35 Burst results for "Ten Year"

What you need to know about Tesla's 'battery day'

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

08:25 min | 1 d ago

What you need to know about Tesla's 'battery day'

"Over the last few months there has been information leaking out about Tesla establishing a new battery production line near the Fremont factory, and it is aptly code-named roadrunner not only does that hint speed, but there might also be. A reference there to roadrunner and Wylie coyote the looney tunes characters engaged in a perpetual game of Jason, in which Miley Coyote could never catch the roadrunner. Maybe legacy auto is the Wiley Coyote to Tesla's roadrunner. So one of the expectations for Battery Day is that Tesla unveils this roadrunner production line to demonstrate the potential throughput that can be accomplished with all. These advancements I believe Ilan made reference to this today as well as tussles other progress in manufacturing outside of batteries. When he tweeted quote speed running Victorio and real life dot dot dot, and quote if you're unfamiliar Factoria is a video game described themselves. By saying quote Factoria was a game in which you build and maintain factories you'll be mining resources researching. Technologies building infrastructure, automating production and fighting enemies and quote that you're sounds a lot like. TUSLA. So a lot of these are related but I believe manufacturing and energy density at the pack level to be the two most important things for battery day. But it doesn't just end there. There are few other topics that may be discussed at Battery Day the first. which has been heavily speculated on is the possibility of Tesla introducing a million mile battery. So first things first on that that means a million mile life cycle or another way to say, that would be the ability for the battery to recharge. Let's say three or four thousand times without having significant capacity degradation because of already done a full ten fifteen minute episode. On the Million Mile Battery I'M NOT GONNA go into as much detail on that here a link that episode but the Short version is that they're already batteries capable of producing that many cycles. It's just a matter as it always is with batteries of the trade offs are willing to make. For example, does that increase the life cycle lower energy density or? Increased cost, and if so maybe it's not worth the tradeoff in fact, Tesla already has batteries that are capable of doing a million miles. They just don't use them in their vehicles because of those trade offs rather they use them in their energy storage products. So we'll see what Tesla has to say about a million mile battery they have talked about wanting. To, get there with the whole powertrain and the past, which really makes a lot of sense when you bring in a Tommy because if a scenario exists where there is a full self-driving row taxi that vehicles going to be traveling a lot more than ten thousand or fifteen, thousand miles per year if the utilization is five times higher or ten times higher. Then to have a useful life of ten years twenty years, you're going to need a million mile powertrain including that million mile battery. It also makes a lot of sense for other utility vehicles such as the upcoming Tesla semi the other wildcard that could potentially add life cycles to the battery for a vehicle would be vehicle to grid technology. Again, we've talked about. Tesla hasn't been super bullish on that technology in the past. So it's relatively lower on my expectations list there certainly value to that feature, but there's also complexity in extracting that value. So we'll wait and see what Tesla has to say on life cycle and any additional features that could drive utilization of those battery packs higher next on the watch list is. Charging capability there's a lot of potential here. We've already seen Tesla over the years increase the supercharging rate from ninety kilowatts to one hundred, twenty kilowatts, two, hundred, and fifty all the way up to two hundred and fifty kilowatts at peak now, and at the cyber truck unveiling last November onscreen they shut a graphic that showed the charging capability of the cyber. At. Two hundred and fifty kilowatts plus you elon musk at that unveiling said quote it will be capable of more than two hundred and fifty kilowatts will reveal the actual number later and quote. So maybe battery day ends up being that later we know that just last week lucid, motors announced that the lucid air will have three hundred and fifty kilowatt capable charging Tesla's kinda competitive. So I'm not sure they're gonNA, sit around for too long being outmatched on that charging rate. If we can get a bit speculative for a moment, one of our listeners, Florian halen helped me out with this it appears that the V. Three superchargers should be capable. Of quite a bit more output than the hundred and fifty kilowatt. Max. That does vehicles can charge at today to get a full understanding of this, we have to start with the version two superchargers. If we look at the label on those chargers, we can see the voltage listed at four hundred and ten volts. They amperage listed at two hundred and seventy amps to get the power capacity. We just multiply the voltage by the amperage. So in this case that comes out to about one hundred and eleven kilowatts but what happens in reality is that vehicles on version two charges, one hundred and fifty kilowatts all the time. So the amperage here is. Actually understated the same thing appears to be happening with the V. Three superchargers as well on the label for those, we can see that the voltage is thousand and the amperage is four, hundred and twenty-five. So multiplying those together yet Max power capacity of four hundred and twenty five kilowatts. So that's already higher than the two hundred and fifty kilowatts. The vehicles can accept today leaving some room for upside and charging rate but back to the amperage, it appears that the amperage capacity is understated on the be three charges as well. We have a screen shot here of a model three charging at that Max two hundred and fifty kilowatt rate, but with. The voltage only at three hundred, sixty eight. So if we divide those two hundred and fifty thousand watts, two hundred and fifty kilowatts by three hundred, sixty eight that gives us six, hundred eighty amps, which is well above the four hundred twenty, five amps on the label right now, a model threes battery is limited to four hundred and four volts. So at six hundred and eighty amps that would mean a Max charging rate of two, hundred, seventy, five kilowatts instead of the two, hundred fifty, that is listed, but it's probably limited at two hundred and fifty kilowatts to avoid overheating if we consider a new battery though maybe some of those constraints can. Be removed and the V. Three superchargers seems capable of delivering quite a bit more power than that two hundred, fifty kilowatts. If we use the six hundred eighty amps here that we have already seen register out of a supercharged V three location and we multiply that by the maximum a thousand volts we could be looking at a power output of six hundred eighty kilowatts from three charter and potentially even higher based on whatever that true actual limit on ams it's. So none of this means that Tesla's going to suddenly unveil a battery that's capable of charging at seven hundred kilowatts just that the V. Three chargers do seem to be putting in. Place. The infrastructure for higher charging to come over time with a new cell likely being introduced. Maybe we will hear more about that at battery debt last couple of aspects that I've heard discussed the first mining Tesla has alluded to maybe getting into mining someday if they needed to that's not something that I expect here from Battery Day as should be cleared by this point in time I think they've got enough to go through without going down that figurative rabbit hole but I do expect. Yulon mosque to again plead with suppliers to ramp up supply especially for nickel next is a point on Tesla suppliers we know that tussle works with Panasonic LG. L. To source batteries from them. So the question has arisen of how those partnerships are going to work and evolve if Tesla is designing and manufacturing their own cell and I think this is answered by what we spoke to earlier with product differentiation Tesla is going to need all the batteries they can get their hands on it's going to take time to ramp up their own battery production. So not only can they not just convert all their products over to their own cells instantly even if they were to do that, they still probably need even more batteries so they're going to continue to partner with these other suppliers though suppliers give them viable. Products, which can help Tesla Grow capture revenue capture prophet regardless of their own endeavors and battery cells and production as far as tesla actually supplying these cells to others I definitely don't expect that not for a long long time if at all, and that's really for the same reason, Tesla is gonNA need these cells themselves supplying them to another oem just adds again that extra layer of cost because both sides need their margin that creates a more expensive and a product for the consumer, which is contradictory to tussles goal of accelerating the advent of sustainable energy. So as long as Tesla is battery constrained, which I expect to be for a long time. See them supplying their batteries to anybody else. All right. So after all of this, we finally come to the product. The last thing to maybe expect out of Battery Day could be the introduction of the plaid model s and Model X. potentially being the first products to utilize these new battery cells as Tesla works to ramp up that initial production it's been yearly quiet on the plaid. Powertrain Front for a while now, but the timing is about right and maybe we will finally again here's something about the new roadster.

Tesla Roadrunner Factoria Ilan Fremont First Things First Miley Coyote Tommy Florian Halen Jason Partner Yulon Mosque Panasonic LG
How the North Bay Became 'Wine Country'

Bay Curious

03:48 min | 2 d ago

How the North Bay Became 'Wine Country'

"To answer Michael's question about when wine country got start and how it became. So popular, we brought in reporter Christopher Beale Hey Christopher Hay alluvia. So let's start with when wine grapes were first planted in the North Bay. When was that all the way back in eighteen twenty three the Spanish created a mission in Sonoma's. It's the first place where grapes were intentionally planted in wine country but the wine made from these grapes was Sacramento Kinda like alcoholic. Grape juice used in church, not what we would recognize as wine, and then in eighteen thirty s some of the early European settlers in the NAPA sonoma valleys would have grown some basic wine grapes as well. Now, when does the wine country that we think of today start to take shape for the sake of the story let's start in eighteen forty California is ten years from entering the Union and this guy named Charles Krug arrives in San Francisco. Crew was a German after the revolutions of eighteen, forty eight in Europe the comes into San Francisco. It was the editor of a German language newspaper in San Francisco. That's Jim Lapsley he managed agricultural continuing education at UC Davis for more than thirty years with focus on wine-making. Now, after a few years in San Francisco Charles Krug gets married and ended up as a dowry getting quite a bit of land. This is the area just North of Santa Lena where the Charles Krug winery is located considered. It'd be the first commercial winery in Napa Valley. The wine country story is really one about marketing and innovation, and this Guy Charles crew gets credit for a lot of the early innovation and wine country including being the first to use a cider press, which is kind of like a slotted barrel to press wine grapes before that grapes were generally crushed by people's feet. When California entered the union, it was a place where we could grow grapes because the climate was quite similar to the southern Mediterranean. It was dry during the summer it had wet winters and differ grew very well here in California. For, is a species of grapevine. It's used to make wine after the early success of pioneers like Cruyff people began to plant grapes and produce more wind and the NAPA and sonoma valleys. But this was still considered low quality table wine and it continued to represent only a fraction of the US market mainly because it was still cheaper for east coast consumers to import wine. From Europe by boat, then from California by train. But that all changed in eighteen, seventy five, the US government stepped in and increase the tax on imported European wines to twenty cents a gallon which leveled the financial playing field for California's wine producers, and as a result, the wines dig it imported from Europe can be much more expensive wines and oak wine that was everyday drinking. That became the from California. Now. It wasn't a linear march from this moment today. The wind industry suffered a few major setbacks over the years but one way or another managed to survive them. Here's a few of the important ones I wine country was almost destroyed by bugs in the eighteen seventies. This is a microscopic bug that eats the roots of wine grapes. It's related to an eighth fit in it's called. PHILOXENIA. And when it arrived in wine country, it destroyed the vineyards to kill the vineyards and the only way could really come up with a solution was to plant on grafted vines the bottom, the rootstock would be a native variety and then on top graft with Vida's Benifica.

California San Francisco Charles Krug Europe Napa Charles Krug Winery Union Sonoma United States Guy Charles Napa Valley North Bay Christopher Beale Michael Reporter Jim Lapsley Christopher Hay Santa Lena Cruyff Vida
Samantha Skelly Onn How Breathwork Helps Heal Emotional Eating

Hay House Meditations

05:07 min | 2 d ago

Samantha Skelly Onn How Breathwork Helps Heal Emotional Eating

"So, welcome onto the podcast. Samantha thank you so much for having me. I'm so excited. Yeah. I'm really looking forward to talking with you about meditation and in particular breath work and I thought that we might want to do it in that order as it seems to be the trajectory in your soon to be released book hungry for happiness, stop emotional eating, and start loving yourself that that book is coming out at the end of September. So this is the this podcast is to dropping a couple of weeks. Before that. So I thought that we would talk about this. Is that okay with you haven't lately unless to excellent. Excellent. So let's begin with with hungry for happiness this the book I I read it It's it's part healing memoir. Can Apart guided introspection and meditations and and also this sort of. Part can a best friend encouragement like you're like this not really a coach like this like your your girlfriend come on. Let's do this. You know so. Can You? Can you tell us about your healing journey that we read about in the book? Absolutely I love how you explain it like that you know my my intention for Reading For writing that book was to write it to just my best friend you know that that felt sense of. I understand you I get it. I was there I know how terrible it can feel when you are in a battle with food in your body. So I'm grateful that the final product came out like that. So I grew up as a dancer and actress when I was quite young and dealt with all kinds of body image issues growing up. I can remember being very young in the bathtub just feeling. This. Felt Santa, feeling, discuss it in my body, which was a feeling that I felt often when I looked in the mirror at at young age and that then manifested into an eating disorder emotional eating restricting overeating all sorts of things when I was about eighteen. And I entered into this period of my life that I. Call My Diet Depression years where. I was on over fifty diets in less than four years and. Truly had no idea how to just eat like a normal person like that was a impossible task for me at that time, I can remember waking up some mornings thinking to myself like a hi, can I just can't wait to go to bed because the thoughts in my mind were so just honestly abusive and just my level of body image. The the severity in which I hated my body was just through the roof and so. I began trying to try to heal my my emotional eating through dieting. So I was going on all sorts of different diets, and of course, just making the making things worse. What we need to realize what I needed to realize that time is emotional eating and and disordered eating is all in inside job and the Maury trying to manipulate and control and mess with our food the worse it actually gets. and. So I can remember about ten years ago reading eat pray love and. It was a story where she went to Bali and she right? Elizabeth. Yeah and he liked poker with dicks. He she found this healer in Bali. That poker with East Dickson and Blah Blah Blah Blah long story short. So I'm like, all right that's what I'm going to do. So I bought a one way ticket to Bali I flew to Bali and I found this exact healer that she wrote about in her book I drove this I I got I got on a scooter scooter got on like a taxi scooter and drove to this man's home. And he barely spoke any English and he started poking me with his sticks and. He, then just has to be your brains broken. And I was like Oh God. Okay. What's going on here? And so he goes you think too much. You have too much thinking and I was like you're so right I really do. And so this was a point in my life where I I couldn't tell the story I had was I couldn't meditate. And I would say I would sit there and meditation and my brain would be going a million miles a minute. And thinking of all sorts of different things I would get up after twenty minutes and. Feel more stressed out than when I initially sat right because a lot of people's experience. And I know you're a pro meditators I, could've used you back in the day. So for me meditation was a challenge but everyone in their dog was telling me that meditation was going to be the path for me to heal my disordered eating will that mean such an interesting position because here's this thing that apparently has all these amazing benefits which it does and I know that now but I couldn't do it to save my

Bali Maury Samantha East Dickson Santa Elizabeth
Should I ask my dad to invest in my business?

The $100 MBA Show

05:00 min | 4 d ago

Should I ask my dad to invest in my business?

"Survey S Should I get my dad to invest in my business or should I ask him to invest my business? I say, I like to point out that it's good that you actually say invest. An investment means he's going to get a percentage of the company in return for the twenty thousand dollars you're looking for. And this is not a loan. This is not like loan me twenty grand and I'll pay you back. Your father will be a part of the company, Meaning Hill own part of it. It may not be a controlling stake, but he will own a good portion of it. especially the fact that you haven't started your company really doesn't have much value because. You don't have anything to show yet because you haven't sold the APP, you have made money from customers been made. Any revenue has showed any kind of traction to say, Hey, this company is worth X. amount of dollars right now is just the hopes that the just purely on the concept and the idea that you actually give him a return on investment. So the first thing I want to say that if you're going to approach her dad for investment, you have to seem as an investor and not your dad, which means you getting to present him the business just like you see presenting on shark tank right and what does the first thing they ask on shark tank all The sharks to ask the same question. Every time somebody does a presentation to go through the whole presentation things like that. The first question they ask is how many units have you sold? How many sales have you made a money Jimmy revenue they want to know do people actually want while you're selling the market value this product because the investor that's all they really care about this. This thing have legs have the potential to grow. Their opinion really doesn't matter. It's the market's opinion that matters. So you're not in that position right now where you can actually give numbers and proved that people want what you have, and that means you need to give up more equity to get the money. So think about the value of your company right now it doesn't really have much value because you're not selling anything you know have nothing in your hands it you don't have anything created, but what will it be in the future If it somewhat successful, it's really hard for you to tell because you don't have any data. But even if you say in two years, the company is going to be worth one, hundred, thousand dollars. In order for an investor to want to make money, they're to want to at least double their money. Okay. That means they won't forty thousand dollars in return for their investment of twenty thousand dollars. That means they're going to at least forty percent of the company. If you're uncomfortable with all of this, then my advice us a try to bootstrap your business much as possible you some of your savings grow as you can think of the minimal viable version of your APPs. You can get idea validation for a skin product market fit get some customers. Make some revenue see this has legs first before you actually try to raise capital because it's a lot easier to raise the money. When you have a working product when you have sales when you have customers, we can say, hey, people like this you know and it's making money and here my projections. But right now you don't have any of that data. So. If you're willing to part with, you know a big percentage of your company. Then go ahead and get an investment from your father and doesn't matter if your father anybody else that is an option if you're willing to part ways with that large chunk of percentage whatever that is if you still feel like you, WanNa bootstrap you WANNA raise some. Money try to see if you really need twenty grand how much is the bare minimum you need to star this thing to have it off the ground maybe it's not twenty maybe it's ten years, five thousand dollars and five thousand dollars can be earned right. You can actually hold off on launching this product and save five grand after a few months. Of living a little frugally. If you absolutely have to take alone five thousand dollars is a whole lot better than twenty in terms of what you're gonNA pay an interest. But if you do want approach your father and you feel like you'd like to have a part of the business. There's nothing wrong with mixing family with business as long as it's clear expectations are what everybody's getting in the deal. You don't want any sour grapes later on, you want people to feel like that. They got what they asked for what they they knew they were getting into. This is why it's important for you to be open and honest with your dad if you're going to approach him and as well as pitched to him as if he was an investor, you have to convince him that your product. Your APP actually has the potential with any data you can gather even if it surveys even if it's a market research, even if it's just simple as. Hey My APP is in this market and the potential in this market is X. amount of dollars of revenue year is how big the pie is, how much money that can be made who are the big players in that market who your competitors and how you going to compete with them. These are some things that you can really explore and display and present to anybody who's interested in investing, including your father and all this time wasted you're actually investing. Some, really good time and learning a whole lot about the market. You're about to enter

Jimmy
World isn't meeting biodiversity goals, UN report finds

UN News

07:08 min | 4 d ago

World isn't meeting biodiversity goals, UN report finds

"The number of plants and animals on the planet that are at risk today would be far higher without globally agreed safeguards in action to protect him but it still far from good enough UN by diversity exports sat on Tuesday in call for far greater commitment from only Chicago to safeguard human wellbeing in the planet's the body that oversees these work. The Convention on biodiversity urged those gathering for UN summit at the end of the. Month to broaden their ambition from the convention. Here's Executive Secretary Elizabeth Marina Deputy Executive Secretary David Cooper talking to UN uses Daniel Johnson just if you wouldn't mind Elizabeth Merima give me the classification of diversity and in particular why is it important in simple words by devastate is everything around us and when I say everything around us, it means everything we do as human activities affected by busy. Each could be what we do on the land what we're doing. What we do in the forest, what we do on species, animals, plants, I mean, what we do is we produce our food as we consume all by diversities. So our human actions in the nature of virus around us and what we're finding is that if fact but diversity is in massive trouble and your report from the conventional biological diversity, the UN Conventional Biological Diversity tells us that only six out of the world's twenty goals on biodiversity have. been achieved only partially achieved by the deadline, which is actually this year. So to be honest I wasn't aware that the governments of the world had agreed in Japan twenty ten to a series of biodiversity targets and you're saying that only six of twenty goals of being partially achieved by the two thousand twenty deadline. So what is the concern? Which of these? Obviously a very bad report card where have we gone wrong and please don't say everywhere. No because they some progress. But indeed unfortunately by diversity's declining it unprecedented level rate and precious deriving they decline unfortunately. So increasing just as underlying. So indeed this scorecard, his only identify six of the twenties so not even half in the seats. In the areas of deforestation, where at least deforestation is gone down by Fed or two percent fisheries. Management fisheries catches also improved clearly indicating where appropriate policies on fisheries management have been put in place. Then the fishery cage hazing and abundance is increased and improved education of alien species. Particularly from the islands Z. Qualley improved protected areas has increased from ten percent to fifteen percent in terrestrial in three to seven percents on marine areas we also learned my says extinction fishes extension at really threatened in the history of mankind still where conservation measures they've been put in place every improved and reduce extinction of species without which. We and be waste than what we are talking today I think joining us now we are very fortunate have Mr David Cooper. Deputy Executive Secretary of the UN. Conventional. Biological, diversity. Welcome to you Mr Cooper. Thank you very much. Daniel. Thank you ever so much for joining us. We were just talking there with Elizabeth, my executive secretary on the really mixed report card. I. Think that's the charitable worth putting it off. The biodiversity targets that was back in two, thousand ten. So a decade on. We've got six of twenty goals partially achieved although Elizabeth was saying that the has been some good work on eliminating foreign species from islands and in the fisheries to and other national programs that perhaps you could tell me a bit more about to give us maybe a little bit of positive news. What is a pretty Hesse mystic outlook for humankind and also forbade diversity moving forward? Yes. Thank you very much indeed even in those targets that haven't been pasta passages talks that haven't been achieved. Is. Some signs the progress as as in his methods as as mentioned in which Houston deforestation rates in fooding fisheries management in dealing with invasive alien species and in reducing. Rate. So numbers of bird mammal extinctions that occurred over the past ten years or indeed over the life of the Convention would bean at least to perhaps up to four times higher without the actions of being taken. So one clear message despite the disappointing results one clear message is policies do work if they are put in place and implemented, and so we need to learn from that we. Need to be encouraged by that, we need to step up those policies more widely in order to reduce the greater biodiversity loss. The report also shows that if he wants to actually not only we do survey to biodiversity loss that Ben that curve and put me on a path to recovery than more fundamental actions also needed looking at the way we produce and consume food in particular that. Sustainable production and consumption captains more broadly as well. I'm just going to dive in that because the report is pretty alarming and I'm very glad to hear about some of these national projects that have been successful in. Boosting bio-diversity, but the report says that the rate of biodiversity loss is unprecedented in human history I guess we did know that really and precious intensifying and living as a whole being compromised, and of course, we can't have this discussion without talking about covert and how the degradation of our natural environment has I suppose, but closer into contact with viruses in the natural world, is that the kind of thing that's really going to galvanize support for greater support for native greater protection for nature if we don't do so we're going to be huge trouble ourselves forms. Suddenly I I. Hope. So there's Very clear evidence as you say that the degradation of of ecosystems encroachment into international areas, unregulated wildlife trade, these things. Increase the risk of emergence of future. Disease increase the risk of future pandemics, and conversely, if we can invest in conservation an investigation regulating control wildlife trade, we will reduce those risks. So these are suddenly Lead important reasons on top of wanting to prevent six-man south extinction. These really positive reasons also for investing in IDA versity.

UN Un Conventional Biological Div Deputy Executive Secretary Executive Secretary Mr David Cooper Daniel Johnson Elizabeth Elizabeth Merima Elizabeth Marina David Cooper Chicago Ida Versity Japan FED Houston BEN
Mixed report card forprotecting natural biodiversity can be turned round, say experts

UN News

05:40 min | 4 d ago

Mixed report card forprotecting natural biodiversity can be turned round, say experts

"The number of plants and animals on the planet that are at risk today would be far higher without globally agreed safeguards in action to protect him but it still far from good enough UN by diversity exports sat on Tuesday in call for far greater commitment from only Chicago to safeguard human wellbeing in the planet's the body that oversees these work. The Convention on biodiversity urged those gathering for UN summit at the end of the. Month to broaden their ambition from the convention. Here's Executive Secretary Elizabeth Marina Deputy Executive Secretary David Cooper talking to UN uses Daniel Johnson just if you wouldn't mind Elizabeth Merima give me the classification of diversity and in particular why is it important in simple words by devastate is everything around us and when I say everything around us, it means everything we do as human activities affected by busy. Each could be what we do on the land what we're doing. What we do in the forest, what we do on species, animals, plants, I mean, what we do is we produce our food as we consume all by diversities. So our human actions in the nature of virus around us and what we're finding is that if fact but diversity is in massive trouble and your report from the conventional biological diversity, the UN Conventional Biological Diversity tells us that only six out of the world's twenty goals on biodiversity have. been achieved only partially achieved by the deadline, which is actually this year. So to be honest I wasn't aware that the governments of the world had agreed in Japan twenty ten to a series of biodiversity targets and you're saying that only six of twenty goals of being partially achieved by the two thousand twenty deadline. So what is the concern? Which of these? Obviously a very bad report card where have we gone wrong and please don't say everywhere. No because they some progress. But indeed unfortunately by diversity's declining it unprecedented level rate and precious deriving they decline unfortunately. So increasing just as underlying. So indeed this scorecard, his only identify six of the twenties so not even half in the seats. In the areas of deforestation, where at least deforestation is gone down by Fed or two percent fisheries. Management fisheries catches also improved clearly indicating where appropriate policies on fisheries management have been put in place. Then the fishery cage hazing and abundance is increased and improved education of alien species. Particularly from the islands Z. Qualley improved protected areas has increased from ten percent to fifteen percent in terrestrial in three to seven percents on marine areas we also learned my says extinction fishes extension at really threatened in the history of mankind still where conservation measures they've been put in place every improved and reduce extinction of species without which. We and be waste than what we are talking today I think joining us now we are very fortunate have Mr David Cooper. Deputy Executive Secretary of the UN. Conventional. Biological, diversity. Welcome to you Mr Cooper. Thank you very much. Daniel. Thank you ever so much for joining us. We were just talking there with Elizabeth, my executive secretary on the really mixed report card. I. Think that's the charitable worth putting it off. The biodiversity targets that was back in two, thousand ten. So a decade on. We've got six of twenty goals partially achieved although Elizabeth was saying that the has been some good work on eliminating foreign species from islands and in the fisheries to and other national programs that perhaps you could tell me a bit more about to give us maybe a little bit of positive news. What is a pretty Hesse mystic outlook for humankind and also forbade diversity moving forward? Yes. Thank you very much indeed even in those targets that haven't been pasta passages talks that haven't been achieved. Is. Some signs the progress as as in his methods as as mentioned in which Houston deforestation rates in fooding fisheries management in dealing with invasive alien species and in reducing. Rate. So numbers of bird mammal extinctions that occurred over the past ten years or indeed over the life of the Convention would bean at least to perhaps up to four times higher without the actions of being taken. So one clear message despite the disappointing results one clear message is policies do work if they are put in place and implemented, and so we need to learn from that we. Need to be encouraged by that, we need to step up those policies more widely in order to reduce the greater biodiversity loss. The report also shows that if he wants to actually not only we do survey to biodiversity loss that Ben that curve and put me on a path to recovery than more fundamental actions also needed looking at the way we produce and consume food in particular that. Sustainable production and consumption captains more broadly as well.

Un Conventional Biological Div Deputy Executive Secretary UN Mr David Cooper Elizabeth Executive Secretary Daniel Johnson Elizabeth Merima Elizabeth Marina Chicago Japan FED BEN Houston
An Excerpt from the book Flirting with Darkness by Ben Courson

Optimal Living Daily

06:57 min | 4 d ago

An Excerpt from the book Flirting with Darkness by Ben Courson

"An excerpt from the book flirting with darkness. Ben. Carson. Weapon number three, the magic number of greatness. I got to a point in my struggle with depression where something needed needed to change must suffering. So badly, I finally decided to do something about it. The ten thousand hour rule saved my life. His Book Outliers Malcolm Glad well demonstrated that to be truly greeted anything. You have to put in ten thousand hours of practice. People such as world chess champion Bobby. Fischer businessman Bill Joy, and IBM founder Bill Gates are among the many examples. Glad. While gives of people who excelled because they accelerated they focused and worked hard and gave at least ten thousand hours to becoming the best at what they did. Glad will show that whether you want to be a fiction writer or master criminal. Hockey player or a pianist ten thousand hours was the magic number of greatness. Bent my mind to that goal is a writer Manspeaker. A resolved to stop wasting my energies, processing psychological trauma and to go on a diametrically opposed direction. Instead of disappearing over why dreams weren't coming to pass, I decided to commit myself to working my fingers to the bone to ensure they did. Psychologists, John Hayes quote looked at how long it took the best composers of all time to create their first grey work. He found that nobody including Mozarts was a child prodigy had produced a piece of work of any significance until about ten years after they had I, taken music no amount of innate talent even in a field of genius such as music could overcome the years of practice necessary to Korea work someone may be talented. They may be lucky but they still have to go through ten years of practice in order to become a master and quote. When Churchill came to power during World War Two he said this as he was being inaugurated into office as prime. Minister quote. I. Offer you nothing save blood, toil tears, and sweat and quo. Lecture Chill Ready to go to battle anew, the path will be difficult PROC- ready to claim own finest hour. Getting better stars, which is getting off your tuition in doing something. So I did. My goal was to become a writer and a speaker put in the needed hours. My nearly worked myself to death, but it was infinitely better than brooding found the effort. Cathartic in fulfilling my spirit's began to lift. I figured I had two options number one either get discouraged that my dreams were not coming pass or number to spend the effort of getting prepared for when they did. Legendary preacher Charles spurgeon advised students to stop worrying about when they would get their shot at speaking and concentrate instead on their ability, and they'll let God take the opportunity in other words quit fretting over the how and focus on the what I took these words to heart and focused on my skill set as I improved my craft, our English word amateur comes from a French Italian an line route which means to love an obvious works when he loves the process and it feels good a professional is someone who worked seven days a week whether he feels like it or not. Today. My TV show hope generation is on twenty different networks more than one hundred and eighty countries and radio shows heard on more than four hundred stations daily. I get to speak in stadiums and arenas. My quote unquote overnight success came through hours of hard work. How you'll spend your ten thousand hours may be different from how I spend mind but you'll find as I did a clear focus and a way of getting off the existential treadmill of despair, transform your life but the age of twenty one, the average American has put ten thousand hours of practice into computer and video games when I use those hours for something more productive. How hard you hustle in the darkness determines how brightly you shine in the spotlight. To prepare for speaking to people I got really good at lecturing my furniture. My chairs were my captive audience I remember that Billy Graham. One said he got his start by preaching to alligators before he preached in stadiums. You have to start with a small stuff and work your way up. So I took every opportunity that presented itself. I spoke to classes of little kids and homeless shelters at old folks, homes, and to student clubs I volunteered to take the opportunities. Others turned down, I got lots of practice. When other speakers turned an organization or church down my said, yes I did this I several years Only the small minded person will refuse the small task for me if I had an audience of four people those enough to get some more practice to put in some more hours toward my ten thousand our goal. Jesus said that if you're faithful and a few small things, you'll be given responsibility over bigger ones Matthew Twenty five that sound good to me. Yes sometimes I did feel like surface the tragic here of Greek mythology who had to roll a boulder of a hill only to see roll back down then roll it back up again only for it to roll back down again repeatedly, I'll stubborn in my pursuit it was a great weapon against despair to keep working in spite of how I felt, which puts me in the mind of a scene from Tolkien's the Lord of the Rings in the First Book of that trilogy the Fellowship of the Ring, a band of warriors is commission travel to the ends of the Earth to destroy the evil ring of power by casting it into mount doom. During their long journey. Gandalf who was their leader was thought to be killed in the minds of Maurya in response airborne stepped up to lead the band in his stead amid his grief and despair he cried out farewell Gandalf what hope have we with you then he turned to the fellowship and said, we must do without hope let us gird ourselves and weep no more come. We have a long road. Like that trek to mount doom healing is usually a long journey. We normally don't start feeling better overnight sometimes, we must go on when we feel absolutely no hope. Our quest leads down a winding path and his sometimes fraught with trolls and Goblins and all manner of Dr Treasures. But psychological heroism is possible in such journey is were taking like Eric Gordon Frodo my set my foot upon my own path out of depression I gave them my flirtation with darkness and began to tread the road toward a grand purpose and it worked after many many years. The Dreams I had begun to despair finally came true new ones came into sight, but it all began by putting one foot in front of the other. If you allow yourself to just sit around and partly catatonic state stuffing yourself with junk food is a form of therapy and watching callous hours of television. You'll probably never start feeling better. But I. Tell You that you get off the couch and venture into the world to do something toward your goals. Things will start to change in your heart and mind if you pull yourself out of bed and get going on your dreams, that's how you'll will begin the journey to healing your broken spirit.

Writer Depression Mount Doom Gandalf Carson Charles Spurgeon Bill Gates Korea Billy Graham Hockey Dr Treasures Bobby Eric Gordon Frodo John Hayes Jesus Mozarts Bill Joy Churchill IBM
Biden's Agenda for the Black Community with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake

The Electorette Podcast

05:25 min | 5 d ago

Biden's Agenda for the Black Community with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner, and this is the electorate. On this episode. A have a conversation with Mayor Stephanie, Rawlings Bleak Mayor Rawlings Blake served as the forty ninth mayor of Baltimore as she joins me to discuss Biden's agenda for the black community. Now, if you haven't taken a look at Biden's agenda for the black community, you WanNa hear this conversation we discuss this plans to close disparities in homeownership rates within the black community his plans to help close the wealth gap the expansion of the affordable care act and has extensive criminal justice reform plans including employing the Department of Justice to address police accountability, decriminalizing the use of canvas and the automatic expunge -ment of all cannabis use convictions. So. Here's my conversation with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake Mayor Rawlings Blake. Welcome to the PODCAST. So I WANNA talk about Biden's agenda for the black community because I was reading through that and I don't think in my lifetime that I've seen or proposal that's this extensive and targeted towards the black community and I wanted to be fair. So I looked through some other past presidential platforms and a lot of them aren't really archived. You know how he crafted this or you know, did he have help from outside organization or WHO's influencing him on this? The vice principal former Vice President Biden has a theory broad group of. Individuals who have been advising him and who care a lot about making sure that the the Democratic Party is right by a black people as well as he does right by black people when he is very hopefully elected NFC among about. Today's that's right. It's like fifty days or something I think with just kind of makes me nervous nervous excited both at the same time. And he's got economists that have been advising him as well as advocates and I think when you take a look at the plan many aspects of the plan, you see their their fingerprints on it that this is not for show. This is not something that is decorative on a on a website. This is something then can be implemented and we'll have a real impact on our community. Absolutely. Right. I agree with that and when I was just looking at the wording and some of the things that he hits on. Pretty. Deep right in an isn't something I would expect it to see us on the democratic side. You wouldn't see it on the Republican side even on the Democratic side, you know five or ten years ago. So that's something. Yeah. I WANNA go really deeply into every policy proposal, but there are few that I want to hit on some pressings. Building Wealth no health care and criminal justice reform. But. I WANNA start with building wealth because one of the things that he proposes is doubling the funding for the State Small Business Credit Initiative which doubling that to three billion dollars to assist small businesses and targeting specifically people of Color. You don't WanNa talk about the fact that you know that that's great but you know black people I think in the group of people of Color by people are thinker are usually at the bottom in terms of getting capital access to capital for building small businesses because there are other bias and other limitations that we face, we try to start small business you know. So have you actually address that those unique barriers to black people getting capital in starting small businesses? The first thing you do to address the barrier is acknowledged I can't tell you optus pointed I've been to hear our current president deny ignore the disparities that exist or by people in our country as when you start off ahead in the game and you have someone's willing to name it. And to a work to address it in also wanted to bring to your attention. It's not just the the the money for small businesses Biden Harris. Focused on African American women business owners specifically because as you know a, we are the majority of the businesses offices that are being created in the NBA minority community are African American women see address s like I said at first by identifying them and second step by step I I know there's going to need to be mentors are business mentors that are working to help these these small businesses achieve and when you have an administration that is sensitive, you'll be able to do what was done under the Obama Administration where there was a lot of support event to two businesses. You know a lot of those sports have been ripped up by the current administration so A. Definitely identifying the issues and pudding supports in place to close some of those gaps are the essential you're right. So we have to recover from the damage has been done from the current administration, but then you know things like this policies like this have to account for the fact that we're pandemic. I'm a lot of the businesses that by people have owned have probably been hit in hurt quite. A bit. So that's another place to start. Definitely I. Mean I think one of the things you you will hear a line that I've heard a lot. It's not. We're not trying to go back to where we were. You know this is about ripping up be You know the race face inequities that impact the black community across the board and making sure that we are not ignoring you. Know, the problems you've seen,

Black Community Biden Harris Stephanie Rawlings Rawlings Blake Democratic Party Jim Taylor Skinner Baltimore Department Of Justice Cannabis Optus Broad Group NBA Obama Administration NFC Vice President Principal President Trump
MacLane Wilkison: NuCypher  Proxy Re-Encryption for Distributed Systems

Epicenter

04:08 min | 5 d ago

MacLane Wilkison: NuCypher Proxy Re-Encryption for Distributed Systems

"Using them. What are some of the hurdles that you've encountered in getting people to understand the value and utility of privacy preserving technologies, and are there some things that just most people will never really be able to pass off? The unfortunate reality of trying to sell technologies enterprise is that it's much more about like the enterprise sales mission and how good you are, how good your Oregon's at that that it is about the technology. So do you have sort of enterprise sales or they can reach these customers that can reach the influence these decision makers there's a whole lot of sort of comedian and bureaucracy to get sort of particularly something like this where it started touching their core infrastructure and encryption is very sensitive and it has regulatory and compliance implications for the end user like there's a lot of layers of approval that yet to go through. To go through compliance, they're going to want to know who you're institutional backers are they're going to your existing customers are because no one wants to be like the first bank to adopt something and then goes wrong. I think like if you're building enterprise -nology selling top down to CIO or. It's much less unfortunately about like the technology and much more about enterprise sales motion and whether you have that expertise inside of the organization and ashes not I think for for me not really a salesperson that's not something that I'm especially particularly intrinsic interest in. With Zero DB, what were some of the like technology that you had to use their? What's it like and how like related to sort of stuff you ended up building at new? Cyber. So she was actually quite simple. So it was an encrypted data end to end encrypted database where you encrypt everything client side before you uploaded to the server and the server never see the plain text data. So usually when you say that people like Oh, it must be like fully home orphee encryption was not it was much much simpler than that. So basically we would. Like remotely and incrementally traverse like a B index. This index clydeside sent it to the server, and then like we want search for something, we'd ask the server for the you know the included root of the tree fetch that down decrypted that we know which branch of the tree to go to next and we just basically do that. So it was pretty simple and kind of a little bit naive. It wasn't nearly like a fancy like fully morphou conscription sort of on everyone is looking for. Sort of like a client side search but like a smarter way of doing it basically. Exactly so like you couldn't really use it for applications that were performed sensitive, but you could use it maybe for things that you didn't really need to get a result back quickly. So the use case that we were pitching to enterprises, you can use us to archive stuff. So a lot of banks at the time and still currently I think are basically just habit archiving everything from like tapes whereas using zero DB they could theoretically throw that into something cloud storage like it abuse glacier or something, but still never exposed to Amazon would be able to query back. You know regulatory a regulator asks for something from eight ten years ago. So that was the basic technology and then we also built in this functionality to allow other people to query that encrypted data as well, and that was how we discovered this technology called proxy re encryption without proxy re encryption. Obviously, whoever has the key? Basically the person who included a client side? He's the only one query you know zero DB database but we started getting interested in proximity encryption because then like the enterprise could enable partners whether it's like. Supplier, regulator or customer whoever to also delegate access to that encrypted and allow them to do the search as well, and that ended up actually becoming like the the most interesting part zero was disability sort of delegate access to encrypted data, and that's ultimately what morphed into through this. The First Avenue Cypher Network, which is basically a decentralized network of a bunch of notes that perform this proxy Rian corruption function the basic idea of be sorta left behind. But this proxy rip jeter delegation to Encrypt data is what we kind of pulled out eventually

First Avenue Cypher Network Oregon CIO Jeter Amazon Rian
Making Peace with Your Family

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

05:47 min | 5 d ago

Making Peace with Your Family

"Their feud has been brewing since childhood last year during a family trip things got so bad. They came to actual blows. Their father had to pull them apart bobby and robin our sisters but they barely speak Robin says the sound of bobbies voice makes her sick Nicole they're younger sister Peter. Their little brothers say enough is enough the Cole Road to us in hopes that we could help bring her sisters back together. Father Peter. Senior is also here. If, you have conflicts within your family and let me just say who doesn't this show. We'll give you a whole new way to deal with them. It could save you years and years of pain Mark Brian says, he wrote this book codes of Love How to rethink your family and remake your life because he used to hate his own family he stayed away from them for over ten years throughout the show mark is going to be telling us how he changed all that and how you can too. So we're not here just to have because you know you can watch one of those other shows where people, chairs and Viewed as they bring out surprise family members, you haven't seen in a long time. That's not what we're GONNA. Do we're here to try to resolve it and for the millions of you who are also separated from your family to try to bring back some sense of coat of love that you once had memories of that earlier this week mark heard both sides of this family feud starting with Bobby Nicole and Peter. At Different Times Robin has stopped speaking to each of us that she has low self esteem and. She whenever argument comes up she says to me that I I think I'm better than everybody else and that I'm a goody goody and. And this type of staff. Which of course, upsets me last week I went for lunch with Robin and a few of our cousins, the bridesmaids kind of thing for Robin's wedding to discuss things and I just felt that bobby should have been involved with that. That would have been you know more of A. Total package I'm to the point now where it's like okay. You. Go ahead and behave that way. Not. Going to let it bug me. I have tried to contact her and she has my number blocked. She has your number blocked live in the country can't do that on my phone. So I don't have a number of locked and I have an answering machine and I've never had any messages about. Mark spent time with Robin to hear her version. I've always felt like the black sheep. Always felt like. Fingers always point to that me. I always felt like troublemaker. I've been accused of being over emotional. I've been accused of being. sleazy. have been accused of being slutty. I've been accused of. Basically, everything out there. in particular with my sister Bobby. I. I. Always felt compared to her. I always felt like I had to live up to. My parents, expectations. Of the expectations that she set? What are the three happiest moments of your life. They don't include family. Or? My parents were there when my daughter was born. Thought was one of the happiest moments midlife. My Dad was there when I graduated I. Guess that was another happy moment. The, day I moved out with the happiest moment of my life. And I honestly, truly with all my heart believe that was the best thing ever did because I've come so far sets. If you could go back in time, what would you change? I would I would change. I would put myself with the different family. But you can't do that down. So mark says there four basic steps to help you refrain reconnect with your family and they are I remember what are the good things? So many times in today's psychology we're looking at the bad things. My parents do that messed me up I, WanNa look back at what's the pleasant things were the strengths and the and the love and the loyalty that I've been given for these two, five fifty how old we are those years? The second one is we want to reflect on that. We want to see what's my part in this dynamic in my family when am I at fault and also I don't want to end the blame and the labeling you know. She's the black sheep she's the she's the goody two shoes she's been labeled to by other members of her family is the goody two shoes we want to be out of those labels. So we want to reflect on that what are part is and what's the larger picture of our family? labeled. Early, you just sort of follow that pattern absolutely. Yes. Yes. I have never told Robin she slutty. I've never used those words that she used on her. I'm always careful I don't offend with what I say and ever since we're very young, robin has done things on purpose. she just says whatever she wants whether it hurts your feelings or not. So the slutty thing but those terms that you're using those are not terms that she used or is that what you think she thinks of you. Okay. It might have been another family member but everybody was sitting there and it was them against me and that's how it was portrayed. But. Then again, sitting up here, acting like she's a goody two shoes I wouldn't be here if we didn't have problems. You know who? Didn't cause all my family's problems. We're not here just because of me and you know what? I don't even think there's a lot of family problems here beyond some role definition and the next thing we're going to do is we're going to take a look and refrain these experiences from this. New Perspective. Where we learned where each of us is trying to show concern, but it's being misconstrued as criticism or. As control.

Robin Bobby Nicole Mark Brian Peter
Distributed In Memory Processing And Streaming With Hazelcast

Data Engineering Podcast

04:17 min | 5 d ago

Distributed In Memory Processing And Streaming With Hazelcast

"You hear about all these different data management platforms that talk about these things but Hazel casts advantage is around in memory and in memory isn't a new concept it's been around for a while but there have been some limitations about what it can do in the past and some of these limitations are being mitigated so that in memory speeds are opening up to more and more companies and Hazel cast was founded a little more than ten years ago actually in. Turkey by a couple of very smart engineers and they came to Silicon Valley to start his cast as a former company, and it was all about in memory computing, and so the first product was the I M D product which stands for the in memory data grit. So very much like a database, but a bit more capabilities in terms of distributed computing ways to simplify building applications that could be spread across multiple nodes in a cluster and thus enable paralyzation much more simply and so from the early roots. It was all about trying to get applications that ran faster, but at the same time maintaining some of these enterprise qualities like security and reliability and availability. So ensuring that you're not getting speed at any cost but getting the right amount of speed that you need to address your use cases while also protecting your data and with added on stream processing since and we have a set of technologies that work extremely well together and are fitting in quite well with some types of use cases that people are building today. and. You mentioned that it's not being built at the expense of some of the reliability durability guarantees that you might care about is particularly if you're working on mission critical applications so I'm wondering if you can dig a bit more into some of the benefits and the potential trade offs of in memory compute particularly for data intensive workouts and things that are going to be operating on stateful sets of operations. You have the benefits of computing have largely to do with the fact that you have fast access to data stored in memory, and so I've heard some people say that this notion of in memory computation or in memory processing is redundant. When in fact, if you think about it, the processing isn't done in memory. The processing is done in the CPU or these days increasingly more in the GP and the in memory simply means that all of the data is stored within memory and not necessarily spilled out to disk, and so when you have a system that's designed to optimize that pattern where you have all your data in. Memory that means that you can get fast access to a lot of fast processing and be able to deliver on some of these use cases that have very narrow windows for service level agreements. So you get performance the same time when you have fastest, you need to incorporate some of the typical characteristics of a distributed system like replication in a variety of ways and you need to have consistent replication. So we've after doing some research, some competitive research we've seen at least one technology where at certain levels of throughput, it pauses some of the replication to be able to handle the throughput and so most people won't notice it but. It's one of those things that if you're not watching, then you could potentially have a big problem when your dad isn't replicated and notes go down and you get failures then you might see a lot of unexpected data loss when you thought that all of the data protection capabilities were in place but for us, we don't make those trade offs when we run our benchmark. So we say here's what you get in a true production environment in terms of performance, and you can be sure that we keep everything retained for business news that you would expect, and certainly some of the trade offs are pretty clear if people from there. With these, it's mostly about how much daddy can store. So you wouldn't use Hazel cast as your say your system of record for Peta Bytes of data we're talking more about operational data where you want to process it very quickly. So things like payment processing or fraud detection are good cases where you might have a good amount of data in memory as a cup, but also have the engine processing in parallel and being able to use that data in it almost transient way. So it's it's data that persisted somewhere else, but we put it into our engines so that we can have those very stringent, very data intensive workloads running. My understanding is that the actual implementation is as a library that can be embedded

Hazel Cast Turkey Silicon Valley M D Fraud Peta
Cyber Power Index highlighting Australian Governments gaps in cyber capability

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

06:22 min | 5 d ago

Cyber Power Index highlighting Australian Governments gaps in cyber capability

"Like any INFO Technology Sector security has plenty of indexes flooding around or get. Indexes collided by vendors and people trying to sell things to us I thought this for Senate index was. Useful because it doesn't come from I accompany product. It say independent academic attempt to benchmark Com, sub security capability and intent from nation sites It appealed to make per couple of reasons may not have had A to do with Bill Center in the past spend a little bit of Thanh. Talking to their academics in previous roles and particularly locked the way that This report sets metrics that up designed to objectively major subsidy maturity in nations So it says what are the kind of things that we could judge the intent of a nation in the obscurity spice and one of the kind of things that we could use to objectively major capability. And it tells an interesting story in Australia Australia's categorized in the higher intent, low capability quadrant and the reason for that is because when the the objective metrics this reporter applied to the statements made by by government ministers by government departments, entities about what our intent is. Assab security spice. Where about the most ambitious nation in the world for ask security attend? But. Then when you look at what our actual capabilities against that intent on again measured in a series of objective metrics. We fold anti sixteenth in that space. So, FA May that told a pretty familiar story because this over promising on delivering stories. One that I think is familiar to a lot of. People in the Strand security sector. In the context of these trying government's actions since the twenty six, Day sub, security strategy. A lot of announcement to be my bet when you follow up way those announcements. In the years after that have been made you say less deleted then was announced to the media. Will what's on the industry? Kodak in the two thousand, sixteen strategy that was undefended at least out of the Prime Minister's office. This one is looking out at a ten years. The two thousand twenty strategy is looking at at the ten year timeframe. And proposing one point six, billion, dollar funding. Backdrop, but a lot of that is going into law enforcement and as you say might be into that capability. What's your take on the strategy itself? Overall as you say, it's it's another announcement is on the strategy whether it's not as another thing but certainly yet your thoughts on the strategy itself and where maybe else we could have been in twenty twenty from the twenty six danes strategies. Have you have you seen that the two thousand twenty strategy's building on the twenty, sixteen or? Taking a completely new direction. While the that, you can certainly say the why the two thousand twenty strategy is reaction to experience the twenty six strategy That the twenty sixteen subsequently strategy had a very large number of of objectives and Nisha announced under it. I think the government found the experience of trying to implement those very large number projected initiatives again, adopted under outcome Tambo's prime ministership around the breathing bruising exercise because the twenty twenty strategy dramatically rationalize is temptation I'm say that the broad spread of of initiatives and objectives under the strategy a kind of a toddler. Your decide that the Gospel confessed about ninety percent of the funding. Associated with these twenty twenty strategy he's allocated to security agencies So it goes into building. Capabilities with particularly the is day but also other security agencies on. Enforcement agencies like the the I pay, and that's well and good We have I think outstanding internationally recognized capabilities within is. and this is the conduct that you have to keep investing in order to. Maintain those capabilities in my time that that international ranking. Suppose big Criticism that that libraries had is one that we've been exploring for at the loss twelve months and that's really When you look at security policy to strike the problem is the ability to project those capabilities out of the silos of how defense and security agencies. To the problems in Australia Com in terms of lifting a bench, mock the baseline up security security. Brazil and Sada resilience across the Australian government trying economy You know there's a lot of examples of that. Wall is day is absolutely world standard. Saab resiliency combined entities is as at the government's own description reminding at relatively low levels. you know the is days top full became mandatory in the. Seventies ago now. had a slew of a straight national ordered office inquiry since then. when you type them all up on like twenty nine percent of Kamal entities compliant with all the top four. Seven years after theoretically became mandatory say interesting. Is Connect between very high capability. Inside Is Day lower levels of saga resilience and more broadly throughout government not to sign story that we see in the corporate sector unites now at banks and Al. Telcos, absolately will class intends to their sub security posture. But you only have to sort of take one stiff through the down. In the I six navy top fifty. And you start seeing. Very, different levels of resilience.

Info Technology Sector Senate Bill Center Australia Australia Kodak Australia Prime Minister Saab Tambo AL Nisha Absolately Reporter Brazil
Naomi Ceder - 20 Years with Python

Developer Tea

04:41 min | 5 d ago

Naomi Ceder - 20 Years with Python

"Python for twenty years. It's a long time to invest in a singular direction seems very focused and I wonder I have a couple of questions about that. You know. Of course you can predict the future. You can do your best to say I think this has a promising future but. If you're picking language in two, thousand, one in python is still relatively young. I think it was probably six years old at the time Is that right? It's about six years the thing. About ten years old then okay it was. Very. It was very yes. At at Lenox world where I I went to Gaydos workshops there were I think there eleven thousand people at Lenox ruled that that year and I know the more experienced establish python types wondered if there'd be enough to make it worse going out for beer? So it's not very popular. And of course, it's exploded in popularity for variety of reasons but. I'm more interested in what made you have buy in number one and number two. Is it accurate to say that you stayed fully focused on python or would it be more accurate to say that python was kind of the central? The hub and you may have had spokes to other types of technologies, other languages, right? Well. So. I've thought a little bit about about this general question and to be honest I. I do recall thinking in after I'd done python for a few years that. It was really likely that something else was going to come along. That was better more interesting more whatever I, and I would probably switch to another language and it it never happened I mean. Clearly there there are other things that you do along the way. So for example. Database technologies have have evolved and emerged. So they're different flavors of things that you can do with databases. So that's that's one thing you can do Know. Web managing things in the cloud there. There are lots of different areas around that. I think part of it was that python. Flexible. Enough to do all of the things I wanted to do. But I think also it's just that through a series of. Of Happy Accidents I think I would say a python has continued to kind of move and and in effect. I don't WANNA say keep keep up with me. Keep ahead of me. I suppose. So that it's always kind of been there for the next thing that I was interested in doing I you know when I switched to to being a developer full-time we we started using aws and it was a great way to help automate the management of that By then Django is maturing and I was working in an e commerce platform that that was based on Django. So we can do that. They are those things just kind of happened, and then now, of course, with the rise of of data science and I do a certain amount of not data science but data engineering, you know all of the things that data science needs in order to do their things. So. That has been part of the reason why that that's happened I think python really has just kind of seemed to catch one way of after another and you know having been involved a little bit in the leadership of Python. I wish I could claim credit for this but I don't think even Gita would claim credit for this it's just been. It's a good language certainly, but there are other languages with it just seems to have been. Capable and picked up at the right time to pick the you know the next wave. So I think that's part of it. So. Yeah. I. Think the other thing that has helped keep me around to though has been the continuing development of pythons community. Now it's something that. From from Gedo on to everybody else involved with python everybody values in his intentional about fostering community and Not all open source communities have. That going for them all the time. So I think that's been a plus.

Lenox Gedo Gaydos Gita AWS Developer
Why You Should Fill Out Your 2020 Census Today

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

06:19 min | 6 d ago

Why You Should Fill Out Your 2020 Census Today

"Are Introducing this week is not me telling a story but it's actually A really important issue that we wanted to bring to your attention and to help me do that I have asian-american advancing justices. Demographic Research. Program director. That's a mouthful. June Lim, who's WHO's here to talk about the census. So thanks for being here to do this and for our listeners sake especially those who have yet to fill out the census, they have relatives who haven't filled it out. Why is this census of particular great concern for us. Right. Now, what we see is is a very unfortunate because what we have seen as the administration's attempt to politicize the census s suppress participation ultimately really to shift political representation away from places with large immigrant communities, such as the Asian, American and Native Hawaiian Civic Islander Communities and other communities of color, and Water considered hard to count communities. and what we really want people to know is that regardless of political affiliation or ethnicity everyone needs to be deeply troubled by these attempts to undermine and risk misrepresent data from the census. And the reason is, is that we have so much to lose if people do not participate in the census. Yeah. I mean some states can lose congressional seats I was also reading that there's over a billion dollars in federal funding to over one hundred programs for the next ten years, there's writing on census twenty twenty. It's actually one point five trillion dollars federal funding. Okay. Okay. Okay. I was little off on my decimal point. Wow So, this seems this seems June to fit right in line with our current president and his administration Zena phobic anti immigrant position on. So many policies. Yes. Unfortunately, there's been a lot of anti-immigrant sentiment and fear mongering. In Administration's policies and also like we're really seeing it. Affecting. People's participation in the census. And we understand that because of this for many immigrants both documented and undocumented, there are significant fears about participating in the census. But. We need everyone to know that the constitution mandates that every person living in the United States should be counted in the census regardless of Citizenship Status and that privacy is of utmost importance and that there are strict laws in place to make sure that information is kept confidential. So. That's really important to emphasize right that I think the trump administration is these seeds a fear that yeah. If you fill it out and you're undocumented in particular, like can come get you and that's completely not true. Exactly. There isn't even a question about citizenship status on the census or immigration on the senses. So there is no way using the census data that received from the twenty twenty cents is that that information could be received and regardless of that any information that is like that is received by the census. It doesn't actually leave the census it only can be. Used for statistical this tickle purposes and in like more of a like for statistical purposes in an aggregate form and never by an individual responses. And the Census Bureau They've done something to the due day to right I mean this this. This is one of the reasons why we're doing this special announcement here an encouragement for people to hurry up and fill it out. Can you talk a little bit about what's what's happened? Yeah sure and there's been some new happening since then as well it's it's that ultimately because of everything happening with the pandemic this Census Bureau had to pause some of its. So, the census deadline was actually Extended until October thirty first to make sure that there was enough time for for people to self respond. But also to make sure that the the non response follow up period, which is when enumerators go door to door to take the responses of people who have not yet completed the census can be done in a fair and thorough manner and also taking in mind safety However, that was shortened to be it was to be rushed than leader change to be moved up to. September. Thirtieth. however, right now, there actually was a I think it was A. Temporary. Almost like a restraining order against a restraining order. That's exactly. that. Judge actually did. Accept that. So it is right now there's there's they're actually having a hearing. To See. What the date is going to be, and for now, the Census Bureau has to continue with its operations as planned and that being not necessarily what the short deadline but we we see how that could cause some confusion in the in the community. So really what we want to do is to urge everyone to fill out the census to day job. Because I, it's like we're not sure what the deadline is now because of all the things that are happening because they're so much advocacy taking place for a community. To ensure that we can have an accurate dentists count and really pushing for the October thirty first line However, we don't we don't know if it's going to land there on September thirtieth. So really the messaging we want to put out to our communities is to complete the Senate today.

Census Bureau Native Hawaiian Civic Islander June Lim Program Director United States President Trump Senate Water
What Everyone Forgets About Money

Optimal Finance Daily

04:44 min | Last week

What Everyone Forgets About Money

"What everyone forgets about money by Crowning Chris. RINING DOT COM. Washing dishes was how I earned my first paycheck when you're fifteen years old and don't get money from your parents to buy things then you have to work. So there. I was scrubbing dishes in the filthy kitchen of a small family owned Italian restaurant, and it's where I learned a little life lesson work is nothing more than trading time for money a medium of exchange. You provide one hour of time to an employer and they provide an hour's wage. I quickly discovered teenagers time isn't worth all that much a measly four, twenty, five per hour. Not long after starting that job I wanted this blind melon album. You might remember their catchy song no rain. One Saturday afternoon wandering the aisles in K. Marts, electronics, department I saw it for sale. Cool. I'm getting it. The price was sixteen, Ninety, eight for whatever reason I did the mental math to figure out the album didn't really cost me seventeen dollars. No, it costs four hours on your feet washing never ending streams of bus tubs overflowing with half finished plates of meat balls is this CD worth four hours of my time. In this case it was but more importantly, you realize the money tucked in your wallet isn't money at all. It's time disguised as money. In fact, it was Benjamin Franklin who said time is money but in our hectic day to day lives, it's easy to forget this. When you spend your money, what you're really doing is spending your time, which means if you waste your money, you waste your time. anyways throw my teens I worked a series of jobs, bagging groceries, stocking merchandise theater concessions, and mostly saved my earnings my time to precious and then I went off to college started a career and forgot what I learned. have. You heard that saying from Texas big hat no cattle meaning you can look rich but be poor. It's hard to believe people who make lots of money are poor. But then your tax preparer tells you they see plenty of families making three hundred thousand dollars and living paycheck to paycheck Thomas Stanley profiles. These folks in the millionaire next door, the doctor lawyer types who drive fancy cars living exclusive neighborhoods and take exotic vacations they look rich, but it's an illusion. It's the families who make one hundred, thousand dollars spent forty thousand and have a million dollars in the bank who are rich. Isn't the worst irony that the simplest way to get rich and have lots of money to spend his by not spending lots of money. But just because it's simple to get rich doesn't mean it's easy spend less than you earn and invest the difference that simple would makes getting rich so difficult is that spending less than you earn takes discipline the median retirement account is worth twenty, five, thousand dollars, and so the problem isn't paying people more money they'll save more give people more money to spend and they'll spend more money. I know this because back in my twenties, I spent just like the next person you think acquiring loss of material possessions satisfying all your superficial desires is the key to happiness. It took me years to relearn what I knew as a teenager. The things you buy with money that you surround yourself with aren't things at all it's your time. And research shows it's having control over your time that makes you happiest not money and things. So, most people have a choice. You can trade time for money and money for things, or you can trade time for money and then use that money as a tool to buy back time. That's why you save and invest, which reminds me of what stoic philosopher Seneca said quote. It's not that we have a short time to live but that we waste much of it life is long enough and it's been given to us in generous measure for accomplishing the greatest things if the whole of it is well invested. But when life is squandered through soft and careless living, and when it spent on no worthwhile pursuit death finally presses and we realized that the life which we didn't notice passing has passed away and quote. What he's saying is when you're about to die, you realize life is time and doesn't that make time your most precious resource. Here think about it like this see, you've worked forty hours per week for the past ten years. You've traded twenty thousand hours of your time. That's forty hours times, fifty weeks, times, ten years, and on the other side of the trade is everything you've consumed sure necessities like food clothing, shelter and healthcare but probably a bunch of other stuff you've totally forgotten about buried in the back of some closet. Was it a fair trade? Maybe it was maybe it wasn't but people are always telling me they've earned million dollars over the past ten years and have nothing to show for it and it makes them sick. They're not complaining about wasting their money. What they're complaining about is wasting their time. Trade wisely.

K. Marts Benjamin Franklin Thomas Stanley Texas Seneca
They Call Us Mulan

They Call Us Bruce

07:03 min | Last week

They Call Us Mulan

"Low, and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and I'm Jeff Yang and this will indeed be an unfiltered podcast. It is one which we are going to used to. You know spend talking about something that we've been wanting to talk about for a while waiting to see for awhile, and that is Disney's live. On which released this weekend right before Labor Day and immediately generated quite a lot of opinions some of which we have. And we have guests, schools, opinions in some of them our guests We've seen quite a lot of in somewhere new. Who have with us? Phil? We have making her third appearance on they call US Bruce. Quite possibly a record. Record record. Our good friend formerly journalists of the with the Hollywood reporter most recently, she did a profile of Tima in Vanity Fair. Are Powell Rebecca Son Rebecca. Welcome. Thank you. I'm here to reinforce and ensure that my title as most frequent they call us first guest. On. Challenged. Bring honor to us all. We also have a first timer on the show hopefully, not the last frankie. Hong who is a freelance writer and illustrator and Frankie also grew up until age nine in China and has a pretty solid grasp. I think of some of the larger context around the film both as somebody personally in in more immerse perhaps in Chinese culture than those who grew up here but also just from being able to read and understand the conversations that are going on in. Chinese about this. Conversation's. Break Welcome, to the show. Thank you for having me. So excited to chat with you about this. Well, the conversation has been proceeding Apace has a not I mean literally the show. The movie itself debuted Friday, and I think that's we don't have any metrics yet that feels like a lot of people in have been streaming it despite the way that it's being presented and I mean, maybe that's the first thing to talk about a little bit like. The film. You know how the film has changed over time how it was what was meant to be in where it is now today in this time of Of Covert in quarantine in theaters basically being shot I think I wanted to ask if maybe everybody could share their relationship with the original film because that's that will serve you know color a lot of people's. The way they perceive this this new one right. Rebecca. What was it like watching the original Milan and how did that impact actually shape? This one for you. Yeah. Well, for me, I you know sort of your classic ABC asian-american Crawl one in the bay area you know live here lived in America, my whole life, and so I was I'm looking this up now and I was actually not cured with anime tomatoes teenagers. So I think I was sixteen when I came out Even, though I was no longer a small child I, what I remember most palpably was bursting into tears at the end of the animated film when Milan she's at the Forbidden City and she turns around and it feels like the entire country is kneeling and bowing and Reverend before her and the swell like I remember for years after that, like you know even without we watching the film just thinking about that moment. Just swallow emotion. Kind of being unprepared to see that image of of somebody who representative you know about as exactly. Who I was, you know just a small Chinese girl could be treated with such respect and honor. Listen. you know and reverence that was so moving. So that's what I remember most about you know the animated law and I think the way that made me feel is is sort of what I treasured about that movie even though it was, you know I haven't seen it in such such a long time. And Frankie in you grew up until age nine in China, right? Yeah in Beijing was. Yes. But you but you did also see Milan and I'm atrophies theaters or at home or so I was already living in the US by the time Mulan came out. So I washed it in Missouri were I was in the fifth grade and I think. My first exposure to Mulan the figure was actually when my mother taught me the ballot of Milan and made me memorize recited back to her. So this character was already one of my favorites. You know this cross dressing heroine who bests all the boys that was basically my dream I wanted to. Show everyone how amazing I could be. So you know I wasn't super. I had very mixed feelings about it because even as a ten year old I was you know I had trepidation about whether or not Disney was going to do a good job representing my culture, my country. So but at the same time, of course, I was really proud to see that they chose a Chinese story to bring to the big screen. So when I saw it I think I continue to feel mixed because there were these moments like the one that Rebecca described was incredibly moving but there were also these little things that day I guess. I don't know if I would say they got wrong because you can tell a story a story Harry you want, but it's more like there were very clear league. American narrative elements that were meant to. Get, a reaction out of American audiences. It makes sense but as a Chinese viewer I just thought while if you're going to represent my culture, why don't you get it right? Why don't you think that the? Quote Unquote correct representation can't also get a reaction out of Americans I remember when she dressed up for the matchmaker in the face was all white I just thought well, this reminds me of Geishas much more so than Address up Cheney's lady and maybe geishas is much more recognizable symbol. But why can't you just make her look uncomfortable as? A Chinese woman rather than something that looks more, Japanese. Their stuff like that.

Rebecca Son Rebecca Disney Milan Bruce Frankie China Mulan Jeff Yang Phil Geishas Forbidden City Asia Missouri Beijing Hollywood United States ABC
Housing, Healthcare, and COVID-19

Medicare for All

04:46 min | Last week

Housing, Healthcare, and COVID-19

"Today, we're speaking with Barbara Dipietro. Who Directs the policy and advocacy activities for the national healthcare for the Homeless Council. Barbara, thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me. Yeah it's so. I'm so glad you're you're you're with us today especially during covid nineteen where I feel like the healthcare and housing systems are really failing us and intersectional and kind of dangerous way. So we really wanted to focus on this today. But I could you tell us a little bit about yourself? How did you end up getting involved with this type of work and what do you do for your for your work? Thanks much I came to this work working for the state of. Maryland. In the Department of Health and did a public health policy for about ten years both of the governor's office and for the Department of Health I did interagency family and children's services and and was a staff to the. Agency. Council on Homelessness. I was the opportunity to write Maryland's first a ten year plan to end homelessness, and this was back when those ten year plans were really just getting going under the Bush administration and Interagency Councils to. A homeless policies within states were really becoming the thing to do and and so that was precisely the time when I was in public service and my eyes were opened at that point to the breadth of issues affiliated with Homelessness and just how preventable homelessness is if we could just get good public policies to address it. And that was obviously no more. Well, illustrated than health department and in healthcare, and so one the things that I, the partners that we worked with healthcare for the homeless out here in Maryland they introduced me to a network of healthcare for the homeless providers nationally, and that's where I was. Started working with the National Healthcare for the Homeless Council and came familiar with them, and then they had an opportunity for director of policy and I've been in this role for eleven years now. And really excited to be doing just so much more deeper work on healthcare on homelessness in good public policy. So just to start with. I feel like the image that people have of homelessness doesn't actually match the reality of who experiences homelessness, how people become homeless and what it really looks like to experience housing instability. Can You just define homelessness for our listeners and paint a picture to help us better understand what it really looks like sure. I know we tend to conjure in our mind a street homeless man who was a chronic. That is what most Americans think of when they think of as homelessness. Really that population is about ten percent of the total homeless population in the country. Overwhelmingly, what we are seeing our low income working families are working people If you look in shelters most shelters a third to a half of shelter. Shelter stays our children. When you look at it working families who when we think about. Earning eight nine or ten dollars an hour, ten dollars an hour is twenty dollars. Excuse me twenty thousand dollars a year at fulltime salary. That's still not enough to make rent and pay bills and meet your food needs and and and and so people even when they are working even if it's not minimum wage still maybe in the shelter because they can't afford housing. So the official definition of homelessness, it may not surprise your listeners to know that there are many federal different definitions of homelessness depending on the program you were looking to access and so the definition of homelessness if you were in a housing world is more narrow than in the healthcare world. and. So then it's different even for the schools. And so we're looking at obviously street homelessness but also people who were living in transitional housing programs, permanent housing programs, people who were doubled up with friends or family really unstable. There's just a really A. Many people do not just solely stay in one place so they may be staying in a shelter for few nights. They may bounce back onto the street they may be able to stay for a couple of nights with friends or family member. Maybe, a spare couch something like that. Many of our clients do work, and so they do have some income were there on disability and they have some income. So that income allows them to pay a hundred dollars for the for sleeping on a couch for a couple of weeks.

National Healthcare Homeless Council Barbara Dipietro Maryland Department Of Health Interagency Councils Director Official
The Power of La La Anthony

The Nod

03:37 min | Last week

The Power of La La Anthony

"PLA Anthony Welcome to the show so. How are you guys doing? Don't? Talk to you. So, people. Know, you got your start in radio at the age of just sixteen t talked to us about your journey I like to go to eleventh grade and I was just so until with this radio station and then went to an event they were having enormous like saw some interns like hanging posters with something that the Wu Tang clan was doing and I was like this could be really cool. So I applied for the program NASA I got him but I didn't really have a plan I just knew I. Love Music and my love for music has taken me where to where I'm at now I got somebody who has dj big. Fan You want not held it down. But it's been incredible to see your acting career just flourish and you play the character of dom on most recent season of the shy conduit for the money I, do it for the culture talk to us about what it was like to play. And get into that character shirish doubt I love lean away. She's amazing for our culture and she was like I might have something for you on which to come in addition and I was like I can't mess this up like I wanna be on the shy and I got the role of dom which I love because she's so different from leaky show empowered dom as a chef that's an entrepreneur and trying to get their business off of. The ground and really focused into keeping 'em it on point so they can build this amazing business together. So I think it was a great transition into go from working with great creators like Courtney Kemp and fifty to now be on the Lena and her crew has been just an incredible transition and so there and you've been acting in so many different types of roles for over ten years I'm curious like what type of role do you hope comes next I'm always looking for relieve rooted and grounded stories just stories that matter to us. Our culture stories that we can relate to stories that people aren't telling I'm attracted to that kind of material, which is why I'm also producing house well, because the great thing about producing, find your own material and bring it to life you're working on a new project that gives a behind the scenes. Look at the NFL. Tell us a bit about this new series and why you wanted to be involved. So fifty were executive producing together the book that we read that we love and it's more about like what goes on behind The scenes with sports, but it's mostly about the women. So many women just give up their own lives just to be there for their partner, who's an athlete losing sports, and what happens when you like I have my own life and I want to do my own thing and what effect does that have, but it gets really grimy and gritty in real and obviously you know sports and athletics or something you know I know a lot about so I was able to really give some of my stories and really gives some real. Really exciting content to the show. So we're excited we're excited to hopefully be in production really soon and get that oven going you're also working on. Producing Story About Sin Toya Brown long you know young woman who killed a man in self defense sixteen was tried as an adult given a life sentence was then finally offered clemency last year. Why was it so important to you to make sure that this story was told that just such a powerful story and I had been tracking it for a while and watching toys interviews and just what happened to her from young growth? Donau. Moe's fascinated at like what? Was Your Life like that. took you down these paths and then her completely changing her life and finding God and becoming the spokesperson for young girls and sex trafficking. I thought it was amazing. So that's something we're so excited about and wanted to be so careful with because now we're telling someone's life story. You don't WanNa, take it lightly or take that for granted art.

MOE Wu Tang Nasa Courtney Kemp Toya Brown NFL Lena Partner Executive
"ten year" Discussed on TechFan

TechFan

01:30 min | 8 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on TechFan

"And these companies that create these programs became very wealthy. I would submit that. There isn't any company a software developer. That's become. I'm very wealthy. Because of their success on the IPAD with one exception games I think gaming companies is on the IPAD or the only ones that are seeing any kind of big success. And even when I say big success maybe if it's an apple arcade otherwise I think most developers gallopers most developers ninety five percent of them are probably breaking. Even if that selling anything I would say most of the now. I'll probably making more money. Because they've been out to take those mobile games that run on the IPAD and Portland's an Nintendo switch can charge four times the price. Yes absolutely is that right. Did you see the switch just packs the Super Nintendo. It's now the number three selling in fact not only did it pass for Nintendo become the third bestselling and it will eventually take number one. It will pass any acid in the we will excuse me. It also passed the xbox one which has been out for seven years the switch has been out for three years and it just passed F.. There's no slowing down the switch. It's fantastic gaming. But the onto jr as I said for the developers that is the switch has a very active online store. Eric bledsoe apples and yet you can take your game you can put it and instead of selling it for.

Nintendo Eric bledsoe software developer apple Portland
"ten year" Discussed on TechFan

TechFan

12:38 min | 8 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on TechFan

"I am David Code David up and down up and down. That's not what challenges this week vacation. Coming up a couple of weeks leaks county Florida so looking forward to that Florida. Nice to come visit my mum. She winter's over here as you know because it's yours. It's your tools birthday as well as this year is mind fifty five Oh so is also my mother's seventieth so but we are going to have a joint family celebration shing. When is your birthday April April? So I've got you by a few mine was What what is it two weeks ago a week two weeks ago? Yeah weirdly enough some people saying hey timmy on facebook fifty s a new forty. No it's not it is not the new forty. Yeah because I just just from the the wear and tear on the body thing my body does not feel like eight did when he was forty no and when it was not it didn't feel like he was God. No no and I don't even remember the twenties so you know with this show started when we were forty. Yeah and now. We're both well I am and you're almost fifty so hey welcome to a decade of Tech Fan. Get getting gracefully gracefully grumpy adults get a little bit You know what else in. Here's how this is kind of funny a big topic this week as we're GonNa talk about pretty much the whole show. I think but we'll get to some other topics but big focus is going to be on the IPAD because apple made the announcement in. I believe it was January. Twenty seventh twenty ten a decade ago and then in April of that year They came out with the IPAD. Yeah go ahead. I got one for my fortieth birthday. My family and I bought one as well. How and I got the immediately I bought one and I knew I was going to get one The funny thing is this. This show is ten years old now or technically will be later in the year. But it's twenty twenty so it's Tanner's excuse me. I was actually doing autopsy radio at the time and I devoted a whole forty minute show to the IPAD. My first impressions and I haven't listened to back. I don't know if I will or not I was thinking about listening to it Priority recording this show so I can kind of refresh my memory a little bit of my thoughts originally an IPAD. But the I. I'm pretty sure I remember most of them But that was you know ten years ago. It doesn't doesn't seem like a yeah. Well that's that's when things by gang holders the UH you know I'll say as the years go by they tend to blur together. A little bit But actually the original IPAD. This is where Israeli realizes changed quite a lot has had got better. It got worse stayed the same. Is that fair. I think so but it has a relatively aggressive development particularly if you compared ed to what's happened in the in the Mac in the same period I would say the aggressiveness doesn't necessarily IPAD. I think it's Iowa's in mobile computing. Because if you look at the iphone phone and twenty ten in the iphone now it's the trajectories almost the same if not more aggressive with the iphone because iphones generally a year ahead of of the IPAD. Whatever happens on the IPHONE? This year is what you'll see next year on the IPAD. Yeah on the on. The iphone definitely gets oversee gets a regular upgrade. Every gave with the IPAD has been longer and then the MAC has been even long story. Mac is almost. It's almost a dereliction of duty at this point with the Makah an apple But let's go back ten years. I remember when the IPHONE was released. I I was at macworld Expo that year. Two thousand seven with me and a bunch of other The My crew which you report of them but you weren't actually at that San Francisco. It was the follow again the The MAC vocab enhancement The I've is there with you and so I remember when the iphone announcement hit and sitting there in the crowd and watching and it was. It was a seminal moment. It's one of those rare times that you can look back and go while that really did change everything that that announcement in two thousand seven changed Eh. Everything not just for apple and for people like you and I that were really heavy and attack but it had worldwide consequences And and we could. This whole show could be nothing but the influence of the iphone on what's changed. We could have multiparty to that series so the IPHONE was released. We got a couple of different iterations at that point. I think we are on the IPHONE. Maybe the iphone four because it phone three now the the iphones the iphone three Jay. And then there's a three. Yeah Yeah So. I think we're right between the three GS and the four. This is right in that timeframe when Steve Jobs took the stage and presented the iphone or the IPAD and it was It was an odd product when apple announced it. Uh a lot of people thought. We'll go ahead. I was GonNa say if you remember the time that was I. Guess from from the release of the three GS the previous year. I remember the four in two thousand and ten to four was actually announce a ww DC. So that was quite an aggressive times. Timescale timescale so that the iphone. The IPAD came before that I remember when the three GS came out. There was a massive rumor mill. that a tablet was coming from apple and by the made the announcement. It was well expected though. We didn't know what it was GONNA be. I remember the time everyone thought I was going to be. Based on the Manque. Your that was a big rumer. Everybody was like this is going to be a Mac based on that and everyone thought it was gonna be over at least over a thousand dollars. Yeah and and that's kind of what people were waiting for. And so when you said Steve came out I did probably a par beep. I would site behind the IPHONE announcement. Probably one of the best keynotes. He's ever done. Because I think this was a product that was so much in his wheelhouse. And if you go back I can read the history of the IPHONE development. They thought of the IPAD. I wanted to do the IPAD. I but the technology wasn't there to do it at the time. Something that large something that they could manufacture for for a decent price so they actually did the iphone. I so the IPAD was always the first idea behind this product. And so when he came out he did this you know remember. He did the the thing where he was just sat in a chair using it showing everything off on it and he was just kind of relaxing in a chair. which was the whole point this about taking computing off off the desktop and certainly even off off a desk off your lap into something you held in your hands And it was. Yeah I think it was. It was probably one of his best behind the IPHONE. which oversees is I think is probably the best one ever did and yeah we we were blown away by everything? He showed US especially when it came to the price because it was half the price we're expecting and we thought this amazing thing was going to the way out of range price was it was it. Was I forget I mean how did he confess. I think round about the same process an iphone. Yeah it was yeah But it was about half the price of the cheapest ibook at the time the cheapest apple laptop but yet it ran the exactly the same now. They've split over over time now the IPAD. Os in the in IOS have split the phone the IPAD OS are slightly different. There's the same code base. Don't get me wrong but it's different and because it was the same os then you could run. Every single iphone application application. Because remember the APP store was had been released. It was doing extremely well especially in games and stuff like that so apple says well this is gonNA run the IPAD or the irs from the IPHONE. It's the same operating system and you could use the iphone applications but remember number ahead that to X. thing that's right so you push a button and it filled the screen and quite honestly look like ass So iphone developers had had to optimize their APPs to run on the IPAD. And I remember that was there was every week there was some new application that you loved on the iphone that was released now for the ipad as well and Oh thank God because now it's going to be big it's GonNa be the graphics are GonNa Look Better. Yeah and this was the yeah when apple really push developers towards different screen sizes unraveling these targeting the standard iphone screen size because this was also so the year the IPOD iphone four came out which obviously had arrested the dispute so and a half times more pixels in the show so so everybody redo their programs anyway and this was really apple stuffed. It's a kind of build on the APP store as a as a as a multi multi he platform environment for developing APPs in which is another small feet. But I I think a lot of people don't when you're looking at the history of of IOS iphone and IPAD. They don't really stop and consider especially in the early days that it was really a complex thing. The apple was creating with worldwide developers to to support two different devices to have legacy support and to Google all this basically from the ground up within just three years and nobody else has pulled this. Nobody you look at what Google of tried to to do with android tablets and it's just been a disaster android tablet. I'll just not really a thing. Yeah I mustn't hasn't pulled it off because they've just got one tablet platform and and And so so it's easy for them because they're they're running a fork of android and they control control of that and it feels clunky. Yeah it's clunky. It is clunky. The the best APPs on the on the kindle fire tablets so the Amazon one because they're the ones specifically specifically written for it and then and then you look without a buck softest tried to move windows into this in trying to pull this off with windows these two or three times now and they're still trying to do it will surface with with yeah the surface devices and then these new things that are coming out this year that they would. They the folding screen. That's still trying to find a middle ground between a bridge between windows and mobile and of course they know actually in mobile labeled cells anymore. No no that's what. That's what Steve. How that's how? We presented the IPOD. These he said we felt we feel. There is a gap between aid the macbook and the iphone what could fill it and that was his kind of the structure of his presentation of Philip. I remember the big criticism. The big response from most of the tech press at the time when it came house wells. Well it's just a big IPHONE. What I remember talking about in that episode of ODBC ABC Radio? That I said it's just a big iphone as if it was going to be negative thing but I distinctly remember. You're saying really. And yes that's the best part it is. It's a big IPHONE. It does everything that the iphone Oregon does exceptionally okay. Well on the interface that you know most humans can you and it's not an actual phone. We forget it without big even without big funds. Nowadays we forget how tiny the original iphone screen so three and a half inches. I don't remember congressional have mine. You know what I mean..

apple Mac Steve Jobs timmy Florida David Code Tanner Google San Francisco Iowa
"ten year" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:15 min | 8 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Everybody so this episode of stuff to blow your mind is sponsored by the all new Mazda C X thirty which I actually just got to test drive recently in the beautiful beautiful mountains of southern California and I will say as some. We've told you on the show before we're not really car guys. We don't know a lot about cars. I'm sort of an automobile Philistine. But from on this auto Philistines heart. I will say this was a really wonderful car to drive. I truly enjoyed cruising around the mountains. In this thing. It was very smooth. It was very stylishly sung to my non Kar Heart in a way that cars usually don't so what's actually in this thing details wise so it has class leading standard horsepower horsepower and is active all wheel drive with G. veteran control plus for ultimate control and I will say there is a very special thing about this car. I have driven another car like this. When you go around a corner in it? something about it feels almost like predictive like it. You know you don't need to do like jerking around trying to correct your turn like everything in it is extremely smooth and continuous. And I think that's what's going on here but it's also got a beautiful design on the outside. Yeah Yeah I mean basically. The thirty is size to be agile in the city while still having the interior space in utility to go anywhere anytime encouraging an active life style and to your point. It's the the idea that you're not having to to wrestle the machine to get where you're going there is a. There's a meeting of the man in the machine. It's also very nice driving experience in a visual way. Where like the car doesn't have a touchscreen and a you know we're like you can see those touchscreens? Come up and kind of distract you while you're trying find navigate the the features and stuff driving instead. It's more traditional kind of command controls that you go with buttons and Levers from the steering wheel but it actually makes for a much nicer acer less distracted drive. You've got your eyes on the road. Yeah you're not playing video game the drive the car. You're driving the car but it's also got connected car features that give you convenience at safety peace of mind Got An in-car WIFI option. Remote engine start stop and door. Lock Vehicle Status Navigation Service vehicle finder automatic nine one one dialing in the event of an accident So it's really got it all and I really truly enjoy driving this.

Mazda California acer
"ten year" Discussed on Taste Of Taylor

Taste Of Taylor

02:48 min | 9 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on Taste Of Taylor

"Then I thought Oh is thank thank God somebody else. I know that got fired. I love her sore soulmates. Because I know what that feels like and then you got cast in Summer House and I was just like. Oh she's back. You know after scone gate I called Michelle said how do you think I did. And she was like I think she can like I think you do well but you can tell that you agree and I want those for some ever did radio and I wanted to pretend that I do it all the time so you would have me back and she and I was like what gave it away and she goes. I don't think you're supposed to eat like dry patients and then choke on our for two hours straight into the Mike and I was like God. I just want to look like I knew what I was doing. So I'm GONNA casually discount really impressed this girl. I love you so much. Thank you for having pigmy on. I love you so much. I'm so proud of your career and you so deserve it Hannah. You're so fucking town too. You're so good on summer house so I can't wait for you are such you're growing and rising comedian. And you are. I mean the future is so fucking bright and also your Soga podcasting and you're so smart in the way you approach things. I remember when you came on the radio. Show you learned from me master. Thank you for my coach and then you like had this show but you were just like I'm just GonNa like sleep in and do reality. You're like no I'm GONNA have a platform. I'm going to start a podcast by the time the show airs. podcast up running you fuck an editor and podcast you book it. You work so hard you I mean. Gene millennials have a bad reputation. You are the shining light. That is the millennial. Molyneaux should all die you. I'll let you live now. I love millennials. Does I am not because I'm older I'm just pointing at me. I realize you don't fight the younger generation time this shit. I speak of silver climbing If you WanNa see me Andrew Collin who's been great on this podcast. He shows episode and he isn't Wa Gascoyne Puddles he We have a show that sold out at the sand and in January. Can I come back. I don't know it'll be tough to get you got if we show on Feb in February as well so you can get tickets with February show and I'm in DC This January twenty second. Get tickets there's a couple of left and also guys like I said burning in hell fantastic podcast and hunter Samir. She's hysterical at being burns. And you can catch her every Monday Albatross shirker show and you also need to start full co hosting more because the this is magical. I Love Review. Oh I love you because that's it for us to follow me on social media at Taylor's trucker and also make sure to rate review and subscribe to the podcast. Tell your friends. Let's spread this shoot. Shoot around the world help me get confident needs affirmation and like I don't know if the weight loss can happen and I definitely can't go back in time like Benjamin Button and get younger so the only thing you guys is that I have to be rich so help maybe rich I love you all. I'll be back next week bye bye..

Michelle Summer House Andrew Collin Molyneaux Benjamin Button Mike hunter Samir editor Taylor
"ten year" Discussed on Taste Of Taylor

Taste Of Taylor

16:11 min | 9 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on Taste Of Taylor

"Three zero at thirty six almost thirty seven. I don't Own a house. I don't have children. I'm not married I'm divorced. It's like it and I also feel like money wise career wise. I think everyone's like you're crushing and I'm doing great but like I want to be doing bad taste. Tae Is thirty two who I'm an older woman. Luckily she likes them old and she likes Chubby. Okay so anyway okay. So speaking of speaking of a jolly good christm- okay. So I'm thirty seven so when on instagram. The ten year challenge came out I was enraged and furious and but I just kept it all inside and I I feel. Society is always pitting all women against each other and I felt like the ten year challenge men first of all they really do get better with age. It's so fucking unfair most of them but like with women. It's like the tenure challenge. That's a fun game unless like you're Jaylo or fucking Jennifer Aniston. It's like in what world will any woman really feel like. She looks her best ten years later men years later. Okay okay so I was like really I was. I was against the ten year challenge. I ignored it. It's fun you should 'cause if something's triggering you online don't yes I I'm twenty eight. I look so much better than I did it. Here's the thing this is what this who tenure challenges for. It's for women who are in their late thirties. Early forties maybe even fifties who like our genetic aliens. Yeah and look better now than they ever talks or whatever or even just age gracefully. If you're tall and thin you kind of age fucking awesome. I because as I look at my friends now who are like really spectacular like Taylor will never mind girl from. We'll never be unattractive so she's elegant will always be and because so she's fucking six feet tall in like a string bean you know. I definitely peaked in my late twenties early thirties. I I have like a young face I have. I have like a like a feminine body so for me agents going to be rough. I'm just saying you know what's crazy. My mom had I'd like was a curvy woman had me and I changed her body. Type you bitch. She snow but she said that she all the Touching my network. And you don't have to do the sleep.

Jennifer Aniston Taylor
"ten year" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

05:37 min | 9 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Aw and why that was avenue in five bucks just decide to move real slow. So we'll begin. saw ratcheted second so imagine renton is causing statement where we talk about all these different sort things stories that are going across the world and how our lack of laws and enforcing those laws laws against people who walk around stores is causing chaos amongst the world and it was guys we'd be taking it a little more space but we can't even get gun control because why we never into control right so the tangible goals in one another tangible goals. I think there's a lot of these. Sores regulated get off the street people in impeach him some classes about how will the sword and real responsibly. Because right now you can go to any comic CON Convention. Whatever grab when he's quote unquote replica? Swords and just be walking around stabbing people within minutes. There's no registration there's no Task for proficiency We don't keep like a list of Mosey sores or nothing and I think that's a big. That's a big problem. Sneeze a seventeen year old mister threatening another team with a Samurai sword over one hundred dollars Singapore unhappy that an eighteen year old. Oh Oh okay let me scroll down happy that an eighteen year old. His brother a hundred dollars a seventeen year old confronted with Semi Sore One night last September Muhammad uh-huh Leaf Moustapha admitted to one charge of criminal intimidation on Thursday. The court heard that he or she the sword inside the victim's home jurong east threatening to slash lashed older boy with the twenty seven meter weapon. if he did not come out of the house his charge sheet stays that Zach. Words come down with us if not I'll stab. You did say literally elite. who was sent to a juvenile home and twenty seventeen for commission in House? Trespass and theft may face imprisonment for his current charge. We're giving his young age. Debbie Prosecutor Angela. Hang call for probation suitability ability report before making representations. I'm like I mentioned one dollars. That's a lot of money it is. I mean we were just stab someone number five. I could see why you would want to stab someone over one hundred. That's why you shouldn't have a sore elite who was not represented by a lawyer requested to be placed on probation instead of giving jail time. My mother's not working I. I am the only support from my mother. District Judge agreed to the probation suitability report to be prepared and journey for the man on January. Thirtieth finishing He also claimed that the soil was actually just scared of victim. which I mean? That's probably true. I'd be scared of Nagata. So but You know wasn't there was trying to scare somebody with it and trying to kill them with it either one I. I can't be assuming assuming when you pull out like Oh scary it. I can't be assuming you know So yeah somebody out his brother some money so he asked for his friends between the ages of seventeen. Twenty one to meet him at Was this this Jason Mohammad Yassin. Daniel Rosalyn to meet a Yeltsin's flat to support him as he planned to confront Yassin Seen he decided to bring along the source so that he could use scare. You're saying and repaying the debt while the void deck of Yassin's blocked the group spotted a friend of him to get you to carry down to come down to meet him the free man he's pretty duplicitous. That was involved in this. They should charge this back luring to do down the free taxi I said. But there's there's no reply so they went up to his unit shattering come out yesterday. Opened the gate to unify and a Ruckus at the time at that point two members of at least company and Seventeen hundred eighteen against shouting Yeltsin about their own personal grievances against him. Oh he oh everybody's money he's taken the money. What does she say about my sister son? What isn't it don cut in? A fit of anger leave then unsheathed his sword indirect today housing threatening to slashing if you did not step out of his unit to talk things out. Well I'm gonNA tell you the coming out. Yeah I don't come. Natural pulled a sword out. That's eighty hours. Yeah I'm a lot less likely to come out. I don't think you WanNa talk frightening. I title legal aid needed five minutes to use the WASHROOM. I Oh okay major. Let me take a real quick because my parents are full of shit frightened he say okay. So you're seeing the doors unit. Cada police like a smart person. The group flare when they notice police cars in a car parked nearby but they were later traced interested. Dale one hundred dollars I get it but hale all right. That's it for today. So thank you so much for listening. Thank you I'm glad I show can be anything you want it to be and ten ten years down in hold only like I think this is a great. Alcohol is a great episode to put the proof A we can do whatever we want to. Apparently because our fifty minutes of this was nothing but seriously thank alpha listener and we appreciate. Ah well wishes and condolences to Karen And Our thoughts and stuff. So thank you and we'll let you guys know Or if you don't see more shows during the wine maybe traveling and stuff so you know I until next time I love you I love you..

Jason Mohammad Yassin Yeltsin renton Singapore Debbie Prosecutor Angela Leaf Moustapha theft Nagata Dale Karen Zach hale Daniel Rosalyn
"ten year" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

05:19 min | 9 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"We are friends now now and I got people like I have got people I talk to maybe every four to five years but we taught we taught hager how you doing. Okay how you doing click and we. We are who we see each other again and as I understand that's a different love languages and other people trying to invalidate holiday. They love what I'm saying is the lack of understanding to the fact that we don't all have to connect on that level. We don't we're not all going to have these grand rained friendships. You know I look at my facebook. Hey I don't have to have like five or ten. Maybe that's okay you know. It's not that happen. Awesome happened to me. That's five ten people might they will probably show up or at least college check on me or something right. They know something wrong. There's a lot of people that aren't that way and I'm not holding it against is there but when you see like people expect this shit out of people as other folks don't have fucking lives man. I like why aren't you dropping everything and reading eating my passive aggressive facebook status in stopping coming over my house. That's not what the fuck happened. Twelve I think a lot of people treat friendships like like they did when they was in school. We're best friends. We got to go together. Walk together talk together. We got to be up each other as time. And if you don't treat me like that you're not a friend right. People people have motherfucking lives. It reminds you of that. Yeah of like fifth grade when you get your first best friend. People's definition is you do is just being each of the time it's like Dr. I'm I'm not GonNa be on the phone with you every day and at the same time I understand. That's what you need is just can't come from me not not but it's the weird judgment entitlement that I am expressing of that that I do find lie down. This is really turned a lot of us in the like really selfish self absorbed people who are constantly. Try to put our own light loneliness on everybody else. I own like insecurities. It's all. Oh everybody else to fix input. I know and that book conflict is not abuse and talk about people that have been victims of trauma and stuff. And it's like look win once you've been in the traumatic experience you live with this trauma by people. We live with it all the time right trauma at some point though it is your thing to deal with yes. It is and so you can't always function or be trusted to lead and Shit if you lead from a place of unresolved trauma trauma I but we've been able to reverse the polarity on that online and be like the person does the most traumatize have the most power in the most. Say so we wouldn't don't do that any other if you work at a job and somebody was like. I had racism happen to me one day and I never got over it. They wouldn't be able to walk into your job and be Eli okay. So because some racist she happened to me one day all the white people get the fuck out. We've like what no you can't manage cannot but online you can you can do that. You can kind of flip it to be like you know this thing happen to me. I'll never forgive this group of people. Everyone needs to act accordingly. Hey anytime you guys bring up this topic. I don't feel good so you gotta stop talking about it like that's not think that that has enabled us to really be like these quote unquote friendships. We talk about two. They're not really Because when we get to these moments a conflict it's over you know and I think that's really not good. It's not good. It's not healthy healthy And people are not like I said if people are not checklist and people aren't like you could afford it up though in tragic trashed forget Just can't do that but people do this all the time and is devastated. These can be devastating to people like you you know and it causes hurt. People continue to hurt people like like. That's the two statement but that's a real thing Yeah says the way we talk about. Friendship depends ugly patriots of the new notion of relating one seeks maximum return on minimum investment and allies in our exit strategy. Anytime a friend for fill our fantasies. These post reveal more about the toxicity of our society than a negative describing is a friendship as a capitalistic exchange instead of relationships relationships involving people who care about each other hanging out a helping each other through ups and downs house is enough to make you wanna cry into a beer with a confidante close friend kind is going out of town. Yeah Yeah and also I think for me I don't know if it's a generational thing saying but sometimes is nothing like hearing somebody's voice because so many people do on Lonzo much. Nah sometimes let me are you okay. Let me hear Your Voice your options. They physically see your face was again different love language. Some people need that. You know. I'm not necessarily. You GotTa Call Me and be talk. I don't i. I think there's been some chances sometimes where I reached that level. I might well. Maybe if I talk to this person right I understand maybe proceed as person and you know what sometimes their trauma so deep. It wasn't even matter you know but you know different. Love languages. Transacting relationships take for example..

facebook hager Lonzo Eli
"ten year" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

12:53 min | 9 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Our female We don't have a non binary thing or anything on this one and is amazing. How a lot of the stuff? Asian in target date dare to embed about talk initiate towards women before why they act like women just fucking didn't exist. Yeah a lot of these. Ads Are Harry's razors razors and shit like that. Right Bevo was something where we had to be like. Hey women could use a student now. I work I shaved it before it was good. Good thirty four million women. Listen to podcast in two thousand. Eighteen is a lot of women is this is sixty eight percent more likely for podcast listening to have a postgraduate graduate degree. I mean mostly very highly educated. Yeah talk at forty four forty five percent more likely for podcast listening to have a college degree looking at gender differences in pockets of education female podcast users have a higher education and income than overall US population according to the podcast analytics newsbeat. So Wow Mormon. Listen and a lot of podcasts. Catered them in women are the ones with the money and education some shit yeah. Yeah did you audience don't exist. Yeah and he still was funny. Is that the decision makers Komo mostly seem to chase after the male demographic Because I think that's just tradition radio and TV so the decision makers there's Impact casting are quicker to give that like if I were running network. Okay let me reach out to a man who's GonNa podcast even if what the man does. It is something that pisses women off. You know. It's like okay. We want to be a network with Joe Button. We WanNa you know we gotta get Charlemagne we gotta get ti. See Ya and women might be like fuck them. I don't like them I don't WanNa but that's the people get the money behind. No normally you know not obviously not all and there's a lot of women at that. They've got it again too but it's just funny. How male dominated a lot of the official podcast are While women are the ones listening. Yeah and then you know podcast actually catered towards women feel like we're Goddamn Wad women. Didn't they get sponsors that catered towards women and everybody is Zahn was like almost like the thing with black become out and everything. Oh Shit Nigga movie yes women like this shit too and women's Bauer like you know. We get perks prowess ignorant to ignore this whole as audience. Yeah like obviously I see our donations. I see our premium listeners. And stuff like that and I don't. I've never looked to see like exactly what the percentages of women never done a survey or anything like that but I would say that is if not fifty fifty is like slightly majority. Women probably anecdotally off the top of my head and a lot of times. People will say. Well how'd you monetize. How do you how make money? How are we are able to do that? And I think a lot of shit really is because of our natural predisposition to be light light. We Love Women. We love black people. We love our people and a lot of that to me. And it's not vache putting on airs. It's not it wasn't like a branding decision where we say. We're going to get all this money like literally. I lost a job in cameras. We should try to make money so it wasn't like bydesign but I think by happenstance or whatever a lot of how we were able to monetize because of that type of inclusive cocoa just kind of like more fair minded thing now doesn't mean that these shows are very like women bash initiate and Black Women. This and all that those shows make money to do if you look at a lot of times. They make money off of like advertisers or someone coming in and and quote unquote pain them to do what they do right which kinda takes the listener almost out of the equation but as a listener funded podcast? I know a large part of this is because you know black women feel okay given us money as a point where we do you know because we're not just out here trying to like embarrassed embarrassing them but at the same time we're not our just pandering and you know at the same time you know to go. Listen to just be a pandering podcast as me and ain't Shit me and trash ask women. Is Everything please give us your money. Please gives you. You know like we just keep it real but it is also I think Not a coincidence that we're wondering if there's black monetize like this agreed. Forty three percent pockets. Man's use spotify to listen to podcasts. Yes spotify they are game changer for people and we we said years ago these music apps a like a into podcasting blend them and spotify lycopene now where anybody can get on and that change it because now you will allow people people when people go. I got a podcast. You can go as some of my podcast and then you go you gotTa spotify. Yes is this and they can just type into title. I don't have have to have a fucking separate. I don't have to Dalo nothing new. I don't have to take because once you start taking extra steps a lot of people fucking tap out. Yeah I it's also amazing because spotify hasn't been in the game that long no it hasn't because they both people get get their pocket is normally like a phone and stuff and apple was the first people that really put podcast into like the what they do into their phones and their ipads and stuff is interesting to see that like literally early. spotify came in and boom. Now we're doing podcasts. Their original stuff and just going and cherry picking the good shows from other places and now they can just you you can just submit your feet and they'll take anybody but yeah Forty three percent is a huge amount for somebody that just hopped into the thing and plus spotify advantage of being on android and right now all the other stuff right and also the thing particularly with the apple sticky keep dishes separate which is fucking dumb combined that Let's see thirty nine percent of smart speaker owners. Listen to podcasts. At least once week I know I do six percent podcast shows are downloaded from apple The average podcast listeners describes a seven different shows weekly. I stand stupid but yeah that that makes sense because you variety taste outage to fifty two percent or podcast scribes listen to entire episodes which is much higher than over fifty podcast consumers. Listen to between seventy six six to one hundred percent of all the podcasts downloaded devices. I will never be in that percentage. I have so many downloaded. I'll never get to a mom agreed around twenty twenty six percent of the podcast listeners. Speed podcast while listening. Yeah knows no say when a listen to this show and come in late day like a while. I'm so used to a union like speed. I just listened to the normal speed. I've never spared a slowdown. Anything like that. Yeah but that means somebody out there stores right now we are the chipmunks see eight RPM you Inca yes Alvin they do do do you welcome out there listeners. On three times speed or whatever Yeah podcast listeners. Being an average of six hours was in thirty seven minutes list the podcast every week Ninety percent of podcast consumers to listen to podcasts. At home I would think most people will probably. I be listened to on commuter style but I I was doing everywhere in the car at the gym. More than half of Americans do chair chores while listening to podcast. Ask Your cleaning up. Welcome to the fold. Okay I'm in hive. I'm in Chore Hive. I ninety four percent. PODCAST consumers are active on at least one social media channel channel which is a great way for most why we tell people between about to show us. TVD WT come follow us on instagram. Come be our facebook page. We love that stuff what have us. PODCASTS pay attention to the AD which is much higher than radio. Fifty four percent. A podcast consumers say they you think about buying advertising product and thing I said that one what was the other one that There was another one that that was interesting. I think about race But it might be down there AC- fifty billion episodes have been strained or download. It from APO Monday. Tuesday wins out our best as a release a podcast. That is so true because when we do the show I can watch our feedback in on our Hashtag I I we. Do you know Saturday Sunday Monday. And then you'll see like a boom boom boom feedback feedback but you get towards the end of the week. Our people want to get off work. Mark on twitter CASS. Now we gotta get you done a lot less Thursday Friday Saturday Hashtag like I'm listening to the show So that makes total sense Let's the Amazon. Prime podcast has one hundred and fifty million active users. What probably got August August? I don't I didn't know that. What all right tasers from June? Two thousand nine hundred. I ain't no problem. Had A podcast feed two percent in a survey to mega. Say podcast are too long because you know why Americans work too fucking much time. And that's why I always say don't make your show for for everybody because the bane two hours find interesting when people get podcasting advised they always tell you make it short. I always tell you not to you. Know don't go too long not too often not this. And I'm like Dr. If the person listening to you is like upset that your show is too long Dank. The one for you know gay not. You're title audience. They really ain't fucking what you anyway. Yeah because the thing is as a podcast listener they are short. Sure Park has its did are born is look and then there are long podcast. Is the entertaining. You normally is hard to have both you know. Most people don't do both so a lot of times. People don't WanNa admit I don't like listening because you're not entertaining Dr. I've heard the truth right light honestly if I roll my eyes podcast. I'm are is because I already don't really fuck with you and you know and I mean that's just an honest thing the people I'm not naming no names but I think and the same thing for us if people look at us and go oh two hours yet. They don't really talk with her right now. Because you know what. When I listened to the morning Jones I never once like three hours of this shit? I love the morning journals. I even longer better. Yeah I was listening to the commercials and Shit you now when you know win day. lebatardshow is on and he's GonNa be on effort three hours four hours out of the middle of the day. People look forward to that time and they don't. Oh you know the radios to me way worse than podcast throwing out his product placement advertising. And and you can't make everything confine you know yes so me personally like dogs. They spoke with us They GONNA fuck with us so it's going to be as long as it needs to be you know and also is one of those things where different people's lifestyle demands different types of podcasts. For Groping for change people leave all and you have some people who like you say I have three and four hour commute back and forth to work so they love. The traffic is going to listen to. I don't have to have fourteen episodes queued up because every ten minutes Gal finished and I've binged podcast before I have to have twenty thirty minute episodes. I just threw them because I you know I have the time and if if I like it I want it all right now. You know so you know we made our show it was you know we didn't set out with a go. I remember the first episode is US say Ashort it was GonNa be twenty minutes. It was how short it was GONNA be. We weren't gonNA talk about politics. Yeah we were just go have fun you know it and look at what the show came. Because you don't know you know another thing I would point out man be consistent. You know pick that thing you can do it when you pick that that thing that you can stick to..

spotify Black Women US apple Bevo Harry official Komo Joe Button Charlemagne facebook Zahn Bauer Sure Park twitter Amazon
"ten year" Discussed on Cold

Cold

11:24 min | 10 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on Cold

"Podcast. I've seen a lot of young women who are seventeen. Eighteen nineteen years old. Who are listening? Because of their age didn't hear about Susan when this was all happening and they're they're hearing it for the first time and having a very different experience than Either of US right in in living that in real time but they're but they're learning so much from it and they'll someone your age age who is what would you be. Would you be Susan's ages head so since you three years you delve. Lv into it. Did you have any clue how sick and twisted this stuff was. Even even with what I knew about Josh and Steve which which was enough to know these guys are not good role when you really look at with the close focus It is I mean the word disturbing can't even begin to cover and has changed who you are. Yes and it changed how you deal with people people and you are now better. Qualified are better able to help people and there's decisions and seeing these things differently really the thing. I was with the reason the police released. The file is because we were going to sue them if they didn't so then they released a redacted. Copy though you don't have to sue US okay. The reason they release reset the unredacted copy because we were going to sue them. Because try and get this because I want more people to look at it and work on it and the thing I didn't want because has rejected files and and seeing their files is they had all steve's garbage and I didn't WanNa look at it and I don't want to look at it I didn't have have to look at it because everybody else look a few other people looked at it and I thank you so much for putting up with it and going to that and and stuff. So it's it's just something that needed to be done in a story told that I couldn't have told as Susan's bother. I couldn't could've toll it with any credibility or any objectively would all be a question where somebody else could. And that's that's you you show me things I had no clue about the depravity or the how bad it was and I'm glad I didn't. There was one time I went to the House House. Josh was supposed to take care of the boys and Susan. I gotta go out and do something. I don't remember what it was anyway. A but she She forgot something. I have to go back and come with me okay. Let's be quiet we don't want to the boys will WANNA I don't want to have to say no okay so we're going up the stairs to the second floor and she retrieves something but as soon as I got the top the store the stairs I she looked at me she goes. Do you feel it. I go what I go. I feel uncomfortable. I not exactly happy to be here. She goes you feel the evil. She kept things in perspective that was Steep House House. Steve Pals Yeah. They reached something at the top of the stairs. Dart at I thought that was interesting that she would say that to me yet. I'll bring that up in all of that really ugly environment that she found herself in through no action of her own right aside from meeting the wrong guys for initial mistake. Yeah for her to persist as long as she did in being the champion of her own value beak so much to her character. And I honestly believe it's an inspiration. Two people who hear her story myself included so I think the boys are lot big part of it so those kids meant everything to her and she was a real good. Mother need to learn from lessons from the past for the future. And this this is one of those lessons that can be repeated off and on S. needs to be. It'll be a little differently but you know it's still the same story good versus evil trying hard and you know and one of my daughters who has rejected everything. She was raised on We'll say leave it there but anyway he's okay. I WanNa talk to you and I need your help and everything but don't tell me to about prayer or God and I'm going pray when you have a question and that's what I've done so I don't understand how anybody can handle it without that kind of support include including Susan when when I was reading through so so much of Susan's writings and she's talking about going to her bishop asking for that council going to the temple and praying about it and it seemed very important to me that that part of Susan's life experience be presented so that people can understand Dan. It's not just what any one of US perceives about. Our our personal feelings about religion aren't was important. It's what Susan believed right and doing doing justice and honor to that. And when Steve and Josh who were Steve This openly that he wants to destroy the church. Jesus Christ latter-day Saints when they say well. She didn't really like it he was all well. Let's let that was ridiculous and you know she was trying to live it Josh. We're taking advantage that when he was looking for a woman within the church search. You know the very thing he saying that he didn't care about in the only waste reasons. He stuck around. As long as she did is she was trying to follow every everything along those that the church taught and she was not given up on him. Even though it was clear to me in the beginning of this there was nothing to be true to begin as soon as I started but but once it did she was going down that road and she kept investing time and energy and and love and stuff to try. Try and bring him back and save him and all that when he was a loss case from the beginning. I don't know I would never dreamed. Winded Steve was as messed up as he was their families as messed up his. I don't know how you would ever comprehend that I don't think anyone who's not actually lived it and including myself can really understand what the dynamics of the Palley were how how strange it was. We stayed away from Steve because we figured it. He wasn't good news and wasn't a pro. We didn't have to be there so we stayed away from it. Which as most people would you just avoid those issues? He's so it's opener is to that I guess I believe there is evil. And there's certainly good and there's gardeners there's a disc Satan and I think when you go down that pass here you're subject told that aren't making bad choices you make like the responsibility was on Josh to to not make those decisions right. But also he was. Steve taught him to be who he was. And Steve's parents affected MSU brought out in there and is that a terrible i. It's just a sad waste of life. Waste of time and tragedy that his time life his steve ruined his family and his but is he a victim. And who's going to judge judge stat by STAT I. I don't know what his life was like a child. I don't know what his parents lice were. So as much as I he was and what he did in the situation he did. Who can judge that not me? It worries me when I see people. People Focus too much on Steve Right when the focus needs to be on Susan. It's about Susan and where she is. I think the right time she'll be found and if not you know there's a whole lot of people in the world let her missing people will never see they're gonna get so at least not on this earth but to to your point I mean I have that house as well yeah. There's hope so if it's been ten years years we still haven't found her living day to day as we always do and every time every time there's Zabad pound every time there's a you know could ever found somewhere we start wondering is this. The one is our awaken. Be Over. We'll we'll be able to put her whatever's left to her to rest with their but were fateful or whoever is found even even though it remains. It's still good. Take matter how hard that has to be. It's hard but I think it's harder not knowing I mean we don't know yet or you know I love to be wrong and she blocking the door sometime or get a call. Hey there's this person you know I've had dreams. Were that has happened waking up thicky. She's home they'll dream. Aw but it was a good dream you know for that day. It was a piece moment. That was If Susan story sounds familiar in your own life in other words if you or someone you know is experiencing domestic abuse in any form. Please get immediate help in the. US support is a phone. Call Away at the national domestic violence hotline at one eight hundred seven nine nine seven two three three four online at www dot the hotline dot. Org My thanks again to chuck and Judy Cox for their candor and continued. Willingness is to share their daughter. Susan's story thanks as well to my colleague Nina Ernest for her work. Editing this episode Michael Bond Miller composed the music for cold old with additional sounds and songs by me. Cold is a production of K._S._l.. podcasts thank you for listening..

Susan Steve Josh US Steve Pals Steve Right Steep House House House House Steve This Palley Christ latter-day Saints Michael Bond Miller MSU Nina Ernest chuck Dan Judy Cox
"ten year" Discussed on Full Coverage

Full Coverage

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Full Coverage

"And it feels like them going about doing something. Very what's nice about the photography within the press piece is that it does feel like this brow for everyone within this range. Subscribing one type yet row. It's like if you like it you can do that too. But there's really a browser everyone within this range in Lang. Going anywhere. We're never going to see the back of people doing their brows stay whether they end up staying fatter all in all. Oh. Wants the marketing team of realize they use something they're never gonna stop wanting to sell something. So I'm really excited to see that this is not bandwagon jumping this is someone's going back said what does this mean for our brand? How do we do it for our do we well it's not enough of what benefit does not nocco for under stars? You does urban decays browse. And I think they've done it. So well, and I love it eleven eleven eleven loves it loves loves it. Do it gets full all three boys? What do we think about that Monday? All nice. I'm not going to bury into the ground. But we are going to keep using. Which brings us to joint highlight. This a good one good one is a foldable. Dory. Guys, don't worry. So the product that we all both loving, and we have both hide. There's a photo we can put on the Instagram both of us wearing it's yes it on someone with a fair complexion of kala dog a heck and a Motown complexion. So this is the Knicks line and load, which it almost looks like liquid eyeliner, but actually a a lip liner lipstick. You want to on Lippi? That's what it says. It says on the books this kid like I feel like you could play passes into Hamburg, very discreetly which is great and the opera catch was like nothing I've ever seen before loops Lindsey. It's a super slim that line your lips.

Knicks Lippi Instagram Hamburg Lindsey
"ten year" Discussed on Full Coverage

Full Coverage

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Full Coverage

"The four it was like a bigger brand. And they had a boutique in south Molton street. And when I I wanted to make parties that was my favorite thing was going to London with my mom, and we'd go in the makeup forever shop, and I just off the poor go behind the counter this guy. She's got like what day what grow up only make potest? Favorite which we again. I wish we could tell blast much thing. Hopwood? Yes. It's just bunkers. I mean, I'm really fascinated. Hey, what people have in the old memory banks because we've talked about the nostalgia of makeup. So many times. I I'm so happy this moment of finding oboe because it is like a diary Nya. If I was up to on my makeup was like so part of it. I remember specifically like I did a little thing on the blog where I did a different lipstick had people just lipsticks was called the great kiss off. Didn't have good. Should bring it back. I send lipsticks people and they would test it for me. And then I would ride to log, and it was great. The even like, I was reading one. I'm like, oh, I remember that night. Our I remember testing that on that night out. And then I went and found a photo from that my out, and it was so it's so volative. Yes. I reminds me so much of specific moments. It just makes me very happy the whole MAC Donald loss. Lindsey two thousand dollars. L'idee loved math dazzle just loved going into a store because I think as a budding meek part there is something very intoxicating about a Maxtor for the first time. I got my make part discount. God. Honest. I've sent off. I spend was so supportive of me. When I start out they really were. So I was always like the most exciting thing to me. There's a lot of mention of MAC was I think that was the thing like my Kate when I first started when I was at London fashion where I studied makeup kit. We had was predominantly max that we start kit and can face body seat without packaging when we first twenty nineteen. I think it really did. Like there's bits and not kit that did see me through my first years as a part. No, it's crazy. Mac gives always gives me a nostalgia old Revlon nail polish bottle get very polish bottles. Always. Yeah. I mean. I mean, if twenty it challenge. Selfridge publishes a little tiny ones. I loved Michelle fridge now polishes. I did the court they were so 'nineties. Yes. Mcgreevy chick. Every we discussed our. I used to work agreed with check discuss it again. I just remember the idea dress. But we check on the no perk to terrible company, and they've gone to call to defend that fact, so I don't get a little I actually saw someone like primordial something doing retro groovy chick socks on. And I had a full emotional breakdowns. Do I just you won't you will not it was the worst year of my life..

Mac Kate London Maxtor Hopwood Michelle Lindsey Selfridge two thousand dollars
"ten year" Discussed on Full Coverage

Full Coverage

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Full Coverage

"John ten years go slips deep. So that thing of like, oh, in fact, actually did wear a lot was nozzle blush are and then buying the sleep while that was rose gold. 'cause I this is way Cheever chivalry. It's not too. And I was thinking about actually the first flick. I have I used to wear if it wasn't the Joe I see working for them. I got it free was actually, and I still use them in my kit now because I love the full minute. Bobby Brown long Joan liner in the poll. Chocolate shimmer shimmery Brown. A love that. I there on my list as well things. I was wearing that. Yeah. They had the cream. I shut in two thousand nine would like the long way jealous. But they were long way Joel cream I shot. Oh, they will just also I'm looking at a list of software. I was saying that I was taking on holiday with me. I've got the prescriptive foundation screaming so much where you go to sell. They would make your exact skin color. I was devastated when they killed it back down in that recently income right now. Yeah, that's back back back certain stores. You can go to. To shake. Counter. I loved that. I do fantastic. Yeah. It's such a fun experience to you. I've got well. If I go on here got my two Chak law was all about two thousand nine and actually thinking about it. I was also to Chicago. And what was it clearly what was it called airbrush conceal? I love me some of that. Yes. That loved Caen. Yeah. I did chubby stick as well. Trump can Hazel. He's there is more. Like, the it was oh God. What was it called clinic Moscow? Or that you can still get dozen lacked power lash prowls. With worth. Yeah. Yes. I had which was so mazing, then the Steeler shadows. Steal Aisha's is like squares jam. Yes. Still lost. Massive jam. And I had this loud was like my absolute favorite, which is. So is because we would just playing with cloud in the new cream formula right now and cloud. I never didn't have it. And it was a silvery Tope Topi color. I would wear every day in a very share. And then I would just be like very Lii in mine is all over. No. It wasn't a then. Yeah. Then I go private koshen again in twenty four seven pencils in stash rockstar Earl slick and corrupt and again like I still have all those pencils. That's yeah. That's nice. When you remember the things that you've had, but you still use still have a love affair for. Now. You just couldn't believe how many was even going about looking at this thing. And I'm like, oh, I've just been using this elements rose collagen quartz, man. Which is the mossy just brought back yet. Collagen quotes mascots the say moody rounded, only, oh, my go- when that came out. And I was like, oh, this is so amazing. How wait I've been used? Ten years ten years ago. It's so crazy. How many things there are on this list of off and stuff that I just fiercely loved. Yup. Die. Hold. And now, I'm like, oh, yeah. I remember that still a lip glaze singlet pledges. Yes. Oh, there is a ruby. What was it could fire? The glazed one that you put up. It was a mini. I always always had like a five pound voucher way you'd buy something. And he was many. And I always bought I thought review many brushes were amazing. Yeah. That was how I started my kid a little time getting my five pound voucher. What I brought something from. I'm not keep. Yeah. Keep getting that. It's so funny 'cause I'm just remembering now, I think I was coming out actually when I was a coming out of phase of wearing quite fifties clothing. Actually, I was going to phase of that. I used to draw beauty spot on Marilyn place. I used to do I think it was an eyeliner pencil that I would shop really Shaw and then just always late round. Yeah. I always stayed because I ain't wearing that wanna met Dave 'cause I met David too. So. Yeah. Just one of my favorite things about looking at the old blow boasts is products that don't exist anymore. Jemma can't Jeb kit kit. Of indicate lip envy here, which looks the nail polish pod. Cam danger of Hodge now in WalMart here. Different. Yes. I still remember as well back in the day when boots used to have a makeup forever..

Earl slick Trump Cheever Bobby Brown Caen John Aisha Joel Jemma WalMart Shaw Moscow Chicago Joan Hodge Dave David five pound ten years Ten years
"ten year" Discussed on Full Coverage

Full Coverage

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Full Coverage

"You can still go and see it. Yeah. I saw it in two thousand seven according to the. On two thousand nine I was so posting. So I was in the BBC world as a blogger. So I was trialing stuff. But I will say even though I was a hardcore blogger at the times postings every day every other day. I was still. I never wore a ton of makeup. I was doing very very cautious with what I will. I knew I liked what I knew always go to events and people like, oh, it's so funny that you come to make offense you never wear makeup wearing so much my face eats make off it's not I don't translate to wearing a lot of makeup. And then if I'm wearing a lot I suddenly looked like a Wayne, I think you'll make well, I I've learned, but it was really interesting because of BBC mecca I was able to go back and actually look at the products. I was writing about 'cause I looked at photos a diary mono who didn't love Tope silvery. Nine because every Jovan Topi silvery. I. So it was interested to go back and see what actual products. I was writing about using a lot. And it was fun to see those diary out. Just great. So I do actual specific product remember forgotten about which exciting. But then they're also I'm still using interest to yes, ten years. So tells about what you were up to like I said I would have been finished university. I was living in London. I was assisting another makeup artist. I was working with him fulltime pretty much. I'm that was the today. So I was what TV shows expecting the makeup various different. I think it was it was very early on in my career. Getting into the industry. And again, I think at that time beauty blocking it wasn't a big thing. So it's funny. Even looking back. I guess the biggest thing was all my inspirations coming directly from print magazines. They will wasn't the emphasis on the internet. It was the mice base air Lindsey. So it really it was the both of. But I feel like, you know, back then I didn't have the portfolio. I have. Now, I didn't have the clients. I have now. So I won't be gifted. Aw, everything was being scraped and saved, and you know, if a friend hustle, and they didn't want any more. I'll have that. And yeah, it was expiring and also to understand products. I was having to go into department stores and play with everything on the back of my hand. So even if I couldn't have it in my I knew how it worked or how it felt recommending people. And I guess a lot of it when I look back. Yeah. Probably mostly go friends using it was not more word because blogging and it was the beginning. Yeah. It was really go friends friends saying you really should try this or you know, when I would work with other Macra and seeing that kit and being inspired. But will they have and funny again, let you set the makeup thing even back, then I don't feel like I. All different types of makeup. Really? I I've always wanted flick. I've always done some kind of flick because that's just what my eyes shame. If I didn't even really do my eyebrows for years. Squeezing. Well, I used to tweet the living crap about two minutes. But I definitely wasn't doing anything to them. Yes. Allies or anything funny?.

BBC Jovan Topi London Wayne Macra two minutes ten years
"ten year" Discussed on Full Coverage

Full Coverage

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Full Coverage

"And for me. The I quote they made that will let the Mucci texture fall into that category. But then they also have the new I shutters. They made like the ones that in the squeezy cheese, a really full pigment and very much encourage I would say play and experimentation with a makeup quite creative in their shade choices. So I kinda feel like milk is a good one. Because there is something for everyone. It's a fascinating brand. I've watched it since it started. And I have to say it's very similar Jacobs line to me when it first came out. I was really disappointed. There wasn't much. I thought was very exciting or fun or actually that good. I just felt kind of rushed and a lot of style over substance. Yeah. What I will say since then moved into something that I really love to be with those cheek six say all Kroger's good. I big huge new. I love it. Really love the highlight sticks. I love the super iridescent glittery ones. Yes. Miles is gorgeous as well and color bones party time that so much even you can rub it in your hand and put it through your hair. It's really really pretty. I like the gel eyeliner pencils yet. A recent discovery that came second my. Tested, the blow of foundation, I didn't get along with me too. But it felt kind of like the flower to me it was quite a heavy cream. I thought it was going to be a lot lighter than it was. But I think view looking for full coverage the tube, patching great. Yeah. So give if you're looking for mobile coverage foundation. I just wasn't. I'm trying to think. Well, I don't think there's anything that's out in the current range. Don't lie. No. I love all the sticks. I like the tone of stick. I like the cool. Yeah. I like the Sarah's innovative technology on the Kushner scar. Again, I think we see Christmas ARA introduction as CD oil reviews of that people grew into dot com as well and lip gloss in the Cush line now as well, which really lovely of Catholic loss, and it's very nice. Wells does the the sun oil is really skin oil is just so so pretty gifts to beat sfu finish on the skin. I just I'm very excited. This finally out. I think people have been waiting for so long way. Ju it's very exciting. And yeah, I mean, we could carry on all day, so many there's been talk about really ought to because we've been talking for eighteen years or a day. So we're gonna talk about a bunch of things in our highlight of the week because I think a highlight might be some highlights. Most importantly now is all main feature which would be ten challenge. So tell us about this for the people that don't know if so if you're not on Instagram there has been a hashtag going around hashtag year challenge where people have been posting a pitcher themselves ten years ago, and then a pitcher now, and I guess generally having a bit of a Lawler props equality head to also very Steiner shout fits stylish, inverted commas. We've all those days is important that so million thought we take a trip down memory lane. You want to trip? It was we would have reminisce. I mean to clarify way saying we're trying to work out. I was like wait ten years back is that hard to do. I need to run. A how old are right now. How would I would have been twenty two? So I would have been just finishing. It would have been when I was living in London. And I would have just finished university about a year or two ago. So yeah. No, I would finish university. I would have been just starting. I've been assisting that was assisting days. I took my wisdom, Twenty-eight dot e Ben. Ben it's on now. Twenty to shut up. Twenty eight. And actually two thousand nine was big if me because that's what my moved to America. So I moved to the to New York in July. So it was a big transition phase for me. I was BT blogging. OJ OJ. Daddy. My daddy. Mac. I was blogging. My blog beauty, Meca dot blog. Spot dot com. It's still out there..

Jacobs sfu Instagram Miles Kushner Mac Sarah Wells Lawler America New York London Steiner ten years eighteen years milk
"ten year" Discussed on Full Coverage

Full Coverage

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Full Coverage

"This is where we should be filming it I'm going to. Nice nice back to the same as the I prime, but it's a white lady. Melania pink. Yeah. It's just a why it's so it says it's of media. It says it's coverage. I think it's it's a solid medium. I got one swipe because my underwriter. Us a lot. This is also what it's for. Yes is gets not for natural. Look just isn't. I did on my eyes. I did it around chin and around my nose where I would usually it and blend blended. It's not going to blend it self. I will say than what is what amongst those is stuff rich. This is medium to full medium to full, and it's kind of thick. Yeah. Taste. It's it. It's it's got the moisture, but I think it hasn't million to it. But it still is quite dense. It's still dents. Yeah. It's definitely not as heavy as shape note. It's not a million miles away. No. I think reviews I've seen people are saying that it's not as full coverage is tape shape tape, and it's more of a medium concede. I would say you'll getting medium to full. And I think it's going to be built I think for a lot of people. This will be full coverage. You know what I mean? So we'll try this. And be like it's also again looking at the ingredients which round around putting the agreements on the books. There is a lesser in it, which is nice. That's the hydration that you're feeling that. There's also. Again. Tons of silicones. There's just so many silicon in this, which is the slip. Yeah. So that's nice that some flow nectar. Okay. I put it on. I it blended easy than I thought it would when this went on. I was like, oh my God dot so much coverage. And it was a lot more than I'm used, but it did blend. Well. I had a really puffy under is today because I had a reaction something in the night. I would really giant puffy face isn't the ideal day. I am going to give it a second. Go. I don't think it's creased horribly. I don't think it's gone into the fine line. Oh, how road east given the state of my bloody face when put it on his -ly so nuts again, that's probably the silicon just hoping it sit on top blended nicely..

"ten year" Discussed on Full Coverage

Full Coverage

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Full Coverage

"So it shouldn't be shocked by the pencil is still my perfect and so perfect pencil pillow talk. The pilot and the blush just pulled saro-wiya the blush. Take years pulled really Brown the pallet. I thought was nice. It just wasn't that special for me. But things I feel I haven't tried that one actually, but I feel like I've got friends who love it. And then somebody selfie. It's good. But things that worked better. Yeah. I know there are people who are very excited. I'm excited for those people. Yes, also knew we talked about this a couple of weeks ago. We said it was coming. And now, I've tried some of it. And now we're going to talk about it. And I'm going to try and keep my positive pounce on new launches. Seila? We bought the setting powders. I didn't get the brushes and the I don't I've looked them. I've played with them. I've talked to people about them the fine. There's nothing about them. Are you just don't think they're necessarily? They're better available for the money. That's really where I stand on it. So the fence I I'm wearing a full face a full face offense. You from a pilot of pinks Hello to full face offending. I waiting forever to get the foundation because my shade which was one s never in stock insofar anywhere whenever I go. And I just didn't order online. I don't know why it should have been a sign when using the primer the face fine ever, do you like the face primer? So I got the foundation on I got the conceal and I got the powder in lavender, which is the lighter brightening shade. There's a banana shade as well for bright DACA scans on the butter, which is the lightest of the colored powders. None of them not that non translucent option. Yeah. They're all different. Shay. Yeah. Which is great. Because that's what she does. So we'll start with what's good. I think the packaging on the power does is gorgeous stunning onto local. Local vintage fail which is nice with the silica modern edge. Yeah. Let's diamond edge. It does pick up fingerprints. She says immediately putting fingerprints all worth it looks so pretty with it. But then what you heavy so you could still travel with us still definitely portable. And it does come once you take the lid off. And there is the little sticker inside covering up the holes where the power comes out. There is inside the bulk says actually a cap that you can slip in for when you travel. So that doesn't spill everywhere, which I think is genius. So I appreciate that Rana. The powder. I think is lovely. It's really lovely slip to it. The brightening shade is writing the buses shade is light enough for me, which I thought was very exciting. Because I wasn't sure that said first ingredient is still talk second ingredient silica. So it's still got some showing the then third ingredient is domestic own which is a silicon, and you cannot feel that I'm going to make Harry posing it, how do you feel knife-edge polls in it? You can feel the silicone in that has definitely like a very velvety to it, which I think a lot of people were like if you want something that's going to give that kind of silky appearance ingredient is also squally, which is hydrating oil, which actually I went to a bio since launch recently and say hero ingredient is squalene. Hey, we're going to be hearing a lot more about that. Yes. As we come up to it's it's a big thing at the moment. So there is hydrating of in it. But. You don't know the ingredients call some traces in these things. It's like, yes, it's full on the list. So it's pretty high up but talk number one silica number two domestic oh. Number three and squally number four. It's gonna feel sleepy. And it's gonna feel pleasant on the skin. I don't know what the long term effect is going to be with it being talk. So obviously you've had to put the silicon and the squalene in to counter the fact that it's just talk. It is. I also this is the lavender. We've got she the brightening is really pretty. Yeah. I mean, they feel the texture feels it feels very finely milled, I feel like it's the kind of thing that isn't going to sit in Paul's, which is nice. Yeah. It's just one of those things if you'll offended by the silicone issue some. Yeah. So I think I like the powder probably not blown away by the powder..

Shay Brown Rana Paul Harry
"ten year" Discussed on Full Coverage

Full Coverage

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Full Coverage

"Fan and beauty gigantic addict. Yeah. Because beauty goes out and buys a new pilot. And as my God, which I do get very excited. If you've got a problem in the style of us, it's when you go out and buying empty pellets to fill up from your own style. It's when the woman at the checkout is saying are, you sure you want the sixteen. Are you one hundred percent show? You do know you sixteen again Icee she should get ten and then Lindsey goes, oh, maybe twelve and then we look each other. We'll take all. We didn't just get those either. We. Tiny pocket-size five palm pallets which we're gonna fill whether and stuff and make our own makeup lesions, Jerry that you moron collection. And then not literally our full coverage. Announce it out of all of our shit. But then I also you vote more of other policies. Empty pilots are the gateway drug to excite whole fun, and you outta gloss red wine, and you live in Jesus you live in. I mean, I think it's very good. And it's inspirational of us from our it's very shop pure stash. It's very good for no by by. Yeah. Yeah. Loving what you've already gall, but making it more new forefront. So you actually a use it more often mix and match, and you remember what you've got an put it into something that makes you use it so excited so excited miss as get and there's no other word, Dan giddy giddy episode, I can feel it. So we've got news of we've got highlights the week. Obviously our main feature this week. We should say wasn't by by someone in the Facebook group Instagram in general. Yeah. One of our Facebook group friends suggested that we talk about the ten year challenge happening over Instagram. But with regards to our makeup, and what make up we were ten years ago versus what we wear now, which we thought was awesome. So that's what we're going to do. We're going to get into news. I because says l'idee lords of it all there's a lot also table covered in Mako. We do have a table covered a makeup. And I thought we've got something from every price range, which we've done everything for you. So don't favor if you are no by January. Well, probably. If you're a low by January or in need, a payday Trie, that's not gonna break the Bank. We've definitely go up. If you I need a patriot is going to write the Bank. I'll go to that got. We've got every two we got you so start with new news. This is something a lot people ask about as well. So actual news is actual news. From the news business news, one of our favorite brands elements. Everyone knows what big elements fans we've had no other Gabriel the founder on the part. We had lovely interview with Noah, we talk about their new product all the time. We actually got more talk about as well after we talked about this. But as some of you will seen elements has been sold the company itself husband sold who looks interesting for nine hundred million dollars. Not one million dollars. Nelia billion nine hundred million dollars business is big business to lock the time which I think surprise people's kinda surprising. No they were buying. I didn't know they owned anything other than themselves pretends out they do so that sex citing people of our stars. I who message is on the Facebook group and on our Instagram. What this would mean for elements for them as a consumer short story as it went mean anything. Yeah. Especially right away. Because you probably don't even know elements has been bought and sold a couple of times over the last few years. So it was sold to I'm trying to find almost starts, but it was so to Steiner leisure who owned bliss, and then that Steiner was sold to L catoon. It's will be moved around this happens. I think a lot more than people realize bronze get bought and sold and packaged moved around. Big news because elements was sold just a couple of years ago as a bundle of brands on that sale was something like nine hundred and twenty five million..

Facebook Steiner Bank Icee Noah Jerry Instagram Dan Lindsey Gabriel founder billion nine hundred million d nine hundred million dollars one hundred percent one million dollars five palm ten years ten year