35 Burst results for "Ten Years"

A Life in Leadership: Dr. Daniel Zinnel

Supporting Leaders

03:15 min | 1 d ago

A Life in Leadership: Dr. Daniel Zinnel

"All right one. This episode of supporting leaders podcasts. We have dr daniels in all and we discover that we went to the same program at creighton. our past probably like just just crossed each other But i'm so excited to have you on the show. Thank you so much for taking time out of your day to have a conversation with us looking forward to it. So let's just start off and share with us a little bit about your background. I mean you seem to be involved in so many things. You can definitely tell. You're an advocate for a lot of different groups of people and and you're engaged in political things. The arts Work so share with us a little bit about who you are and what you do. Well i'll start at the beginning. I was I grew up in northwestern iowa outside of a tiny town called pomeroy which is about six hundred fifty people Youngest of four grip on the farm right across the road from my dad's parents my grandparents. So i saw them every day growing up which i am very grateful order but in small town iowa you have to do everything be involved in everything so i was in all four sports played. The charm sang in the choir. Did all of the things was in. Nhs or h ffa. So i truly am grateful for that Well rounded nece that. Allow me to really try so many things. And i think that's still kinda tested to my career in my life. I like to be involved. In a variety of even today North west island's pretty conservative and so growing up as a little boy was very challenging to to recognize what i was going through to see others. Who were like me and should not be alone and so i went to iowa. Central community. college burst in fort. Dodge years and then moved to into moines in two thousand six to perform at adventure land. So you're at adventure land in the summer of two thousand six and if you know eventually know there's a stage that comes up from out of the ground i performed Had eight shows everyday. They were short set. So it wasn't too long but i we a country show at patriotic show in greece. So that was a ton of fun. And i think really helped me develop competence in front of people because you have to have confidence when performing And then i started going to school full time while working fulltime in. I did that for ten years. Finish undergrad did a masters in health and then completed the doctor of education and leadership from creighton. But my career really started in nonprofit type. Still were still working nonprofits but it started working with individuals with intellectual disabilities and technically and still employed doing that type of work. That i transitioned to more part-time respite. But i have a client that i worked with since two thousand six which is just wild to think about the had that relationship with him for so long

Dr Daniels Iowa Creighton North West Island Pomeroy FFA Moines Dodge Fort Greece
How to Generate Loyal and Committed Clients with Cristy Nickel

Healthcare Business Secrets

02:13 min | 3 d ago

How to Generate Loyal and Committed Clients with Cristy Nickel

"The working with christy nikko. Christie is the president and ceo of code rid author of the code revolution number. Two will ranked boxes. Currently retired and celebrity tristesse a warning from china in elite level. Athletes is also the author of four books. I'm really excited to have her on the show. She's an evid makita salesperson and has got a kick ass business which we're gonna talk about today's episode. Welcome to the show. Kristy yes and the mohawk. Let's not forget the mohawk. Oh my god. I got a different color for change it constantly. My poor husband walks around the corner. He goes and he goes. Oh as you. And i'm like why do you think it's red now. So yes thank you for that awesome introduction. Only some some background on you. What do you do. Who do you help. And how'd you get into the space. The elevator pitch is. I created a nutrition program that enables people to lose ten percent of their body weight every month without shakes pills diet foods or exercise. So that's kind of the some of the code red lifestyle but it kind of started back when i was. I was raised in northern idaho which is in the pacific northwest and i was raised very poor. My dad was a cop and our local minister was a very small town and my mom worked for minimum wage and we just had no money but we raised on a farm and so we were very poor growing up and when it was time for me to move out of the house and go to college. Nobody in my family helped me. That was zero help. I was working. I bought my first horse at ten years old making monthly payments to my neighbor to buy this horse so i started waiting tables and i was just waiting tables and bartending trying to put myself through nursing school and i was approached by a boxing coach after he watched me in in a local boxing class. And he said how long you been. Boxing and i said forty four minutes. And he said you have a propensity for this. And i was like pow whatever and he goes. Do you wanna fight. And i thought fight. Are you kidding me like real fight. I've never even been in a fight. Never been hit. He said you could earn money. Well that's all. I needed to hear because i was so poor so i literally started fighting for my dinner. I started fighting for five hundred bucks a five. This legit federally licensed sanctioned boxing matches you know six ounce gloves Twelve rounds three minute rounds and little. Did i know. I was really good at boxing

Christy Nikko Christie Kristy Boxing China Pacific Northwest Idaho
The Resurgence of Psychedelic Psychiatry

Short Wave

02:08 min | 4 d ago

The Resurgence of Psychedelic Psychiatry

"I'm only here with. Npr science correspondent. john hamilton. hydro on me. So as npr's neuroscience reporter you're always reporting on the most interesting thing so what you got for us today. What i've got for you. Today is psychedelic drugs. Not literally of course. But i wanna talk about how these drugs are getting a second look as a way to treat psychiatric problems like depression anxiety substance use disorders. Even ptsd in the past decade. It's become a very hot topic. Brain sites yes. It is a very hot topic. In fact john. Our first shortwave episode was about using silla sivan as a treatment for smoking cessation. Some guy you're bringing this topic back to the podcast. What are some of the drugs will be talking about today. Lot of familiar names. You mentioned suicide side. There's also ketamine masculine. Ibew gain ecstasy even Lsd in some cases and those are all drugs that can cause hallucinations or out of body experiences. Right right and most of them are not legal right but how do they work for depression. And all those other psychiatric conditions so ketamine for example is able to help a lot of people with major depression even when nothing else works about ten years ago i was able to talk to one of the first people to take part in a clinical trial ketamine. His first name is christopher. He asked me not to use his last name. Christopher had depression that made him so aside uil and before he got ketamine he had been prescribed just about every drug out there to treat his depression he told me it started with prozac and paxil and went onto klarna pen atta van zanex ramen gabba penton byu spar depakote. They had me on for a while. That is a long list and none of those helped him either. They didn't work or the side effects. Were so bad. He had quit taking them. But christopher was lucky managed to get into one of the first studies of ketamine and now fifteen years later the fda has approved a version of ketamine for use in people like christopher.

NPR Depression Anxiety Substance U Silla Sivan John Hamilton Depression Van Zanex John Christopher FDA
"ten years" Discussed on Photography Tips From the Top Floor

Photography Tips From the Top Floor

05:20 min | 4 d ago

"ten years" Discussed on Photography Tips From the Top Floor

"Your credibility back so we can ruin that again next year. You remember before we get in visible camera part and how that all started. But do you remember. I got more emails one year later from the from the miserable camera. Remember i think it was one year later might have been to could been pretty sure. It was one remember what came out a year after almost to the day there was another thing but what was it again. The light tro true. The lipstick camera the light show the three d depth. Free focus camera that kicked off a lot of things. Yep yup. I got emails from like my old high schoolteacher who i hadn't been in touch with him in a while and he's this you guys. I think this might be real hard to know. But there's a lot of lot of connection made by people i know. I don't think the whole world stops as just mark horton average again that that happens. I don't know i did. This exists still no nitro to the pivot to business professional production only and then they disappeared. And i think they got bought by google or something. Okay but the. The the adjustable focused production focus. That's in our phones now. That's that's an iphone in with with portrait mode and you can change the the the aperture size and change the depth of field. And there's some machine learning part of that then there's also some some of the debts information that the multiple cameras can capture that kind of stuff. It's not it's not real light field kind of thing but it's it's getting off right lows. It's yeah that's the computational version of that right yeah yeah yeah and a in the end for the end user. I don't think it makes a difference. What the technology is. The result is count so so unless it comes to cameras that you can't see and then so i saw your video. You could clearly see the camera right. You couldn't that was the joke of it is not not. That invisible wasn't wonder woman's plane. Well that was that was in my head when we thought about that lake. Ten years ago. When idea was being thrown around i kind of that was part of what so i saw your video Your reaction video. I was amused because there are some things i'd forgotten about. How he shot that and that was a lot of fun. Let's go back. You remember how it the idea started. I don't know so so you. And i we both were neighbors pretty much and i think you brought this up by. I give you full credit for having the idea of doing something along the lines of April fools joke but the details. No hey it's ten years later. I'm over fifty. It's things fade you are. I'm fifty one. Oh wow i'm old. I feel an after being reminded by a few people out there that it's the ten year anniversary of the indivisible camera. I feel even older now. Okay so i remember going over to your your old the top floor over there studio quarter. Yep that's how we we. We met actually is. I was living in the french quarter with my wife. Were married at the time. I think so. Yeah we were married and living there..

google next year fifty Ten years ago iphone one year later french quarter ten years later over fifty mark horton both ten year anniversary a year after one three depth quarter April
"ten years" Discussed on Photography Tips From the Top Floor

Photography Tips From the Top Floor

03:39 min | 4 d ago

"ten years" Discussed on Photography Tips From the Top Floor

"Invisible camera is yeah. What is the invisible camera. Well those of you who don't remember which is always a possibility it is It is a an april fools. Joke that allen at trajan. I did ten years ago. Yeah it's been ten years april i. It was exactly ten years. Actually seven days earlier was exactly ten years. 'cause we release that before we before april i was was there a week early and it was. It was this. Yeah it was a scary thing to do. It was a fun thing to do. It was a scary week to to live through while we saw the reactions coming in and this kind of blowing up in the photo community and then on the april first we pulled the plug in took it off line and The the whole what was going on there. How did we feel about it and so on. That is what i talked to. L. an average about address is the host of the two hosmer's podcast. He's been a guest here on the show numerous times and we recorded this for his two hoses podcasts. But i thought it would be fun to put it on this episode. So here you go. Let's talk about what happened ten years ago. Yeah i'm rolling. So i still do a countdown for my sake. But i'll we'll do account on a clap. Whatever you want clap does not help you count Five four three two one. Don't really need the one that's just for continuity really really it just it fits should be quiet. It should be like the like the to pop and then goes quiet right like. That's that's how you do it. The one but yeah that's worked for ten years adamant i we've never messed up that sink zero sink problems in ten years. It's the it's the low tech approach that works best. It is while. I also like to give adam as little as possible. Fewer fewer variables for some people. That is the best ways to not have to do anything right so marquardt ten years this snuck up on me the ten years me to not even the ten years of course but the last year i remember i remember a year or two ago thinking. Oh wow it's eight years or and the tens coming up we do and then we should do cove it. That's what we should do. that took precedence. So maybe we'll do the eleven hours to eleven like spinal tap do fool everybody again You know i i this. This completely burned by ability to ever fool anyone ever again. Don't know if that's true. Well at least as the people who got fooled by it or who saw it and light and did not get full but for a long time for many years since since then after after we did the invisible camera i often heard people say is that a is that is that is april fools jokes. Is that so people. Were really cautious. Really on guard for the for the for but people forget and then all of a sudden you..

eight years eleven hours two hoses ten years ago last year tens seven days earlier ten years two hosmer eleven two a year or marquardt Five a week early two ago april first trajan april before
How to Handle Slumber Party Politics

Mom and Dad Are Fighting

02:06 min | 4 d ago

How to Handle Slumber Party Politics

"My daughter is ten years old in wants to have an all girls slumber party. I recently mentioned the sleepover to my sister-in-law. She has twin boys who are the same age as my daughter and attend the same school. My sister-in-law expressed that her sons would want to be included in the sleepover. My first thought was no way. It's perfectly natural for a girl to one an all girls party but my sister-in-law said my nephew's would be crushed not to be included. They recently moved across the country to be close to us and the boys have been slow to make new friends. They also have a household rule that the boys can only sleep over with family. I love my nephews. They're kind and respectful boys. Who are very close to my daughter and the three kids regularly have sleepovers but it also seems reasonable for my daughter to request a girl only party. Am i being old fashioned. Should i be asking my daughter to expand the guest list to include her cousins or is there a way to help. My nephews still feel included and still honor. My daughter's request thanks. Slumber parties aware shape gets real. You know in terms of vendor division and it sucks you know especially for those of us that want to raise children that do not you know. See the world through a gender binary that an overly you know fixated on girls can and cannot do or boys can and cannot do. But you're not going to have a very easy time getting a lot of those other girls. Mothers on board. With a coed sleepover ten year olds. They're just kind of like maybe just a little bit too old right if we were talking about maybe six or seven year olds and a bunch of parents on duty. And you know. Six or seven year olds sleepover. Sounds a little bit like a nightmare. Nightmare. anyway But maybe then but now if we were talking about you know i have a nephew that is most of his friends are girls and he does not feel comfortable being around groups. Avoid like if there was something to it like that that might be a different conversation.

Matthew Zachary, Founder and CEO at Stupid Cancer on Life After Cancer

Outcomes Rocket

02:00 min | 6 d ago

Matthew Zachary, Founder and CEO at Stupid Cancer on Life After Cancer

"Today i have the privilege of hosting. Matthew zachary ten years after surviving brain cancer at age twenty one concert pianist and composer. Matthew zachary created the first health podcast founded stupid cancer. The not not for profit responsible for igniting. A global movement advocating a y. Adolescent young adult cancer programs and support that brought dignity in the face of health adversity after stepping down as stupid cancers ceo and twenty nineteen matthew continues his legacy of building community galvanizing the patient voice and blowing up the status quo with off script media the first digital health podcast network focused on advocacy education and empowerment. We're going to have a great discussion with matthew today and super privileged to have him here with us. So matthew welcome. We've got to get that border plate to less words. I'm so sorry you had to read all that and and it's all very interesting things. And i mean at the core of it matthew kudos you survive brain cancer. Just i mean right there right. I mean the first question that i ask all of our gases. Why health care what ignites your fire. Talk to us about that and just let us know more well. I got drafted into it. You know we always joke like no one wakes up and says can't wait to get brain cancer. So i recommend advocate one day nets was not what i was thinking. Twenty years old college. I was studying to be a film composer. That was my. You know who knows what the hell they want to do in the nineteen. I did but i got derailed My left hand stopped working as a Early effect of not even knowing there was to head But i was diagnosed. Eventually i did reclaim my left hand after five years. But i fell back on plan. B when i didn't die which was advertising marketing branding creative and i fixed macintoshes. And then i g ninety s any gigs out. Have it river. Mac os seven joined the

Matthew Zachary Matthew Adult Cancer Brain Cancer Cancer
Is a ton of psychology just ... wrong?

Unexplainable

01:50 min | 6 d ago

Is a ton of psychology just ... wrong?

"How much of psychology is wrong. Do we have do. We have reason to assume. That tons of psychology is wrong Yeah so ten years ago researchers started to notice and to really get you know worried about some really rotten things going on. At the core of a lot of psychological research it led them to really question and rewrite a lot of assumptions. And since then there's just been this kind of huge fight. It's really a crisis scary. Okay where where do where do we start here. Let's start with the psychologist. Who's been working on this problem for years. Now i'm seen vizier. And i study how we can do. Psychology better so mean said like this crisis really started getting going and twenty eleven when this one paper came out. That had some really weird claims in it. Yes so it was a paper claiming that people have esp like predicting the future like esp. Like sci fi knowing. What's in people's heads. Yeah this paper was from a psychologist named daryl bem interesting and he wrote up a lot of experiments. This is an experiment that tests esp. It takes about twenty minutes and is run completely by computer. This is the language participants read when they sat in front of a screen on each trial of the experiment. Pictures of two curtains will appear on the screen side by side. The computer would put a picture behind one. The curtains and behind the other one would be a blank wall. Your task is to click on the curtain. That you feel has the picture behind it. If participants guessed correctly them took the as evidence that they predicted. The future. That espn's real

Daryl Bem Espn
Microsoft Signs Deal To Outfit US Army With AR Headsets

Techmeme Ride Home

02:11 min | Last week

Microsoft Signs Deal To Outfit US Army With AR Headsets

"Essentially this. This broke yesterday. And what i called. It was the biggest news in the history of the ar industry which is not saying much since the air industry is relatively young but this is like a big bang moment because in one deal in industry can be validated and so the headlines would be microsoft Signed a contract with the pentagon to create one hundred and twenty thousand custom hollow lens. A our headsets for the us army and that deal could be worth as much as twenty one point eight billion dollars over ten years. The point that i made on the show was think of all of those moon. Shots that google has been investing in and this is not me being snarky in one fell swoop. Microsoft has essentially completely earned. Its money back from a moonshot that no one was paying attention to were. But this is a hardware moonshot. This is essentially if people have been thinking about a. r. n. vr as the next big thing to the tune of twenty billion dollars. Microsoft is like this is by the way a thing now so I this follows. Of course the the deals that microsoft has done with the pentagon in terms of their cloud computing stuff. But i'm saying and compared to the moon shots of google and comparing it to what amazon has done with aws and all the sudden amazon out of left field. Or i'm sorry. Microsoft out of left field has this whole pentagon arm of its business that depending on how you term it in terms of years something is worth thirty billion dollars so dialing back from the pentagon angle of it. It's just the idea that out of nowhere. The ar vr space in my opinion has suddenly been validated.

Microsoft Pentagon Us Army Google Amazon
Why mRNA Vaccine Technology is Totally Safe

Today, Explained

02:01 min | Last week

Why mRNA Vaccine Technology is Totally Safe

"Dr deborah fuller. I'm a professor in the department of microbiology. At the university of washington. School of medicine. Dr fuller has spent decades studying the kinds of vaccines were now using to fight. Cove it one of the things that a lot of people don't realize is i think that Amarna vaccines just suddenly appeared as a brand new vaccine when covid nineteen started but there has been research going on in this field for over thirty years and i was one of those people thirty years ago who i started working on the idea of a code into your cells and express a protein that was stimulated immune response. So you're basically the perfect person to tackle a wide range of questions about all these different vaccines are you gain. I am totally game absolutely. Let's give it a shot okay. My buddy was too shy to call our voicemail line and admit that he's scared of 'em are a but this listener was not. Hey sean looking. For the science face evidence that suggests that lab created. Mr rene is not gonna trigger some sort of long-term averse affecting my body and say five twenty forty or sixty years. I feel like. I'm being asked to trust something that does not have published long-term medical research behind it. What school leaves my future. Something unknown risk. What would you say to people like. Dude let's start out with general with vaccines idea that they're gonna cause some sort of issue five ten years from now that's just doesn't happen back us to how vaccines work. They get in. They do their job. They go away. Vaccine does stimulate an immune response. And then when you get exposed to a pathogen that immune response is going to act on it and get rid of that pathogens so they do a very focused directed immune response and once they get inside your cell and they instruct yourself to do that. They disintegrate our body deals with 'em are a all the time we'll eat it were exposed to it were. It's in our environment and knows what to do with marina.

Dr Deborah Fuller Department Of Microbiology Dr Fuller Mr Rene University Of Washington School Of Medicine Sean Marina
Microsoft's Pentagon Deal Validates The AR Industry

Techmeme Ride Home

02:12 min | Last week

Microsoft's Pentagon Deal Validates The AR Industry

"News for the augmented reality industry. Maybe the biggest news in the history of this nascent. The military says microsoft will build one hundred and twenty thousand custom. Hololens headsets for the us army. Validation of the use case for a are in some very serious real world conditions. Yes but also look at how much this validates the hololens as a business microsoft says the contract could be worth up to twenty one point. Eight billion dollars over ten years. Think of all those years and billions of dollars spent on moon shots over at google and in one fell swoop. Microsoft has been like yeah. Hold our beer as brad sam's tweeted and just like the rnd costs for this product have been more than recovered and quote and something tells me if these things prove useful we could eventually see way more than one hundred and twenty thousand units ordered quoting cnbc. This deal follows a four hundred and eighty million dollar contracts microsoft received to give the army prototypes of the integrated visual system or es in two thousand eighteen. The new deal will involve providing production versions the standard issue. Helen's which cost thirty five hundred dollars enables people to see holograms overlaid over their actual environments and interact using hand and voice gestures in iva s. Prototype that a cnbc reporter trade out in two thousand nineteen display a map and a compass and had thermal imaging to reveal people in the dark. The system could also show the aim for a weapon. Quote the ivy a headset based on holland's and augmented by microsoft azure cloud services delivers a platform. That will keep soldiers safer and make them more effective. Alex kitman a technical fellow at microsoft and the person who introduced the helen's in two thousand fifteen wrote in a blog post quote. The program delivers enhanced situational awareness enabling information sharing and decision making in a variety of scenarios and quote. The headset enables soldiers to fight rehearse and train in one system. The army said in a statement. The contract which was awarded on friday has a five year base period where they five year option after that and army spokesperson told cnbc an email. The pentagon did not immediately respond to a request for

Microsoft Brad Sam Cnbc Us Army Alex Kitman Army Google Helen Holland Pentagon
Mets, Francisco Lindor reach contract extension

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

01:08 min | Last week

Mets, Francisco Lindor reach contract extension

"This is the baseball tonight. Podcast for thursday april. First twenty one. It's opening day producing from its own studio in the foothills of connecticut. The twenty on buster. Only in my hotel room on thursday morning in washington. Dc and taylor you repairing rundown for today's show and it kinda got blown up. Oh my gosh late. Last night. I literally hit send in less than thirty seconds later. I flip over to twitter. Francisco indoor is a met for life craziness now. Other agents have been predicting in recent days. This was going to happen then. They had to finish it. We're gonna be talking about that with scourge coming up because they really. The two sides had so much to lose otherwise last night they finished at ten years. Three hundred and forty one million dollars with partial. No trade clause no opt-outs in this deal in about fifty million dollars in deferred money in a signing bonus of about twenty million dollars. So the mets get their man. Francisco door gets his contract and he will be in the mets lineup. Tonight for his first plate appearance with the new york

Baseball Connecticut Taylor Francisco Washington Twitter Mets New York
Jessi Pujji - A Primer on Performance Marketing

Invest Like the Best

01:57 min | Last week

Jessi Pujji - A Primer on Performance Marketing

"So jesse the first part of this conversation is going to be what. I'll call the definitive conversation on performance marketing and i guess really just marketing generally speaking to set the stage as to why you are the right person to be having this conversation with. Just tell us the short history thumbnail version of an push how it got started. And what you've been doing since its founding. Yeah sure. I was not born. A performance marketer. Rank wouldn't wouldn't have expected myself to end up here. Ten years ago is i was working at goldman sachs and i went to wharton and if you go to wharton goldman sachs says the goal of every word kid. I got that ring and my dad was an entrepreneur came from india. I grew up around that entrepreneurship. What i thought i was going to do. But kinda said man. I want to see what it's like to be an investor and learn about that. And you know i liked it but i didn't love it and i said i wanna love what i do and so pretty much on a whim moved out west and said hey i'm gonna start a business and was as in love with the idea of starting a business as i was about and i specifically wanted to build something building organization culture and said you know what let's bootstrap this thing. We don't want to raise angel round and then have a gun on her head and burn money. We want to get something that can make money from early on. And we went around talked a lot of mentors and friends and they said oh you're good with numbers and data go look at performance marketing. That you'll figure something out there and we started calling it sandbox entrepreneurship. which was. We're not going to come up with an idea. Sitting are goldman sachs as what we get in the sandbox of something. We'll figure something out and so we kind of did it like nerdy. People would pick a business ideas so he's okay. We got it number. Zero online marketing. That works will. We don't have any relationships with anyone. We're twenty-five years this. this is late. Two thousand nine early thousand ten or don't know anyone don't have any relationships so how do we get into digital marketing. Well there's this thing called performance marketing netflix's invented it and they'll just pay you kind of like a bounty. They'll pay you fifty dollars or one hundred dollars every time you get them a customer you take all the risks and you make the margin and we go arbitrage. That sounds familiar like. Let's go do that right. And let's go figure that

Wharton Goldman Sachs Goldman Sachs Jesse Wharton Kinda India Netflix
Interview With Dr. Laura Forese, COO, New York Presbyterian

Skimm'd from The Couch

02:33 min | Last week

Interview With Dr. Laura Forese, COO, New York Presbyterian

"Welcome to our women's history month series on skimmed from the couch. Where we're telling you about the women who made history. This past year. Dr laura for east joins us on today's episode. She's the chief operating officer of new york presbyterian one of the largest nonprofit hospitals in the country on her leadership newyork presbyterian has been on the front lines fighting the covid nineteen pandemic since last year. Dr freeze thank you so much for joining us and welcome to skin from the couch so much. It's great to be with you. Your resume is very long as as i think. Doctors and chief operating officers at ten to be wants one job or when experience. You've had that means the most you. I started wanting to be a doctor from the time i was a little girl so it really is about for patients. But i really have shifted. After i was in practice for about ten years. i'm orthopedic surgeon. And i moved to become a fulltime hospital executive. Because i thought i'd be able to have more impact in so now is the chief operating officer of big hospital system. My job is really to make sure that the business runs so that our doctors nurses have everything that they need to do what they do best which is care for our patients so in some ways come full circle from where i thought i was going to be when i was a little girl. How did you know that you wanted to be in medicine when you were a kid. You know carly i have no real good answer for that it just from the time. It was a little girl. I thought that would be a great job. Every kid knows what a doctor is. They're going to help you get better and i was say my parents were always very encouraging. I don't have doctors in my family. But i had that as a little girl and i stuck with it when reading about you. What stood out is that you have one of the things that many that stood out was that early on in your residency twins. And i know everything there to know about med school residencies. Because i've seen grace anatomy. So i am very very educated on your fields. I still watch it. So i feel like i'm right in there but i want you to take us back to to that time. What was that time like for you. Especially at a time when there were very few women in orthopedics. Well let me start with there. Were very few women in medical school class. Unlike today where we have more women medical students than men. It was unusual then and i chose a field that had very few women in it.

Dr Laura East Joins New York Presbyterian Carly
Arm's new chip architecture boosts security, speed for billions of processors

Daily Tech News Show

01:36 min | Last week

Arm's new chip architecture boosts security, speed for billions of processors

"Arm announced its first major. New chip architecture in ten years called v nine and it is backwards compatible with good old fashioned arm v eight that we've had since two thousand eleven but it adds some new security a signal processing and performance features arm v nine introduces confidential compute architecture which allows the concept of realms realms will let a developer right application where the data can be kept from the rest of the system from the operating system from other apps that way only the realm manager software can see the data and if another part of the device were somehow breached. It wouldn't immediately be able to get at that. Data this is particularly important for companies who use cloud services specially like health or finance a helps prevent an intruder or even an employee breaking into an amazon. Google microsoft hyper visor and peaking at customer data scalable vector extension to or. Sv to extend the a workload capability of the architecture beyond just high performance chips they had sv in in v8 eight but v. nine now gets it on all the architectures seo to can enable digital signal processing capability for things like image processing internet of things. Smart home stuff arm thinks this will improve performance even when it is done outside the cpu in like a gpu or neuro processing unit or something like that but the bottom line for many of you will be the promised fifteen percent gaining computer power this year and an additional fifteen percent the year after for mobile and infrastructure cpu's

Amazon Microsoft Google
NYT Tech Correspondent Cade Metz on the Corporate Forces Shaped AI

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

02:04 min | 2 weeks ago

NYT Tech Correspondent Cade Metz on the Corporate Forces Shaped AI

"A is now a household term whether it's powering driving directions or spotting tumors and cancer patients or driving big discussions over our bias autonomous weapons or the future of work but despite the fact that the first neural network was created in the late nineteen fifties. A lot of what i just described has taken place over only about ten years in his new book. Genius makers new york times tech correspondent kate. Mets writes about the history of ai and the corporate forces that shaped it since the mid two thousands. He told me ai. Pioneer geoffrey hinton really rebranded neural networks as deep learning. And that happened. Just a bunch of other factors. We're coming together really. fifty years. After this idea was first proposed we finally had the two things that were needed to make it work. What we needed was all that data and the internet gave us that gave us lots of photos. Lots of text. Lots of sounds that those neural networks could lies but we also needed the computer processing power needed to crunch all that data and by two thousand and ten we had both and so as jeff was rebranding. The idea we also had the technology needed to make it work. And then you have this of of sort of ten years where it seems like a creeps into our life in ways that are pretty invisible right like talk about this sort of life. We're living now. That is built on these discoveries in this work that we may not even realize. Well you see this in your daily lives today when you power up your iphone and you speak a command into siri. The way that syria is able to recognize. What you're saying is because of a neural network. As time goes on we're going to see chat bots start to emerge. We're seeing this now and that's driven by by neural network as well as self driving cars and other robotics that are coming to the fore rely on this one

Geoffrey Hinton Tumors Mets New York Times Kate AI Cancer Jeff Syria
What good soft skills look like with Kristen Palana

CodeNewbie

02:24 min | 2 weeks ago

What good soft skills look like with Kristen Palana

"Is joining us. Thanks for having us. I think for having us for some added context leon is also my wife and has been with our company almost since the beginning circus and you have a long impressive resume of all the things you do. Tell us a little bit about your background. Sure i'm actually coming to you from malawi in southern africa where have been living since twenty. Nineteen i'm actually Doing are in communication for two. Un organizations unfpa in unison have background is a university professor. And i'm scared to say that. It's been since two thousand but i was in my twenties when it started so i'm not that old i've been working with people on four continents students and other artists and workers. And what have you and soft skills. Actually a huge difference between someone doing really well and sort of fizzling out enough they're quote unquote really talented. Some looking forward to talking about it more. We actually found you through a highly rated you to meet horse titled soft skills clear success how to be excellent at work. How did you start teaching these skills. It's funny because your professors when you're in university probably one of their least favourite things they have to do. but we'll do is be an academic advisor. They tell you what classes you're supposed to take and if you get a good one the lawsuit can help you get into the career that you want and give you advice and i actually. Even though i wasn't looking forward to doing these meetings all day long. I found that i was actually quite good at it. And so alongside teaching our digital media illustration and animation. I found that my students were coming to me quite a lot for advising and i was teaching in new york city in new jersey and then for ten years in rome italy and then three years ago we moved to men mar and they're actually wasn't my field in the universities there so i started teaching for organizations and ad agencies. They're junior staff helping them. Be more confident at work. Be more able to ask questions able to give presentations basically not be so timid. So that's sort of how. I started with the soft skills class i. It was an online resource to a live training. I did in men mar and then once that was over i put it online and opened it up to a more international audience and now i'm helping also students here in malawi with that as well

Unfpa Malawi Southern Africa Leon New York City New Jersey Rome Italy
Laptop or Chromebook, which should you get?

Latest In Tech News

02:05 min | 3 weeks ago

Laptop or Chromebook, which should you get?

"Laptop versus chromebook. What's the difference in which works better for you so we might be wondering windows. Mac laptop chromebook. I don't What's the difference while a breakdown difference here. I do know the difference between both. I have owned both a laptop and a chromebook and my wife owns a mac laptops. So i have some familiarity enough. But casey don't believe me we can always just look at the articles here so laptop chromebook. What's the difference in which works better for you. This article comes to from seen. It chromebooks our laptops in. Two one's running google's chrome operating system the hardware might look like any other laptop the minimalistic web browser based chrome. Os is a different experience from the windows and mac os laptop. You're likely used to or desktop whether you're considering switching from one to another or macbook or your kid received one from your school or you're simply curious about chrome. Here's everything you need to know on chromebook. I arrived in twenty eleven routinely derided and rightfully so for their limited functionality. In reliance on a consistent internet connection but there is a reason for that bap rating system turns ten years old. This year in today's chromebooks are far from started. But some things haven't changed might not be willing to work with the limitations that they do have also. You don't feel like reading this in would just rather experience chrome os. You can temporarily run on any of app. Top using an inexpensive usb flash drive you probably already have laying around you could just test it out for yourself. See how it works now. Here's the software situation on chrome os launched. It was essentially google chrome web browser but those used to operating system. Like windows and mac made the average chromebook seemed like little more than a laptop. That runs the web browser. That's about it. Let's basically the idea. Even if the chrome os never matured at fact is quite a lot can be done entirely on the web. These days take stock of everything you do on a daily basis. And you may find. There's nothing you can't accomplish with chrome at its most basic level

Casey Google MAC
Expand - 04-02-111 - ubuntu.podcast.s13e40-test3 - burst 6

Audio Upload 1

02:10 min | 2 months ago

Expand - 04-02-111 - ubuntu.podcast.s13e40-test3 - burst 6

"So might. The one in my ppa does so the one that the team of publishing doesn't have the invidia gpo enablement. I've enabled that in the the version of publishing might. Ppi on when it starts. you can just use shift. F twelve to tiny on and off so my have always start. And then i can turn it off when i don't want it to be. There doesn't lag the game or impact the game performance in any way notably. Not the i can measure now. And then when i i put some tweets out about this and then a bunch of people said oh what you need now is this thing could go away and overlay is a thing. That configures mango hot. Say what attribute she won't displayed and what color away you want them. So i've also prepared and packaged gopalan. Land is in the same. Ppa so you've got the the ui to configure a manage. This thing mullings the show notes in the show notes to where you can get all of that stuff nice. Now it's time for all your wonderful feedback. And i up eric. Nancy mouth us. I wanted to give you my perspective on. Hp's new laptop and workstation offerings geared towards day to science as a professional statistician and data scientists. I am certainly excited to see. Oem's begin targeting. This rapidly growing field. My only critique is how they have only included python as the language of choice. Where's the love for the our language. I have nothing against python atoll. But we're seeing more and more data. Scientists utilizing both are and python in different aspects of their workload and it would be nice to see how start recognizing the importance of having both readily available. The cutting edge algorithms in statistics are almost guaranteed to have a dedicated. Our package a now. It is much easier for art integrate with python to tap into tens of flow or other libraries. Perhaps i just need to be a bit louder to the oem vendors about this. Eric that's excellent feedback. And help you with that. I m. I have the option to speak to hp about this stuff and all

Gopalan Nancy Mouth Eric HP OEM
ubuntu.podcast.s13e40-test3 - burst 6

Audio Upload 1

02:16 min | 2 months ago

ubuntu.podcast.s13e40-test3 - burst 6

"That's really good because my previous solution to this. I had an nvidia. Gpa was i would ssh into my steam box from another computer right and ran the nvidia to which output this to the to the commodity. Yeah does it work with any. Gp yes so might. The one in my ppa does so the one that the team of publishing doesn't have the invidia gpo enablement. I've enabled that in the the version of publishing might. Ppi on when it starts. you can just use shift. F twelve to tiny on and off so my have always start. And then i can turn it off when i don't want it to be. There doesn't lag the game or impact the game performance in any way notably. Not the i can measure now. And then when i i put some tweets out about this and then a bunch of people said oh what you need now is this thing could go away and overlay is a thing. That configures mango hot. Say what attribute she won't displayed and what color away you want them. So i've also prepared and packaged gopalan. Land is in the same. Ppa so you've got the the ui to configure a manage. This thing mullings the show notes in the show notes to where you can get all of that stuff nice. Now it's time for all your wonderful feedback. And i up eric. Nancy mouth us. I wanted to give you my perspective on. Hp's new laptop and workstation offerings geared towards day to science as a professional statistician and data scientists. I am certainly excited to see. Oem's begin targeting. This rapidly growing field. My only critique is how they have only included python as the language of choice. Where's the love for the our language. I have nothing against python atoll. But we're seeing more and more data. Scientists utilizing both are and python in different aspects of their workload and it would be nice to see how start recognizing the importance of having both readily available. The cutting edge algorithms in statistics are almost guaranteed to have a dedicated. Our package a now. It is much easier for art integrate with python to tap into tens of flow or other libraries. Perhaps i just

Nvidia Gopalan Nancy Mouth Eric HP OEM
"ten years" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

The Minimalists Podcast

05:52 min | 4 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

"We clutter our desires tach moments. Our lives are brimming with existential. Clutter emotional clutter mental clutter spiritual clutter so much so that it's hard to distinguish what is clutter and what is not. We are stressed out overwhelmed and anxious because we filled our lives with disorder chaos though there is a solution look at an object a commitment a habit does it bring tranquillity or increase your wellbeing if not let it go not an easy fix but a simple one. Now i think when ryan i started this journey and sean can attest to this. He's been here for the vast majority of it. When ryan i i started this journey it did start because we were overwhelmed with stuff in our material possessions are physical manifestation of what's going on inside us and so by letting go of those external things i was able to over the last decade. Really deal with a lot of this other. Clutter as i said in. The essay clutter is not relegated only to our material things. I think it starts with the stuff. That's the initial bite at the apple but that changes everything else. You're able to look inward and deal with the business deal with a minute to deal with the media cluttered with the glowing screens to a great extent. And so minimalism can apply way beyond the stuff. I want you to keep that in mind because you'll often start with the stuff you'll struggle with the stuff but when we're done struggling with the stuff the struggle doesn't end it opens up a world of possibilities for decluttering delivering our life of all of these complexities to make room for what's truly important right before we get into our listener tips and our added value segment today. Let me encourage you to become a private podcast supporter. you know. This podcast is a hundred percent advertisement free. That's because of this small group of five or six thousand people who decide to support the minimalist podcasts. And because of that actually. Two thirds of our podcast is on the minimalist private podcast. It's really space for ryan. And i can let her hair down. We could talk about things in private or semi public with an understanding group of people who allow us to fail and screw up out loud in real time. It's a different experience from our public podcast. But it's a much deeper experience as well. Maybe it doesn't reach the same broad audience that this podcast reaches but it goes a lot deeper into the things beyond the clutter and the deeper conversations. We also have with our guests this week ryan and i are really going to go deep into our ten year history and even before that is well if you want to check all that out encourage you to just try it out for a week or a month. It's cheaper than a cup of coffee. You can head on over to Minimalists dot com slash to and get your personal link. So that our private podcasts. Plays in your favorite podcast app by the way if you become a supporter you also get the entire back catalogue. We're talking hundreds of hours of past private podcast episodes. We think you'll enjoy those. Of course you can walk away at anytime you feel like it's not adding value to your life. Let's we got some voicemail comets and tips from our listeners as well check them out hello from the uk. I was recently listening to the podcast on a minimalist christmas from the first of december and i wanted to share with you some of the things that we do with regards to gift-giving My family absolutely love to give gifts to show their love and appreciation. And i usually make a homemade gift fall. Some of our family members which is appreciated so much more than ever anticipated that it would be. We do either baked goods homemade decorations Wreaths made from foraged foliage. So it's a really fun thing to do with the family in the lead up to christmas to make all of these gifts ready to give them on christmas day and i think that they appreciate it so much more than a board gift because it is so hot fell on the time effort. That's gone into so. Hopefully that helps somebody Have a nice christmas. Hi this is shelley moore men. And i'm from windsor connecticut. I had a thought regarding shredding. There's a lotta people who don't want to purchase a shredder. But all of a sudden they'll be cleaning out and they have a lot of studying to do. So here's a couple of ideas. The first one is to call your local banks. A lot of them will offer free shrek days. And you don't have to block that thing to take advantage of that if you don't wanna hold onto the shredding until the bank has the tread day. The other ashes to call places like easter seals who work with people with disabilities a lot of them will have shredding operations and for pretty reasonable. See will shred all of your stuff and the money goes back to easter seals and offers Employments with people who have disabilities aren't y'all for added value segment this week. Well it's the end of the year right. It's our ten year anniversary. It's also the end of twenty twenty. What a year it has been. But there's been a highlight of the year for me. It's been music every year. I think this is my tenth year doing this now or close to that. I put together a like a top ten list. Sometimes there's twelve songs some sometimes twelve album. Sometimes they're seven but it's my top ten albums of the year or top. However many albums of the year and twenty twenty has been a surprisingly great year for music. There have been some really surprised me. I i think there are some folks that are releasing music that otherwise wouldn't have released music. And i think we're of course my my taste.

ryan sean shelley moore apple windsor uk connecticut
"ten years" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

The Minimalists Podcast

02:33 min | 4 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

"Might even say with social media stuff Like the amount that you put out into the world People may say they want more and more and more from you but actually they like wanting more wanting is a nice feeling so maybe it's better to just sometimes let them want to little more and then give them more of an excellent like twenty years ago. My girlfriend at the time She she would do this little like what are you getting for my birthday. Tell me tell me. Tell me i said. Nah i'm not telling you. Please please tell me what you're getting me for. My birthday is no no no. I'm not telling you and she's hopefully he's telling us that. Okay you really wanna know. Yeah i really wanna know. I said all right a necklace on a trip to mexico and she went You weren't supposed to tell me. I said i know. Don't worry i didn't actually get you next trip to mexico. I just knew that you didn't actually want to know. Okay touche. so it's like yeah. She liked yearning to know she didn't actually want to know. So on right maybe with the amount of stuff that we put out into social media and share with the world. It's better to have people want more from us. I like to writing wise. You know when. I whenever i put out in the world. Writing wise is usually very succinct. And i have this. My rule of thumb is if they wish. I would have said more than i've said just enough man. I think that's a great place to end it. Actually dirk servers. Thank you so much. I really judge. I love talking with you anytime. So thanks for having me on are there are forty seven more of those quarantine slash quality conversations over the minimalists dot com slash support. Also as i mentioned this week ryan. And i wanna go in-depth on the minimalist private podcast. We're gonna talk about the last ten years some of our achievements some of our biggest failures some of the lessons. We've learned but i wanted to sum it up with this essay. That i wrote if i were to sum up the last ten years the lessons that i've learned in one essay theresa that i wrote over the.

mexico dirk ryan theresa
"ten years" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

The Minimalists Podcast

01:43 min | 4 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

"The fascinated in a frigging closet because joshua i can't sit in the office now and it's just too big in. There's too many distractions. And i couldn't do it in one day. I realized i gotta get back in the closet. It's funny you say that. I got so used to writing at all of our books at my kitchen table. I have a desk. Now that An i'll a work from there occasionally. But i still find myself writing at the kitchen table. Because that was the the habit i established. I established many years ago. Place that i feel the most creative at and and you're right any of these tools whether it's an office that can augment our experience alternately but not the thing that does the writing for she can have the same exact pencil as stephen king. It doesn't mean you're going to start writing horror novels tomorrow. It's never thing it's never the next thing it's never different thing Now this is the the lesson is an in by the way. I still have to learn everyday joshua like i still can convince myself i have about fifty six thousand bottles of potions in my bathroom and i can. I will still promise you josh tomorrow. I'll see something and be like this. Is it though. This is the bottle of lotion that will change my base in therefore changed. My life blake the amount. Get suckered into this stuff really is amazing to me marketing. His powerful man iranian all just want the longing we want belonging and we want acceptance and.

joshua stephen king josh
"ten years" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

The Minimalists Podcast

05:32 min | 4 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

"I mean you nervous. And i don't even mean anything big and bold. I don't i mean you know those things that we want to say. But we're not seeing them. The things we want a tribe or not trying them but just little things that that Right on other side of discontent. And i think that we are all afraid to admit that we have any discontent or any longing or that we can imagine anything better for ourselves because the met might mean that we have to do something about it so in a way we we long for sometimes the wrong things. The temporary pacifier is the the ephemeral pleasures. The things that don't make us better men and women that are human beings but That that distract us in the moment. Yeah i think makes perfect sense. We can be forgiven for that. I mean we live in a in a capitalistic culture. I mean you know marketers jobs. Their whole job is to sit in rooms and identify the basic needs of human beings and then attach products up. They do their job. We do all day. they're really good at it. It's not subtle. It's literally their job right so you know when people woman said to speaking of that. I put this in untamed. She said i can't go round trusting my longing or my desire. I long for a bottle. Malibu every night should i just go for that said no you don't you don't go for that new. Don't trust that first of all. I know you don't trust that because you brought it up to right right. You know know better when you start asking a question like that. The answer is often embedded in the question itself. Exactly exactly you already know and second of all when you when you have a surface desire like the one you just like what you just said about the things that we think we want. If you don't trust it have to look below it to the deeper desire. So what's beneath bat bottle of malibu. What human deep human need. Those marketers attached that to its west. It's escape right away. You really want deeper desire. The desire beneath the desire is for some freakin rest. Yeah and we have the why behind it right because if we don't ask why we go for that surface of thing whether it's the The bottle or it's the the rolex. And i know for me throughout my twenties which feels like a lifetime ago. Now i you know. I wanted the the nice thing i really longed for. The i thought. I longed for that. But i was really longing for what the marketers and advertisers were selling underneath that the the sort of acceptance of others the the the love or the uniqueness and and and i think that if we can get beyond that you realize that of course the rolex will never get you that but you can get what you actually long for no matter how many will lexus. you get. You will realize that it never works because you can't ever get enough of what you don't need right. That's why i mean. I have a friend. Put this in the book. I have a friend who was obsessed josh Getting the speech house mckay. She wanted to rent to be just for the whole summer. Did not have the money for it. It was very bad decision. We kept talking about trying to get to the desire beneath the desiring. She burst into tears when in the middle of our conversation. She said i just see all these people with their families at the beach. Look like they're having they're connected and they're having so much fun. And i just feel so disconnected from my family. Don't even talk anymore. By the time we got it to end the conversation. We figured out you know. Which do she had a basket and everyone in your family should put their phones in the frigging basket before dinner. You guys should sit together for an hour and look at each other and talk to each other and she tried that and we laughed now today because that you know fifteen cent basket was a lot cheaper. That'd be joss you can really by the solution to your problems your true. It's true that money does solve money problems but most of our problems once our basic needs are met tend not to be Money problems at all in fact we the house examples. Such a great example. I know that that often when there are failing relationships and we try to do is like well. I'll buy my way out of this. If we just had a better house that would fix relationship. I just had the right car. Or if i just had a kid with this person. I'm sure that would fix the relationship. Of course all that does complicate things. Say i mean josh. I convince myself that i would listen. A really should had this talk a couple of years ago with you. Because i convince myself i would be a better writer. I finally had an office. Because i am a started writing when i lived in such a tiny house that i wrote in the closet. I had a vote between like piles of underwear jeans night. That's where i wrote my books. And so i decided okay if i can write books in closet. Imagine how good. I would be if i had like a real grownup office so my wife and i moved. I got a big office in genoa. I write.

Malibu josh mckay joss genoa
"ten years" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

The Minimalists Podcast

02:01 min | 4 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

"Of the painful emotions that we know no one ever taught us to deal with because we live in a culture that worships happiness right the cracks in our relationships. Our dreams are dreams that we feel like a braver. Bolder version of ourselves would do but we're not doing them. All of our pain. Potential is inside of stillness and painted potential. Two things are very hard to sit with right. So that's why because it's easier to to distract ourselves from those things into face them but the beautiful thing is that anybody who's lucky enough to have gone through any sort of recovery program. We'll tell you why. I see all the real pain and yet have great. Hope for this moment or what comes next should say is that in my life. I have found that every single good thing. My marriage my health my career my my personality all of it is a result of sitting in that stillness feeling all of that pain and digging into that potential. End what comes next is usually something new and beautiful. You talked about finding a braver. Boulder self. And i like that. I think that sometimes we have a misconception about what that looks like. We think that a a braver version of ourselves is some sort of perfect infallible person. But it doesn't sound to me like that's what you're actually talking about here. Yeah i mean. I stopped waiting to become a grownup allante. I figured out that never happens. Right never get to that. They were all waiting for a keep just waking up everyday in keeping myself so dragic normal..

Boulder
"ten years" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

The Minimalists Podcast

04:01 min | 4 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

"My name is joshua fields. Millburn ryan nicodemus is out today. He has some sort of weird thing going on with his eyeball. And i think he was terrified to be on camera today. But don't worry. We actually have three guests today because today is a celebration. It's our anniversary q. Rafael cdc that. Tony tony tony. It's our anniversary. Podcast sean. and jordan no more in the studio with me as well. We have three amazing guests today. Really a celebration and a gift for all of you. We got you an anniversary present. It's been ten years since we started the minimum literally ten years ago this week. December of twenty ten ryan. I started the minimalists dot com. It was about a year and a few months. After my mother died my marriage ended. It was a few months after ryan had had done his packing party and we had simplified our lives. We wanted to share that story with everyone else. And so for seven bucks. We became the minimalists dot com and we started the blog and from there. There was this whole thing of the last ten years. And in fact on the maximal episode this week over unpatriotic the minimalist dot com slash support. If you wanna check it out we're gonna do a long episode ryan and i are together. We're gonna to along episode about the last ten years we're going to answer some questions from the audience over the last ten years but we're also going to really dive into some things that maybe we haven't even talked about on the podcast because the podcast is also has an anniversary this month. It's five years old as well. So five years into the minimalist. We'd already put three books out there. We had gone on a bunch of tours. We started a publishing company. We've been blogging for years. But then we started the podcast. We'd just finished filming our first film. Minimalism for net flex and actually was before it was the the netflix thing was even there. We just had finished filming it and thought. Hey let's start a podcast. We were both really enjoy listening to podcasts. So here we are ten years later or five years after the podcast started. And we have some special guests today. Ryan and i over the course of the last seven eight months. Something like that. We've been doing these quarantine conversations. In fact we switch them to quality conversations as the quarantines and the lockdowns began to lift in in different locales. And so we've done fifty different conversations these short conversations that are anywhere from ten minutes to twenty twenty five minutes. Long over on our private podcast. And what we wanted to bring you. Today were three of those conversations. Three of our favorites. It's really hard to pick because there are so many just great conversations and it's been an exercise for me in listening to people a lot more and i've really enjoyed these short conversations almost like calling a friend and then just recording it and putting it on a podcast. There's no definitive format. There is a -sarily an interview. It's a conversation between two people. And i've been listening to a lot of different viewpoints over the course of this year on these conversations and we've been spoiled conversations with a q. By the way corentin conversations or quality conversations. and so. we're going to dive into some of those. Today will also have an added value segment and Do right here right now at the end but i thought maybe we could go ahead and dive in right now. The first conversation we have is with glennon. Doyle now glennon. She wrote a great book this year. Call while she released a great book. This year called untamed. And it's really a story about a woman finding herself and so we got to talk about that. What it means to to find yourself. You'll hear that in the conversation but we'll also put a link to her new book untamed in the show notes. All right. i'll see in a few minutes. But enjoy this quality conversation with.

joshua fields Millburn ryan nicodemus Rafael cdc Tony tony tony ryan sean jordan netflix Ryan glennon Doyle
"ten years" Discussed on The Sustainable Futures Report

The Sustainable Futures Report

02:47 min | 6 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on The Sustainable Futures Report

"By <Speech_Male> contrast <Speech_Male> ten years to midnight <Speech_Male> is much shorter. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> It's much <Silence> easier read. <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> On finally, <Speech_Male> I leave you with <Speech_Male> the news that <Speech_Male> honey is better <Speech_Male> for you than you <Silence> might have thought. <Speech_Male> A study <Speech_Male> published <Speech_Male> in the Journal B. <Speech_Male> M. J.. <Speech_Male> Based medicine <Speech_Male> found honey <Speech_Male> was a more effective <Speech_Male> treatment for <Speech_Male> coughs, blocked <Speech_Male> noses and sore <Speech_Male> throats. <Speech_Male> Then many remedies <Speech_Male> more conventionally <Silence> prescribed. <Speech_Male> Well, <Speech_Male> as a <Speech_Male> Kiva on you <Silence> that. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Beekeeping <Speech_Male> is suddenly <Speech_Male> getting these celebrity <Speech_Male> treatment. David <Speech_Male> Beckham was pictured in <Speech_Male> the press this week with all <Speech_Male> his family wearing <Speech_Male> suits <Speech_Male> he built his <Speech_Male> own hives as well. <Speech_Male> Apparently <Speech_Male> Ed. Sheeran has <Speech_Male> installed hives on <Speech_Male> his suffolk estate <Speech_Male> could use. <Speech_Male> VP's <Speech_Male> good news for us. As <Speech_Male> aren't important <Speech_Male> police from food crops <Speech_Male> particularly <Speech_Male> fruit. <Speech_Male> If you have <Speech_Male> land time <Speech_Male> and a few hundred pounds <Speech_Male> despite you to <Speech_Male> join them in protecting <Speech_Male> the bees. <Speech_Male> If <Speech_Male> not gruesome, <Speech_Male> be <Speech_Male> friendly plans <Speech_Male> next year. In fact, <Speech_Male> if you PA crocuses <Speech_Male> now <Speech_Male> they will provide <Speech_Male> early food source <Speech_Male> for bees <Speech_Male> and the look nice <Silence> as well. <Speech_Male> On, <Speech_Male> just off <SpeakerChange> to give <Speech_Male> my babies some <Silence> winter feet. <Silence> <Speech_Male> Before <Silence> I go. <Speech_Male> Let <Speech_Male> me. Thank you for listening <Speech_Male> and especially <Speech_Male> those of you who support <Speech_Male> the sustainable <Speech_Male> futures report by <Silence> patrons. <Speech_Male> Thanks to <Speech_Male> Rachel Moreso <Speech_Male> being the very latest <Silence> supporter. <Speech_Male> If <Speech_Male> you'd like to be <Speech_Male> a patron, you'll <Speech_Male> find all the details. <Speech_Male> Patriot <Speech_Male> DOT COM <Speech_Male> SLASH SF. Oh, that's <Speech_Male> P. A. T. <Speech_Male> A. N. <Speech_Male> DOT COM SLASH <Silence> S. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> We're not going <Speech_Male> viral yet but listen <Speech_Male> the numbers are <Speech_Male> at record levels. <Speech_Male> Please <Speech_Male> Shah. <Speech_Male> I published <Speech_Male> the full text of every <Speech_Male> episode on the <Speech_Male> blog at <Speech_Male> www <Speech_Male> don't sustainable <Speech_Male> futures don't <Silence> report. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> With. Extensive <SpeakerChange> links <Silence> to all my sources. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> As being <Speech_Male> a bit of a problem with blogger <Speech_Male> recently, <Speech_Male> and that it stripping <Speech_Male> out all my formatting <Speech_Male> making <Silence> things difficult to read. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> A new website which <Speech_Male> will incorporate the blog <Speech_Male> and links to this podcast <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> will be live <Silence> later this month. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> In <SpeakerChange> the meantime <Speech_Male> I'll have more <Speech_Male> interviews for you. <Speech_Male> Moan useful you <Speech_Male> ideas for you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and do let me <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> have your ideas, your <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> comments, your criticisms. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> That we know what <Speech_Male> you won't be. To report. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> again for listening. <Speech_Male> That was the <Speech_Male> sustainable futures <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> report I'm Anthony <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Day. <Music> <Advertisement> Until <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> next time.

"ten years" Discussed on The Sustainable Futures Report

The Sustainable Futures Report

02:29 min | 6 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on The Sustainable Futures Report

"So perhaps, the most important thing we can do is to keep people's mind on the issues to to promote the message. Hit, and I think two things if you say, what could any individual right? The first one is get really informed in call the question of anyone who's who they they meet. They interact with a knife vote for they talk they're just just just being a good citizen a good employee a good. Consumer in that sense of good intent worrying about the sustainability of it. And then the second one is fine to play she love and a better. Right because essentially I think this is GonNa be. Ten million cities at a time kind of her that that dude a little bit villages, our cities or counties to a little bit at a time and adds up to something. It's really pretty massive because it's it's a it's more than industrial scale problem. It's a complete lifestyle issue that will have to rethink. And actually I think are if you look at all if you re Paul Hawkins Book, for example, the life you live if you go to the solutions is actually Wayne Nicer. Actually way better, and so it's it's not like we're asking people to give something up. We're asking people to move to a much nicer place at book referring to I think he's on trying to draw them throw down. Yes. I recommend people have a look at it. As, as we draw to the end of this conversation, I'd just like to quote the very last sentence in your book way you say, no one is exempt from the need to act. Please decide what Rhody will play on get to it. There's nothing more to say than I think actually that is the at Berkeley summary what we're trying to articulate in the book. So I'm glad you read. BLACHE EPA. Thank you very much for taking the time to talk to the sustainable futures revolt. Anthony Lot and good luck with your mission. I hope you're successful. That was blache shepherd. Global, leader for strategy and leadership odds WC. Ten. He has to midnight four urgent global.

Anthony Lot Paul Hawkins EPA Berkeley Rhody
"ten years" Discussed on The Sustainable Futures Report

The Sustainable Futures Report

03:46 min | 6 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on The Sustainable Futures Report

"Hello, and welcome to the sustainable futures reboard for Friday, the second of October. I'm Anthony Day. As you know I had a break. You know this during that time Rachel Morris became a patron and silver supporter. Sorry you've had to wait so long for your shoutout Rachel. Welcome to the sustainable. Futures Report. We live in challenging times. Which is a rather unhelpful cliche. Nevertheless, it's true as challenges like uncertainty to be faced and if not eliminated. To. Be Reduced a managed. At least if we identify the problems, we're on the white defining solutions. There are fundamental changes taking place to industrial social and political structures across the world. Changes which we have to face up to. Control. I spoke to the author of a new book, Ten years to midnight. Right well, my guest today on these sustainable futures report is shepherd. Is the global leader for strategy and leadership at P. WC which many of you have heard of it's a network of professional services firms committed to building trust in society and solving important problems. Blat is also the Dean Emeritus. Professor. Emeritus of Duke University's Fuqua School of business where he told thirty three years..

Rachel Morris Dean Emeritus Blat Anthony Day P. WC Fuqua School of business Duke University Professor professional services
"ten years" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"ten years" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Everybody so this episode of stuff to blow your mind is sponsored by the all new Mazda C X thirty which I actually just got to test drive recently in the beautiful beautiful mountains of southern California and I will say as some. We've told you on the show before we're not really car guys. We don't know a lot about cars. I'm sort of an automobile Philistine. But from on this auto Philistines heart. I will say this was a really wonderful car to drive. I truly enjoyed cruising around the mountains. In this thing. It was very smooth. It was very stylishly sung to my non Kar Heart in a way that cars usually don't so what's actually in this thing details wise so it has class leading standard horsepower horsepower and is active all wheel drive with G. veteran control plus for ultimate control and I will say there is a very special thing about this car. I have driven another car like this. When you go around a corner in it? something about it feels almost like predictive like it. You know you don't need to do like jerking around trying to correct your turn like everything in it is extremely smooth and continuous. And I think that's what's going on here but it's also got a beautiful design on the outside. Yeah Yeah I mean basically. The thirty is size to be agile in the city while still having the interior space in utility to go anywhere anytime encouraging an active life style and to your point. It's the the idea that you're not having to to wrestle the machine to get where you're going there is a. There's a meeting of the man in the machine. It's also very nice driving experience in a visual way. Where like the car doesn't have a touchscreen and a you know we're like you can see those touchscreens? Come up and kind of distract you while you're trying find navigate the the features and stuff driving instead. It's more traditional kind of command controls that you go with buttons and Levers from the steering wheel but it actually makes for a much nicer acer less distracted drive. You've got your eyes on the road. Yeah you're not playing video game the drive the car. You're driving the car but it's also got connected car features that give you convenience at safety peace of mind Got An in-car WIFI option. Remote engine start stop and door. Lock Vehicle Status Navigation Service vehicle finder automatic nine one one dialing in the event of an accident So it's really got it all and I really truly enjoy driving this.

Mazda California acer
"ten years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"ten years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Aw and why that was avenue in five bucks just decide to move real slow. So we'll begin. saw ratcheted second so imagine renton is causing statement where we talk about all these different sort things stories that are going across the world and how our lack of laws and enforcing those laws laws against people who walk around stores is causing chaos amongst the world and it was guys we'd be taking it a little more space but we can't even get gun control because why we never into control right so the tangible goals in one another tangible goals. I think there's a lot of these. Sores regulated get off the street people in impeach him some classes about how will the sword and real responsibly. Because right now you can go to any comic CON Convention. Whatever grab when he's quote unquote replica? Swords and just be walking around stabbing people within minutes. There's no registration there's no Task for proficiency We don't keep like a list of Mosey sores or nothing and I think that's a big. That's a big problem. Sneeze a seventeen year old mister threatening another team with a Samurai sword over one hundred dollars Singapore unhappy that an eighteen year old. Oh Oh okay let me scroll down happy that an eighteen year old. His brother a hundred dollars a seventeen year old confronted with Semi Sore One night last September Muhammad uh-huh Leaf Moustapha admitted to one charge of criminal intimidation on Thursday. The court heard that he or she the sword inside the victim's home jurong east threatening to slash lashed older boy with the twenty seven meter weapon. if he did not come out of the house his charge sheet stays that Zach. Words come down with us if not I'll stab. You did say literally elite. who was sent to a juvenile home and twenty seventeen for commission in House? Trespass and theft may face imprisonment for his current charge. We're giving his young age. Debbie Prosecutor Angela. Hang call for probation suitability ability report before making representations. I'm like I mentioned one dollars. That's a lot of money it is. I mean we were just stab someone number five. I could see why you would want to stab someone over one hundred. That's why you shouldn't have a sore elite who was not represented by a lawyer requested to be placed on probation instead of giving jail time. My mother's not working I. I am the only support from my mother. District Judge agreed to the probation suitability report to be prepared and journey for the man on January. Thirtieth finishing He also claimed that the soil was actually just scared of victim. which I mean? That's probably true. I'd be scared of Nagata. So but You know wasn't there was trying to scare somebody with it and trying to kill them with it either one I. I can't be assuming assuming when you pull out like Oh scary it. I can't be assuming you know So yeah somebody out his brother some money so he asked for his friends between the ages of seventeen. Twenty one to meet him at Was this this Jason Mohammad Yassin. Daniel Rosalyn to meet a Yeltsin's flat to support him as he planned to confront Yassin Seen he decided to bring along the source so that he could use scare. You're saying and repaying the debt while the void deck of Yassin's blocked the group spotted a friend of him to get you to carry down to come down to meet him the free man he's pretty duplicitous. That was involved in this. They should charge this back luring to do down the free taxi I said. But there's there's no reply so they went up to his unit shattering come out yesterday. Opened the gate to unify and a Ruckus at the time at that point two members of at least company and Seventeen hundred eighteen against shouting Yeltsin about their own personal grievances against him. Oh he oh everybody's money he's taken the money. What does she say about my sister son? What isn't it don cut in? A fit of anger leave then unsheathed his sword indirect today housing threatening to slashing if you did not step out of his unit to talk things out. Well I'm gonNA tell you the coming out. Yeah I don't come. Natural pulled a sword out. That's eighty hours. Yeah I'm a lot less likely to come out. I don't think you WanNa talk frightening. I title legal aid needed five minutes to use the WASHROOM. I Oh okay major. Let me take a real quick because my parents are full of shit frightened he say okay. So you're seeing the doors unit. Cada police like a smart person. The group flare when they notice police cars in a car parked nearby but they were later traced interested. Dale one hundred dollars I get it but hale all right. That's it for today. So thank you so much for listening. Thank you I'm glad I show can be anything you want it to be and ten ten years down in hold only like I think this is a great. Alcohol is a great episode to put the proof A we can do whatever we want to. Apparently because our fifty minutes of this was nothing but seriously thank alpha listener and we appreciate. Ah well wishes and condolences to Karen And Our thoughts and stuff. So thank you and we'll let you guys know Or if you don't see more shows during the wine maybe traveling and stuff so you know I until next time I love you I love you..

Jason Mohammad Yassin Yeltsin renton Singapore Debbie Prosecutor Angela Leaf Moustapha theft Nagata Dale Karen Zach hale Daniel Rosalyn
"ten years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"ten years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"We are friends now now and I got people like I have got people I talk to maybe every four to five years but we taught we taught hager how you doing. Okay how you doing click and we. We are who we see each other again and as I understand that's a different love languages and other people trying to invalidate holiday. They love what I'm saying is the lack of understanding to the fact that we don't all have to connect on that level. We don't we're not all going to have these grand rained friendships. You know I look at my facebook. Hey I don't have to have like five or ten. Maybe that's okay you know. It's not that happen. Awesome happened to me. That's five ten people might they will probably show up or at least college check on me or something right. They know something wrong. There's a lot of people that aren't that way and I'm not holding it against is there but when you see like people expect this shit out of people as other folks don't have fucking lives man. I like why aren't you dropping everything and reading eating my passive aggressive facebook status in stopping coming over my house. That's not what the fuck happened. Twelve I think a lot of people treat friendships like like they did when they was in school. We're best friends. We got to go together. Walk together talk together. We got to be up each other as time. And if you don't treat me like that you're not a friend right. People people have motherfucking lives. It reminds you of that. Yeah of like fifth grade when you get your first best friend. People's definition is you do is just being each of the time it's like Dr. I'm I'm not GonNa be on the phone with you every day and at the same time I understand. That's what you need is just can't come from me not not but it's the weird judgment entitlement that I am expressing of that that I do find lie down. This is really turned a lot of us in the like really selfish self absorbed people who are constantly. Try to put our own light loneliness on everybody else. I own like insecurities. It's all. Oh everybody else to fix input. I know and that book conflict is not abuse and talk about people that have been victims of trauma and stuff. And it's like look win once you've been in the traumatic experience you live with this trauma by people. We live with it all the time right trauma at some point though it is your thing to deal with yes. It is and so you can't always function or be trusted to lead and Shit if you lead from a place of unresolved trauma trauma I but we've been able to reverse the polarity on that online and be like the person does the most traumatize have the most power in the most. Say so we wouldn't don't do that any other if you work at a job and somebody was like. I had racism happen to me one day and I never got over it. They wouldn't be able to walk into your job and be Eli okay. So because some racist she happened to me one day all the white people get the fuck out. We've like what no you can't manage cannot but online you can you can do that. You can kind of flip it to be like you know this thing happen to me. I'll never forgive this group of people. Everyone needs to act accordingly. Hey anytime you guys bring up this topic. I don't feel good so you gotta stop talking about it like that's not think that that has enabled us to really be like these quote unquote friendships. We talk about two. They're not really Because when we get to these moments a conflict it's over you know and I think that's really not good. It's not good. It's not healthy healthy And people are not like I said if people are not checklist and people aren't like you could afford it up though in tragic trashed forget Just can't do that but people do this all the time and is devastated. These can be devastating to people like you you know and it causes hurt. People continue to hurt people like like. That's the two statement but that's a real thing Yeah says the way we talk about. Friendship depends ugly patriots of the new notion of relating one seeks maximum return on minimum investment and allies in our exit strategy. Anytime a friend for fill our fantasies. These post reveal more about the toxicity of our society than a negative describing is a friendship as a capitalistic exchange instead of relationships relationships involving people who care about each other hanging out a helping each other through ups and downs house is enough to make you wanna cry into a beer with a confidante close friend kind is going out of town. Yeah Yeah and also I think for me I don't know if it's a generational thing saying but sometimes is nothing like hearing somebody's voice because so many people do on Lonzo much. Nah sometimes let me are you okay. Let me hear Your Voice your options. They physically see your face was again different love language. Some people need that. You know. I'm not necessarily. You GotTa Call Me and be talk. I don't i. I think there's been some chances sometimes where I reached that level. I might well. Maybe if I talk to this person right I understand maybe proceed as person and you know what sometimes their trauma so deep. It wasn't even matter you know but you know different. Love languages. Transacting relationships take for example..

facebook hager Lonzo Eli
"ten years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

12:53 min | 1 year ago

"ten years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Our female We don't have a non binary thing or anything on this one and is amazing. How a lot of the stuff? Asian in target date dare to embed about talk initiate towards women before why they act like women just fucking didn't exist. Yeah a lot of these. Ads Are Harry's razors razors and shit like that. Right Bevo was something where we had to be like. Hey women could use a student now. I work I shaved it before it was good. Good thirty four million women. Listen to podcast in two thousand. Eighteen is a lot of women is this is sixty eight percent more likely for podcast listening to have a postgraduate graduate degree. I mean mostly very highly educated. Yeah talk at forty four forty five percent more likely for podcast listening to have a college degree looking at gender differences in pockets of education female podcast users have a higher education and income than overall US population according to the podcast analytics newsbeat. So Wow Mormon. Listen and a lot of podcasts. Catered them in women are the ones with the money and education some shit yeah. Yeah did you audience don't exist. Yeah and he still was funny. Is that the decision makers Komo mostly seem to chase after the male demographic Because I think that's just tradition radio and TV so the decision makers there's Impact casting are quicker to give that like if I were running network. Okay let me reach out to a man who's GonNa podcast even if what the man does. It is something that pisses women off. You know. It's like okay. We want to be a network with Joe Button. We WanNa you know we gotta get Charlemagne we gotta get ti. See Ya and women might be like fuck them. I don't like them I don't WanNa but that's the people get the money behind. No normally you know not obviously not all and there's a lot of women at that. They've got it again too but it's just funny. How male dominated a lot of the official podcast are While women are the ones listening. Yeah and then you know podcast actually catered towards women feel like we're Goddamn Wad women. Didn't they get sponsors that catered towards women and everybody is Zahn was like almost like the thing with black become out and everything. Oh Shit Nigga movie yes women like this shit too and women's Bauer like you know. We get perks prowess ignorant to ignore this whole as audience. Yeah like obviously I see our donations. I see our premium listeners. And stuff like that and I don't. I've never looked to see like exactly what the percentages of women never done a survey or anything like that but I would say that is if not fifty fifty is like slightly majority. Women probably anecdotally off the top of my head and a lot of times. People will say. Well how'd you monetize. How do you how make money? How are we are able to do that? And I think a lot of shit really is because of our natural predisposition to be light light. We Love Women. We love black people. We love our people and a lot of that to me. And it's not vache putting on airs. It's not it wasn't like a branding decision where we say. We're going to get all this money like literally. I lost a job in cameras. We should try to make money so it wasn't like bydesign but I think by happenstance or whatever a lot of how we were able to monetize because of that type of inclusive cocoa just kind of like more fair minded thing now doesn't mean that these shows are very like women bash initiate and Black Women. This and all that those shows make money to do if you look at a lot of times. They make money off of like advertisers or someone coming in and and quote unquote pain them to do what they do right which kinda takes the listener almost out of the equation but as a listener funded podcast? I know a large part of this is because you know black women feel okay given us money as a point where we do you know because we're not just out here trying to like embarrassed embarrassing them but at the same time we're not our just pandering and you know at the same time you know to go. Listen to just be a pandering podcast as me and ain't Shit me and trash ask women. Is Everything please give us your money. Please gives you. You know like we just keep it real but it is also I think Not a coincidence that we're wondering if there's black monetize like this agreed. Forty three percent pockets. Man's use spotify to listen to podcasts. Yes spotify they are game changer for people and we we said years ago these music apps a like a into podcasting blend them and spotify lycopene now where anybody can get on and that change it because now you will allow people people when people go. I got a podcast. You can go as some of my podcast and then you go you gotTa spotify. Yes is this and they can just type into title. I don't have have to have a fucking separate. I don't have to Dalo nothing new. I don't have to take because once you start taking extra steps a lot of people fucking tap out. Yeah I it's also amazing because spotify hasn't been in the game that long no it hasn't because they both people get get their pocket is normally like a phone and stuff and apple was the first people that really put podcast into like the what they do into their phones and their ipads and stuff is interesting to see that like literally early. spotify came in and boom. Now we're doing podcasts. Their original stuff and just going and cherry picking the good shows from other places and now they can just you you can just submit your feet and they'll take anybody but yeah Forty three percent is a huge amount for somebody that just hopped into the thing and plus spotify advantage of being on android and right now all the other stuff right and also the thing particularly with the apple sticky keep dishes separate which is fucking dumb combined that Let's see thirty nine percent of smart speaker owners. Listen to podcasts. At least once week I know I do six percent podcast shows are downloaded from apple The average podcast listeners describes a seven different shows weekly. I stand stupid but yeah that that makes sense because you variety taste outage to fifty two percent or podcast scribes listen to entire episodes which is much higher than over fifty podcast consumers. Listen to between seventy six six to one hundred percent of all the podcasts downloaded devices. I will never be in that percentage. I have so many downloaded. I'll never get to a mom agreed around twenty twenty six percent of the podcast listeners. Speed podcast while listening. Yeah knows no say when a listen to this show and come in late day like a while. I'm so used to a union like speed. I just listened to the normal speed. I've never spared a slowdown. Anything like that. Yeah but that means somebody out there stores right now we are the chipmunks see eight RPM you Inca yes Alvin they do do do you welcome out there listeners. On three times speed or whatever Yeah podcast listeners. Being an average of six hours was in thirty seven minutes list the podcast every week Ninety percent of podcast consumers to listen to podcasts. At home I would think most people will probably. I be listened to on commuter style but I I was doing everywhere in the car at the gym. More than half of Americans do chair chores while listening to podcast. Ask Your cleaning up. Welcome to the fold. Okay I'm in hive. I'm in Chore Hive. I ninety four percent. PODCAST consumers are active on at least one social media channel channel which is a great way for most why we tell people between about to show us. TVD WT come follow us on instagram. Come be our facebook page. We love that stuff what have us. PODCASTS pay attention to the AD which is much higher than radio. Fifty four percent. A podcast consumers say they you think about buying advertising product and thing I said that one what was the other one that There was another one that that was interesting. I think about race But it might be down there AC- fifty billion episodes have been strained or download. It from APO Monday. Tuesday wins out our best as a release a podcast. That is so true because when we do the show I can watch our feedback in on our Hashtag I I we. Do you know Saturday Sunday Monday. And then you'll see like a boom boom boom feedback feedback but you get towards the end of the week. Our people want to get off work. Mark on twitter CASS. Now we gotta get you done a lot less Thursday Friday Saturday Hashtag like I'm listening to the show So that makes total sense Let's the Amazon. Prime podcast has one hundred and fifty million active users. What probably got August August? I don't I didn't know that. What all right tasers from June? Two thousand nine hundred. I ain't no problem. Had A podcast feed two percent in a survey to mega. Say podcast are too long because you know why Americans work too fucking much time. And that's why I always say don't make your show for for everybody because the bane two hours find interesting when people get podcasting advised they always tell you make it short. I always tell you not to you. Know don't go too long not too often not this. And I'm like Dr. If the person listening to you is like upset that your show is too long Dank. The one for you know gay not. You're title audience. They really ain't fucking what you anyway. Yeah because the thing is as a podcast listener they are short. Sure Park has its did are born is look and then there are long podcast. Is the entertaining. You normally is hard to have both you know. Most people don't do both so a lot of times. People don't WanNa admit I don't like listening because you're not entertaining Dr. I've heard the truth right light honestly if I roll my eyes podcast. I'm are is because I already don't really fuck with you and you know and I mean that's just an honest thing the people I'm not naming no names but I think and the same thing for us if people look at us and go oh two hours yet. They don't really talk with her right now. Because you know what. When I listened to the morning Jones I never once like three hours of this shit? I love the morning journals. I even longer better. Yeah I was listening to the commercials and Shit you now when you know win day. lebatardshow is on and he's GonNa be on effort three hours four hours out of the middle of the day. People look forward to that time and they don't. Oh you know the radios to me way worse than podcast throwing out his product placement advertising. And and you can't make everything confine you know yes so me personally like dogs. They spoke with us They GONNA fuck with us so it's going to be as long as it needs to be you know and also is one of those things where different people's lifestyle demands different types of podcasts. For Groping for change people leave all and you have some people who like you say I have three and four hour commute back and forth to work so they love. The traffic is going to listen to. I don't have to have fourteen episodes queued up because every ten minutes Gal finished and I've binged podcast before I have to have twenty thirty minute episodes. I just threw them because I you know I have the time and if if I like it I want it all right now. You know so you know we made our show it was you know we didn't set out with a go. I remember the first episode is US say Ashort it was GonNa be twenty minutes. It was how short it was GONNA be. We weren't gonNA talk about politics. Yeah we were just go have fun you know it and look at what the show came. Because you don't know you know another thing I would point out man be consistent. You know pick that thing you can do it when you pick that that thing that you can stick to..

spotify Black Women US apple Bevo Harry official Komo Joe Button Charlemagne facebook Zahn Bauer Sure Park twitter Amazon
"ten years" Discussed on Cold

Cold

11:24 min | 1 year ago

"ten years" Discussed on Cold

"Podcast. I've seen a lot of young women who are seventeen. Eighteen nineteen years old. Who are listening? Because of their age didn't hear about Susan when this was all happening and they're they're hearing it for the first time and having a very different experience than Either of US right in in living that in real time but they're but they're learning so much from it and they'll someone your age age who is what would you be. Would you be Susan's ages head so since you three years you delve. Lv into it. Did you have any clue how sick and twisted this stuff was. Even even with what I knew about Josh and Steve which which was enough to know these guys are not good role when you really look at with the close focus It is I mean the word disturbing can't even begin to cover and has changed who you are. Yes and it changed how you deal with people people and you are now better. Qualified are better able to help people and there's decisions and seeing these things differently really the thing. I was with the reason the police released. The file is because we were going to sue them if they didn't so then they released a redacted. Copy though you don't have to sue US okay. The reason they release reset the unredacted copy because we were going to sue them. Because try and get this because I want more people to look at it and work on it and the thing I didn't want because has rejected files and and seeing their files is they had all steve's garbage and I didn't WanNa look at it and I don't want to look at it I didn't have have to look at it because everybody else look a few other people looked at it and I thank you so much for putting up with it and going to that and and stuff. So it's it's just something that needed to be done in a story told that I couldn't have told as Susan's bother. I couldn't could've toll it with any credibility or any objectively would all be a question where somebody else could. And that's that's you you show me things I had no clue about the depravity or the how bad it was and I'm glad I didn't. There was one time I went to the House House. Josh was supposed to take care of the boys and Susan. I gotta go out and do something. I don't remember what it was anyway. A but she She forgot something. I have to go back and come with me okay. Let's be quiet we don't want to the boys will WANNA I don't want to have to say no okay so we're going up the stairs to the second floor and she retrieves something but as soon as I got the top the store the stairs I she looked at me she goes. Do you feel it. I go what I go. I feel uncomfortable. I not exactly happy to be here. She goes you feel the evil. She kept things in perspective that was Steep House House. Steve Pals Yeah. They reached something at the top of the stairs. Dart at I thought that was interesting that she would say that to me yet. I'll bring that up in all of that really ugly environment that she found herself in through no action of her own right aside from meeting the wrong guys for initial mistake. Yeah for her to persist as long as she did in being the champion of her own value beak so much to her character. And I honestly believe it's an inspiration. Two people who hear her story myself included so I think the boys are lot big part of it so those kids meant everything to her and she was a real good. Mother need to learn from lessons from the past for the future. And this this is one of those lessons that can be repeated off and on S. needs to be. It'll be a little differently but you know it's still the same story good versus evil trying hard and you know and one of my daughters who has rejected everything. She was raised on We'll say leave it there but anyway he's okay. I WanNa talk to you and I need your help and everything but don't tell me to about prayer or God and I'm going pray when you have a question and that's what I've done so I don't understand how anybody can handle it without that kind of support include including Susan when when I was reading through so so much of Susan's writings and she's talking about going to her bishop asking for that council going to the temple and praying about it and it seemed very important to me that that part of Susan's life experience be presented so that people can understand Dan. It's not just what any one of US perceives about. Our our personal feelings about religion aren't was important. It's what Susan believed right and doing doing justice and honor to that. And when Steve and Josh who were Steve This openly that he wants to destroy the church. Jesus Christ latter-day Saints when they say well. She didn't really like it he was all well. Let's let that was ridiculous and you know she was trying to live it Josh. We're taking advantage that when he was looking for a woman within the church search. You know the very thing he saying that he didn't care about in the only waste reasons. He stuck around. As long as she did is she was trying to follow every everything along those that the church taught and she was not given up on him. Even though it was clear to me in the beginning of this there was nothing to be true to begin as soon as I started but but once it did she was going down that road and she kept investing time and energy and and love and stuff to try. Try and bring him back and save him and all that when he was a loss case from the beginning. I don't know I would never dreamed. Winded Steve was as messed up as he was their families as messed up his. I don't know how you would ever comprehend that I don't think anyone who's not actually lived it and including myself can really understand what the dynamics of the Palley were how how strange it was. We stayed away from Steve because we figured it. He wasn't good news and wasn't a pro. We didn't have to be there so we stayed away from it. Which as most people would you just avoid those issues? He's so it's opener is to that I guess I believe there is evil. And there's certainly good and there's gardeners there's a disc Satan and I think when you go down that pass here you're subject told that aren't making bad choices you make like the responsibility was on Josh to to not make those decisions right. But also he was. Steve taught him to be who he was. And Steve's parents affected MSU brought out in there and is that a terrible i. It's just a sad waste of life. Waste of time and tragedy that his time life his steve ruined his family and his but is he a victim. And who's going to judge judge stat by STAT I. I don't know what his life was like a child. I don't know what his parents lice were. So as much as I he was and what he did in the situation he did. Who can judge that not me? It worries me when I see people. People Focus too much on Steve Right when the focus needs to be on Susan. It's about Susan and where she is. I think the right time she'll be found and if not you know there's a whole lot of people in the world let her missing people will never see they're gonna get so at least not on this earth but to to your point I mean I have that house as well yeah. There's hope so if it's been ten years years we still haven't found her living day to day as we always do and every time every time there's Zabad pound every time there's a you know could ever found somewhere we start wondering is this. The one is our awaken. Be Over. We'll we'll be able to put her whatever's left to her to rest with their but were fateful or whoever is found even even though it remains. It's still good. Take matter how hard that has to be. It's hard but I think it's harder not knowing I mean we don't know yet or you know I love to be wrong and she blocking the door sometime or get a call. Hey there's this person you know I've had dreams. Were that has happened waking up thicky. She's home they'll dream. Aw but it was a good dream you know for that day. It was a piece moment. That was If Susan story sounds familiar in your own life in other words if you or someone you know is experiencing domestic abuse in any form. Please get immediate help in the. US support is a phone. Call Away at the national domestic violence hotline at one eight hundred seven nine nine seven two three three four online at www dot the hotline dot. Org My thanks again to chuck and Judy Cox for their candor and continued. Willingness is to share their daughter. Susan's story thanks as well to my colleague Nina Ernest for her work. Editing this episode Michael Bond Miller composed the music for cold old with additional sounds and songs by me. Cold is a production of K._S._l.. podcasts thank you for listening..

Susan Steve Josh US Steve Pals Steve Right Steep House House House House Steve This Palley Christ latter-day Saints Michael Bond Miller MSU Nina Ernest chuck Dan Judy Cox
"ten years" Discussed on Cold

Cold

09:16 min | 1 year ago

"ten years" Discussed on Cold

"While not explicit listener. Discretion is advised. I this is a bonus episode of cold. I'm Dave Collie it's been ten years since Susan Powell disappeared. If you've listened to cold up to this point then you are very familiar with her story. If you are just coming to this podcast I encourage you to check out. All of the earlier episodes they will help provide context to what you are about to hear but for summary Marie Sake. Here is a brief rundown on December. Seventh two thousand nine Susan's two boys. Four year old. Charlie and two year old brayden failed to show up for daycare. It soon became clear that Susan and her husband. Josh Powell had also failed to arrive at work. That's snowy morning. Josh returned that afternoon with the boys he told police he had taken them camping. He claimed to have no idea where Susan might be or what might have become of of. Her suspicion immediately fell on Josh from both police and the public but josh was never arrested and never faced charges. Susan's body has never been found. The investigation uncovered a disturbing dynamic within the Powell family. Joshua's own father. Steve Powell had developed an infatuation with Susan. He even propositioned her. An advance. Susan refused Steph's crimes including voyeurism and possession of child pornography cost Josh custody of his sons but in two thousand twelve during a court authorized visit Josh killed himself and the boys by setting fire to a home he had rented in Washington. I recently sat down with Susan's parents chuck and Judy Cox to discuss their daughters legacy. And how the past decade has affected them. My particular things to judy for taking part as this marks the first time she has shared her perspective in the cold. podcast there's been. Something of a resurgence surgeons in the public interest in Susan Story. When I I reached out to you awhile back to me it felt like the attention had very much faded faded? And we're seeing now. You know the cable shows the dateline the podcast right and it's kind of like it's almost reaching fever pitch again. It feels like how's that been for you to see this kind of brought up again. It was hard for me reliving. The most I mean the days came back in the day. The boys died or problems. Ah they're not pleasant but I'll get through this. It's okay. Her story needs to be Out there and I can deal with that and I'm not as spokesperson as much as it's I just don't feel that comfortable in front of cameras is easy for him and just kind of personal of the family but also want to help others and I want people to know the story so so it doesn't happen to them and as you look at that ten year mark from where we were when Susan I disappeared until now how has your life changed forever. Changed in one day is forever changed and and now we become spokespersons against domestic violence and and our our path is kind of set out before us. I wondered when I retire from the way. What would I do not have to worry about that anymore? I'm going to keep doing what I can to help other people and then help Keep looking for my daughter and keep Helping people that are in this situation. Escape domestic violence possible console the The relatives and of those victims and their families and stuff. So they are they can deal with the situation that they're coming to That's great you and I when we talked For the PODCAST. You told me you know how many people had reached Out To share those stories in and when you said that to me then I hadn't had the experience of having that myself exactly and now that I've had even just a small glimmer of what you've experienced with those messages and phone calls. It's it's inspiring but it's also a very for me draining. Oh definitely it takes so much energy to show that empathy does that. Does that affect you. I think it comes natural to him. It does but it's in a good way. Yeah 'cause you know you're helping that person and and I don't take their problems on myself because you can't help them and I can't help them. They have to help themselves selves. They have to follow the advice. You give them and get to the professionals who can help them. You can't take that on you or you would go nuts the real quick so it's draining in. Its you had to be attentive immediate. Do your best but on the other hand. It's gratifying that you can help somebody in an. I'm not going to give them false hope but I will give them a realistic view and some positive things they can do for themselves. I have experienced a what they need to be watching out for and what am I can give them a realistic look. What they're smoking at? So don't base. Is your whole opinion with the police file. said I mean that's a really great point right. One of the things that has been very instructive for me is trying to understand the situation from the multitude of perspectives. EXAC as you experienced differently than the friends here in Utah experienced than the detectives experience. Then we in the media experienced absolutely ooh I'd also disliked can't believe I'm saying this. I do believe the West Valley city. Police gave it their all and they tried real hard and they did a lot of searches and they did do a lot of work a lot of people while they messed up. We always always can mess up and Do you do you think they plan that no. They were doing everything they could think of that that made sensor and they wanted a happy ending. Well it hasn't happened but they tried and may be with others. You know other stories. Police aren't Miracle Workers Third Their police in. They're trying to do their job. But we also felt frustrated about things but I I knew they were working hard and doing their best. Can you see a point Where either of you both of you say I? I've done this enough in. It's time to to stop being in front the cameras in in talking like this. I don't think he'll ever stop me. I might stay off for a period retire or something because it took me a long time to be willing to get in front of cameras or answer questions because it it hurts hurts it was nice. Things quieted down. I mean it was okay but then I get calls from a few people all about their situation and We'll see where that goes for them and and see. Maybe we can make a difference because I think it's something that people will help people. I know it house and also if they're not in this situation hopefully they're listening because who knows down the Rhode King come up an accident or you know family issue or something to where they can remember something that he said that will help them. We're going to take a pause here for a word from our sponsors but will return with more from this special interview with Chuck Can Judy Cox Marking Ten years since the disappearance of their daughter. Susan Powell right after this.

Susan Josh Powell Susan Powell Judy Cox Susan Story Susan I Steve Powell Powell family Marie Sake Dave Collie fever Joshua Charlie brayden Utah Rhode King West Valley Chuck Washington