet delivery vehicles going one hundred percent electric ups and Fedex are GonNa trail some but then no name trucking companies. Or going to overwhelmingly. Migrate. To Electric, which is going to reduce the cost of distribution in the United States because the electric vehicles are so much cheaper to run. THAN THE GAS ENGINE ONES And this is an important thing for our vehicle market with GM. Ford and Chrysler. They've gotta get moving with us because foreign automakers are pouring tens of billions of dollars each. Into electrifying their fleets because they know that's where everything's going. And I want our American on appeal manufacturing to be strong and remained strong. And we've got to. Be Innovators. We've gotTA. Be Moving ahead of the rest of the world. Not trailing them.

Tesla United States Fedex Amazon Tesla. Ford GM Chrysler
Dont forget to let activists know their work counts, urgesyouth climate adviser

UN News

02:32 min | 4 d ago

Dont forget to let activists know their work counts, urgesyouth climate adviser

"This is Matt, Wells. At U. N. news well, with high level meetings own going to address the climate and Biodiversity Crisis Center stage you and headquarters one of the Secretary General's Youth Advisory Group members urging world leaders to make sure their decisions get back to the people that helped shape policy on the ground, and this Gibson is co Coordinator Three Fifty Fiji regional use lead climate change network in the Pacific driven by young climate leaders and he. Told Julia Dean, of our UN Country Team Australia was important to let groups like his know they've made a difference for me. There are three reasons why we should be continuing to engage young people and the first reason is around young people are the only demographic that has the opportunity, the agency and the capability to be able to respond really quickly and effectively situations that need a response in the Pacific. We Sierra really clear example when it. Comes to responding to natural natural disaster. You look at any cyclone that we've had over the last ten years any development sector agency that's worth. Their salt will tell you that young people have been at the forefront of driving the transformative change to ensure that the response to the crises was done effectively ethically and quickly, and so that's the first reason is the reason we engage young people because without founding biased, we get the job done but. The second reason I think is perhaps more important is because young people have the most vested interest in the way in which the future will pan out. We are in a unique sort of next this position where we have the ability to see the learnings from generations before us, but we also the generation that will be guiding in creating the next generation through the next thirty five to fifty years. So our interest is not just our own. But also the interest of ensuring that our children have a life that is something that is worthwhile and something that we would like for ourselves and fraud Johnson, and then of course, the third reason is because you've will be the population that drives future innovation. So the reason that we work with youth now is not because we want them to feel cool and fancy and like social influences. Now, the reason we work with youth now is to. Ensure that we're laying down the foundations so that humanity and society is going forward are fighting trump because at the end of the day, the leaders that we have. Now that you know pushing retirement age won't be there twenty five years from now to see their plans to fruition. So we need to be able to instill enough Dr Anne, capacity and young people to ensure that the future that we have is not just one that we. Wants, but it's a, it's a reality

Pacific Co Coordinator Three Fifty Fij Julia Dean Gibson Youth Advisory Group Biodiversity Crisis Center Un Country Team Australia Matt Dr Anne U. N. Wells Fraud Johnson
Eva Schloss on Holocaust forgiveness

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

06:44 min | 4 d ago

Eva Schloss on Holocaust forgiveness

"This S Charlie Goals Jewish. States those who listen for those who are willing to listen. Now. Thank you very much. tweed action. and. I've. Lived a long time and have experienced a lot of wonderful things but Israel. I'm believable Bihar. And of course, it leaves it says sign on my way overlooking. World. Let's just bring it back to today in this country. I think it's fair to say that British Jews experienced a visceral form of antisemitism that they have never done before with the election of Jeremy Corbyn, the leader ship of the Labor Party and the genuine threat that should he have won the election in December twenty nine hundred thank goodness didn't that Future, existence in the united. Kingdom. was under threats. Can I ask you in this for years of quite quite considerable pain for the Jewish community here? Could you feel parallels with what she experienced in Vienna announced the damage as a child not at all not at all and no people's starting to be afraid he upset about it. But as always say Sicily announcing and you know unfortunately antisemitism has always been and always be I don't know why but it is affects. Who is essential his and? It does it's just. It's language. So it's subsequent assist inborn in the people, but it is thus Mention it just same. Like what this I'm doesn't. Nazi. Time. So I must say, it doesn't really bother me and mustard personally offend million may. Not experienced any antisemitism in again thank you for making that clear. Now, you lived in the same apartment block in Amsterdam and frank, and you were only a month apart in Asian. Playmates together in early teenage, and then in nineteen forty two, you both went into hiding to avoid the Nazi effort to capture Jews in Amsterdam. Now, you'll family was captured by the Nazis after being betrayed by double agent in the Dutch underground and transported to Auschwitz. You father and brother didn't survive the ordeal, but you and your mother were barely alive while you afraid by Soviet troops in nineteen, forty five. How Did it feel. To have left your home city of the Anna. To try and create new life understood them. And for that to happen to you, even as you fled from way you used to. Well as it was. At tangible tangible time. Have a very happy little girl in Australia had old plaza who was Like older process should be very protective for me. I have a sort of a viable child. It was much more at a bookworm and he had to be all his stories which he was dating Again. Pants. Kaslow's advice Elliott wonderful family life, and then to go to Belgium. Glad we got out of Australia Benny. Many of our family members didn't because it was spent thirty eight. It was very difficult to get past the German Jews had already gone to England and land, and France and everywhere, and most of those companies did the daily want any more Jews? So only if you're somebody special. got visas any more. But advising referenced in Jim and then Mefatha actually lift in Holland and remain Belgium, and of course, the war stock that my father had asked to get as well to Holland because in a war board as will be closed and view may not be able to see. So in in forties ewing's a wall that in February nineteen forty because visas to for three months to visit by Fassa in in Holland. So relief like you say on the same Dressy not an apartment block, it was a hold area of. More than it'll buildings and there was eleven years old. But of course, you know ahead on trust French said ahead to Dutch Andam. difficult to accept that Baz also children and even by the teaches and. So lost all my confidence. became shy Biz stone but friendly and eventually settled down. But of course, the Nazis invaded. And, of course, a measures Jewish people started to come. And for two years VI IN FIA to be arrested. And in nineteen forty two, then southbound young people go to call up notice have to come to a place respect pex given exactly start Schefter Blake to deported to Germany to work in German factories. But Zach to him benighted forty-two most of German Jews had been deported to get us or two camps. So why on Earth should your one more young Jewish be to Cup to Germany? So Zet sit time when Anna's Fazah auto frank and my father and many other Jewish feminists is cited civil send Sam young people, but we would go into hiding. While I was just sit at ten years old. And my father called us together. And he said, hence, you not going to set you we going to hiding. But we couldn't find a family who was to take it for people. So we have split up. I go visit my Mazda enhance feel bismuth files. And that started to cry. And did not want to be separated the game.

Holland Jeremy Corbyn Germany Australia Amsterdam Bihar Belgium Israel Sicily Frank Zach Anna Vienna Labor Party Auschwitz France Fassa Schefter Blake Ewing
Why Esports Coaches Don't Fill the Same Role as Traditional Sports Coaches

Esportz Network Podcast

07:34 min | 4 d ago

Why Esports Coaches Don't Fill the Same Role as Traditional Sports Coaches

"This is actually focused on coaching I. Think this is an interesting parallel of the were talking about. There's an aspect of the MLS LCS COMP that relates to coach and it specifically how coaches approach roles for players and a trend I think started about twenty five years ago where there's this whole thing for young athletes hey, they need to specialize early and they need to find. Not. Just the sport they WANNA play, but the position within that's what they wanna play so that they could focus on it completely. and. It's something that creates a potential issue in terms of teamwork and. Understanding of. Either the field or the virtual or the rift depending on what what you're playing. And that's something that is sort of changing in the sports world a little bit over the last ten years who actually? No, it benefits our goalies to understand what it's like to be an attacking player. They can have that experience. That's good. You flush aw bat specific cop and why that relates to coaching and how it impacts the ability of coaches to really be successful. Of course. Yeah. Yeah. to miss it. Did you ever play a traditional sports? I did I was a soccer player in high school. I'll split tennis basketball really all around until I got injured and play sports because I need competition. I think we're we're pretty similar So. When when when I first started playing like as you mentioned like there was this focus on his Asian and the parallel to. Something like Lee. Legends is abundantly clear especially in North America. players will before they're even like in in ranked 'cause you have those thirty levels to get to. To get to before you start playing rank games. They're gonNA choose favorite position and like that's just Kinda engrained. And that's Kinda rough. But I think that needs to be that needs to be tackled that needs to be gotten rid of because when you're only. Focusing on one position and we have a lot of that and it's hyperfocused in North America. We have things like one called one tricks where you only play one champion. So it's it's hyper focusing on hyper focusing even more than is already have like should be happening. So we have these these one tricks and these one position players. And they're they're going all in and the as you said, they know nothing about the other player. So where coaching comes in is like there should be a focus on foundational knowledge and just general knowledge that will contribute to the overall play when when you're playing midland when you're playing midland in League of legends and Everybody knows most people know and Lee legends that the Mid Jungle Synergy is incredibly important has amid later if you know where your juggler is going to be and where the opponent judy is going to be, you can plan accordingly But if you all you know is about your your mid lane like position like say trade against your enemy mid Lehner and like a manage the waves effectively while that's important. Knowing about the other aspects of the game is it is expansive like you'll have a massive over the other teams and it. It's crazy to me that this the like just knowledge this is just knowledge. It's just being neglected we and I feel like it's just so much more potent in in North America still while still needs growth in other regions like a do follow g to at all. Of course alibi European friends Yeah Yeah G. to. Last year did something unprecedented. They sent a perks down to the bottling and they brought in caps who was a world class midlander, and so perks demonstrated something that no other team had really done before and that a role swap can happen and it will benefit the team like he went from. Midland to bottling lane in they played even better than they did before if anybody in North America attempted the same thing, I don't think we would find. Any semblance of the success that G. to did and I it's. I I think we should start working towards that coaching and House how this relates into coaching is. Is just the the emphasis on on knowledge. Our emphasis is always just as I said earlier, just the position that. You're already play and there are so many holes. There's so many things because people are just rushing to. Can like immediately I feel like I've gone a little rambler here real. They're made for rambling that's the whole point of the medium. It's I think you bring up a really good point is that position Louis play is the hardest thing to do at any most consistent marker of the greatest players and the greatest teams. If you watch a premier league soccer, for example, I was watching Liverpool. Play this past weekend at the way they move even compared to the MLS is completely within motion they're all. Moving with each other if that means that the midfielder needs to go back to Centreback, he does that without debate he's thinking about, Hey, this position I need to be he understands how the team needs to move around the ball and that's something that like you mentioned with g two, it's possible to do if you understand all those positions. But when you're one trick, this is true of MLS is somebody will miss their assignment and the whole defense fall apart because it's all predicated on everyone playing that one specific role, and it does not nearly have the same. Level of. Cohesion of of nuance that that the best teams in other countries are playing for an to America's credit. That's true of other sports say basketball when you watch a team in North America play or in the NBA play basketball, we're moving very position Louis. Format where it's Oh. It's people playing around each other The big men are no longer just staying underneath the basket there out by the three point line. And in other places that's not true because America's got the best basketball player at the best basketball league and it's sort of a martyr of. You have the best players and the Games take on added level of synergy. That's only really seen at the absolute top level, and that again comes down to coaching and a lot of ways coaching from early days, and then also coaching that continues into the pro play and having players who are receptive to have coaches actually talk with them and I think that's what are the big things we need to talk about his eastwards coach is. Especially in North America Arthur coaches respected some are but quite a few. Probably. Just got thrown into their role.

North America Basketball America Soccer LEE League Of Legends Louis North America. Tennis Centreback House NBA Lehner Judy Liverpool
Former Blackboard CEO Aims to Bring New Features to Zoom Classrooms

Equity

01:32 min | 4 d ago

Former Blackboard CEO Aims to Bring New Features to Zoom Classrooms

"The former CO founder of blackboard, which is a learning system that I don't know if you guys used in college I, used it to check grades and syllabi. You don't like it. Alex terrorizes putting thumbs down on the. Echo version of software ratings I mean is blackboard was notoriously bad. Even ten years ago I can't imagine it's gotten better well, well, thankfully, the CO founder has you know he went to actually precision Hawk which is a drone startup left dot in January is now onto his new company class EDU and their first product is not. So casually called class resume for everyone listening I. Suggest reading my story because the demo does a really good job and I won't be able to do as Greg Griffeth job but the features are basically creating zoom if it was genuinely belt for teachers to lead a class beyond kind of a one on one discussion, which is kind of how Zuma's right now. So some of the features all run to them really quickly as. A teacher can kind of launch live sinement quizzes and tests. Then it can see students complete them. We'll also seeing their desktop few you've to give permission, but we can debate on if that's too much power or not. It can also kind to class or music class, which is good for early learners. Its structure kind of puts the teacher on the left and let's students toggle between different views of the. Friends assignments they're talking about, and then finally it lets students reach out and ask a teacher a question and of do a one on one zoom with them on the side in case there shy and don't want to talk in front of the whole class. So it was a little the big features

Blackboard Co Founder Alex Greg Griffeth Zuma
All The Information You Need About Census 2020

Talk, Tales and Trivia

04:37 min | 4 d ago

All The Information You Need About Census 2020

"Today's episode. I, WanNa talk about something that's really important and something that maybe perhaps you didn't know about I have a lot of information about the twenty twenty cents is that is on a deadline of September thirtieth. So get those census forms in call the Census Bureau, or get the census online and fill out by September thirtieth. But now, right now, you can sit back and relax and enjoy this episode on the twenty twenty census. Okay. So let me start out by saying that the census is required by the constitution which calls for an actual enumeration once a decade and no Mauritian is the actual count one by one of the individuals in the United States will the first census after the American revolution was taken in Seventeen Ninety Under Secretary of State, Thomas Jefferson. But on the NPR website, it states that the federal government is trying to get every household to answer some personal questions and they are kind of personal for the twenty twenty census. It's part of a once a decade tradition of counting every person living in the united. States. The twenty thousand population number will shape how political power and federal tax dollars are shared in the US over the next ten years. Ten Years Think about that the data collected by the senses determines the number of seats. Each state has the US House of Representatives and it is used to distribute billions and federal funds to local communities. The more populated your state is the more representatives you'll have in the US House of Representatives so That is really important that you understand that and fill out the twenty twenty census because it does help your state locally and overall in April the twenty twenty cents is started mailing out forms to all US citizens in the hopes of finding out how best to spend federal and state money. Well, the twenty twenty cents is, is the first in the United States since the rise of social media and the first US count that's primarily online. Yes for the first time Americans can answer census questions over the phone and on the Internet as well as mailing in the form. But this is showing concern around the digital security and participation among communities that may not have easy access to the internet or computers such as the homeless population and those living in shelters, and for months, the government has been preparing to combat this information campaigns that may try to disrupt the count which rolled out not only in the middle of a presidential race. That's right. Here. But also during the coronavirus pandemic on March twentieth the announced it is extending the end of counting the census from July thirty first to August fourteenth, and now from August fourteenth until September thirtieth. So you have until September thirtieth to get those census questions answered will officials however say that the sooner households fill out a form on their own the fewer door Knockers or as they are called census takers, the Census Bureau will have to try to send out the demographic data are used by businesses to determine, for example, where to build new supermarkets and other needed structures and business establishments such as daycare, and even the need for school lunch programs and other daily essentials. Also, the results will show where communities need new schools new. New Roads and more services for families, older adults and children. The data will also inform the government. How hundreds of billions of dollars in federal funding are allocated to more than one hundred programs, including Medicaid head start for community mental health services, and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program also known as snap. Also may contribute to what kind of retail stores will do well in these areas that you live in how much tax money per town or county can be distributed to the Department of Transportation How many cars are in a particular area, which may determine the price of gas for that area.

Census Bureau United States House Of Representatives Federal Government NPR Thomas Jefferson Under Secretary Department Of Transportation Supplemental Nutrition Assista Medicaid
Stolen Moments With Harold Sherrick

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:56 min | 4 d ago

Stolen Moments With Harold Sherrick

"Recoup here on the imbalance history of rock and roll Marcus how you doing not bad. How about yourself today? Well I'm doing good but I'm a little nervous because we're trying something different. Today we're going to combine an episode of five favorites with a studio gas well, not in the studio on zoom? Resuming. With Harold Cherokee, he's got a great book called stolen moments. How many years Herald were in La is a seem to time I was born in La so in La for sixty three years. Only been back here for three years moved back here three years ago. where. Were you living before? While I was living in the San Fernando Valley in Sherman Oaks. Dan Is area that you. which is just just over the hill to Hollywood, which is about fifteen minutes from where I live great place to be mad that close you know was wonderful. As a kid growing up there, where did you live and how did you first start plugging into the whole strip in the scene and everything that was going on there? I was born in L. A. Downtown La but then as a kid. Moved to Glendale California which is just right. Next door. They're nice sleepy little town and I basically grew up there went to high school there the whole bit and was there up until like nine hundred ninety and that I but I moved to the valley when I got married a second time and Just. been there all my life and. I was well connected when I was a kid started going to concerts when I was twelve. I concert was the Beatles. Hollywood ball no. That was all I. I went to the last la which was August. Twenty nineteen, sixty six and that was the Beatles Esta left. Day before the last one, which was candlestick. But that was my first concert. That right in the second row air right there. Six dollars? Ticket dollars can you actually hear the Beatles because? I HAVE THEM IN DC and said, the girls were screaming so loud that she couldn't hear the Beatles from where she was sitting in the stadium Yakking you know here and there it wasn't obviously crystal clear. You did have screamed grounding out of most of the time, but you could hear your somewhat mind blown dude, that's all I wanNA say or I'll deal mind-blowing. Well, that'll be a great entry into rock and roll life for anyone. And Talk to us a little bit about the book you were taking pictures around the L. A. Seen for quite a number of years in have some stunning captures in this book in all, it was going to concerts as a kid I used to play around with little Brownie camera when I was nine and ten years old and so eventually when I was able to graduate up to actually getting a decent camera which was. Like nineteen, Seventy, eight, seventy, nine, eighty at one. I really started pushing myself into the into the scene as best I could. It's all proven yourself in the beginning paying your dues you know you're not getting paid when you start out, it wasn't the solely for the money was the for the love of the whole thing. I always had a visual of capturing a great moment. You know whether it was in concert or meeting. Somebody in a hotel room that's what I started doing. Did you build a black and white dark room in your house? My father had a black and white dark room. Yeah. I didn't my house. I had a friend that helped me out a lot a couple of friends that end our rooms and I would bring my films as soon as I shot it the next morning I was there almost at the crack of dawn. We gotta get this process you know right away. That's awesome. You know would do the proof sheets and then big out of print I'd have sometimes I'd have to send something out right away most of the time in the beginning, it was just doing it and getting it done. So I could actually look at what I shot. That's all part of the beginning anyway trial and error is how you learn from a day to day thing you know 'cause I'm self taught I didn't go to school for it and I just I always wanted to do that. You know just take pictures because my father. Was, a newspaper man you were for hearst for the Herald, examiner in La A., and that's how I of got into it. When I was a kid was he would always take me down to the office I used to look at all the photos and the photo room with saga offers, and then I go to the pressroom and watch the paper roll off the presses at night with the greatest greatest experience you know the newspaper game sets how I got into want shoot black and white for falls. What was the first concert? You Shot Elvis Presley Whoa. Seventy six year before he died he he never he didn't come to L. A. and seventy-six closes. He came Long Beach Arena and I had tickets through a friend who is very well connected into Elvis and getting good tickets. So we had some really good seats and that time I think I'd be twenty five bucks to see John a few pictures. They didn't really come out that well. So that's why nothing has really been seen on that because I nothing came out that good at all.

Beatles LA San Fernando Valley The Herald Hollywood Marcus Elvis Presley Harold Cherokee L. A. Downtown La Glendale California DAN Long Beach Arena Sherman Oaks La A. John L. A. Hearst
Really Slow (MM #3473)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 5 d ago

Really Slow (MM #3473)

"The Maisonette with Kevin Nation. I've noticed lately that our internet seems to be really slow now. It's a relative term of course because really slow is not be true. I started back on the internet when you'd literally open up a web site and then go walk away for twenty minutes waiting it to upload the pictures now thanks to high-speed internet. It's not the same. It's not really slow. But it is you want it to be in ten years now, and now that we have the technology it should be instantaneous. But of course, it's not now. The reason our Internet is slow has a lot to do with well the fact that both my wife and I are working now on the internet at home and during the day I didn't have to worry about my wife when she was working from the office. She's on the internet all time. It's what she does for a living. She's got constant teams calls and zoom calls things like that takes up bandwidth and therefore the bandwidth I was using all for myself before is now being shared amongst two or three computers. I just wage number back twenty twenty-five years ago when the internet really was slowed when the internet first started out and I'll spoiled we've gotten yes. I realized we've come to expect things that are instantaneous, but every now and then I have to pause whether I want to or not dead.

Kevin Nation
Bren Brown gets two Spotify exclusives

podnews

02:56 min | 5 d ago

Bren Brown gets two Spotify exclusives

"Time everyone I'm Bernie Brown, and welcome to my new daily podcast on spotify spotify car cost has announced a new partnership with Brennan Brown. Current show unlocking also become a spotify exclusive from January to lead is another exclusive which launches next month. She's also collaborated on a yacht rock playlist. If you like Christopher Cross and Toto Africa that you'll love your brock NPR has released the NPR podcast reports containing data and case studies about the broadcasters PODCASTS podcast uses up twenty percent year on year downloads up twenty six percent can podcast from NPR public radio account for thirty two percent of time spent listening to podcast us. spotify testing listener polls. The features live on spot exclusive shows like the re watchable 's like video and sharing cards. It's another proprietary feature for spotify shows only had him. Curry's no agenda disappeared from spotify earlier this week I never submitted our feet Adam says last I checked it was not associated with my email or my account. After leaving spotify September nineteenth after to our rent on his show earlier, Joe Biden has announced the Joe but a network, the first non button show will be see the thing is hosted by Bridget Kelly. Mandy be Livia dope quote not what they'll say because I'm staying out a women's business lull says button. spotify has also launched your daily in the UK content in there from the time talksport in the evening standard, the BBC global and Bauer taking part later today the rain Digital Canada Twenty twenty summit is taking place. The event is online and free our editor James. Credentials. Moderating the opening session. Hey, that's me. It's at rain digital candidate twenty, twenty dot com if you want to go. The Australian podcast cost awards is giving you extra time to anti. You've now got until midday on. Monday. Blueberry has a fancy new website design, which is nice John. McTaggart's the president's and see of APM, is to step down. The company has been criticised recently for race and gender issues for target claims. His decision to step down is unrelated Pierre Remix of PODCAST radio station in the US is celebrating ten years on Air who knew during that time it said one thousand and eighteen audio creators. The first producer was Roman Mars and podcast movement virtual has announced Mark Cuban as a keynote speaker in conversation with the newsworthy is Erica Mandy. And Infocom News, the former host and producer of the ABC's in this podcast. Australia is now making at home with Brie away for kids across the country to connect. When life gives you. Parkinson's is back for a third season Larry gifts to his diagnosed three years ago hosts the show the season includes the collision of Covid nineteen and Parkinson's disease

Spotify Erica Mandy Christopher Cross Digital Canada Twenty Twenty NPR Brennan Brown Bernie Brown Joe Biden Brock Npr Parkinson Bridget Kelly United States Host And Producer Australia Toto Africa Curry Covid ABC Brie
Canadas Single Payer Prevails Against Privatization Attempt

Medicare for All

05:04 min | 5 d ago

Canadas Single Payer Prevails Against Privatization Attempt

"I, Benjamin. Day. And I'm Stephanie Nakajima. And this is Medicare for all. The podcast for everybody needs healthcare. Today. We have Dr Monica debt who is on the board of Canadian. Doctors for Medicare and Public Health and family physician. Nova Scotia, we're thrilled to have her on today to talk about historic legal challenge to the Medicare program that was just heard by the Supreme Court of British Columbia and spoiler the victory delivered by the court to the country single payer system. I cannot wait to hear about this welcome Dr Dot and I'm just curious before we get into the topic. I mean. You're a family physician, but how did you get involved with? Felt the need to get involved with? Health reform. Protecting the Canadian universal healthcare system, but also trying to expand it and improve upon it. Here Hi. Thanks for having me on your podcast I'm really excited to be here. I've been a family physician about ten years. Now, I've worked in a range of settings from big cities to to mainly though northern. Towns across Canada and I've always been in settings where I've very much appreciated. The fact that my patients have access to healthcare wherever we are whether it's a small town or a big city. You know there's there's variations of cross across the country, but fundamentally, all of my patients do not need to worry about. Physician and hospital care. They do not need to pay when they come see knee or when they get to the hospital they know they can count on that care and that's always been really important to me. I also work in public health in very much care about health policies that. Benefit the health of a community of population and absolutely access to to healthcare is a fundamental determinant of Health I. Think it's something that I wanted to support in a in a everywhere I can in one of those ways has been through involvement with Canadian Doctors for Medicare for about the last ten years. and GM or Canadian for Medicare A as a nonprofit organization we've existed just over ten years and our. Fundamental goal is to maintain an improve our single payer publicly funded healthcare system in. Canada. So we want to maintain that single payer but at the same time know that there's there's always things we can do to make it better, but we can do that with a single payer system. So that it might be a bit confusing for our listeners. To hear that the Canadian single payer healthcare system is also called Medicare since we have a program called Medicare that only. Available for seniors sixty, five and older Whereas Canadian Medicare is of course. Accessible to everybody from to cradle-to-grave. So can you just talk a little bit about how Canadian Medicare works are there are there physician networks? Can you ever lose your coverage? Are you allowed to just out of the system or pay to jump the queue? So we do color our health care system Medicare in Canada at the same time when it actually is it's a series of we have provinces and territories, and so there are thirteen provincial and territorial health insurance programs across the country. So every province and territory is responsible for delivering care. Under the umbrella of what's called the Canada Health Act, which outlines the core principles of of Medicare and Canada and one imposes is universality but really it's a a series of health insurance plans that everyone is covered for primarily for physician and hospital services. So for example, where I work I see patients I build my provincial health insurance program I get paid in that way I cannot bill a private insurance program for for my services. Because it is publicly funded. I'm not allowed to then go in and bill a private insurance program. So for the pieces that are covered publicly through universal system, you cannot buy insurance to go see a physician or go to a hospital privately you need to access it through the public system just as as everyone else does we do have some of our care about thirty percent that is privately paid for either through supplemental insurance or through. Private payment, and that covers pieces like dental care some medications, physiotherapy other allied health professionals, and to be honest it's a gap in that we don't cover some of those pieces, but the vast majority of of care is covered under our public system.

Medicare Medicare And Public Health Canada Family Physician Dr Dot Stephanie Nakajima Canadian Doctors Benjamin Supreme Court Of British Colum Dr Monica Nova Scotia GM
Are We Being Forced to Buy Stocks

Money For the Rest of Us

06:27 min | 5 d ago

Are We Being Forced to Buy Stocks

"Last week in the insiders guide email newsletter I pointed out the expensive valuation of US stocks. Specifically I showed that the forward price to earnings ratio the P. E. based on earnings estimates over the next year was twenty, two point nine. That's three standard deviations above its average of sixteen times going back to two thousand, three at data from Ned Davis. Research. In reply to that email, Andrew wrote regarding stocks being expensive on a forward e true but there's no alternative. What do you do with bond yields near Zero and the vanguard total stock market? Index. Fund. Yielding two percent. By VPI, the vanguard total stock market ETF. JASA forwarded to me a paper by Bridgewater says, which I'll discuss in more detail later in this episode. I had a similar question from a plus member in the money for the rest of US plus member forums. He wrote. So the Fed signals that it wants to keep rates low for three more years. Canada's pension. Fund is reevaluating bond-holdings and you've got an army of small and large investors bidding up companies like Tesla and snowflake to absurdly hype. All this combined to make me think are we as individual investors now forced to buy equities? Is this the mother of all bubbles in which there's literally no other things suitable for purchase. There is a lot of speculation in stocks right now. Jim. Bianco Bianca Research pointed out that small traders are dominating the options market. Bear most of the trades right now and seventy five percent of that volume is an option contracts expire in two weeks. So short term bets. Look at South Korea and article from Bloomberg pointed out that day traders in South Korea have accounted for eighty seven and a half percent of the total value of stocks traded in the first part of September. You. Some men chief strategist at Samsung Securities said retail investors appear to be seeking short-term profits after hearing their next door neighbors earned lots of money from stocks after the March selloff. Receiving a similar situation in India. The Financial Times reports that the number of individual investor accounts rose twenty percent from the start of the year, the twenty, four million, and they point out that around the world, an influx of investors are investing in stocks for the first time. Are. We in a bubble? Is it a speculative frenzy? Are we forced to buy these stocks because there are no alternatives with also? One of the things I like to do investing is think about what's different this time what's unusual? What what doesn't fit the pattern? I had two instances of investing this past week where something didn't fit the pattern Lebron, I were driving up in the mountains of Montana and a small bear cub really bolted right in front of us no idea what it was running from. My son suggested he was running from the year twenty twenty. And then few days later at our front door, there were seven cows drinking water from the driveway eating our bushes. There are no cows around us. We live in an area that nobody keeps cows but there they were right in front of my house. Turns out. They had strayed from the National Forest, which is not very far some outfitters have grazing rights and drop off the cows and leave them there all summer pick them up come late October, and they had straight down because some of that newly cut barley fields, but it didn't fit the pattern. Cows at your front door. Don't fit the pattern. What's different now on investing front that could justify more expensive valuations for stocks. Well, for the first time, ever US interest rates are near zero from short term out to ten years. This is known as a flat yield curve, which is an unusual. We've had flat yield curves in the past. But it's flat near zero. There was a flat yield curve where ten treasury bonds and cash for yielding similar back from two thousand and five to two thousand seven. But yielding four percent. And from two thousand to two, thousand, two cash and tenure treasures were yielding five to six percent. Today, the ten year Treasury yield is zero point, six percent and cash is zero. The Federal Reserve intense to keep it that way. The recent policy statement suggests that they will keep their policy rate. What's known as the Fed funds rate near zero until labor market conditions have improved. The. Unemployment rate has dropped close to to to maximum employment and that inflation has risen to two percent is on track to moderately exceed two percent. They included their economic and rate projections and all, but four officials on the committee. Expect the Fed funds rate is still be near zero at the end of twenty, twenty three. Rates are low across the board. It is a different investment environment than we have ever faced before. And that's what this paper by bridgewater associates was about. It was titled Grappling With the New Reality of zero bond yields virtually everywhere. It was written by Bob Prince Greg Jensen Melissa fear, and Jim Haskell. I. Discussed Bridgewater Associates Founder Ray dallies views back in episode three, hundred changing world order in this paper bills off that. Before we continue let me pause and share some words from one of this week sponsors masterworks. I've shared on the show how low interest rates are on bonds and yields and cash about zero money has to be invested somewhere in preserving your wealth is as hard as it's ever been. That's where masterworks comes in. If you're looking to diversify out of the traditional public markets, then take a look at masterworks. They make blue chip art investing possible works by artists like Banksie, 'cause and Warhol. Art is a one point seven trillion dollar asset class that has performed better than s five hundred by one hundred and eighty percent between two thousand and two thousand eighteen according to Citibank.

United States Federal Reserve Jim Haskell South Korea Ned Davis Bridgewater Bridgewater Associates Financial Times Andrew Bianco Bianca Research Canada India VPI Tesla Bob Prince Banksie
What Will 2021 Hold For U.S. Climate Diplomacy?

Environment: NPR

03:52 min | 6 d ago

What Will 2021 Hold For U.S. Climate Diplomacy?

"What does the president's decision to leave? The Paris Agreement meant for Climate Science Rebecca Hersher is with NPR's clients. I'm science team, good morning becky good morning. So, we have this agreement that the US has now out of but two hundred other countries are still in it. How is humanity broadly doing on carbon emissions? Well humidity broadly is not doing great when you look at the hard numbers that scientists look at, it's bad. Global emissions are still going up, which is a nightmare if you studied global warming because the earth is already about two degrees Fahrenheit hotter than it was last century. So humans are on track for catastrophic warming in the next few decades. Okay how is the US specifically doing? Well to answer that I want to go back a little bit. So if you add up all the co two in other carbon that countries have spouted since industrialization, the US has omitted the most and I, think that's really important because the US emissions have been going down slightly for a while now but they've never fallen really dramatically and that's different from European countries, which also omitted a lot of carbon historically but had slashed their missions in the last few decades. So there's another piece of context here. That is really important, which is that president trump announced three and a half years ago that he was going to pull the US out of this agreement. Today. November, it'll be official but in the meantime in those three and a half years have his administration's policies led to more climate emissions. It's a good question. It's hard to be definitive, but here's what scientists say it probably made a difference. So the US promised under the Paris agreement to reduce emissions by about twenty-five percent by twenty twenty-five most analysts say that if the policies of the Obama administration is like limits from on emissions from cars and trucks and power plants if those it continued for the last four years, the country would likely be on track for that goal. Instead, the US seems to be looking at more like a sixteen or seventeen percent decrease in emissions, which is not insignificant. How is the US on track to reduce emissions by sixteen seventeen percent if the federal government and its policies are working in the opposite direction? Right, I think that's a really interesting question. So one thing is that the global economy is changing. Renewable Energy is getting cheaper. The market for electric vehicles is growing so that cut some emissions right off the bat and more than half of US state say they're trying to meet the twenty twenty, five percent goal that the US originally set under the Paris Agreement and especially in the last year, there's been a huge movement by corporations promising to decarbonised their operations and that's become a really big question in the science community where they're trying to model future warming. And asking this interesting question, which is what will be the main driver of emissions reductions in the next ten years will it actually be national policies? The things we tend to focus on the Paris Agreement or will it be corporate policies state policies even city policies? Oh I bet the engine, the answers to that will be interesting and let me ask you Leslie say Joe Biden Does Win the election could he put the US back in the Paris climate agreement? Yes yes. So As we said we'll be formerly out the day after the election president trump wins a second term. The US will remain out of the agreement US missions will fall slowly if. He said he will reenter. He can do that. As soon as he takes office. If he wins, the big thing would be trying to work with Congress to pass new renewable energy and transportation policies, and that would have to happen pretty quickly to avoid the most catastrophic warming. Rebecca Hersher with NPR's climate team. Thanks becky. Thanks so

United States Paris President Trump Rebecca Hersher NPR Donald Trump Becky Congress Federal Government Joe Biden Official Twenty Twenty Obama Administration Leslie
Sebene Selassie on Bringing Mindfulness into Every Part of Our Lives

Untangle

05:24 min | 6 d ago

Sebene Selassie on Bringing Mindfulness into Every Part of Our Lives

"Seven it is such a pleasure to have you on untangled today. Thank you so much for being with us. Thank you, Patricia for having me. I want to start by asking you a little bit about your childhood. So why don't you tell us what were you like as a ten year old girl? How would you describe yourself? Wow ten years old. So I was born in Ethiopia. My mom was GPO Oban, my dad's Airtran, and we came to this country when I was three. And we moved into a very white upper middle class neighborhood in Washington northwest. Upper northwest DC, and at ten years old I would say I was pretty confused though. I lived at home, which was not very assimilated. So we ate you in food my parents spoke to us in. Iraq, we were part of that point small community of Ethiopian xlt now DC the DC areas large huge argest community business country. But at that time, there were only a few families and. We were all pretty tight and then my world of the neighborhood and school was very white, very upper middle class and it was confusing to move between those two worlds. So I was a Latchkey kid both my parents worked a so at ten years old coming home and spending time with my intellectually disabled sister who I felt pretty responsible for even though she's four years older than me. And I was learning how to navigate these two worlds, the world of home and Ethiopian culture and then the world of school and American media I watched a lot of TV I think I learned a lot about the culture around me from TV in popular culture, which probably not the best place to start understand your life and world so shy introverted. I was smart but did not do well in school at all at that age, and honestly, if there could have been a diagnosis at the time I was probably really depressed or at least Melancholic I. Think it had to do a lot with not understanding how these two different realities together he added. So in writing because at ten years old to feel that split between. Your experience at home in your experience at school can be so overwhelming and do you feel like you tried to Numb your feelings and just do what you need to do every day help your sister go to school what was your experience going through that time in your life I was very athletic kid at that age probably found a lot of release and any joy through sports through climbing trees through riding my bike riding skateboards soberly through my body and I lost that in my early adolescence, which is interesting. That was probably where could find a sense of belonging or connection. But in terms of school and relationships, I was a tomboy. So I didn't fit in with my girlfriends I remember going to sleepovers and friends wanting to play Barbie or dolls, and I just had no interest in that whatsoever. And I in a neighborhood full of boys. So I think I took a lot of refuge in physical play in activity and when I didn't have that I remember being numbed by television I watched a lot of TV as a kid they wanna get to this later the themes of your upcoming book and these themes of belonging and identity, and it's so interesting that. Your world was so focused on this kind of split identity as you were growing up and I think I've read that you started learning to meditate when you were a teenager is that right? What was your first experience there? Yeah. My brother, who's eight years older than me was probably as confused terms of his sense of identity and he became what's colloquially known as. Now, when I was fifteen or sixteen So my first introduction to eastern religions and spirituality and philosophy was through him and he was reading the I ching back of Gita and. Also had some Buddhist books at the time. So I started reading those things also started going to the street temple in downtown DC where a lot of punk rock kids hang out too. So it was kind of a cool scene at that point and started going to Cure Thanh chanting going to lectures and started to meditate very berry intermittently I didn't know what was doing. So by the time I got to my first year university, I started taking religion classes and ended up majoring in religious studies with a focus on Hindus men but. My entry way into, but just philosophy and thought was through that.

Patricia Iraq DC Ethiopia Airtran Cure Thanh Washington Northwest Latchkey Argest
How To Bring Mindfulness Into Every Part Of Our Lives

Untangle

03:51 min | 6 d ago

How To Bring Mindfulness Into Every Part Of Our Lives

"Seven it is such a pleasure to have you on untangled today. Thank you so much for being with us. Thank you, Patricia for having me. I want to start by asking you a little bit about your childhood. So why don't you tell us what were you like as a ten year old girl? How would you describe yourself? Wow ten years old. So I was born in Ethiopia. My mom was GPO Oban, my dad's Airtran, and we came to this country when I was three. And we moved into a very white upper middle class neighborhood in Washington northwest. Upper northwest DC, and at ten years old I would say I was pretty confused though. I lived at home, which was not very assimilated. So we ate you in food my parents spoke to us in. Iraq, we were part of that point small community of Ethiopian xlt now DC the DC areas large huge argest community business country. But at that time, there were only a few families and. We were all pretty tight and then my world of the neighborhood and school was very white, very upper middle class and it was confusing to move between those two worlds. So I was a Latchkey kid both my parents worked a so at ten years old coming home and spending time with my intellectually disabled sister who I felt pretty responsible for even though she's four years older than me. And I was learning how to navigate these two worlds, the world of home and Ethiopian culture and then the world of school and American media I watched a lot of TV I think I learned a lot about the culture around me from TV in popular culture, which probably not the best place to start understand your life and world so shy introverted. I was smart but did not do well in school at all at that age, and honestly, if there could have been a diagnosis at the time I was probably really depressed or at least Melancholic I. Think it had to do a lot with not understanding how these two different realities together he added. So in writing because at ten years old to feel that split between. Your experience at home in your experience at school can be so overwhelming and do you feel like you tried to Numb your feelings and just do what you need to do every day help your sister go to school what was your experience going through that time in your life I was very athletic kid at that age probably found a lot of release and any joy through sports through climbing trees through riding my bike riding skateboards soberly through my body and I lost that in my early adolescence, which is interesting. That was probably where could find a sense of belonging or connection. But in terms of school and relationships, I was a tomboy. So I didn't fit in with my girlfriends I remember going to sleepovers and friends wanting to play Barbie or dolls, and I just had no interest in that whatsoever. And I in a neighborhood full of boys. So I think I took a lot of refuge in physical play in activity and when I didn't have that I remember being numbed by television I watched a lot of TV as a kid

Patricia Iraq Airtran Ethiopia Washington Northwest Latchkey Argest
Escaping monogamy

Ladies, We Need To Talk

04:59 min | Last week

Escaping monogamy

"Women are more sexually liberated than we've ever been, but in spite of. Work, nece. The majority of his still believe in monogamy monogamy means the search is over. You'll here now arrived where it's safe, secure and familiar. But if we admit it, it can also get kind of well. Being polite, he bit kind of repetitive. After you find someone, you think he's Jesus settle down with its completely assumed that your in monogamous relationship. And that presumption isn't just coming from society it's coming from you. According to the Australian Study of Health and relationships ninety six percent Australians expect monogamy from themselves and their partner. But what if instead of one pot now one bed and one stupid advice to look at every morning it's two, three, four I don't know maybe five stupid faces. We're exclusive to each other people might say like, why did you bother game? Then sometimes I do think that myself. This is Khloe she's in her thirties been married for three years and with the same partner for ten. They're still working out the rules of the Pali Game. We talked about threesomes, but it never happened because like how'd you engineer that like neither of US wanted to go on the APPs because it was it would just be embarrassing like all. What if someone that we know US knows that we have sex. And then earlier this year basically all started I developed this huge crush on a friend. And it was actually really stressful. Because I was terrified that it kind of meant that I didn't love my husband anymore and maybe I wasn't supposed to be with my husband and maybe are supposed to be with this guy and my partner knew about this told them from the very beginning like, Oh, I'm having these squishy feeling. So this guy and I was very honest about all of it, but then the more intense feelings. The more stressful. It became because like I said I was worried. That it meant that I needed to get a divorce. I'm been in therapy for a long time and I remember me telling the therapist, all of this and her being like I'm just going to tell you something all of these feelings your feelings have got nothing to do with your relationship with your husband. It's all on you and I was like say. It. Just needed to say that because I was so scared and I think talking about that with other women like we all get crushes and it doesn't mean that you've made the wrong decision. So, yeah. That didn't go anywhere but then old friend of mine called me around my birthday happy birthday. Then a couple of days later he text me and invited me over to his place and I showed my husband this text and I was like isn't it with like we don't see each other often I've never been to his house before yet he's inviting me over. Do you think is like trying to sleep with me and my partner was like Nah sounds like he wants to hang out and have a few drinks and I said Okay Should I continue with this story? This is where interesting. So I went to this guy's house. So I, my PJ's I really didn't think that he wanted to have sex with me. And we sat up and we were talking for ages and we're watching telly and he just suddenly turned. Hey. So I can't get Netflix on this. TV. In the lounge room but I can get it on my laptop. This question like watch TV in bed together is that too weird and I was like, oh no, that's fine. So we lay down in bed and I was like as far away as I could possibly get from him on the other side of the bed and we sat there and we watched about twenty minutes of Queer Eye. And he was like, can I just I just? Can you come a bit closer? If. That's a good idea and he was like why and I was like because I think if we touch than, we might have sex and he was like, would that be? And then weakest, and then we had sex. And it was very intense like that was the first time I'd had sex anyone side from my partner. In ten years. It was intense. What about your husband does he had any? Yeah. He doesn't tell me unless I ask I think because he knows that it it makes me feel icky by also know that that aching. US. Get smaller with time like when I first found out, they had slept with someone. I, was on a train. Carriage on a drain. And he text me Tomiichi I. Yelled like what the fuck? Everyone in the. ME. And I couldn't I kind of couldn't stop laughing because I was so shocked. I mean he's a sexy man. Obviously I, love him I married him but it was just so weird to thing that he actually likes let with someone else. And it felt horrible. And I got off the train and he met me and I just. I I couldn't stop laughing. So. Like I moved through their emotions pretty quickly obviously shock I. But then it was funny and then it felt a bit gross. Then it was kind of sexy which I didn't see coming at all.

Partner United States Australian Study Of Health Netflix Khloe Engineer
ON The Frontlines Of The Youth Climate Strikes

PODSHIP EARTH

05:53 min | Last week

ON The Frontlines Of The Youth Climate Strikes

"This week we go to the frontlines of the youth climate strike movement. There are hundreds of protests going on all around the world today as young people, school children from Australia to Iceland come together to protest about what they're calling the crisis of their lifetime climate change. Of course, what they see is politicians inability or unwillingness to do anything about it to the global protests that is underway right now, students and workers all around the world of flooding the streets demanding action on climate change, Maggie, Rulli that a demonstration in London with the latest Michael with thousands of protesters, right underneath parliament, and what's so striking besides just the sheer size of protesters here are. The age of people who are demonstrating almost all of them are students that's hiding just nine years old. We spoke to a group of seventeen year olds who said they're here today to fight for their future. Now, the goal of this strike, really all these strikes around the world it's a send a clear message to world leaders ahead of the UN climate summit happening this week in New York climate change protests happening right now in lower Manhattan this is video from chopper four showing the massive crowd marching from Foley Square the courthouses down to the battery among the people flooding city streets were students who were allowed to skip class today to join this 'cause. I told with Jerome Foster. who had seven sounded watching documentaries about our planet go activated and started climate blogging creating virtual reality platforms social justice. He's now eighteen has been climate striking for eighty one weeks in front of the white. House. He founded one million of us to get youth to vote this November Jerome is one of eleven million people from over one hundred and forty countries the climate striking and skipping school to tell us we need to act now. I stopped by asking Jerome where he is now. I'm visiting New York City I just moved here for college, but I was born and raised in Washington DC. I'm going to college at Peace University and Columbia Columbia basically majoring in computer science specializing artificial intelligence. are distance-learning others are like mixed waken coming class in? Their dorm near the off his classes, some of them, most of my classes right now are digital. Have One. Now. So tell me about growing up in DC and kind of what led you to get into the place where you founded the organization one, million US. So where I grew up in Washington DC right around like places. And forests and those like a huge place for me to explore my neighborhood. So I kinda grew up getting in touch with nature and after years of like understanding what nature wasn't had really appreciate it. I started watching documented by astrophysics and learning about like what are world's about like what a black holes water were imposed all these cool late science things, and after that, I started watching documentaries about my own planet and how our planet fit into. Astrophysics. into the rest of the world that every time they talk about something else beautiful it's like but humans are burning it down and but. Are Continuing to extract coal and an oil and natural gas to power earth than is going to continue to see species go extinct and like that was kind of a wake up call for me understanding that our earth is actually has like trouble going on but still being like six or seven years old was like. This isn't that big of an issue. Adults are GonNa fix this adults definitely going to step up and take action but Learning later on like it didn't happen. That's that's not the story as the navy faded it. kind of grew into another understanding that like if the corruption is the unwillingness to have moral clarity won't stand up to corporations and that they don't have the political leadership to acting say, we need to hold you accountable and like as older I was like, how can I get into? Really. Getting their attention actually taking action when my friends kind of toby lunch table they're like, Hey, you should start into pitch. Okay. Cool. So like for sixth seventh and Eighth Grade I posted every single day. and. Like facts and got to like and I was like I got to convince that climate change because back then like global warming is a hoax and everyone believed that that was the big struggle and like today it's not that same conversation. It's about how do we take action but back then it was all about is it real? And I did that for six eighth grade in ninth grade I trying to transition. To. More technology and building I reality environments. So I mean when you say like it's ten years, it has been view like if he started when you seven that. Yeah. I started virtuality company called Vr, and basically it was the idea that like we can use virtuality. Gaming Place, but actually civic engagement accident building empathy only a few people will be able to see it because it's so expensive to create and it's so hard. Tribute it out. So I, kind of transition into. into journalism and it was because I started watching my documentaries again. It was Leonardo DiCaprio's before the flood and like in the last five minutes he said we need commentators then covered as if it's a lot we need young people we need people to come out here and start talking about time change in a new way. So I was like I can do that. There's like I'm I'm I'm with around blood so like two hours. Later I I email my English teacher in accurate a blog called the climb reporter and one hundred, sixty, five articles like eight months and determine about climate change from east perspective sounds like we need young people in this movement because our future is directly at stake people will say their children's children but we're the Stojan. At this point we waited fifty years to take action. Our Future. Now,

Jerome Foster. Washington Dc Manhattan UN United States Leonardo Dicaprio Australia Michael London Reporter Foley Square Maggie Iceland Rulli Toby Columbia Columbia Peace University
"ten years" Discussed on TechFan

TechFan

01:30 min | 8 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on TechFan

"And these companies that create these programs became very wealthy. I would submit that. There isn't any company a software developer. That's become. I'm very wealthy. Because of their success on the IPAD with one exception games I think gaming companies is on the IPAD or the only ones that are seeing any kind of big success. And even when I say big success maybe if it's an apple arcade otherwise I think most developers gallopers most developers ninety five percent of them are probably breaking. Even if that selling anything I would say most of the now. I'll probably making more money. Because they've been out to take those mobile games that run on the IPAD and Portland's an Nintendo switch can charge four times the price. Yes absolutely is that right. Did you see the switch just packs the Super Nintendo. It's now the number three selling in fact not only did it pass for Nintendo become the third bestselling and it will eventually take number one. It will pass any acid in the we will excuse me. It also passed the xbox one which has been out for seven years the switch has been out for three years and it just passed F.. There's no slowing down the switch. It's fantastic gaming. But the onto jr as I said for the developers that is the switch has a very active online store. Eric bledsoe apples and yet you can take your game you can put it and instead of selling it for.

Nintendo Eric bledsoe software developer apple Portland
"ten years" Discussed on TechFan

TechFan

12:38 min | 8 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on TechFan

"I am David Code David up and down up and down. That's not what challenges this week vacation. Coming up a couple of weeks leaks county Florida so looking forward to that Florida. Nice to come visit my mum. She winter's over here as you know because it's yours. It's your tools birthday as well as this year is mind fifty five Oh so is also my mother's seventieth so but we are going to have a joint family celebration shing. When is your birthday April April? So I've got you by a few mine was What what is it two weeks ago a week two weeks ago? Yeah weirdly enough some people saying hey timmy on facebook fifty s a new forty. No it's not it is not the new forty. Yeah because I just just from the the wear and tear on the body thing my body does not feel like eight did when he was forty no and when it was not it didn't feel like he was God. No no and I don't even remember the twenties so you know with this show started when we were forty. Yeah and now. We're both well I am and you're almost fifty so hey welcome to a decade of Tech Fan. Get getting gracefully gracefully grumpy adults get a little bit You know what else in. Here's how this is kind of funny a big topic this week as we're GonNa talk about pretty much the whole show. I think but we'll get to some other topics but big focus is going to be on the IPAD because apple made the announcement in. I believe it was January. Twenty seventh twenty ten a decade ago and then in April of that year They came out with the IPAD. Yeah go ahead. I got one for my fortieth birthday. My family and I bought one as well. How and I got the immediately I bought one and I knew I was going to get one The funny thing is this. This show is ten years old now or technically will be later in the year. But it's twenty twenty so it's Tanner's excuse me. I was actually doing autopsy radio at the time and I devoted a whole forty minute show to the IPAD. My first impressions and I haven't listened to back. I don't know if I will or not I was thinking about listening to it Priority recording this show so I can kind of refresh my memory a little bit of my thoughts originally an IPAD. But the I. I'm pretty sure I remember most of them But that was you know ten years ago. It doesn't doesn't seem like a yeah. Well that's that's when things by gang holders the UH you know I'll say as the years go by they tend to blur together. A little bit But actually the original IPAD. This is where Israeli realizes changed quite a lot has had got better. It got worse stayed the same. Is that fair. I think so but it has a relatively aggressive development particularly if you compared ed to what's happened in the in the Mac in the same period I would say the aggressiveness doesn't necessarily IPAD. I think it's Iowa's in mobile computing. Because if you look at the iphone phone and twenty ten in the iphone now it's the trajectories almost the same if not more aggressive with the iphone because iphones generally a year ahead of of the IPAD. Whatever happens on the IPHONE? This year is what you'll see next year on the IPAD. Yeah on the on. The iphone definitely gets oversee gets a regular upgrade. Every gave with the IPAD has been longer and then the MAC has been even long story. Mac is almost. It's almost a dereliction of duty at this point with the Makah an apple But let's go back ten years. I remember when the IPHONE was released. I I was at macworld Expo that year. Two thousand seven with me and a bunch of other The My crew which you report of them but you weren't actually at that San Francisco. It was the follow again the The MAC vocab enhancement The I've is there with you and so I remember when the iphone announcement hit and sitting there in the crowd and watching and it was. It was a seminal moment. It's one of those rare times that you can look back and go while that really did change everything that that announcement in two thousand seven changed Eh. Everything not just for apple and for people like you and I that were really heavy and attack but it had worldwide consequences And and we could. This whole show could be nothing but the influence of the iphone on what's changed. We could have multiparty to that series so the IPHONE was released. We got a couple of different iterations at that point. I think we are on the IPHONE. Maybe the iphone four because it phone three now the the iphones the iphone three Jay. And then there's a three. Yeah Yeah So. I think we're right between the three GS and the four. This is right in that timeframe when Steve Jobs took the stage and presented the iphone or the IPAD and it was It was an odd product when apple announced it. Uh a lot of people thought. We'll go ahead. I was GonNa say if you remember the time that was I. Guess from from the release of the three GS the previous year. I remember the four in two thousand and ten to four was actually announce a ww DC. So that was quite an aggressive times. Timescale timescale so that the iphone. The IPAD came before that I remember when the three GS came out. There was a massive rumor mill. that a tablet was coming from apple and by the made the announcement. It was well expected though. We didn't know what it was GONNA be. I remember the time everyone thought I was going to be. Based on the Manque. Your that was a big rumer. Everybody was like this is going to be a Mac based on that and everyone thought it was gonna be over at least over a thousand dollars. Yeah and and that's kind of what people were waiting for. And so when you said Steve came out I did probably a par beep. I would site behind the IPHONE announcement. Probably one of the best keynotes. He's ever done. Because I think this was a product that was so much in his wheelhouse. And if you go back I can read the history of the IPHONE development. They thought of the IPAD. I wanted to do the IPAD. I but the technology wasn't there to do it at the time. Something that large something that they could manufacture for for a decent price so they actually did the iphone. I so the IPAD was always the first idea behind this product. And so when he came out he did this you know remember. He did the the thing where he was just sat in a chair using it showing everything off on it and he was just kind of relaxing in a chair. which was the whole point this about taking computing off off the desktop and certainly even off off a desk off your lap into something you held in your hands And it was. Yeah I think it was. It was probably one of his best behind the IPHONE. which oversees is I think is probably the best one ever did and yeah we we were blown away by everything? He showed US especially when it came to the price because it was half the price we're expecting and we thought this amazing thing was going to the way out of range price was it was it. Was I forget I mean how did he confess. I think round about the same process an iphone. Yeah it was yeah But it was about half the price of the cheapest ibook at the time the cheapest apple laptop but yet it ran the exactly the same now. They've split over over time now the IPAD. Os in the in IOS have split the phone the IPAD OS are slightly different. There's the same code base. Don't get me wrong but it's different and because it was the same os then you could run. Every single iphone application application. Because remember the APP store was had been released. It was doing extremely well especially in games and stuff like that so apple says well this is gonNA run the IPAD or the irs from the IPHONE. It's the same operating system and you could use the iphone applications but remember number ahead that to X. thing that's right so you push a button and it filled the screen and quite honestly look like ass So iphone developers had had to optimize their APPs to run on the IPAD. And I remember that was there was every week there was some new application that you loved on the iphone that was released now for the ipad as well and Oh thank God because now it's going to be big it's GonNa be the graphics are GonNa Look Better. Yeah and this was the yeah when apple really push developers towards different screen sizes unraveling these targeting the standard iphone screen size because this was also so the year the IPOD iphone four came out which obviously had arrested the dispute so and a half times more pixels in the show so so everybody redo their programs anyway and this was really apple stuffed. It's a kind of build on the APP store as a as a as a multi multi he platform environment for developing APPs in which is another small feet. But I I think a lot of people don't when you're looking at the history of of IOS iphone and IPAD. They don't really stop and consider especially in the early days that it was really a complex thing. The apple was creating with worldwide developers to to support two different devices to have legacy support and to Google all this basically from the ground up within just three years and nobody else has pulled this. Nobody you look at what Google of tried to to do with android tablets and it's just been a disaster android tablet. I'll just not really a thing. Yeah I mustn't hasn't pulled it off because they've just got one tablet platform and and And so so it's easy for them because they're they're running a fork of android and they control control of that and it feels clunky. Yeah it's clunky. It is clunky. The the best APPs on the on the kindle fire tablets so the Amazon one because they're the ones specifically specifically written for it and then and then you look without a buck softest tried to move windows into this in trying to pull this off with windows these two or three times now and they're still trying to do it will surface with with yeah the surface devices and then these new things that are coming out this year that they would. They the folding screen. That's still trying to find a middle ground between a bridge between windows and mobile and of course they know actually in mobile labeled cells anymore. No no that's what. That's what Steve. How that's how? We presented the IPOD. These he said we felt we feel. There is a gap between aid the macbook and the iphone what could fill it and that was his kind of the structure of his presentation of Philip. I remember the big criticism. The big response from most of the tech press at the time when it came house wells. Well it's just a big IPHONE. What I remember talking about in that episode of ODBC ABC Radio? That I said it's just a big iphone as if it was going to be negative thing but I distinctly remember. You're saying really. And yes that's the best part it is. It's a big IPHONE. It does everything that the iphone Oregon does exceptionally okay. Well on the interface that you know most humans can you and it's not an actual phone. We forget it without big even without big funds. Nowadays we forget how tiny the original iphone screen so three and a half inches. I don't remember congressional have mine. You know what I mean..

apple Mac Steve Jobs timmy Florida David Code Tanner Google San Francisco Iowa
"ten years" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:15 min | 9 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Everybody so this episode of stuff to blow your mind is sponsored by the all new Mazda C X thirty which I actually just got to test drive recently in the beautiful beautiful mountains of southern California and I will say as some. We've told you on the show before we're not really car guys. We don't know a lot about cars. I'm sort of an automobile Philistine. But from on this auto Philistines heart. I will say this was a really wonderful car to drive. I truly enjoyed cruising around the mountains. In this thing. It was very smooth. It was very stylishly sung to my non Kar Heart in a way that cars usually don't so what's actually in this thing details wise so it has class leading standard horsepower horsepower and is active all wheel drive with G. veteran control plus for ultimate control and I will say there is a very special thing about this car. I have driven another car like this. When you go around a corner in it? something about it feels almost like predictive like it. You know you don't need to do like jerking around trying to correct your turn like everything in it is extremely smooth and continuous. And I think that's what's going on here but it's also got a beautiful design on the outside. Yeah Yeah I mean basically. The thirty is size to be agile in the city while still having the interior space in utility to go anywhere anytime encouraging an active life style and to your point. It's the the idea that you're not having to to wrestle the machine to get where you're going there is a. There's a meeting of the man in the machine. It's also very nice driving experience in a visual way. Where like the car doesn't have a touchscreen and a you know we're like you can see those touchscreens? Come up and kind of distract you while you're trying find navigate the the features and stuff driving instead. It's more traditional kind of command controls that you go with buttons and Levers from the steering wheel but it actually makes for a much nicer acer less distracted drive. You've got your eyes on the road. Yeah you're not playing video game the drive the car. You're driving the car but it's also got connected car features that give you convenience at safety peace of mind Got An in-car WIFI option. Remote engine start stop and door. Lock Vehicle Status Navigation Service vehicle finder automatic nine one one dialing in the event of an accident So it's really got it all and I really truly enjoy driving this.

Mazda California acer
"ten years" Discussed on Taste Of Taylor

Taste Of Taylor

02:48 min | 9 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on Taste Of Taylor

"Then I thought Oh is thank thank God somebody else. I know that got fired. I love her sore soulmates. Because I know what that feels like and then you got cast in Summer House and I was just like. Oh she's back. You know after scone gate I called Michelle said how do you think I did. And she was like I think she can like I think you do well but you can tell that you agree and I want those for some ever did radio and I wanted to pretend that I do it all the time so you would have me back and she and I was like what gave it away and she goes. I don't think you're supposed to eat like dry patients and then choke on our for two hours straight into the Mike and I was like God. I just want to look like I knew what I was doing. So I'm GONNA casually discount really impressed this girl. I love you so much. Thank you for having pigmy on. I love you so much. I'm so proud of your career and you so deserve it Hannah. You're so fucking town too. You're so good on summer house so I can't wait for you are such you're growing and rising comedian. And you are. I mean the future is so fucking bright and also your Soga podcasting and you're so smart in the way you approach things. I remember when you came on the radio. Show you learned from me master. Thank you for my coach and then you like had this show but you were just like I'm just GonNa like sleep in and do reality. You're like no I'm GONNA have a platform. I'm going to start a podcast by the time the show airs. podcast up running you fuck an editor and podcast you book it. You work so hard you I mean. Gene millennials have a bad reputation. You are the shining light. That is the millennial. Molyneaux should all die you. I'll let you live now. I love millennials. Does I am not because I'm older I'm just pointing at me. I realize you don't fight the younger generation time this shit. I speak of silver climbing If you WanNa see me Andrew Collin who's been great on this podcast. He shows episode and he isn't Wa Gascoyne Puddles he We have a show that sold out at the sand and in January. Can I come back. I don't know it'll be tough to get you got if we show on Feb in February as well so you can get tickets with February show and I'm in DC This January twenty second. Get tickets there's a couple of left and also guys like I said burning in hell fantastic podcast and hunter Samir. She's hysterical at being burns. And you can catch her every Monday Albatross shirker show and you also need to start full co hosting more because the this is magical. I Love Review. Oh I love you because that's it for us to follow me on social media at Taylor's trucker and also make sure to rate review and subscribe to the podcast. Tell your friends. Let's spread this shoot. Shoot around the world help me get confident needs affirmation and like I don't know if the weight loss can happen and I definitely can't go back in time like Benjamin Button and get younger so the only thing you guys is that I have to be rich so help maybe rich I love you all. I'll be back next week bye bye..

Michelle Summer House Andrew Collin Molyneaux Benjamin Button Mike hunter Samir editor Taylor
"ten years" Discussed on Taste Of Taylor

Taste Of Taylor

16:11 min | 9 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on Taste Of Taylor

"Three zero at thirty six almost thirty seven. I don't Own a house. I don't have children. I'm not married I'm divorced. It's like it and I also feel like money wise career wise. I think everyone's like you're crushing and I'm doing great but like I want to be doing bad taste. Tae Is thirty two who I'm an older woman. Luckily she likes them old and she likes Chubby. Okay so anyway okay. So speaking of speaking of a jolly good christm- okay. So I'm thirty seven so when on instagram. The ten year challenge came out I was enraged and furious and but I just kept it all inside and I I feel. Society is always pitting all women against each other and I felt like the ten year challenge men first of all they really do get better with age. It's so fucking unfair most of them but like with women. It's like the tenure challenge. That's a fun game unless like you're Jaylo or fucking Jennifer Aniston. It's like in what world will any woman really feel like. She looks her best ten years later men years later. Okay okay so I was like really I was. I was against the ten year challenge. I ignored it. It's fun you should 'cause if something's triggering you online don't yes I I'm twenty eight. I look so much better than I did it. Here's the thing this is what this who tenure challenges for. It's for women who are in their late thirties. Early forties maybe even fifties who like our genetic aliens. Yeah and look better now than they ever talks or whatever or even just age gracefully. If you're tall and thin you kind of age fucking awesome. I because as I look at my friends now who are like really spectacular like Taylor will never mind girl from. We'll never be unattractive so she's elegant will always be and because so she's fucking six feet tall in like a string bean you know. I definitely peaked in my late twenties early thirties. I I have like a young face I have. I have like a like a feminine body so for me agents going to be rough. I'm just saying you know what's crazy. My mom had I'd like was a curvy woman had me and I changed her body. Type you bitch. She snow but she said that she all the Touching my network. And you don't have to do the sleep.

Jennifer Aniston Taylor
"ten years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

05:37 min | 9 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Aw and why that was avenue in five bucks just decide to move real slow. So we'll begin. saw ratcheted second so imagine renton is causing statement where we talk about all these different sort things stories that are going across the world and how our lack of laws and enforcing those laws laws against people who walk around stores is causing chaos amongst the world and it was guys we'd be taking it a little more space but we can't even get gun control because why we never into control right so the tangible goals in one another tangible goals. I think there's a lot of these. Sores regulated get off the street people in impeach him some classes about how will the sword and real responsibly. Because right now you can go to any comic CON Convention. Whatever grab when he's quote unquote replica? Swords and just be walking around stabbing people within minutes. There's no registration there's no Task for proficiency We don't keep like a list of Mosey sores or nothing and I think that's a big. That's a big problem. Sneeze a seventeen year old mister threatening another team with a Samurai sword over one hundred dollars Singapore unhappy that an eighteen year old. Oh Oh okay let me scroll down happy that an eighteen year old. His brother a hundred dollars a seventeen year old confronted with Semi Sore One night last September Muhammad uh-huh Leaf Moustapha admitted to one charge of criminal intimidation on Thursday. The court heard that he or she the sword inside the victim's home jurong east threatening to slash lashed older boy with the twenty seven meter weapon. if he did not come out of the house his charge sheet stays that Zach. Words come down with us if not I'll stab. You did say literally elite. who was sent to a juvenile home and twenty seventeen for commission in House? Trespass and theft may face imprisonment for his current charge. We're giving his young age. Debbie Prosecutor Angela. Hang call for probation suitability ability report before making representations. I'm like I mentioned one dollars. That's a lot of money it is. I mean we were just stab someone number five. I could see why you would want to stab someone over one hundred. That's why you shouldn't have a sore elite who was not represented by a lawyer requested to be placed on probation instead of giving jail time. My mother's not working I. I am the only support from my mother. District Judge agreed to the probation suitability report to be prepared and journey for the man on January. Thirtieth finishing He also claimed that the soil was actually just scared of victim. which I mean? That's probably true. I'd be scared of Nagata. So but You know wasn't there was trying to scare somebody with it and trying to kill them with it either one I. I can't be assuming assuming when you pull out like Oh scary it. I can't be assuming you know So yeah somebody out his brother some money so he asked for his friends between the ages of seventeen. Twenty one to meet him at Was this this Jason Mohammad Yassin. Daniel Rosalyn to meet a Yeltsin's flat to support him as he planned to confront Yassin Seen he decided to bring along the source so that he could use scare. You're saying and repaying the debt while the void deck of Yassin's blocked the group spotted a friend of him to get you to carry down to come down to meet him the free man he's pretty duplicitous. That was involved in this. They should charge this back luring to do down the free taxi I said. But there's there's no reply so they went up to his unit shattering come out yesterday. Opened the gate to unify and a Ruckus at the time at that point two members of at least company and Seventeen hundred eighteen against shouting Yeltsin about their own personal grievances against him. Oh he oh everybody's money he's taken the money. What does she say about my sister son? What isn't it don cut in? A fit of anger leave then unsheathed his sword indirect today housing threatening to slashing if you did not step out of his unit to talk things out. Well I'm gonNA tell you the coming out. Yeah I don't come. Natural pulled a sword out. That's eighty hours. Yeah I'm a lot less likely to come out. I don't think you WanNa talk frightening. I title legal aid needed five minutes to use the WASHROOM. I Oh okay major. Let me take a real quick because my parents are full of shit frightened he say okay. So you're seeing the doors unit. Cada police like a smart person. The group flare when they notice police cars in a car parked nearby but they were later traced interested. Dale one hundred dollars I get it but hale all right. That's it for today. So thank you so much for listening. Thank you I'm glad I show can be anything you want it to be and ten ten years down in hold only like I think this is a great. Alcohol is a great episode to put the proof A we can do whatever we want to. Apparently because our fifty minutes of this was nothing but seriously thank alpha listener and we appreciate. Ah well wishes and condolences to Karen And Our thoughts and stuff. So thank you and we'll let you guys know Or if you don't see more shows during the wine maybe traveling and stuff so you know I until next time I love you I love you..

Jason Mohammad Yassin Yeltsin renton Singapore Debbie Prosecutor Angela Leaf Moustapha theft Nagata Dale Karen Zach hale Daniel Rosalyn
"ten years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

05:19 min | 9 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"We are friends now now and I got people like I have got people I talk to maybe every four to five years but we taught we taught hager how you doing. Okay how you doing click and we. We are who we see each other again and as I understand that's a different love languages and other people trying to invalidate holiday. They love what I'm saying is the lack of understanding to the fact that we don't all have to connect on that level. We don't we're not all going to have these grand rained friendships. You know I look at my facebook. Hey I don't have to have like five or ten. Maybe that's okay you know. It's not that happen. Awesome happened to me. That's five ten people might they will probably show up or at least college check on me or something right. They know something wrong. There's a lot of people that aren't that way and I'm not holding it against is there but when you see like people expect this shit out of people as other folks don't have fucking lives man. I like why aren't you dropping everything and reading eating my passive aggressive facebook status in stopping coming over my house. That's not what the fuck happened. Twelve I think a lot of people treat friendships like like they did when they was in school. We're best friends. We got to go together. Walk together talk together. We got to be up each other as time. And if you don't treat me like that you're not a friend right. People people have motherfucking lives. It reminds you of that. Yeah of like fifth grade when you get your first best friend. People's definition is you do is just being each of the time it's like Dr. I'm I'm not GonNa be on the phone with you every day and at the same time I understand. That's what you need is just can't come from me not not but it's the weird judgment entitlement that I am expressing of that that I do find lie down. This is really turned a lot of us in the like really selfish self absorbed people who are constantly. Try to put our own light loneliness on everybody else. I own like insecurities. It's all. Oh everybody else to fix input. I know and that book conflict is not abuse and talk about people that have been victims of trauma and stuff. And it's like look win once you've been in the traumatic experience you live with this trauma by people. We live with it all the time right trauma at some point though it is your thing to deal with yes. It is and so you can't always function or be trusted to lead and Shit if you lead from a place of unresolved trauma trauma I but we've been able to reverse the polarity on that online and be like the person does the most traumatize have the most power in the most. Say so we wouldn't don't do that any other if you work at a job and somebody was like. I had racism happen to me one day and I never got over it. They wouldn't be able to walk into your job and be Eli okay. So because some racist she happened to me one day all the white people get the fuck out. We've like what no you can't manage cannot but online you can you can do that. You can kind of flip it to be like you know this thing happen to me. I'll never forgive this group of people. Everyone needs to act accordingly. Hey anytime you guys bring up this topic. I don't feel good so you gotta stop talking about it like that's not think that that has enabled us to really be like these quote unquote friendships. We talk about two. They're not really Because when we get to these moments a conflict it's over you know and I think that's really not good. It's not good. It's not healthy healthy And people are not like I said if people are not checklist and people aren't like you could afford it up though in tragic trashed forget Just can't do that but people do this all the time and is devastated. These can be devastating to people like you you know and it causes hurt. People continue to hurt people like like. That's the two statement but that's a real thing Yeah says the way we talk about. Friendship depends ugly patriots of the new notion of relating one seeks maximum return on minimum investment and allies in our exit strategy. Anytime a friend for fill our fantasies. These post reveal more about the toxicity of our society than a negative describing is a friendship as a capitalistic exchange instead of relationships relationships involving people who care about each other hanging out a helping each other through ups and downs house is enough to make you wanna cry into a beer with a confidante close friend kind is going out of town. Yeah Yeah and also I think for me I don't know if it's a generational thing saying but sometimes is nothing like hearing somebody's voice because so many people do on Lonzo much. Nah sometimes let me are you okay. Let me hear Your Voice your options. They physically see your face was again different love language. Some people need that. You know. I'm not necessarily. You GotTa Call Me and be talk. I don't i. I think there's been some chances sometimes where I reached that level. I might well. Maybe if I talk to this person right I understand maybe proceed as person and you know what sometimes their trauma so deep. It wasn't even matter you know but you know different. Love languages. Transacting relationships take for example..

facebook hager Lonzo Eli
"ten years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

12:53 min | 9 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Our female We don't have a non binary thing or anything on this one and is amazing. How a lot of the stuff? Asian in target date dare to embed about talk initiate towards women before why they act like women just fucking didn't exist. Yeah a lot of these. Ads Are Harry's razors razors and shit like that. Right Bevo was something where we had to be like. Hey women could use a student now. I work I shaved it before it was good. Good thirty four million women. Listen to podcast in two thousand. Eighteen is a lot of women is this is sixty eight percent more likely for podcast listening to have a postgraduate graduate degree. I mean mostly very highly educated. Yeah talk at forty four forty five percent more likely for podcast listening to have a college degree looking at gender differences in pockets of education female podcast users have a higher education and income than overall US population according to the podcast analytics newsbeat. So Wow Mormon. Listen and a lot of podcasts. Catered them in women are the ones with the money and education some shit yeah. Yeah did you audience don't exist. Yeah and he still was funny. Is that the decision makers Komo mostly seem to chase after the male demographic Because I think that's just tradition radio and TV so the decision makers there's Impact casting are quicker to give that like if I were running network. Okay let me reach out to a man who's GonNa podcast even if what the man does. It is something that pisses women off. You know. It's like okay. We want to be a network with Joe Button. We WanNa you know we gotta get Charlemagne we gotta get ti. See Ya and women might be like fuck them. I don't like them I don't WanNa but that's the people get the money behind. No normally you know not obviously not all and there's a lot of women at that. They've got it again too but it's just funny. How male dominated a lot of the official podcast are While women are the ones listening. Yeah and then you know podcast actually catered towards women feel like we're Goddamn Wad women. Didn't they get sponsors that catered towards women and everybody is Zahn was like almost like the thing with black become out and everything. Oh Shit Nigga movie yes women like this shit too and women's Bauer like you know. We get perks prowess ignorant to ignore this whole as audience. Yeah like obviously I see our donations. I see our premium listeners. And stuff like that and I don't. I've never looked to see like exactly what the percentages of women never done a survey or anything like that but I would say that is if not fifty fifty is like slightly majority. Women probably anecdotally off the top of my head and a lot of times. People will say. Well how'd you monetize. How do you how make money? How are we are able to do that? And I think a lot of shit really is because of our natural predisposition to be light light. We Love Women. We love black people. We love our people and a lot of that to me. And it's not vache putting on airs. It's not it wasn't like a branding decision where we say. We're going to get all this money like literally. I lost a job in cameras. We should try to make money so it wasn't like bydesign but I think by happenstance or whatever a lot of how we were able to monetize because of that type of inclusive cocoa just kind of like more fair minded thing now doesn't mean that these shows are very like women bash initiate and Black Women. This and all that those shows make money to do if you look at a lot of times. They make money off of like advertisers or someone coming in and and quote unquote pain them to do what they do right which kinda takes the listener almost out of the equation but as a listener funded podcast? I know a large part of this is because you know black women feel okay given us money as a point where we do you know because we're not just out here trying to like embarrassed embarrassing them but at the same time we're not our just pandering and you know at the same time you know to go. Listen to just be a pandering podcast as me and ain't Shit me and trash ask women. Is Everything please give us your money. Please gives you. You know like we just keep it real but it is also I think Not a coincidence that we're wondering if there's black monetize like this agreed. Forty three percent pockets. Man's use spotify to listen to podcasts. Yes spotify they are game changer for people and we we said years ago these music apps a like a into podcasting blend them and spotify lycopene now where anybody can get on and that change it because now you will allow people people when people go. I got a podcast. You can go as some of my podcast and then you go you gotTa spotify. Yes is this and they can just type into title. I don't have have to have a fucking separate. I don't have to Dalo nothing new. I don't have to take because once you start taking extra steps a lot of people fucking tap out. Yeah I it's also amazing because spotify hasn't been in the game that long no it hasn't because they both people get get their pocket is normally like a phone and stuff and apple was the first people that really put podcast into like the what they do into their phones and their ipads and stuff is interesting to see that like literally early. spotify came in and boom. Now we're doing podcasts. Their original stuff and just going and cherry picking the good shows from other places and now they can just you you can just submit your feet and they'll take anybody but yeah Forty three percent is a huge amount for somebody that just hopped into the thing and plus spotify advantage of being on android and right now all the other stuff right and also the thing particularly with the apple sticky keep dishes separate which is fucking dumb combined that Let's see thirty nine percent of smart speaker owners. Listen to podcasts. At least once week I know I do six percent podcast shows are downloaded from apple The average podcast listeners describes a seven different shows weekly. I stand stupid but yeah that that makes sense because you variety taste outage to fifty two percent or podcast scribes listen to entire episodes which is much higher than over fifty podcast consumers. Listen to between seventy six six to one hundred percent of all the podcasts downloaded devices. I will never be in that percentage. I have so many downloaded. I'll never get to a mom agreed around twenty twenty six percent of the podcast listeners. Speed podcast while listening. Yeah knows no say when a listen to this show and come in late day like a while. I'm so used to a union like speed. I just listened to the normal speed. I've never spared a slowdown. Anything like that. Yeah but that means somebody out there stores right now we are the chipmunks see eight RPM you Inca yes Alvin they do do do you welcome out there listeners. On three times speed or whatever Yeah podcast listeners. Being an average of six hours was in thirty seven minutes list the podcast every week Ninety percent of podcast consumers to listen to podcasts. At home I would think most people will probably. I be listened to on commuter style but I I was doing everywhere in the car at the gym. More than half of Americans do chair chores while listening to podcast. Ask Your cleaning up. Welcome to the fold. Okay I'm in hive. I'm in Chore Hive. I ninety four percent. PODCAST consumers are active on at least one social media channel channel which is a great way for most why we tell people between about to show us. TVD WT come follow us on instagram. Come be our facebook page. We love that stuff what have us. PODCASTS pay attention to the AD which is much higher than radio. Fifty four percent. A podcast consumers say they you think about buying advertising product and thing I said that one what was the other one that There was another one that that was interesting. I think about race But it might be down there AC- fifty billion episodes have been strained or download. It from APO Monday. Tuesday wins out our best as a release a podcast. That is so true because when we do the show I can watch our feedback in on our Hashtag I I we. Do you know Saturday Sunday Monday. And then you'll see like a boom boom boom feedback feedback but you get towards the end of the week. Our people want to get off work. Mark on twitter CASS. Now we gotta get you done a lot less Thursday Friday Saturday Hashtag like I'm listening to the show So that makes total sense Let's the Amazon. Prime podcast has one hundred and fifty million active users. What probably got August August? I don't I didn't know that. What all right tasers from June? Two thousand nine hundred. I ain't no problem. Had A podcast feed two percent in a survey to mega. Say podcast are too long because you know why Americans work too fucking much time. And that's why I always say don't make your show for for everybody because the bane two hours find interesting when people get podcasting advised they always tell you make it short. I always tell you not to you. Know don't go too long not too often not this. And I'm like Dr. If the person listening to you is like upset that your show is too long Dank. The one for you know gay not. You're title audience. They really ain't fucking what you anyway. Yeah because the thing is as a podcast listener they are short. Sure Park has its did are born is look and then there are long podcast. Is the entertaining. You normally is hard to have both you know. Most people don't do both so a lot of times. People don't WanNa admit I don't like listening because you're not entertaining Dr. I've heard the truth right light honestly if I roll my eyes podcast. I'm are is because I already don't really fuck with you and you know and I mean that's just an honest thing the people I'm not naming no names but I think and the same thing for us if people look at us and go oh two hours yet. They don't really talk with her right now. Because you know what. When I listened to the morning Jones I never once like three hours of this shit? I love the morning journals. I even longer better. Yeah I was listening to the commercials and Shit you now when you know win day. lebatardshow is on and he's GonNa be on effort three hours four hours out of the middle of the day. People look forward to that time and they don't. Oh you know the radios to me way worse than podcast throwing out his product placement advertising. And and you can't make everything confine you know yes so me personally like dogs. They spoke with us They GONNA fuck with us so it's going to be as long as it needs to be you know and also is one of those things where different people's lifestyle demands different types of podcasts. For Groping for change people leave all and you have some people who like you say I have three and four hour commute back and forth to work so they love. The traffic is going to listen to. I don't have to have fourteen episodes queued up because every ten minutes Gal finished and I've binged podcast before I have to have twenty thirty minute episodes. I just threw them because I you know I have the time and if if I like it I want it all right now. You know so you know we made our show it was you know we didn't set out with a go. I remember the first episode is US say Ashort it was GonNa be twenty minutes. It was how short it was GONNA be. We weren't gonNA talk about politics. Yeah we were just go have fun you know it and look at what the show came. Because you don't know you know another thing I would point out man be consistent. You know pick that thing you can do it when you pick that that thing that you can stick to..

spotify Black Women US apple Bevo Harry official Komo Joe Button Charlemagne facebook Zahn Bauer Sure Park twitter Amazon
"ten years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

12:07 min | 9 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"I listened to the Black Guy who tips podcast because Rawdon Karen Hearts for blacks widely assumed to be guilty of a range of promiscuity. Temperance was an issue that under my stereotypes for black women reformers their membership in such organizations as WCTC. You forget what this carbon women's temperance. I was all clues was important. For for another reason that public association Asian with elite White Women Reformer Sir to affirm their own true womanhood. It was no coincidence. That at the time of the night's meeting at W C T U organization Shelby Shelby County Attorney. General made a rare backhanded declaration of moral equivalency between black and white women. The precise context of the statement is unclear earlier but according to an article I wrote in a response the Attorney General had proclaimed that black women were no longer the Harlot S- they had been in the past they could. It'd be as decent or disgraceful as white women. Well not thought not. Not Appreciative of the positive sentiment wrote a mouse corrective active. That was published in the white-owned Memphis Scimitar a Republican paper as well as the New York Freeman black women. She said we're not consoled by the knowledge aristocratic circles furnished parallel examples of immorality the most disheartening aspect of race relations was the wholesale contention was defamation of black women. Me and the refusal to believe there are among us. Mothers wives and maidens who have attained a true noble and Refining Womanhood Ida added that she only wanted them to be given giving equal credit for their virtues. Hey welcome to the blackout test. PODCAST host rod carrying and we are alive on eight Monday sir. Of course you can find items stitcher. Paramedics searched the black guy who tibbs leave us. Five star reviews the official as a weapon of the show is take an unofficial sport. What about bullet ball And that expert that I read is from Ida sort among lions of which. I've read from several different times. And that's interesting that to me Eh. That that like that story is interesting because at once at the same time you're seeing that I And other black women are concerned about being respectable because I think one of the things people Always skip over his that respectability politics to be revolutionary politics. You know we can dress a certain way we can behave a certain way animals right. We can talk starting way because the prevailing theory was that black lack women were. I mean black. People were subservient and not just subservient but a subspecies of humanity white people being the standard and so a lot of stuff that we frown upon now and go we won't save you you'll respectability politics was stuff that literally. In addition to survival it was also like to approve. Appoint a hey we can be refined and even though you say we can't be these things and the reason. It was important because it will target in schools. That black people couldn't do it. They add sciences for -nology things like this. This is why black people are stupid and savage and and they'll never be like white people and so maybe be as of a vain attempt or maybe it was attempt in vain. It didn't work out but there was a there was a a lot of high minded people that we consider to be revolutionary. Louche Inari very forward thinking who had this way of believing at the time and I think is being glossed over. The second part is is is amazing. How okay a women's Tolerance Union or whatever it was called that organization was one narrows essentially trying to stop people from drinking this? They were the people that promoted prohibitionist auditions and stuff. Actually alcoholics anonymous still goes back to to this. These women STA and so Because of these these women they had just 'cause racism they split off into two different types of factors right. There were the white women and their racism. Were so strong they will i. Even if we you know until blacks were allowed to vote it was like even as places where we could use some black women's hell we're not gonNA take it because they kept making these assumptions that will white women will leave you know and we need the racist white women. That's more important than having more people even if because because then we you know we might have more people but when his black women some people leave and we can't have that that was a big excuse and all these white women feminist organizations for a long time so I just thought it was interesting because the affiliation and cooperation between White and black women at that time there was a mutually beneficial obviously to increase their numbers and was wacky will have the right to vote. Definitely why why we must are looking at you know because he ma uh-huh neither one of these groups could vote at the time right so white women startling in a black woman is we need this form some type of unity you know And all of a sudden you know they're they're they're allowed in there and these and these associations are good for black one because like you said they had one hundred million different clubs uh but being in a club where white women actually meant something to be like okay. You're now a member of this this this organization that's a bit more prestigious gets. It's a little bit more done. White women have the ear of white man. White may have the power financing things of that nature. So it's a really complicated thing and then for for that white man who you know. Essentially I'll share white. Women took offence to but essentially said well black women are now showing that they can be more more than just Harley. It's 'cause assumption. was that are black. Women were all overly sexually active and sexually available. It was one of the reasons that wipe me and with you know pretty much never be tried for assault of a black woman in the south. 'cause they would always argue you know no she jumped on me Janas another. I could have done nine. You know and it would and that was assumed to be common knowledge like okay. That's fine that's illegal defense. So in a way thinks he's complimented because he's never thought of black women anything else and so he's like Oh there proved and not just whores they can also be as good and as bad as a white woman. I wasn't you know they approved proved they could be virtuous they can prove. It's I'm sure white women were offended as what the fuck they're not equal to earth and I'm sure black like wildfire. Dr Even have to emphasize advertise on the bad. Why do you keep downplaying? Says it will evil creatures and Shit so anyway that was passed out maybe thinking about here in this case I want to because people still feel that way today which is really fucked up. They may not using language they might not say the same verbiage. Put it many way who feel that that same way today. Yeah it reminds me a little bit of like the organizing part of it And I I didn't obviously we don't really watch Golden Globes and pretty much any. Why award shows But I know there were Williams why actress she gave a speech at the Golden Globes and there was like a big deal. People were you know shouting Out and of course it fell into factions. Because I don't think this rift between white and black women has existed forever it will always exist yes And even and in the case I just right up once Once the vote for prohibition failed the White Women Basically turn on the black women kick them out of the organization white liberals blamed black people and and said that they're the ones who voted who didn't vote enough against prohibition and that's the reason it lost now turns out white man obviously would have wanted who wanted wanted to keep alcohol. I mean it's a huge source of income. They're the ones that most of that means of production products to more than any other group right now. The women injuring day consumed more than any other. As long as you have black people you always had escaped. Go reminds me of the vote for gay marriage or whatever in in California and how people blame black people for that white white liberal people blaming black people for gay marriage marriage equality not passing and California and you you literally had like million dollar funds from like the Jesus Christ's Church of Latter Day saints. Yeah and those white people who Raleigh had the power to end money to get the air politicians to go door to door spread the word. Somehow they let off the hook. Because you don't want to blame them and it's easier to blame black people as a scapegoat right As so what Michelle Williams speeds. I noticed about going all kinds of tangible shell when your speech last night she talked about how how you know women are powerful voting bloc and we all need to vote together and You know that You know she was saying it. Underlines along the lines of life the right to choose abortion rights and you know we asked if we vote star voting for why interest and not against the ball blah. And of course you know every personnel. To point out black women are at so you really only talking to white women and you're talking to fifty three percent now who are okay with losing their own rights who are with. You ain't talking to us. Their their bodies being policed there. Okay all of that stuff And so that's what it reminded me to like. You know this is from the past but all of is still relevant today all of still stuff that people are going through right now live and you know that all connected to me when and I was reading that just now so yeah and it's amazing how people can say those statements. When I realized doll you ain't talking to? Who Do you really think this message? Eight for us. Yeah and that's the other thing I always say man. I don't think you know and this isn't to be some people file. Feel like this letting them off hook but I I I really don't feel it but why people do not think about us. Not Don't you know and so sometimes we ascribe a maliciousness to them. In a way that I think is almost is almost giving them too much power like they just sit around and come balls and little rooms and every every white person secretly hates black people in like plot known us and they're thinking about how that's what I don't have the time they didn't even consider this year. Yeah like when you see these commercials IOS or something some tweet or something pisses Blackley Ball. I don't think why people I don't think fortune five hundred companies are sitting around in a room going. How can we piss all black people? I think they're just not thinking thinking about us. And you know the by product is that they pissed us off with shitting doing thoughtlessness right and Michelle Williams. well-meaning person gave a great speech. I'm sure black women or the farthest from her mind in that situation probably a good way probably because she don't need I don't want to you tell them black we wanted to do. They are doing the right things she really wanted to talk to our fellow white women and they always pull up a little bit short you know could have just say hey white women I'm talking to us is US fifty three percent of us you know she could have said that but is day women in general you know all the women are white. All the blacks are men. You know so apparently anyway today's rainbow..

White Michelle Williams Attorney US Temperance Karen Hearts California Shelby Shelby County Louche Inari W C T U Golden Globes New York Freeman assault official Tolerance Union Michelle Williams. Blackley Ball Raleigh
"ten years" Discussed on Cold

Cold

11:24 min | 10 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on Cold

"Podcast. I've seen a lot of young women who are seventeen. Eighteen nineteen years old. Who are listening? Because of their age didn't hear about Susan when this was all happening and they're they're hearing it for the first time and having a very different experience than Either of US right in in living that in real time but they're but they're learning so much from it and they'll someone your age age who is what would you be. Would you be Susan's ages head so since you three years you delve. Lv into it. Did you have any clue how sick and twisted this stuff was. Even even with what I knew about Josh and Steve which which was enough to know these guys are not good role when you really look at with the close focus It is I mean the word disturbing can't even begin to cover and has changed who you are. Yes and it changed how you deal with people people and you are now better. Qualified are better able to help people and there's decisions and seeing these things differently really the thing. I was with the reason the police released. The file is because we were going to sue them if they didn't so then they released a redacted. Copy though you don't have to sue US okay. The reason they release reset the unredacted copy because we were going to sue them. Because try and get this because I want more people to look at it and work on it and the thing I didn't want because has rejected files and and seeing their files is they had all steve's garbage and I didn't WanNa look at it and I don't want to look at it I didn't have have to look at it because everybody else look a few other people looked at it and I thank you so much for putting up with it and going to that and and stuff. So it's it's just something that needed to be done in a story told that I couldn't have told as Susan's bother. I couldn't could've toll it with any credibility or any objectively would all be a question where somebody else could. And that's that's you you show me things I had no clue about the depravity or the how bad it was and I'm glad I didn't. There was one time I went to the House House. Josh was supposed to take care of the boys and Susan. I gotta go out and do something. I don't remember what it was anyway. A but she She forgot something. I have to go back and come with me okay. Let's be quiet we don't want to the boys will WANNA I don't want to have to say no okay so we're going up the stairs to the second floor and she retrieves something but as soon as I got the top the store the stairs I she looked at me she goes. Do you feel it. I go what I go. I feel uncomfortable. I not exactly happy to be here. She goes you feel the evil. She kept things in perspective that was Steep House House. Steve Pals Yeah. They reached something at the top of the stairs. Dart at I thought that was interesting that she would say that to me yet. I'll bring that up in all of that really ugly environment that she found herself in through no action of her own right aside from meeting the wrong guys for initial mistake. Yeah for her to persist as long as she did in being the champion of her own value beak so much to her character. And I honestly believe it's an inspiration. Two people who hear her story myself included so I think the boys are lot big part of it so those kids meant everything to her and she was a real good. Mother need to learn from lessons from the past for the future. And this this is one of those lessons that can be repeated off and on S. needs to be. It'll be a little differently but you know it's still the same story good versus evil trying hard and you know and one of my daughters who has rejected everything. She was raised on We'll say leave it there but anyway he's okay. I WanNa talk to you and I need your help and everything but don't tell me to about prayer or God and I'm going pray when you have a question and that's what I've done so I don't understand how anybody can handle it without that kind of support include including Susan when when I was reading through so so much of Susan's writings and she's talking about going to her bishop asking for that council going to the temple and praying about it and it seemed very important to me that that part of Susan's life experience be presented so that people can understand Dan. It's not just what any one of US perceives about. Our our personal feelings about religion aren't was important. It's what Susan believed right and doing doing justice and honor to that. And when Steve and Josh who were Steve This openly that he wants to destroy the church. Jesus Christ latter-day Saints when they say well. She didn't really like it he was all well. Let's let that was ridiculous and you know she was trying to live it Josh. We're taking advantage that when he was looking for a woman within the church search. You know the very thing he saying that he didn't care about in the only waste reasons. He stuck around. As long as she did is she was trying to follow every everything along those that the church taught and she was not given up on him. Even though it was clear to me in the beginning of this there was nothing to be true to begin as soon as I started but but once it did she was going down that road and she kept investing time and energy and and love and stuff to try. Try and bring him back and save him and all that when he was a loss case from the beginning. I don't know I would never dreamed. Winded Steve was as messed up as he was their families as messed up his. I don't know how you would ever comprehend that I don't think anyone who's not actually lived it and including myself can really understand what the dynamics of the Palley were how how strange it was. We stayed away from Steve because we figured it. He wasn't good news and wasn't a pro. We didn't have to be there so we stayed away from it. Which as most people would you just avoid those issues? He's so it's opener is to that I guess I believe there is evil. And there's certainly good and there's gardeners there's a disc Satan and I think when you go down that pass here you're subject told that aren't making bad choices you make like the responsibility was on Josh to to not make those decisions right. But also he was. Steve taught him to be who he was. And Steve's parents affected MSU brought out in there and is that a terrible i. It's just a sad waste of life. Waste of time and tragedy that his time life his steve ruined his family and his but is he a victim. And who's going to judge judge stat by STAT I. I don't know what his life was like a child. I don't know what his parents lice were. So as much as I he was and what he did in the situation he did. Who can judge that not me? It worries me when I see people. People Focus too much on Steve Right when the focus needs to be on Susan. It's about Susan and where she is. I think the right time she'll be found and if not you know there's a whole lot of people in the world let her missing people will never see they're gonna get so at least not on this earth but to to your point I mean I have that house as well yeah. There's hope so if it's been ten years years we still haven't found her living day to day as we always do and every time every time there's Zabad pound every time there's a you know could ever found somewhere we start wondering is this. The one is our awaken. Be Over. We'll we'll be able to put her whatever's left to her to rest with their but were fateful or whoever is found even even though it remains. It's still good. Take matter how hard that has to be. It's hard but I think it's harder not knowing I mean we don't know yet or you know I love to be wrong and she blocking the door sometime or get a call. Hey there's this person you know I've had dreams. Were that has happened waking up thicky. She's home they'll dream. Aw but it was a good dream you know for that day. It was a piece moment. That was If Susan story sounds familiar in your own life in other words if you or someone you know is experiencing domestic abuse in any form. Please get immediate help in the. US support is a phone. Call Away at the national domestic violence hotline at one eight hundred seven nine nine seven two three three four online at www dot the hotline dot. Org My thanks again to chuck and Judy Cox for their candor and continued. Willingness is to share their daughter. Susan's story thanks as well to my colleague Nina Ernest for her work. Editing this episode Michael Bond Miller composed the music for cold old with additional sounds and songs by me. Cold is a production of K._S._l.. podcasts thank you for listening..

Susan Steve Josh US Steve Pals Steve Right Steep House House House House Steve This Palley Christ latter-day Saints Michael Bond Miller MSU Nina Ernest chuck Dan Judy Cox
"ten years" Discussed on Cold

Cold

09:16 min | 10 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on Cold

"While not explicit listener. Discretion is advised. I this is a bonus episode of cold. I'm Dave Collie it's been ten years since Susan Powell disappeared. If you've listened to cold up to this point then you are very familiar with her story. If you are just coming to this podcast I encourage you to check out. All of the earlier episodes they will help provide context to what you are about to hear but for summary Marie Sake. Here is a brief rundown on December. Seventh two thousand nine Susan's two boys. Four year old. Charlie and two year old brayden failed to show up for daycare. It soon became clear that Susan and her husband. Josh Powell had also failed to arrive at work. That's snowy morning. Josh returned that afternoon with the boys he told police he had taken them camping. He claimed to have no idea where Susan might be or what might have become of of. Her suspicion immediately fell on Josh from both police and the public but josh was never arrested and never faced charges. Susan's body has never been found. The investigation uncovered a disturbing dynamic within the Powell family. Joshua's own father. Steve Powell had developed an infatuation with Susan. He even propositioned her. An advance. Susan refused Steph's crimes including voyeurism and possession of child pornography cost Josh custody of his sons but in two thousand twelve during a court authorized visit Josh killed himself and the boys by setting fire to a home he had rented in Washington. I recently sat down with Susan's parents chuck and Judy Cox to discuss their daughters legacy. And how the past decade has affected them. My particular things to judy for taking part as this marks the first time she has shared her perspective in the cold. podcast there's been. Something of a resurgence surgeons in the public interest in Susan Story. When I I reached out to you awhile back to me it felt like the attention had very much faded faded? And we're seeing now. You know the cable shows the dateline the podcast right and it's kind of like it's almost reaching fever pitch again. It feels like how's that been for you to see this kind of brought up again. It was hard for me reliving. The most I mean the days came back in the day. The boys died or problems. Ah they're not pleasant but I'll get through this. It's okay. Her story needs to be Out there and I can deal with that and I'm not as spokesperson as much as it's I just don't feel that comfortable in front of cameras is easy for him and just kind of personal of the family but also want to help others and I want people to know the story so so it doesn't happen to them and as you look at that ten year mark from where we were when Susan I disappeared until now how has your life changed forever. Changed in one day is forever changed and and now we become spokespersons against domestic violence and and our our path is kind of set out before us. I wondered when I retire from the way. What would I do not have to worry about that anymore? I'm going to keep doing what I can to help other people and then help Keep looking for my daughter and keep Helping people that are in this situation. Escape domestic violence possible console the The relatives and of those victims and their families and stuff. So they are they can deal with the situation that they're coming to That's great you and I when we talked For the PODCAST. You told me you know how many people had reached Out To share those stories in and when you said that to me then I hadn't had the experience of having that myself exactly and now that I've had even just a small glimmer of what you've experienced with those messages and phone calls. It's it's inspiring but it's also a very for me draining. Oh definitely it takes so much energy to show that empathy does that. Does that affect you. I think it comes natural to him. It does but it's in a good way. Yeah 'cause you know you're helping that person and and I don't take their problems on myself because you can't help them and I can't help them. They have to help themselves selves. They have to follow the advice. You give them and get to the professionals who can help them. You can't take that on you or you would go nuts the real quick so it's draining in. Its you had to be attentive immediate. Do your best but on the other hand. It's gratifying that you can help somebody in an. I'm not going to give them false hope but I will give them a realistic view and some positive things they can do for themselves. I have experienced a what they need to be watching out for and what am I can give them a realistic look. What they're smoking at? So don't base. Is your whole opinion with the police file. said I mean that's a really great point right. One of the things that has been very instructive for me is trying to understand the situation from the multitude of perspectives. EXAC as you experienced differently than the friends here in Utah experienced than the detectives experience. Then we in the media experienced absolutely ooh I'd also disliked can't believe I'm saying this. I do believe the West Valley city. Police gave it their all and they tried real hard and they did a lot of searches and they did do a lot of work a lot of people while they messed up. We always always can mess up and Do you do you think they plan that no. They were doing everything they could think of that that made sensor and they wanted a happy ending. Well it hasn't happened but they tried and may be with others. You know other stories. Police aren't Miracle Workers Third Their police in. They're trying to do their job. But we also felt frustrated about things but I I knew they were working hard and doing their best. Can you see a point Where either of you both of you say I? I've done this enough in. It's time to to stop being in front the cameras in in talking like this. I don't think he'll ever stop me. I might stay off for a period retire or something because it took me a long time to be willing to get in front of cameras or answer questions because it it hurts hurts it was nice. Things quieted down. I mean it was okay but then I get calls from a few people all about their situation and We'll see where that goes for them and and see. Maybe we can make a difference because I think it's something that people will help people. I know it house and also if they're not in this situation hopefully they're listening because who knows down the Rhode King come up an accident or you know family issue or something to where they can remember something that he said that will help them. We're going to take a pause here for a word from our sponsors but will return with more from this special interview with Chuck Can Judy Cox Marking Ten years since the disappearance of their daughter. Susan Powell right after this.

Susan Josh Powell Susan Powell Judy Cox Susan Story Susan I Steve Powell Powell family Marie Sake Dave Collie fever Joshua Charlie brayden Utah Rhode King West Valley Chuck Washington
"ten years" Discussed on Start Today Morning Show

Start Today Morning Show

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"ten years" Discussed on Start Today Morning Show

"It's the morning show that no one knows no one is talking about is talking about Dated they probably the best way to start today eight gave welcome to Tuesday welcome I don't even know where to begin you know where I'm going to begin where will this morning because I am running in the evening I used my hour of getting up early to watch things that I had saved and my who Q. and it made me happy camp I don't watch things very often I was going to I was nervous they were watching things that were going to stress you out for the day no way any thing that pulls in politics news world information I was like this is a terrible way to start Friday I watched John Oliver who I I love I mean like satire he was talking about China's one child policy that's not gonNa make me feel anxiety today that's just gonNa make me smarter about the universe but it just I I don't watch TV almost at all and in the mornings I tend to be the one that goes out to the gym I would because I'm running in the afternoon I had this morning and I was like you know what leave me alone world I'm going to sit here and watch my who not an ad I did not start my day that way I started by day this way because that's what we're supposed to do I did not use this one but I use the blue one you do sound off a salad gives a heart worth of up if you've already done your start today journal work today double thumbs that we've been doing you know other people do fist bumps show them we do thumb bump O.'s very it's it's a technical term at that we've done since we first started dating and we did it at our wedding which is the lamest thing I've ever heard who we are worried about our wedding cool we are my gosh do you have that picture is now the time it's not the time it's not the time it's not yet when do you think I don't know our niece sent us a photo of us the day after wedding and you guys it's bananas you don't even know who you're looking at she said she did say I do appreciate this she said you guys glowed up well and glowing up means but I think it means that like we we got better with aiding up yeah there's a picture of me and I can show I don't Oh I don't know how well people are going to be able to see it it's try try try Hashtag worth the effort all right let's see if we can try it judges it's a thing it's a thing it is we are a yeah you're right I don't know how well people are Gonna be able to see this they're not my words are these default this is the day people day after our wedding all right I don't know if you're GONNA be able to see this well see that this can see in this and I think they can see that I am eight months pregnant but I'm so happy with I mean every what's happening here we've come a long way baby this is come a long way if teen years ago can you imagine what my metabolism was fifteen years ago wasted so many metabolism years on and looks like a crab it's a Scorpion sped Texas Texas think of what we could have done with the body that we had back we just here right now you're under the age of twenty five watching this program listen to it on Pie cast sister rather not waste he's years of a of a fast metabolism about this this is real no matter what age you are right this second the very best ten years.

fifteen years eight months ten years
"ten years" Discussed on Full Coverage

Full Coverage

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"ten years" Discussed on Full Coverage

"John ten years go slips deep. So that thing of like, oh, in fact, actually did wear a lot was nozzle blush are and then buying the sleep while that was rose gold. 'cause I this is way Cheever chivalry. It's not too. And I was thinking about actually the first flick. I have I used to wear if it wasn't the Joe I see working for them. I got it free was actually, and I still use them in my kit now because I love the full minute. Bobby Brown long Joan liner in the poll. Chocolate shimmer shimmery Brown. A love that. I there on my list as well things. I was wearing that. Yeah. They had the cream. I shut in two thousand nine would like the long way jealous. But they were long way Joel cream I shot. Oh, they will just also I'm looking at a list of software. I was saying that I was taking on holiday with me. I've got the prescriptive foundation screaming so much where you go to sell. They would make your exact skin color. I was devastated when they killed it back down in that recently income right now. Yeah, that's back back back certain stores. You can go to. To shake. Counter. I loved that. I do fantastic. Yeah. It's such a fun experience to you. I've got well. If I go on here got my two Chak law was all about two thousand nine and actually thinking about it. I was also to Chicago. And what was it clearly what was it called airbrush conceal? I love me some of that. Yes. That loved Caen. Yeah. I did chubby stick as well. Trump can Hazel. He's there is more. Like, the it was oh God. What was it called clinic Moscow? Or that you can still get dozen lacked power lash prowls. With worth. Yeah. Yes. I had which was so mazing, then the Steeler shadows. Steal Aisha's is like squares jam. Yes. Still lost. Massive jam. And I had this loud was like my absolute favorite, which is. So is because we would just playing with cloud in the new cream formula right now and cloud. I never didn't have it. And it was a silvery Tope Topi color. I would wear every day in a very share. And then I would just be like very Lii in mine is all over. No. It wasn't a then. Yeah. Then I go private koshen again in twenty four seven pencils in stash rockstar Earl slick and corrupt and again like I still have all those pencils. That's yeah. That's nice. When you remember the things that you've had, but you still use still have a love affair for. Now. You just couldn't believe how many was even going about looking at this thing. And I'm like, oh, I've just been using this elements rose collagen quartz, man. Which is the mossy just brought back yet. Collagen quotes mascots the say moody rounded, only, oh, my go- when that came out. And I was like, oh, this is so amazing. How wait I've been used? Ten years ten years ago. It's so crazy. How many things there are on this list of off and stuff that I just fiercely loved. Yup. Die. Hold. And now, I'm like, oh, yeah. I remember that still a lip glaze singlet pledges. Yes. Oh, there is a ruby. What was it could fire? The glazed one that you put up. It was a mini. I always always had like a five pound voucher way you'd buy something. And he was many. And I always bought I thought review many brushes were amazing. Yeah. That was how I started my kid a little time getting my five pound voucher. What I brought something from. I'm not keep. Yeah. Keep getting that. It's so funny 'cause I'm just remembering now, I think I was coming out actually when I was a coming out of phase of wearing quite fifties clothing. Actually, I was going to phase of that. I used to draw beauty spot on Marilyn place. I used to do I think it was an eyeliner pencil that I would shop really Shaw and then just always late round. Yeah. I always stayed because I ain't wearing that wanna met Dave 'cause I met David too. So. Yeah. Just one of my favorite things about looking at the old blow boasts is products that don't exist anymore. Jemma can't Jeb kit kit. Of indicate lip envy here, which looks the nail polish pod. Cam danger of Hodge now in WalMart here. Different. Yes. I still remember as well back in the day when boots used to have a makeup forever..

Earl slick Trump Cheever Bobby Brown Caen John Aisha Joel Jemma WalMart Shaw Moscow Chicago Joan Hodge Dave David five pound ten years Ten years
"ten years" Discussed on Full Coverage

Full Coverage

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"ten years" Discussed on Full Coverage

"I didn't I didn't put any pencil when he color in. I think I just left them as they were sorry member. That's a big difference. Now is trying to add a little bit extra. Yeah. I think I was gonna come. We'll Dacian that much. I mean, even now I don't always westbound Asian. But I think as well now, I'm more. I know the foundations I like to go forward. I think back then I was sort of like, I remember I worked with Paul and Joe for little batch lay while I was doing assisting like a part time thing as a freelance, and they did this amazing primer. Dave not still make it was called. It was just the shade to. And it was like golden tint, I would wear that. Instead of foundation always gave me a lovely glow that because it was a primer. You could see my skin through it. And I guess that's the me. My real shocker days worth of like the age the so I feel like I was quite lucky. There's nothing I look back and feel like all that was crazy crazy because I think it was quite minimal. But I also think interesting for me as we look at the whole tenure challenges like where my kit was props ten years ago, you know, and also how my friends were wearing makeup and stuff because I think I was actually quite born with my makeup. I just did a flake or. Mochi? I if I went out, you know, it wasn't pretty nice to me give it it wasn't. I see these photos of people. I'm like, and the funny thing is even when this ten year, I didn't have Gordy. Of how many I couldn't? I mean, look, you know, it sort of. Yeah. It's fun. I so I yeah. It was a big year. On forever and ever and ever and a right before turned twenty eight so, you know, beginning of two thousand eight just before this. I decided to go Brown because. Because it's actually all logged in BT mecca. I'd go face event, which was brand that That was. was. She was the creative consultant on it. And that's what's in the blog is Charlotte till we telling me to die my hair Brown because I blew is how to promptly did. So I my head onto my hair was pretty dark Brown. It did look good in famous like, I'll give her a juicy. So she was right. All this no color in my skin. I have any. Aikman mois again. It's my I was really Brown. I'd really heavy buying 's. It was so short. But then is really interesting. So I had a list my top picks of two thousand nine that was on BT mecca. Number one was Ellis pro college marine cream, which is bunkers. I'm still using that. Yeah. I was talking about I've had knee, and I talked about, but my skin was really dry, and so on this was amazing. Like that agree with that Clerel perfect ten which is what I used to die. Just like oh Martin. Unless you do which case go crazy, but it didn't go wealth management. We wait much pigment in the. Are you going get old strip? But that's fine. And then my and this was a real flashback because I totally forgotten about this. Now as soon as I read it I was like, oh my God. I never didn't have this with me. There was a smash folks lip ball lip gloss on. It's still I think it still exists that was glow plump, and they were shifting where we know. I've had like water color glow. Do you lip glow college football? But it was the smash box. On glossy pink adjust to your ph and I loved it. The plump was Bosa plump untangle. I don't really agree that any of those things do that loved it loved it. Then the MAC Hello kitschy range. I was obsessed. I've still got two of the bushes. I think it's called tippy could blue pink eye stunned by it being a hourglass ambient blush. I use to all of is the only blush that I've ever hit pound on. Yep. Too. Big deal. Lindsey. Urban decay twenty four seven pencils. Yep. One of my not using those now and decay primer potion, and they were the make. Even the Lori L true match foundation. Yep powder. Compact. The I still love. I couldn't believe it. I couldn't believe it. How many I'm still using? I was definitely still using L'Oreal mabley miscarriage predominantly. I'd say drunk..

Brown BT mecca consultant Aikman Lindsey Ellis pro college Bosa Gordy Dave Lori L Clerel Paul football Joe ten years ten year
"ten years" Discussed on Full Coverage

Full Coverage

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"ten years" Discussed on Full Coverage

"You can still go and see it. Yeah. I saw it in two thousand seven according to the. On two thousand nine I was so posting. So I was in the BBC world as a blogger. So I was trialing stuff. But I will say even though I was a hardcore blogger at the times postings every day every other day. I was still. I never wore a ton of makeup. I was doing very very cautious with what I will. I knew I liked what I knew always go to events and people like, oh, it's so funny that you come to make offense you never wear makeup wearing so much my face eats make off it's not I don't translate to wearing a lot of makeup. And then if I'm wearing a lot I suddenly looked like a Wayne, I think you'll make well, I I've learned, but it was really interesting because of BBC mecca I was able to go back and actually look at the products. I was writing about 'cause I looked at photos a diary mono who didn't love Tope silvery. Nine because every Jovan Topi silvery. I. So it was interested to go back and see what actual products. I was writing about using a lot. And it was fun to see those diary out. Just great. So I do actual specific product remember forgotten about which exciting. But then they're also I'm still using interest to yes, ten years. So tells about what you were up to like I said I would have been finished university. I was living in London. I was assisting another makeup artist. I was working with him fulltime pretty much. I'm that was the today. So I was what TV shows expecting the makeup various different. I think it was it was very early on in my career. Getting into the industry. And again, I think at that time beauty blocking it wasn't a big thing. So it's funny. Even looking back. I guess the biggest thing was all my inspirations coming directly from print magazines. They will wasn't the emphasis on the internet. It was the mice base air Lindsey. So it really it was the both of. But I feel like, you know, back then I didn't have the portfolio. I have. Now, I didn't have the clients. I have now. So I won't be gifted. Aw, everything was being scraped and saved, and you know, if a friend hustle, and they didn't want any more. I'll have that. And yeah, it was expiring and also to understand products. I was having to go into department stores and play with everything on the back of my hand. So even if I couldn't have it in my I knew how it worked or how it felt recommending people. And I guess a lot of it when I look back. Yeah. Probably mostly go friends using it was not more word because blogging and it was the beginning. Yeah. It was really go friends friends saying you really should try this or you know, when I would work with other Macra and seeing that kit and being inspired. But will they have and funny again, let you set the makeup thing even back, then I don't feel like I. All different types of makeup. Really? I I've always wanted flick. I've always done some kind of flick because that's just what my eyes shame. If I didn't even really do my eyebrows for years. Squeezing. Well, I used to tweet the living crap about two minutes. But I definitely wasn't doing anything to them. Yes. Allies or anything funny?.

BBC Jovan Topi London Wayne Macra two minutes ten years
"ten years" Discussed on Full Coverage

Full Coverage

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"ten years" Discussed on Full Coverage

"And for me. The I quote they made that will let the Mucci texture fall into that category. But then they also have the new I shutters. They made like the ones that in the squeezy cheese, a really full pigment and very much encourage I would say play and experimentation with a makeup quite creative in their shade choices. So I kinda feel like milk is a good one. Because there is something for everyone. It's a fascinating brand. I've watched it since it started. And I have to say it's very similar Jacobs line to me when it first came out. I was really disappointed. There wasn't much. I thought was very exciting or fun or actually that good. I just felt kind of rushed and a lot of style over substance. Yeah. What I will say since then moved into something that I really love to be with those cheek six say all Kroger's good. I big huge new. I love it. Really love the highlight sticks. I love the super iridescent glittery ones. Yes. Miles is gorgeous as well and color bones party time that so much even you can rub it in your hand and put it through your hair. It's really really pretty. I like the gel eyeliner pencils yet. A recent discovery that came second my. Tested, the blow of foundation, I didn't get along with me too. But it felt kind of like the flower to me it was quite a heavy cream. I thought it was going to be a lot lighter than it was. But I think view looking for full coverage the tube, patching great. Yeah. So give if you're looking for mobile coverage foundation. I just wasn't. I'm trying to think. Well, I don't think there's anything that's out in the current range. Don't lie. No. I love all the sticks. I like the tone of stick. I like the cool. Yeah. I like the Sarah's innovative technology on the Kushner scar. Again, I think we see Christmas ARA introduction as CD oil reviews of that people grew into dot com as well and lip gloss in the Cush line now as well, which really lovely of Catholic loss, and it's very nice. Wells does the the sun oil is really skin oil is just so so pretty gifts to beat sfu finish on the skin. I just I'm very excited. This finally out. I think people have been waiting for so long way. Ju it's very exciting. And yeah, I mean, we could carry on all day, so many there's been talk about really ought to because we've been talking for eighteen years or a day. So we're gonna talk about a bunch of things in our highlight of the week because I think a highlight might be some highlights. Most importantly now is all main feature which would be ten challenge. So tell us about this for the people that don't know if so if you're not on Instagram there has been a hashtag going around hashtag year challenge where people have been posting a pitcher themselves ten years ago, and then a pitcher now, and I guess generally having a bit of a Lawler props equality head to also very Steiner shout fits stylish, inverted commas. We've all those days is important that so million thought we take a trip down memory lane. You want to trip? It was we would have reminisce. I mean to clarify way saying we're trying to work out. I was like wait ten years back is that hard to do. I need to run. A how old are right now. How would I would have been twenty two? So I would have been just finishing. It would have been when I was living in London. And I would have just finished university about a year or two ago. So yeah. No, I would finish university. I would have been just starting. I've been assisting that was assisting days. I took my wisdom, Twenty-eight dot e Ben. Ben it's on now. Twenty to shut up. Twenty eight. And actually two thousand nine was big if me because that's what my moved to America. So I moved to the to New York in July. So it was a big transition phase for me. I was BT blogging. OJ OJ. Daddy. My daddy. Mac. I was blogging. My blog beauty, Meca dot blog. Spot dot com. It's still out there..

Jacobs sfu Instagram Miles Kushner Mac Sarah Wells Lawler America New York London Steiner ten years eighteen years milk
"ten years" Discussed on Full Coverage

Full Coverage

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"ten years" Discussed on Full Coverage

"Fan and beauty gigantic addict. Yeah. Because beauty goes out and buys a new pilot. And as my God, which I do get very excited. If you've got a problem in the style of us, it's when you go out and buying empty pellets to fill up from your own style. It's when the woman at the checkout is saying are, you sure you want the sixteen. Are you one hundred percent show? You do know you sixteen again Icee she should get ten and then Lindsey goes, oh, maybe twelve and then we look each other. We'll take all. We didn't just get those either. We. Tiny pocket-size five palm pallets which we're gonna fill whether and stuff and make our own makeup lesions, Jerry that you moron collection. And then not literally our full coverage. Announce it out of all of our shit. But then I also you vote more of other policies. Empty pilots are the gateway drug to excite whole fun, and you outta gloss red wine, and you live in Jesus you live in. I mean, I think it's very good. And it's inspirational of us from our it's very shop pure stash. It's very good for no by by. Yeah. Yeah. Loving what you've already gall, but making it more new forefront. So you actually a use it more often mix and match, and you remember what you've got an put it into something that makes you use it so excited so excited miss as get and there's no other word, Dan giddy giddy episode, I can feel it. So we've got news of we've got highlights the week. Obviously our main feature this week. We should say wasn't by by someone in the Facebook group Instagram in general. Yeah. One of our Facebook group friends suggested that we talk about the ten year challenge happening over Instagram. But with regards to our makeup, and what make up we were ten years ago versus what we wear now, which we thought was awesome. So that's what we're going to do. We're going to get into news. I because says l'idee lords of it all there's a lot also table covered in Mako. We do have a table covered a makeup. And I thought we've got something from every price range, which we've done everything for you. So don't favor if you are no by January. Well, probably. If you're a low by January or in need, a payday Trie, that's not gonna break the Bank. We've definitely go up. If you I need a patriot is going to write the Bank. I'll go to that got. We've got every two we got you so start with new news. This is something a lot people ask about as well. So actual news is actual news. From the news business news, one of our favorite brands elements. Everyone knows what big elements fans we've had no other Gabriel the founder on the part. We had lovely interview with Noah, we talk about their new product all the time. We actually got more talk about as well after we talked about this. But as some of you will seen elements has been sold the company itself husband sold who looks interesting for nine hundred million dollars. Not one million dollars. Nelia billion nine hundred million dollars business is big business to lock the time which I think surprise people's kinda surprising. No they were buying. I didn't know they owned anything other than themselves pretends out they do so that sex citing people of our stars. I who message is on the Facebook group and on our Instagram. What this would mean for elements for them as a consumer short story as it went mean anything. Yeah. Especially right away. Because you probably don't even know elements has been bought and sold a couple of times over the last few years. So it was sold to I'm trying to find almost starts, but it was so to Steiner leisure who owned bliss, and then that Steiner was sold to L catoon. It's will be moved around this happens. I think a lot more than people realize bronze get bought and sold and packaged moved around. Big news because elements was sold just a couple of years ago as a bundle of brands on that sale was something like nine hundred and twenty five million..

Facebook Steiner Bank Icee Noah Jerry Instagram Dan Lindsey Gabriel founder billion nine hundred million d nine hundred million dollars one hundred percent one million dollars five palm ten years ten year