35 Burst results for "Ten Year"

Frances McDormand Explains Why She Turned Down Press Requests for 10 Years

Daily Pop

02:25 min | 12 hrs ago

Frances McDormand Explains Why She Turned Down Press Requests for 10 Years

"Okay. We're going to move on to actress. Frances mcdormand so. She just made this bold confession. She says she turned out interviews for ten years and chance. Good recent the oscar winner told the new york times. It gave me a mystery back to who i was. And then the roles performed. I could take an audience to a place where someone who sold watches or perfume and magazines could not ooh that she a pull that off. Talk to me like with the studio. And say i'm not going to do any interviews. Well that is interesting. But you know who was famous for that trend's prince dude and that's why everybody loved him. He was so mysterious. He's one of the most mysterious unicorns ever. That's why i always say. I miss the days of times when we didn't know every single thing about celebrity. It's the reason why tom cruise came up and came up so hard. It's the reason why. Julia roberts has survived for so long because they gave you that. We didn't know about what they were eating about. What was in their frigerator as we didn't know where they were on vacation. But you also have to just remember that. This was years ago was ninety six when she started this remember. We only had the rag magazines and we had the big magazines and television shows. We didn't have all of this social media so now that's why everyone is putting everything out about what they do. Were like okay enough already. I don't do. You said about the scenario so i i think it was brilliant. Does it do you think they're still shame because to me i. I don't care if if i see a big celebrity coffee or watch or on a magazine cover. It doesn't really lowered their celebrity to me. I still value their are. And i don't mind seeing them in the movies. That doesn't distract me. Dad there's an opposite there's two sides to every story because there are some actors who look down on other actors can't get those endorsement deals. Who aren't you know making that extra coin but i think for for francis and garment. This is about her craft and she never wanted her craft ever be. I don't wanna say soil because it's not really solid but she didn't want white diamonds but i'll hawks. I'm white. i'm here for a chat about the art and her choices in the character because her first come out character was what fargo was in. That was a big deal so in order for you to maintain that you have to pick roles that bring that kind of eat. Attention or people is hollywood.

Frances Mcdormand Oscar The New York Times Julia Roberts Tom Cruise Francis Fargo Hollywood
Why Beef Isn’t The Enemy

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:00 min | 17 hrs ago

Why Beef Isn’t The Enemy

"I want to sort of elephant room. Which is the conversation about meat. Itself is a good for you. Is it bad for. You is bad for the planet is a good for the planet is bad for the animals. Is it okay to eat animals. Because the conversation it's really emerging in many many circles is that we should become vegan or to save our health and save the planet. And you put up a very different conversation about this How how do we become to understand. That beef is the enemy and and why why is why is it not absolutely i mean. There's a series of cultural conversations. That happened after the industrialization of beef production that shifted the arctic millennials reviewed beef. You know the narrative. Well i'll repeat it. The broad brushstrokes. That story after the second world war we had a major consolidation agriculture many of the ammunition factories converted to fertilizer factories. Which made we had basically a vast infrastructure loot fertilizer factories. That were ready to go. We started to make fertilizer much much cheaper. We had a bigger industrialisation of agriculture. At the same time we had a different approach towards food security is what we call them today but the government after the second world war and around that time was very concerned about america autonomy understandably and invested in systems that ensure that we had enough corn wheat rice soy those key crops and a few others cotton sorghum tobacco that we had those introduced in volume sufficient to feed the american public in the us. The conflans those two things is an overabundance of food crops starting in the fifties that we began to understandably redivert to be feed developed. The world service's in too much food so we feed. It does something else right and the thing is to mark. It's a bunch of rational things that we did right. We are like okay. I don't wanna have another. You know victory gardens and terrifying end of the world scenario. Understand right we have all these huge factories that we need to do something else with understand. These are all rational economic. It was good. It was good intentions with bad consequences and longer term consequences. You know these are sort of short term pivots responses. I think sometimes. And i do agree with some of the broader kind of conspiracies time around big ag but the way that it's been built up i think was a normal reaction to a bunch of social and economic forces and so we ended up with though is by the fifties we were realizing we could get fatter. Beef faster feeding it. Human food right and then about ten years later diet for small planet planet was one of the first book said that hit around those but then by ten years later people started to say but wait a second. This is devastating for the environment. Right because we're basically producing resource intensive crops that are maladaptive for beef diet right And are also bad for the planet being produced at the scale for this usage and effectively we created a very unsustainable beef supply system so the way that it happened is that we pivoted how we produce beef from a natural regenerate traditional system to the modern industrial farm. Yeah and then we started to understand. I'd say they the the response to that was for many people will. We're going to be vegan now the response but just like oh my god. Look what's happening. These factory farms and then of course literature came out. That meat is bad for you as got saturated fat. We shouldn't be eating. It causes heart disease right. Yes yes. And i think a lot of they you know they the conversation around beef and how bad it is a lot of it. I agree with directionally in that confinement. Beef is really bad.

Arctic United States Heart Disease Right
Your body as a smartwatch battery?

Talking Tech

01:39 min | 21 hrs ago

Your body as a smartwatch battery?

"So it's possible wearable devices like smartwatches. Fitness trackers could run without the use of a traditional battery. Instead you are the battery. I did not miss speak there. You are the battery. Researchers the university of colorado boulder developed wearable technology that uses thermoelectric generators it. Convert the body's internal temperature to electric to provide power so no more plugging into the wall. None of that is your body that will charge your smartwatch or your tracker researchers say the wearable can generate about one volt of energy for every square centimeter of skin space which is less than most existing batteries. But it's enough to power. A wearable device of their findings were published in the peer reviewed journal science advances which is managed by the american association for the advancement science. So how does this work exactly technology. They use combines stretchy material called pala mine poly mean. I hope i'm pronouncing that right along with thermo electric chips in liquid metal wires that can be worn either on your wrist or like a ring on. Your finger sounds complicated. We might need iron man to figure that out so how soon before he might actually see this happen. So researchers predict devices using this technology could hit the market in five to ten years and the way they see it is they see this as something that replaces the batteries altogether. So let's say you have a fitbit instead of the regular battery. Have it would have this technology where you put it on your wrist. And then your body he internal body heat would charge it and keep charged all the time. So obviously it's going to be a while before we buy a smart watch power with type technology but i will be grateful to have one less gadget that i have to charge every night here here. This all sounds good

University Of Colorado Boulder American Association For The A
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Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:43 min | 22 hrs ago

test

"Mary frank johnson. Welcome to technician. It's great to speak with you. Thanks so much. Peter i always enjoy talking with you. I do as well so please on the record at this point. I'm i'm as somebody who is a luminary ao space. You do not need a big introduction with my audience. I don't imagine but you are perhaps best known. As former editor in chief of cio magazine the the moderator of the cio leadership live broadcast which is just a phenomenal phenomenal series of interviews with with leaders in the tech space x os with a healthy dose of course of chief information officers as the name suggests and a prolific writer. Somebody who's wisdom. I know my team. And i have have gained mightily from across the years as well so i'm so pleased to to have this more formal conversation after many many informal ones with you okay. Well thanks very much peter. I we've got a lot of great stuff to talk about indeed indeed wipe. We begin at the beginning at least as relevant to the cio space. You're not somebody who grew up with immersed in technology You are somebody who The written word came the more easily to the dentist too many others. Perhaps and and you were focused on journalism. I wonder what was what was the genesis of your time In focusing your skills on the cio. Space okay thanks. Exxon question and i love telling the story because i think that it reflects so much of how many of the it leaders cio's that we both know today ended up in the positions that you know they were music majors or they majored in english literature and history and then they got really interested in data side of things for me. I had started out. I spent ten years at daily newspapers. In florida and ohio in washington state and i reported on everything from city and county commission beats to k twelve education to police even state politics when i was two bureau chief for gannett news service out in columbus ohio and then we were moving to the boston area in nineteen eighty nine. My husband was an atmospheric scientist and he was taking a job in cambridge and so naturally i went reached out to the boston globe and to the boston herald and the it was. Nobody was hiring. So i was. We were arriving in the boston area. And i had heard about a very vibrant technology publishing world here and so i had examined it somewhat and made some phone calls A lot of this was so far before the days of regular emails. And you know we weren't living on our phones. Then so i was just applying my reporter skills to it. And i ended up getting a copy of computerworld mailed to me and sat there. I remember sitting there in my living room in ohio looking through it and feeling somewhat reassured that i could understand about what have the stories were about And then on the drive from ohio to massachusetts. I basically grill my husband One side down the other about the computer industry. Because i was coming into it only knowing that ibm made typewriters and the rest of it was kind of a big mystery. But i had been using some of the very early unix. That was vi editor on unix. That you could use to do work on. He had some sun workstations and very early versions of sun and unix workstations at our house and so i used that a little bit. And i remember when i was in my interview for the computer job with The executive and executive editor in the editor chiefs of computerworld. I think they were very impressed. That i was referring to things like vi editor in youth so but computerworld at always hired. They hired reporters who could learn the beat. And i think that's pretty much the way almost everybody on the tech journalism side got into it. They were journalists bite training. Then they do. They dove into their beats. Because one of the things we discovered trying to hire people over the years if you try to higher in a technical person and hand the technology beat they wouldn't know the story angle with fell on them so it was really important if you were genuinely out there reporting And then i found enjoyed it. I just enjoyed it so much and by the time i was a couple years into my job at computer world when the boston globe was to interview people and hire all. But i wouldn't left for anything at that point it just it was such a. I just enjoyed the way. The story kept changing and advancing and moving forward.

CIO Mary Frank Johnson Ohio Cio Magazine Boston Globe Gannett News Boston Exxon County Commission Peter Boston Herald Columbus Cambridge Florida Washington Massachusetts IBM SUN
Higher-Order Thinking and Personalized Systems of Instruction (PSIs) in Higher Education

ABA Inside Track

06:07 min | 23 hrs ago

Higher-Order Thinking and Personalized Systems of Instruction (PSIs) in Higher Education

"You i got interested in the idea of kind of looking at higher order thinking and sort of personal systems of instruction when you yourself were a student and that led me to the question of what was personalized systems of instruction especially computerized ones from beyond. You know i. I think today everyone sort of thinks about all you can do all this stuff online. You learn online. Everyone's an online program. But if you go back maybe fifteen years you know. Maybe even ten years it feels like one of these technologies that couldn't have existed but we know. Psi original work was from well before computers. Were something that everyone had seven of in their house and you know in in the form of a phone so could you tell us a little bit about what. Psi's were like when you were starting out in higher education. You were starting to use them as part of your doctoral program. Sure well can. I use a way back machine to tell you another little tidbit secret. Of course you can do right if we go way back to me being in grade one and then i realized this later that there were reading. Labs and reading. Lab was the self paced set of there. Were these big boxes at the back of our room and you could go through these little reading vignettes. I remember reading about brown bears and things like that. Like that. Just stuck out to me because i love reading about them right like what were they. Where did they live what they eat so forth. And then you would answer these questions and if you'd have to get them all complete and correct and then you could go on to the next one so there was kind of this. It was all mastery based and i realized later this. Psi in like k. Through twelve right like in this really popular back at the time that i was in grade one and you know as students we kind of love this we could go at our own pace and get immediate feedback on whether or not we're right and we keep going on and on and on on these things and there's a little bit of competition among us rate because like you could be finished all of this work in your reading and language arts like whenever it was up to you you could get it all done and then go into something else so that was kind of exciting or are you could help other students in the class so i think that i never thought about it until recently but i think that when i when i was introduced to computer aided psi which was topped by joseph parrot the university of manitoba but this is probably why i love this system so much because it is self paced but the early early psi if you go back to the work of fred keller when he published his seminal article and nineteen sixty eight rate and the journal of applied behavior analysis goodbye teacher based upon a rhyme and he's introducing people to assist them that he's developed and he introduced in brazil as well as the united states. Psi was you know these units of study that you could you know master hopefully in about a week or so and you would go in and you would take a test when you're ready to take the test and then you either pass or you've gotta re study and if you've gotta re study you could go over the task with the proctor or the professor and then you could come back and retake it when you're ready to do so after you know some amount of kind of time out to re steady So if you think about that like things that there's an instructor right like if you have ten units that you have to have students take tests on. How many different tests do you need for them. You know if they get a reset and one you don't just give them the same test you have to have like a whole bunch of questions and different forms of big zam right for each unit so imagine the administration of that right like just can you imagine like panel versus thirty students versus three hundred. What would that be like a lot of tests a lot of grading more file cabinets right basically all the file cabinets right. Yeah file cabinet. Imagine carrying all the tests to and from the classroom and keeping them organnized. And you know. And we didn't have and they didn't have computers back then either right so when joe pair computerized this he actually made it. So that you could go in and you could request a-tast online and this is before point and click okay. This is before we had windows right in the we actually had to learn how to type in commands into the computer. And i never think of myself as somebody who programs but i did. I had to learn programming to be able to do this. Because you have to give the computer commands to get into your account and then to call up a test and then tell it to add more lines if you wanted to add more information to your answer or are you. Talking like a dos. Prompt or more like an old like early. Eighties looking kind of you know unix mainframe mainframe o wow absolutely yeah rob. It's definitely a mainframe computer right. And so so we did that and you know we after you master to test then you could sign on to be a peer reviewer or printer for student who had not yet passed that unit. So i mean think of it right like if you love this stuff and you're and you just go in and on a weekly basis at least on a weekly basis you pass one unit a week or more you can be peer reviewing a whole bunch of them and the peer reviews were great because they were bonus points in the course you and and the final exam where something like sixty percent because it was in person and they that was the quality control you had over the online course was making sure that people were who they said they were and you know that they weren't just doing things open book so you know it was nice being able to pat up though the the bonus points just in case but he bit. But here's here's the track right like when you do that and you're actually going and you're taking your test and your peer reviewing other students test. You're actually

Joseph Parrot Fred Keller Journal Of Applied Behavior An PSI University Of Manitoba Joe Pair Brazil United States Cabinet ROB
A new way to invest that doesn't involve buying stocks hyped on Reddit

Clark Howard Show

06:18 min | 1 d ago

A new way to invest that doesn't involve buying stocks hyped on Reddit

"So lately. All the buzz his been about well. Bitcoin and other crypto currencies. Bitcoin recently fifty thousand dollars a bitcoin and people who've been buying the stocks that are being touted on read it and it was all that mess that went on with Game stop and other stocks. That went up like rockets and then like rockets can do crash back down to earth and my son is in this investing group at school. He's fifteen and they're investing not real money but they all have their stock portfolios and wanna read you to texts from him from this morning. They're really funny. Is said in the last nineteen minutes. My stock portfolio dropped by six sixty. Then he texts me eight minutes later and these eh. then it went up by eight hundred dollars. And i the other night. When he was trapped. In the car with me i started boring. I'm trying to talk about how my philosophies investing work very differently than matt worrying about day trading and options and all. That was going to happen up to the minute and if you thought a father could be more irrelevant to sun then i was that minute you you couldn't be no interest in anything i was saying because to him. This is sport and that's what investing has been of late call. Investing is really speculating. And that's not my thing. I mean i'm the dulles person alive and i invest in a dull way because the ideas i wanna make money over time and so. That's why i get excited about really accessible. Investing opportunities for small investors did allow you to build reasonable wealth over time instead of trying to get the quick score and my son's a sharp kid hill. Eventually get it and will not that. It matters what you're buying and selling minute by minute. And by the way he's asked me if he can have a real investing account. Will you know you'd have to have what's called a custodial said yeah yeah where where you were the pretend owner but i'm the one doing the investing and i don't know what to do you know. Give them a couple of hundred dollars and let him play. And maybe learn the value of term investing. But you know it fifteen. What is long term. That's like three days from now. It's hard to explain a concept where you build wealth over time well do you know goldman sachs is goldman sachs is for rich people like crista. People was massive amounts of money. Who work with a personal financial manager. Who handles their money for them. That's right krista. That's what you do with your millions. Yeah no no okay. So there are. There are very wealthy people. That's what they do and goldman sachs has been doing some stuff lately that doesn't fit at all their historical pedigree They're the ones that issue the apple card for people that have the apple credit card and they have Savings accounts and all that kind of thing with no minimums will now. They've launched some cold. Marcus invest which allows people to use goldman sachs incredible financial analysis investment analysis till build robo investing portfolios for you using very low cost funds. And this is something you would ask somebody. Ten years ago if goldman sachs would ever being looking to provide investments an investment advice to everyday ordinary. People they'd say you're crazy. That will never happen. Well they're not doing what fidelity investments does where a dollar is enough to open an account many cases schwab one hundred dollars. They're doing what vanguard. Does you have to have a thousand bucks to open an account but once you have that thousand you can get advice that is tailored to your personal financial goals and outlook. The money can be and a retirement account or an investment account use what are known is exchange traded funds. Etf's and typically for the advice and the investments you pay roughly a third of a percent per year for them to handle your money. So i guess ten thousand dollars be thirty five bucks a year. Is that right. I think that's about right. three dollars. Fifty cents on a thousand. I think that's right so this is an opportunity for you to do. Investing through the nation's big boys big money houses and their whole business plan is pretty similar to what you'd have if you were with Betterment or wealth front that really started this whole investing idea. And i'm sure neither of them are very happy the goldman sachs through. Marcus invest is playing in their ballpark.

Goldman Sachs Bitcoin Crista Matt Apple Krista Marcus Schwab
Finding Connection, Self-Love, And Thriving With Chronic Illness Ft. Nitika Chopra

TIFFANY

05:36 min | 1 d ago

Finding Connection, Self-Love, And Thriving With Chronic Illness Ft. Nitika Chopra

"Hi everyone. this is tiffany. And you are listening to this. Episode of tiffany and the podcast. When if you are new to the podcast tiffany and you is a podcast chatting with friends. Who are using their voices and platforms to cultivate compassion. Change and creativity. Today i have with me. Nigga chopra who is founder of chronic kahn which is incredible community for the one hundred thirty plus million people who live with chronic illness in the us. High nigga. I tiffany thanks for having me. We ended up getting introduced through nate. Nichols he's a big fan of yours. And by the time you were thinking about launching your online community chronic khan and then we emerged on clubhouse and we've become much better friends since then. I always like starting with origin stories. What led you point of really thinking that cronica needed to be in the world. Well i just have to say. I'm so glad that clubhouse brought us closer together. Because i do feel like it was nice that there were all of these touch point in then being with you and clubhouse has been so special and the way i would start by origin story is that it started when i was probably ten years old and i was diagnosed with my first chronic illness. And so there's so many things. I could say about that journey and i know you and so many of your listeners have been on their own journeys but their bodies but that has definitely been my greatest teacher in my life and so when i got diagnosed with psoriasis at the age of ten i just saw my whole life through that lens. I had it in a very debilitating way. Sometimes people get psoriasis. It's maybe a small patch or in their scalp which is frustrating. For sure but for me i ended up having it covering ninety eight percent of my body and i couldn't really move without severe pain so it was everything. It was the way that i saw everything. It was the way people saw me. And then when i was nineteen i was diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis. Which just really impacted me in a whole new set of ways. It made it really hard for me to walk without severe pain because my joints were painful before it was my skin was painful and now my joints added to it. So as i'm sure you and so many of your listeners can relate. That was the lens that i saw everything through. I try to be positive. I have a really strong spiritual center and that really helped me through a lot of those challenges but it also shaped me to want to help people. Because i felt like there were not enough resources almost no resources when i was going through all of that that were there to really support be especially emotionally so i'm not a doctor. I'm not a practitioner. I'm a patient so pretend to try to heal people but just that emotional support of like yeah. You know. i've got somebody. That knows exactly what i'm feeling. I don't have to explain to this person. Why i can't walk the five blocks or i need to take a cab or i actually can't help with moving this box or whatever. I don't have to talk about it. It's just like no. I'm not going to do that. And you just move on. there's no heaviness there. So i never really had that growing up so i think that just has a lot to do with the story. Weiss started doing the work that i do thanks for sharing there's a term that was coined by someone in in the disability justice. Face a manguson cheeses the term access intimacy and. It's this idea that when you show up in a place you don't have to ask for permission. People just get it and it sounds like the community that you've created or what you were seeking was some level of that access intimacy was the turning point of really moving more toward advocacy and really wanting to create that community. There was definitely a turning point for me i. I started my career about eleven years ago. And you know at that point. No one was talking about chronic illness or disability or health. Really in the truest sense of the word. There was this health and wellness industry. That i sort of found myself being a part of but truthfully it never was very helpful or felt very supportive. It was just my only option at the time. And so i gravitated towards that i started an online magazine talked a lot about self love. I talked a lot about beauty as it relates to self love. I did that. Threw a lot of media opportunities that i had which was really great but there was a turning point and i would say after the twenty sixteen election. There was just a reckoning that was happening for so many people and myself included and it felt like i thought i was using my voice before i thought i was standing up for people that i wanted to stand up for and for what was right but there was something after that election that made me realize there was so much more that i could be saying and sharing and really it was a refinement process for so many people. If this is going to be this dark where are we going to find the truth. And the light in the midst of all of this and so i really had to go on that personal journey and i spent a couple of years actually in two thousand sixteen twenty seventeen asking myself a lot of really hard questions realizing that i wasn't at all speaking up for the things that i i never talked about my house

Nigga Chopra Psoriasis Nichols Tiffany Nate Psoriatic Arthritis Khan Weiss United States
An End to the Tech Rally?

CNBC's Fast Money

04:35 min | 2 d ago

An End to the Tech Rally?

"We'll rising rates kill the tech rally. Guy what do you say yes back to. You melt absolutely so much of this has been predicated on on this low interest rate zero straight environment when you have tenure yields go from fifty three basis points in august two one point four percent today i understand rates are still low but the velocity and the speed of the move has been well. It hasn't been historic. But it's been noteworthy. And i think we're headed to one and a half. We've said it for a while and that's your line in the sand you start getting significantly north of one and a half percent and the entire thesis in my opinion behind a lot of these high flying tech names starts unravel and you're starting to see it now in the big hans christian andersen fan. I know euros well. Mel and a lot of people mistakenly call the that little vignette that he wrote. The emperor has no clothes. It's the emperor's new clothes. But i got to tell you the close at the fed is wearing right now are not fitting and i think they're going to be revealed for what they are in the coming weeks. They think they can control this out of their control at this point. Yeah karen i. I'll go to you on this. Well i mean obviously we have been in this environment of close zero percent insurance for so long and so when we move out of that. Something's gotta give now. Yes i think. So but i think a few things are happening at the same time. So there's the higher rates that guy talked about. We always talk about the risk premium. What should the equity risk premium beaten as rates go up. The risk premium should be higher therefore valuations lower. But the other side of. It is a rates going up because the economy is improving. And i believe that. Yes that's the case. But i also think that the earnings of a lot of these high flyers and let's talk about something like google for example. I think those earnings are going to be actually much better so on long those. It's a painful day. One thing that. I have on as a hedge which is not nearly enough to hedge how much i would lose him. A day like today is the gb which is the it's tech software and its high fliers. The biggest position is microsoft. But it's really expensive. Names salesforce service now zoom video. Docu sign crowd strike. Those are all going to get hit. Against what i think of as my more value tech today wasn't value at all on sale again and again but i think that if the rates move up slowly because the economy improves. I'm okay with that. I know we'll have a rotation into more cyclicals. But i'm sticking with what i've got. Yeah and obviously it's highest wires on. They'll probably take the hardest hits at this point carfax. North cornerstone macro makes a very good point in that is their alliance the s. and hunt five hundred on information technology. More broadly and in terms of down days and information technology eighty percent of the time the s. and p. five hundred trades lower as well. This is since nineteen eighty nine. Dan and i know you like carter's work. So i mean his point basically is you can't hire overall without technology that being said though if you look at the mag accomplish the microsoft apple google amazon. They've gone sideways for the last four months. Or so as we've seen that rotation into more cyclical names so we did move higher without their real participation and now it's interesting on a day like today that you see the nasdaq down two and a half percent or so to me. I think what karen laid out is really smart. I mean you look at the mega caps and you see their value tech yes. They benefited from low. Interest rates. For a whole host of reasons most notably. They raised a ton of money and they put on their balance sheet and they really not paying a whole heck of a lot and i think as it relates to interest rates. You have to ask yourself who really wants. Interest rates to go higher at this point and guy makes a good point that yeah they're going to they're going because the economy is getting a little better. Look at the ten year chart of the us treasury. You'll we thought we had generational lows at about one and a half percent back in two thousand twelve then again in two thousand sixteen then again in two thousand and thousand nine hundred then you consider yourself or you consider how much negative yielding sovereign debt. There is in the world about fifteen trillion and you think about the corporate been john debt and even consumers you yourself who wants rates to go higher then you look at it over a thirty year period and i think we have that chart and it's just upper left to bottom right so maybe you get through that one and a half on the ten year treasury. Maybe you get to that long-term downtrend which would be about two and a quarter. If that is the case then yes equities. You're going to have a very hard time in this environment. Given the state of deficits right

Christian Andersen Karen MEL FED Microsoft Google Us Treasury Carter DAN Amazon Apple John Treasury
Top 10 Team Success Secrets Revealed

Real Estate Coaching Radio

06:02 min | 2 d ago

Top 10 Team Success Secrets Revealed

"So Julie, we are talking about team-building and we were we pick this back up last week and the essence of our philosophy on teams is were being a succinct about it as possible. We are absolute Advocates of building teams, but we're Advocates of building teams that are designed not profitable from the onset not hoping and praying that there's profit left over after the transactions are you know have fluid through exactly. So last week we talked about the things that our team eroding Team Dodge straying making teams fail and we didn't want to keep it all that negative. But some of those things are obvious some of them are underlying until you discover them. So we went over all ten points that are a destructive and now we're going to talk about successful teams what actually makes for a successful team. So I'm going to jump right in if that's absolutely okay. So number one maintaining the magic number of lists wage. All times so successful teams maintain the magic number of listings at all times and know how to replace listings as they sell in a predictable duplicatable way lead generation is proactive prospecting based and marketing enhanced a lot to that one point your team me up for the real estate treasure map. I am indeed. And so what this says guys when she talks about the magic number, it's simply a formula that we both know created basically years ago and lived for years and lived for years. Right when we sold real estate cuz it's love you guys know Julie and I were selling between 100 and 200 houses per year for about ten years old over a hundred houses our first year in business in the early twenties. And so the real estate magic number is simply the number of listings you needed all times do meet or exceed your financial, you know, your goals your expectations your obligations, your commitments, the real estate magic number is not complicated to figure out but it is critical that you understand the concept because it's going to save you from a lot of the pitfalls that frankly ruin agents businesses and their potential reality. We want to give you the real estate magic number. Yep. To give you the real estate treasure map the real estate treasure map the essence of the treasure map the essence of what the treasure map is, it's our fill in the blank business and personal life plan. Its you got a business plan but really truly is a life plan and when you complete this the output is going to be a lot of important numbers the most important of which is knowing the number of listings you need at all times to meet or exceed your financial goals and expectations. So what I want you to understand is that you're going to most likely fall behind your actual potential if you get too distracted from anything other than focusing on the magic number of listings you need at all times. So you should receive this and it is free. You can buy this on the on Amazon, but I want to just give you this book. Okay, it's called The Real Estate treasure map. Just text 20-21 855-685-1055 text 2021 to 85685 10:45. And when you do we're going to text you back a link to not just the treasure map, but also a lot of other great books, including your 12 monthly generation guide and thinking Rich for Real Estate, which is an iteration of Napoleon Hill's great book Think and Grow Rich. Yes only it is practical and tactical translating how you actually use what you read in Think and Grow Rich. So let's say this point just for a second because when I have or you have an agent who's considering joining a team one of the first questions I asked if they've identified a team that they might want to join is does that team actually get listings? Because if they have no listings or very few listings or they're not, you know, established as a really Kick-Ass listing team. You should keep looking absolutely because they're not going to have enough for you but that goes actual circles back around to the you know, free previous points. We made by why teams failed. Yes. The biggest reasons is cuz there are all predicated on buying leads right teams will fail and you'll always fail if your business is dependent on being passive and bring your business. Nothing more to say might drop in K, but I want you to think about this guy's it's a very interesting concept Julie and I teach you to be proactively lead-generating first and and then based off. Want to look at marketing, right? There's proactively generation. There's passively generation or there's proactive marketing and there's passive marketing. Julie and I are always going to tell you to be proactive marketers and Lead generators first. And then if you choose not to be passive, then you can choose to be passive after you've mastered the Art and Science of being a proactively generator. I know that just sounds like I'm playing with words but it really is critically important and here's the essence of why it's important in listen to them. And if you've been in real estate for any amount of time you're going to end you're going to say hallelujah when I'm done saying this ready many of you are being taught incorrectly really bad business techniques where you're supposed to basically by your business and buying businesses in the literal sense from like over paying a referral fees, but it's also from social networking from branding any of those types of passive activities that are absolutely need that guy's of every real estate, you know, evangelist nowadays. They're all going to tell you work on your brand. They're all going to tell you to buy leads or all going to tell you clever Facebook ads and Instagram videos and hell even Clubhouse write them off. Always looking for ways to generate leads passively but here's the ultimate fallacy in that. It's unpredictable. You cannot predict when you're going to get something from the passive be we know that they digital generated off essentially internet generated at or I'm sorry leads are the worst quality leads that you can possibly get oftentimes. No better than just going to an old-school phone book and ripping out like ten pages and having an calling those leads the leads you get from online lead-generation our garbage and you guys know that not that people I'm not saying that I'm talking about lead quality. So be very clear about that. If your goal is to generate a bunch of leads that might someday hopefully within typically it's eighteen months three to four percent will actually transact. There's no guarantee. They're going to transact with you again. Does anyone think about this or tell you the truth about all this? No, they do not why cuz they're trying to sell Young Generation. But the biggest reason why we want you to be proactively generators is because this great analogy that actually are heard which I wish I would have thought of cuz it explains it so succinctly you're going to build a mansion. Yep. Engine is going to be your future. The manager is going to be represent the future of your family maybe but it's a literal Mansion right? It's your financial future. It's your potential reality going forward.

Julie Dodge Napoleon Hill Amazon Real Estate Facebook
There is a Surge Of Coronavirus Deaths in Mexico

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:21 min | 2 d ago

There is a Surge Of Coronavirus Deaths in Mexico

"New data reveal a surge of cova deaths in mexico. The country has officially confirmed more than two million cases. An almost one hundred eighty thousand deaths from the corona virus but mortality rates. Tell an even more grim tale over the past year deaths were fifty two percent higher than in previous years. According to the financial times that puts mexico's rate of excess deaths much higher than that of countries such as america and brazil assembled woman to stay lot yet earlier this month. Mexico's president andres manuel. Lopez obrador widely known as anglo said. We are living in a stellar moment. The kovic spike is far from the country's only problem poverty. Corruption and crime are all on the rise but polls indicate that two years into amyloid term. Most mexicans are willing to give him more time. Mexico's president is incredibly popular. Sir burke is our mexico bureau chief he wanted on slide in two thousand eighteen and he still has approval ratings that most other leaders would be extremely jealous off at sixty two percent as it stands and that's all in spite of what looks like a very good handling of most things most obviously at the moment the pandemic. What do you mean by that. Mexico is a terrible record for covert hospitals are full and oxygen tanks in short supply. It's done very few tests for covid. It hasn't provided very much financial support tool for people who are suffering or being asked to stay home not to work the vaccination which is one sort of bright spot potentially insofar as mexico has lined up enough vaccines to cover its population. But it's a very very slow start. That might be picking up now. But otherwise there talks of ten years to get to seventy five percent of the population being vaccinated. I'm currently this has been a problem again from the top. So i'm low has completely downplayed the importance of the pandemic. He has refused to wear a face mask apart from wants when he flew in an airplane to go to the united states and he got covid himself the stars of this year and he reappeared and everyone thought well. Maybe he'll have changed his mind after this. But he reiterated again that he wouldn't be wearing a face mask so in the face of that pandemic response on wires his popularity still so high so he had this amazing vision for mexico in eighteen. Which is why he won with a landslide. He said. I'm going to do a fourth transformation. These big bold plan to make the country fairer and more equitable ending corruption and crime. And making sure there was economic growth where the gains were fairly distributed so that poor people go rich. The reality is slightly different from the vision so far in the two and a bit years. He's been in power. He's been undoing. The reforms of previous presidents and dismantling that system throwing out the baby with the bath water you could say. And then his new initiatives mainly they seem to fail to solve the problems that they put two and then a of third element is that he's really concentrated power in the presidency and some people say that they get things done and other people think they're more evil intentions behind that well. Let's come back to the throwing the baby out with the bathwater part. What's he'd been doing. In terms of reform he abolished prosper. Which was a very sort of lauded conditional cash transfer program for the poor he also reversed education. Reform was much more meritocratic assessment of teachers. A big one at the moment is he's trying to reverse bit by bit and opening of the energy market. That happened in two thousand thirteen so it was open to private and foreign enterprises which make electricity cheaper and greener on current. Neither congress is debating a bill which would favor cfe which is state owned electricity provider. So they're actually go first into the grid. As opposed to the cheaper electric which is often green provided by private companies. This would obviously raise prices and deti energy but it could also breach the. Us mexico canada agreement. Which is the north american free trade pact to replace after another sort of big thing has been getting rid of or proposing get rid of a lot of the autonomous agencies such as the freedom of information agency all these ones keep checks on the government and what it's doing so well he's been tearing all that down. What's he been building up. Will you say his own initiatives. Don't do what they should. He's very dedicated to fiscal discipline. That's a good thing especially in a so-called left leaning president it's also become very counter productive during the pandemic. The imf is telling mexico to spend more so far it's only spent nine point seven percents of gdp on extra efforts during the pandemic and more needs to be done and some people think this is going to need to scarring that there's going to be permanent drop in output caused by loss of jobs and businesses so the recovery is going to be much much slower in mexico than elsewhere. He's also splashed out on bizarre old-economy projects such as pouring money. Pex the world's most indebted oil company. And then he's putting eight billion dollars into a refinery at the time when no other country is building refineries and it's not clear what economic return that will be from that and you mentioned the big transformative plan was in part about ending endemic corruption and crime. How's that been going. Well either jason. That was point. Four percent dip in murders last year and he proclaimed this dip as a very significant success. But that's after a rise the before and frankly during the pandemic you'd expect it to have dropped them. In in other countries across latin america that also suffer high levels of violence that has been the case he also rejected the previous government's tactic of killing and capturing crime kingpins because led to a splintering of gangs. And you might be worth rejecting that. But there's no alternative puts in place. So i think his vision is that you alleviate poverty and crime goes down. That might happen in the long term but it does nothing to sort out the short term problem the problem of the current chapel as opposed to the ones who are still only three years old on corruption. As you could say he's set a good example so has been good political rhetoric. The stiffer penalties on bribe-taking for bureaucrats. But he's unless strengthen the institutions to carry that ford again it's more rhetoric than actual institutional change or heft. The national anticorruption prosecutors overwhelmed with cases and one government agency suggests that the number of acts of corruption actually rose by nineteen percent between two thousand seventeen and two thousand nineteen. It is as you say not a big list of happy news here. I mean when will that's ring down to the electorate. I mean how long we'll mexicans continue to support him for his failures because he really has persuaded a lot of people that he's like them and cares about the he's very popular because of who he is and his message rather than necessarily what he does. The opposition is seen as corrupt on what came before him was horrifically corrupt. And so he's seen the best of a bad bunch by a loss of people. But you know here's a classic populace and a lot of elite azam Against him they see him as a mexican version of hugo chavez. Which i think is a little bit of an exaggeration. But there's this big divides on the mix of policy failure. I'm power grabbing is is worrying.

Mexico Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador Sir Burke United States Anglo Brazil IMF Congress Canada Latin America Jason Ford
Seattle Public Schools becomes first in state committed to phasing out fossil fuels by 2040

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:45 sec | 2 d ago

Seattle Public Schools becomes first in state committed to phasing out fossil fuels by 2040

"Washington state lawmakers consider a bill to clean up the energy that buildings run on some cities and institutions are already leading the way house. Ten eighty would put the state on a path to decarbonising building sector the fastest growing source of greenhouse gas emissions. In the state last week the seattle school board committed to run on one hundred percent clean. Renewable energy by twenty forty board members zachary to wolf co wrote the resolution and says he was inspired by a speech from the valedictorians of seattle high school and twenty nineteen. What are you doing. We have eight to ten years before we are going to be at a point of no return when it comes to climate emergency. Hp four in the washington house committee on appropriations. It received a public hearing this week.

Seattle School Board Wolf Co Seattle High School Washington Zachary Washington House Committee On HP
Jeremiah Owyang - Social Audio Analytics and Constituent Groups - Voicebot Podcast 195 - burst 07

The Voicebot Podcast

03:36 min | 3 d ago

Jeremiah Owyang - Social Audio Analytics and Constituent Groups - Voicebot Podcast 195 - burst 07

"I want to come back to this idea social audio analytics and maybe the social audio management system this is going to be near and dear to the heart to a lot of the people who listen to this podcast because their space is accustomed to taking raw audio content transforming taxed analyzing it Actually putting it against other services and potentially returning information. So i wanted to explore that with you. A little bit we. We haven't seen that publicly yet and any of these social audio spaces you expect. People are actually doing it today. How do you think that that's going to play out. Do you expect this to be predominantly the platforms are going to try to control it and use this as a feature and trying to block other people or do you think it's mostly going to be third parties coming in and somehow getting the feed whether through direct. Api or from a rogue angle and then being able to provide that data to people who are interested in it. Yes so. I think there's maybe four constituent groups to think about here. Let's try to break this down. And i don't have all the answers here. I'm speculating so there are the platforms themselves twitter spaces and clubhouse and facebook. I think they are so twitter. Spaces already has real time voice to text translation into english which is on the lower third for some speakers. It's a three second delay about ninety percent accuracy. Ucla right yes okay. The second group would be the Government agencies and spies They're probably already doing it. But we'll never know. Group will be the traditional social media Analytics companies like salesforce and adobe salesforce acquired radian six In two thousand eleven ten years ago For three hundred million and their job was to grab all of the text based social media content. That was being produced at a rapid pace and make insights out of it and sell to brands for seven. Figure deals annually on what is being set in their market and give them analysis on share voice sentiment byproduct by region by country by network by individual by they produce. I was involved heavily with that industry now. The fourth group the fourth group i think is the one that will deploy so i. I don't think salesforce. And adobe wanna risk breaking the terms of service against twitter and risk that access that they already have in their. Api I don't think they wanna be scraping that content and also risk privacy concerns especially when a democratic administration is very concerned about privacy when it comes to social media as well as on the right hand side of the government as well they're even more concerned about suppression of so i don't think those big giant tech companies Adobe salesforce and oracle to do an ibm want to do that. So i think it's gonna be the fourth category which will be roguish punkish startups that are going to rip the content off with botts at a recording. The information then conduct voice to text analysis. And then do the other things that i already mentioned with sentiment in mining and influence analysis network. So i think it's going to be done under the covers of darkness fair enough and do you believe that the botts will be listed as users and basically some sort of fake user or are they going to be attached to a real users use. The system could be both. I mean there are. People are reporting data out of social audio by using. You know i rig systems and connecting to their ipod to other systems as well and just you know exporting that data. That's already happening.

Salesforce Twitter Adobe Radian Ucla Facebook Government Botts Oracle IBM
Should the US Federal Reserve Buy Bitcoin?

The Breakdown with NLW

03:07 min | 3 d ago

Should the US Federal Reserve Buy Bitcoin?

"Why the us needs. Bitcoin elon musk and other. Vip's have endorsed it. Here's why the federal reserve should seriously consider btc for its balance sheet. The united states will adopt bitcoin as a reserve asset. Why because it is unequivocally in strategic interest to do so. The question is not if this will happen but when whether it happens within twelve months to years five years or ten years will have major implications for us positioning for decades failure to embrace bitcoin sooner rather than later will damage strategic interests and benefit rivals. Adopting at first by examining how the us and other countries manage their reserve assets. Today we can already see the logic for this transition to occur golden empire today the us hold two hundred sixty one. Million troy ounces. Eight thousand one hundred and thirty-three metric tons of gold or about four hundred and seventy five billion worth this makes the us the largest holder of gold in the world by a wide margin with over two times the amount of the next largest holder germany. Historically there was a very good reason for the us to own gold the us dollar was pegged to its value yet. The us broke with the gold standard in nineteen seventy-one ushering in the fiat currency age that has existed ever since. So why exactly the. Us and other countries continue to own all this gold here. Some of the reasons provided directly from central bankers themselves. Gold is the defacto safe haven asset. It is an insurance policy against any major economic. Monetary or geopolitical shifts given gold's ample liquidity and universal appeal countries can easily liquidate it for other assets in turbulent times. Gold is both independent of any given country's economic or monetary policies while also having a fixed supply on earth with relatively stable supply growth making it an ideal hedge against both monetary inflation and fluctuations in other reserve assets. Gold is viewed as nobody's liability. It cannot be frozen in a bank account or defaulted on when frictions between countries arise combined these reasons with the cultural importance of gold and it's uncontroversial to say that having more golden everyone else is a very good thing. Fort knox two point. Oh bitcoin similarities. To gold are well-documented. Earning it the appropriate nickname of digital gold yet. Bitcoin shares many similarities with cluding scarcity. Stable supply inflation fungibility durability. It also makes major improvements over golden some key areas when gold is in high demand. Minors are incentivized to dig up more of it increasing its supply. Bitcoin supply does not change in the face of demand making it less inflationary and more predictable far easier and cheaper to verify the authenticity of bitcoin. Gold bitcoin is much easier to transfer than gold and cost much. Less to store securely. Bitcoin is easily divided whereas gold is not for these reasons a rapidly increasing number of people companies and institutional investors agree that having more bitcoin than everyone else is a very good thing today. This includes the world's richest man highly conservative long-term thinking asset managers industry-leading companies and the most prominent macro investors in the

United States Elon Musk Bitcoin Federal Reserve Germany Fort Knox
From ballet dancer to zombie slayer: Cree actor Michael Greyeyes on his prolific career

Unreserved

04:32 min | 4 d ago

From ballet dancer to zombie slayer: Cree actor Michael Greyeyes on his prolific career

"You may have seen my guest today on the small screen and big screens or on the stage. Michael is is a man of many talents. He's a classically trained ballet dancer. Choreographer director playwright and renowned actor over his three decade. Long career michael has appeared in some of the most beloved first nation films like dance me outside and smoke signals. He has taken on challenging roles. Playing indigenous leaders like sitting bull wandering spirit to come see and crazy horse more recently. He's taken the small screen by storm appearing on hit tv shows like fear the walking dead true detective and the soon to be released nbc. Comedy rutherford falls. Michael is net. Oh and a member of the musket lake cremation in sketch. Juan and he joins me now from los angeles. Welcome to the show. Michael falen thank you so much for the invitation. Oh it's so great to have you here so you're in los angeles right now But i wanna go back a bit. Can you tell me about where you grew up. I'm from treaty. Six territory in saskatchewan My mom and dad are from reserves in the middle of saskatchewan. My dad's from moscow. And my mom is from sweet grass and my sister and my family. We lived in a couple of places where in the capelle valley. Of course lebron and then we moved to saskatoon and saskatoon was where i spent my boyhood until i was plucked plucked from the prairies at the age of ten years old to attend canada's national ballet school in toronto and my family and i we moved from treaty six territory to To dish with one spoon territory. So i could pursue dance as as a career potential career and so i wanna talk about your dancing a bit but first i want to know what was it. Like growing up on the prairies. What do you remember What do you remember about growing up on the prairies. So many beautiful things. Obviously that's home. That's that's that's my home. That's where i know about my family. My a my early years. I remember the sunlight of remember the sky. I remember my cousins and all my relatives. And i remember playing just riding my bike with my banana seat all over town. They need to make banana seats again. They're very comfortable. they do they do in los angeles. There's a whole like bike culture. We're fleeing be tricked out bike's banana seats. So you're known primarily as an actor now but as you mentioned you know you got into the entertainment industry in a different way. You started as a dancer as a ballet dancer. So how does a kid growing up in saskatoon and up in the ballet well by accident entirely by axes we were living in saskatoon and my mom was a teacher at the school for the deaf. A very famous School for deaf children in saskatoon and my sister. And i were doing you know little kid things. I was playing hockey of course and my sister was taking dance lessons so mumbai. I we used to week for my sister in the car and i was you know five six years old so i was like a super board super easily so it was like she died. She'd done and i would go up and check on her. I remember the classes at the university of scotch one and it was kind of like this wile experiences little kid i walk in. I'd look for her and then she be dancing with these little girls. In one day. I decided to really kinda pay attention to what they were doing. And i and then. I blurted got ceesay. Teacher overheard me. She said well. Do you think it's easy. Why don't you come on back next week. So i said A will and i told my mom all week. I'm going to dance next week. And she of course you know. I apparently said lots of crazy things as as a boy but as the days got closer. She was like okay he. He's repeating it. He's he's he's he's insistent about this. Why do you think you're going to death sex because the teacher invited me so with my mom and my mom used me. I'm so so sorry. Michael thinks that you've invited him. Smith usually oh yeah yeah yeah come on in. And that's how. It started precocious boy pushing his way into a dance class that he hadn't signed up for.

Saskatoon Rutherford Falls Michael Falen Capelle Valley Los Angeles Saskatchewan Michael National Ballet School NBC Juan School For Deaf Children Lebron Moscow University Of Scotch Toronto Canada Mumbai Hockey Smith
What Is Clubhouse and Do You Need to Be on It?

The Talk Show

07:55 min | 4 d ago

What Is Clubhouse and Do You Need to Be on It?

"Talk about clubhouse before we run out of time I what what are your thoughts on club. I feel like clubhouse right now is is like as we speak february twenty. Twenty one is still in private I wouldn't call a beta on the app store. It's invite only right but they seem to be accelerating the invitations to the point. Now where february. Twenty twenty one sort of is the month where clubhouse went big. Yeah i would agree with that. I mean i would say maybe maybe january No yeah i'm trying to think. When was the lawn on. When when did he do the thing that was like it's over joins twitter moment twenty twenty one today january to february. And i'm sure you know in hindsight you know there'll be more people in march and more people in but it's getting a. Can you describe what clubhouse is and then. Tell me your thoughts about it okay. I'm going to find something. That is certainly find my tweet that i sent about it because stevens noffke was annoyed with me but i stand by it. Okay this was. Someone asked me two weeks ago. Says what does one do with clubhouse. And then i wrote waste time. Not working by listening to other people not working talking about stuff. They claim to be experts end but really aren't while hoping for celebrities to show up. That's pretty it's pretty tart. But but i don't disagree with it. And i say this as someone who i've spent a lot of time on clubhouse i've hosted shows on capelle when that was still a beta feature. I think i joined in april. I'm i'm not above this. Like at all. I'm just saying like when i use it. It is usually because it's the end of the day. And there i see one of the main notifications come in that. You know somebody you're on things interesting is going on or i'm like you know kind of trying to avoid doing actual work and so i tune in the afternoon and then listen to other people who are often doing the same thing and then there is that bit of like. Oh and maybe someone famous will pop in. I don't know i'm being totally honest like for me that that is kind of the appeal. That's not to say that. I don't think there. I think that you can have some real substantive and interesting conversations and and there are some really interesting ways it can be used in the way that it's interest. Graph is both connected but disconnected from twitter. I think is interesting i was. I was in a room last week. End someone's a ten year. Old was briefly in the room before that was deemed. I guess not okay. And and We were asking the the youth some questions about their use of technology. And you know they kind of described it. They were like. Oh it's dischord for adults and that's actually not a bad description to be totally honest like it's kind of scored audio groups but you know audio channels for adults. That's that's not a completely terrible analogy I i'm trying to wrap my head around it. I think there are. I do think they're onto something totally. And i also think i haven't quite had this feeling about something since instagram in two thousand ten like so i was not on the instagram beta n. g. siegler was and he tweeted enough like pictures from it. I definitely kind of it was like okay square pictures filters and then i just say on my other. Podcast dithering with ben thompson. I think the episode that aired this morning. That i remember where i was when i realized instagram out of beta and i could sign up. I was with my family down in disneyworld. And i was on a bus going from I think i even remember which park we're going to. We're going from our hotel to the disney studios park on the little disney transportation. Bus and i was like. Oh it's out of beta quick. Get gruber still available got it start clicking around and like within five minutes because you know all of a sudden we're at disney and it's time to have fun and go on rides and stuff. I was like oh this. Is i get this. This is great. You know now. That is the original instagram where it was. Just you post pictures and you see pictures from the people you follow and you can comment on the pictures And you can apply these filters that re- you know at the time was great feature because don't care cell phone cameras still so crappy. The filters it was perfect and histogram or no hips dramatic amount of it was was awesome so it fit without whole asiatic that was happening with the time that made it. Easy to to apply like they. They didn't take as long as you know. Some of the other filter ops did and it. It really made your photos look better and added remember. When they added the tilt shift feature and amazing. Yeah until fisher. Was this massive deal. Because i was like. Oh my god i can take mr rogers pictures right. Like is how i felt at the time. The hips dramatic took so long. And i don't know. I've never to anybody who could explain it. I don't know if they did it on purpose to to fake. Yeah but it hipster. Matic took so long to apply filters remember talking to somebody at apple about near like. Yeah it makes no sense to even if you're using a bat algorithm it shouldn't take that long and it was like crazy. It was frustrating and instagram. Let you like oh this filter. Nope this filter. Nope and they apply instantly. And then you'd pick one that major picture look better then you'd posted and i was like i got it. I was like oh. This is going to be huge. Just a snap judgment. I feel that way. I feel that way about clubhouse with just with a little less certainty because the thing about instagram was i knew i wanted to use it whereas with gregg house. I'm like i get this. I can see why people really get. I don't think this is for me. Yeah no i kind of agree with you. And i'm like i go back and forth about my feeling like i do. I do think that it's you know. Current valuation is kind of insane. Yes drink the concept has massive legs. Absolutely i think the other difference is is that instagram came out. There were a couple of other Kind of competitor's pick please which was available on both ios and android that dalton caldwell who later did app dot net did and the. Didn't you know work and there were some other kind of attempts at doing similar things but instagram was always wear momentum was and i think it's because they had really strong product direction. I think that always going to be getting the product direction in the attic. Usability was key. It was always product. I don't always product. I clubhouse one of those things were not that i don't think we're i wonder if it's going to be more like an instagram stories. Saying we're not as a staff staffed stories. Thanks but you see where. I'm going with this where it's a great idea but it could be potentially co-opted and done better by someone else. Like i feel like twitter spaces. Could you know. Beat it in a way that you know. No one else even had a chance against instagram. Even though instagram was ios only until it was acquired by facebook like no one else even had a chance at sucks all the oxygen out of the room Because it was it was the best. Might i feel like the concept of clubhouse has a lot of legs just don't know of clubhouse it's going to be the thing or if it'll be whatever mark cuban. He thinks he's doing or if it'll be twitter spaces. I don't think it'll be facebook. Facebook single fall flat on. Its face but i do feel like twitter spaces could potentially you know Hold the the instagram move and like make their version of stories way more successful even though it's a blatant copy it's it's better

Stevens Noffke Capelle Instagram Okay Square Twitter Disney Studios Park App Store Ben Thompson Siegler Disney Gruber Gregg House Mr Rogers Dalton Caldwell Fisher Apple Facebook Mark Cuban
4 Stocks Ready to Ride the 2020 Infrastructure Boom

CNBC's Fast Money

05:07 min | 5 d ago

4 Stocks Ready to Ride the 2020 Infrastructure Boom

"As extreme cold grips. The south and texas tries to cope with massive power failures infrastructure plays or heating up. Checkout names like report. Macaroni neither rental soaring. Today has all this. Wild weather made that infrastructure investments story even more compelling karen wedges. What do you say well certainly sort of brings to light how we need. crept infrastructure upgrades. And then i think there's also some policy as we battle it out with china you know. How can we rely on this. Worldwide trade that the globalization. That's happened over the last ten or twenty years. We need to start bringing stuff. Poem that of course would be very inflationary if everybody needs to manufacture their own stuff but as it relates to infrastructure have been hoping for this for a long time position. Like united rental. This is just absolutely the holy grail for them to think about their business model. They have fixed costs very low variable costs so if you get utilization pricing way up. That's fantastic for them. All that having been said this is as expensive as as i've ever seen uri. So there is optimism already in there. We need an infrastructure bill trade down. But i think we've got one. It would continue to trade higher. Yeah nadine where the opportunities are you and karen hopped up on the midday call talking about infrastructure because if there was ever a time where we're the american Consumer the american voter out there was convinced that infrastructure needed attention needed investment. Now is the time in what is going on in texas melissa. I think you and karen are right. Here is what you have in texas as a supply shock. And you have the governor saying listen we need a winter is our state. Look at my own state. Will we need to protect against fire against floods and so that understand infrastructure is a really big deal so you see biden coming out saying we need a big plan today see the house transportation and infrastructure chair saying we need a one point five. Trillion dollar caught a spend and people are saying. That's not enough. So those two things along with what karen said. Which is china threatening to limit exports for precious metals and technology. All of those things very inflationary but it means that the probability of infrastructure spending just went up. yeah so where are the values jeff karen. How deluded to your uri. What she thinks is overvalued. There are a lot of stocks out there that may already be taking into consideration the possibility of an infrastructure bill we were valued if there is no infrastructure sorry overvalued if there is no infrastructure if there is infrastructure then it's a okay all right. Jeff what do you say. Yeah absolutely no. I agree with karen. And that's really exactly where i was going to go just to echo the sentiments of everyone else you know i think that there was this concern building that if we were to get a really big stimulus bill right. Now it'll be more difficult to pass infrastructure Climate spending things of that nature a little bit later in the year. I think that has changed now. Given what happened in texas. I think there's political capital to push some of that spending through but let's not forget. I mean there are fundamentals. That are supporting this story to. We got manufacturing today for the us for europe both very strong. So i think that's part of the story as well and i look at stocks like cat and volkan. These are names that i've been mentioning over the last couple of months. They're really nice. Steady uptrend just breaking out now to new highs over the last couple of months and i would say the same thing. Maybe for some of the rails. Npr norfolk southern. I think they end up participating in all of this The last thing i'll say is just relative. The small caps been such a big story. This year Definitely overbought. there's. There's no question about that. But i think the valuation gaffe still exists and when you look at the s. l. y. That's how we would prefer to play small caps almost twenty five percent and industrials and materials. So i think that also benefits from this trend. We're talking about see if this is also wrapped up in the in the rotation that you've been advocating which is away from the growth away from technology and into the cyclical plays on the bet that the economy will reopen is reopening soon. So if you look at the i. Wm so i'll pick up where we're jeff left off the wm's since november first. They're up forty seven percent against the snp. that's up twenty one percent outperformance. That's what you're looking for so where you started out saying that. This is about infrastructure shore. But i think it's only about twenty percent about infrastructure. I think the balance eighty percent is about rates. This is about the reflation trade. I know it's all sort of mixed up in the sausage making the ten year. Tenure went from fifty basis points to one point three three percent now. I know that it's a huge move. It's one hundred. Sixty three percent move based on a percentage of the percentage. That's what it's about. Think about this senate. The house are tied up with the covid relief. Reconciliation bill that's going to take us another couple of months. We're not getting infrastructure until june or july.

Karen Texas Jeff Karen China Nadine Biden Melissa Jeff Europe United States Senate
How 2,000 Years Of Monetary History Led Us To Bitcoin, With Nik Bhatia

The Breakdown with NLW

06:02 min | 6 d ago

How 2,000 Years Of Monetary History Led Us To Bitcoin, With Nik Bhatia

"All right nick. Welcome to the breakdown. How you doing. I'm doing great. Thank you so much for having me. This should be superfund so as we were just discussing following your writing forever. I loved seeing it. Come together in kind of the the full length form In what i wanted to do today is actually kind of go back through history. And i think what layered money does so well is it gives people the context understand this rather than kind of just being like. Here's why bitcoin is awesome. Bitcoin is amazing. Let's actually dig into the history of money that got us here. And so what. I thought would be really fun. Today is actually walk. The listeners through some of that history of money starting way back at the beginning But before that. I guess like start with defining the kind of the central term here the central concept of layered money since the name of the book. It's obviously a really important concept. What is layered money. Actually meet layered. Money is a new framework. And so what i did was i took this idea of assets and liabilities and in our monetary system the way that the way that the system works is that financial institutions have assets and liabilities. They have relationships with each other and through these relationships come. Monetary instruments and monitoring instruments. Because they are within these relationships between financial institutions there is a natural hierarchy there and so the hierarchy of monetary instruments is not something that is common commonly discussed at term. So my goal with layered money was to bring that to the forefront in instead of talking about liabilities talking about a pyramid of money in which there is a hierarchy and at top of the pyramid are certain financial instruments or commodities and certain financial institutions. Right below them using those assets as the base for a whole monetary system and so the idea for layer money actually came directly from a paper in academia called the inherent hierarchy of money by a economics. Professor merlin. And what he wrote was fat. Money is inherently hierarchy go and he provided this academic framework for this and he had a three layered system gold government currency and deposits so a three layer system and i found that paper so fascinating in. So what i did was. I actually tried to trace the roots of that paper. That paper didn't have a historical context. It was about the hierarchy of sheets in the financial system. What i did with layered money is. I tried to trace the roots of that paper and i ended up starting the story about eight hundred years ago in renaissance florence To describe how. I saw this evolution occurred so i wanna get into florence but you actually start the book even farther back. You kind of pull the earliest experiments with coinage kind of set it in historical context. So let's talk about in the sort of ad era. I guess those early experiments with money with coinage What were the important kind of steps on the journey to get to where we get in that in that kind of renaissance that early period. What were the important parts of the earliest phases that you're looking at. So the transition between gold and gold coins is what identified as the first important transition so before gold coins gold was used golden. Silver were used as mediums of exchange. But it was in the form of non standardized fars jewelry etc these days gold and silver items but not necessarily uniform in their measure in weight. So the coin. The coin did was it. Changed this idea that we can to measure or gold and silver. Every time we transacted with each other. Because now the coin that i that you recognized you have acquired that i recognize. I know how much your coin as you know how much mike ways and so we can change We can exchange a lot quicker than if we didn't have the coin so that was very important advance in that happened for the first time. Several hundred years before a renaissance florence in actually in ancient libya which is in modern day turkey so after the after we start getting gold coins then we actually see the greek in the roman empire's us coins To admit coins and to use these coins in order to expand their empires and exert their influence over their subjects and what we saw the roman empire was really example devaluation so this idea that a government can come in mint coin but then the next year put less gold. Silver in the coin and progressively keep cheapening the currency But tried to really get away with this idea that the currency that the issue this year is the same as the currency that they issued ten years ago which had twice as much silver or golden and so the manipulation of currency at through government started to happen as well Along the signed before we get into the rasul's

Professor Merlin Bitcoin Nick Libya Mike United States Rasul
How Real Estate Sells Cars with Gina McCartney

Talking Automotive

07:21 min | Last week

How Real Estate Sells Cars with Gina McCartney

"Gina, welcome to . the It show is great to have you speaking to us today. Maybe just to kick things off can you maybe just tell us a bit about Gina McCartney - who you are and some background. . to thank Yes, I'm yourself sure, you so Gi for na McCartney having me here today. Super excited to see both. So my background if i go back to perhaps my brief - youth and into professional career. I really my whole life was distant creative: sculpting, painting, designing and off the back of that passion went to uni studied creative advertising and was destined. ..my path was to become a art director . My very early career was in advertising agencies and spent ten years ing servic some like pretty big clients ilo, . kohl's meyer group. Cbi off foundation and then some order client bmw and many were because of mine and it was during that time that i realized how much i loved as and surprised no surprise. I joined renault. Stralia and joining renault at the time was at a really pivotal point for the business. And that was all about preaching and finding every possible opportunity we could in the market and myra was to introduce the sierra digital program. Really lift the capability of the dealer network from a lead management perspective. Sur getting out outta rot on building confidence back in the network that we were providing leads to them in generating value from office and then from neymar roll moved into a brand and events role and so the full marketing swayed had an awesome time with the business and great team. And then my time was up. When i was tapped on the shoulder for all at anchor pinellas area group been realized real estate dot com to you joined the business not really knowing much about the role. I was joining. He'd go to market manager role and of bain there now close to seven years and moved my way through various segments. So we're two now. Residential business at develop a business emotional property meteorologisy and clients and also to stint in malaysia. And i leave the win. We acquired a southeast asia and helped with the integration of that business side at an awesome korea here. Rei and now run. I tame called the customer. Excellence team and so my team move. Twenty incredibly talented people help support our two hundred thirty sales teams across australia. And that includes the learning development perching old training ogata market siles support collateral and operations analytic. Kpi's commissions incentive sprints and really big a big team mission and vision is to pave the new way of selling and selling clock when you work for rei. Let's bit about my story. Love love gardening love dancing and eighteen. And that's how i spend most of my time let's it's an impressive story. How you you've migrated from during the karate stuff through to or i will now into real estate now. We can't get a bit of understanding as to real estate dot com o. Rei group and what's the back story of real estate. Dot com abc business was born in the garage. Dome koster and for those familiar with john. It's in the eastern suburbs of melbourne and in nineteen ninety five and they came up with a crazy idea of water. We put the photos of property onto online so people can see them on the internet and so literally scanning photo by photo by photo built this web sought. That looks very different today than what did obviously up. Twenty plus years ago and over the years to really brilliant simple idea to gos- and today with the leading australian property portal and we have hundred million plus is it as a month coming to thought trillions of photos from a perspective and yeah we service most property clients around australia and that includes real estate agents property manages developers homebuilders land developers media clients of less amount of probably. But almost all and anyone that wants to reach property. Sega's we do business. You know you've got a really interesting background. Having spent tom and credit in automotive value in real estate can you. Maybe just discuss some of the similarities. Between automotive and real estate i remember when i joined. Ra and it was probably a month thing. I thought wow. I didn't realize there was so many similarities between the two industries. And if i stop from a business structure perspective the similarities of utah franchise groups independence at relationship between head office and you know the small small businesses that are running in local and regional areas. I think that that pressure that applies with a small business to find the raw talent retain talent when there is no professional requirement This note there's no huddle to get into other industry. And i think that is a challenge that are still share today and another real estate industry in particular institute really trying to introduce their professional courses create more opportunities for the right people to enter the industry. So they've got really quality staff sieving consumers invincibles. And i think our remember. That was a challenge in the automotive industry finding the right talent and apprenticeship styles perspective perhaps a bit of bid process. But that was probably one thing that i saw straightaway is a big lesson. In automotive that i think real estate can learn with the handshake. Between sales and after-sales and if you think of the real estate version of that is the sales and rental market now rent rolls the most profitable part of a real estate agency and if you think about the handover in the importance of one to the other the ongoing retention of the customer. I think that's a really important similarity between the two some. I think some best practice sharing could happen more. And then the probably the other big similarity i would say is the is much smarter and much savia and this is probably not exclusive to automotive in real estate but their expectations have increased tenfold. And no longer. Can you get back to a later inquiry within a couple of days. We're now seeing consumer expectations at a couple of minutes. And i think that's something that dealerships deal with daily and you know the the now now now economy that exists within cosima world.

Gina Mccartney Na Mccartney Meyer Group Cbi Off Foundation Stralia Neymar Roll Ogata Siles Rei Group Dome Koster Kohl Gina UNI Myra Renault Pinellas Bain BMW KPI Australia
"ten year" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

The Minimalists Podcast

02:33 min | 2 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

"Might even say with social media stuff Like the amount that you put out into the world People may say they want more and more and more from you but actually they like wanting more wanting is a nice feeling so maybe it's better to just sometimes let them want to little more and then give them more of an excellent like twenty years ago. My girlfriend at the time She she would do this little like what are you getting for my birthday. Tell me tell me. Tell me i said. Nah i'm not telling you. Please please tell me what you're getting me for. My birthday is no no no. I'm not telling you and she's hopefully he's telling us that. Okay you really wanna know. Yeah i really wanna know. I said all right a necklace on a trip to mexico and she went You weren't supposed to tell me. I said i know. Don't worry i didn't actually get you next trip to mexico. I just knew that you didn't actually want to know. Okay touche. so it's like yeah. She liked yearning to know she didn't actually want to know. So on right maybe with the amount of stuff that we put out into social media and share with the world. It's better to have people want more from us. I like to writing wise. You know when. I whenever i put out in the world. Writing wise is usually very succinct. And i have this. My rule of thumb is if they wish. I would have said more than i've said just enough man. I think that's a great place to end it. Actually dirk servers. Thank you so much. I really judge. I love talking with you anytime. So thanks for having me on are there are forty seven more of those quarantine slash quality conversations over the minimalists dot com slash support. Also as i mentioned this week ryan. And i wanna go in-depth on the minimalist private podcast. We're gonna talk about the last ten years some of our achievements some of our biggest failures some of the lessons. We've learned but i wanted to sum it up with this essay. That i wrote if i were to sum up the last ten years the lessons that i've learned in one essay theresa that i wrote over the.

mexico dirk ryan theresa
"ten year" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

The Minimalists Podcast

05:36 min | 2 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

"We had him on the podcast sort of in the past. We did a live event with him and twenty seventeen in new zealand. He was living in new zealand at the time. And it was the. I think interview. He did and something like three or four years. that sound. how sean something like that. Yeah and so we got him to come out and do this live event with us. You can go back and listen to it The episode was just called sievers. We'll put a link to that in the show notes as well if you want to hear a longer form conversation with him. But here's a short conversation. I had with them. We covered a bunch of topics over a short span of time enjoy. Derek thank you for joining me today. Thank you for having me all the way across the world. Oh my gosh. Last time we were together was in new zealand. I guess that was what Three three and a half years ago. Something like that and we both left and now i'm back so i'm here in wellington new zealand but yeah last time i saw. You was in auckland at a horse racing course with your honestly i. I've done. Several hundred tour stops in. That might have been the strangest venue for locals thought. So yeah. That was awesome. There were escalators. And yeah. I was just waiting for a horse. The bus through door at any moment. Anyway i figure we could start by talking about beliefs. One of the things that i admire you for is when i look at you compared to your average person. You seem to be less influenced by mimetic or or societal beliefs and you sort of have your own personal beliefs. How do you think you develop the skill or why do you think that is. I think it's because i was. I think it's two things for one. I was just a long haired musician that wanted to be a rockstar and so i was surrounded by people that were trying to Get into a good college and all of that was moot to me. They were trying to get a good job somewhere in that was moot to me. They were looking into like how to make lots of money and get insurance and healthcare and all that was moot to me so for most of it. I just felt like i the things that most of the world wanted just didn't seem to apply to me anyway anyway. I was just pursuing a different thing. You know i was. I was the ringleader emcee of a circus for ten years from the age of eighteen to twenty eight i was in a circus. And so i guess that could be a bit of a alienating thing where. I just Most people couldn't relate to the life of a circus performer. Full-time i quit my last job in nineteen ninety-two you have a full-time just musician. And whatever guys since nineteen ninety-two. So i think that's most of it but even going back further If you lay me on the shrink couch when i was five years old we moved from chicago to or sorry. We moved from california to england and I was it the american kid at an english school and everybody Was really weird to me. Seemed to have different values from the in think that different things are important so She's like yeah. I'm not one of you people and then we moved to chicago and everybody called me the english kid because i had picked up the accent and so once again i was just like i'm not like you people i just felt like ever since i was like five years old. It just felt like whatever situation. I'm in it just feels like the rules. Don't apply to me. I'm just doing something else so I find your i find your reaction to that fascinating because a lot of people feel that way. I'm not like you people. But i might as well assimilate thin in yours was sort of the opposite of that where it's It's almost pushing those those societal or mimetic beliefs away and making sure that what you're doing is aligned with your own. We could call the values we can call beliefs but with what you want to do. Yeah and maybe it's flaunting it for attention. No i don't want attention. Maybe i did long ago now. I don't know what was that thing. Yeah i don't know it did just feel more like you guys are doing a different thing here. Your your pursuing something that i'm not pursuing so therefore all of these norms and rules which seemed to be about fitting in and being liked and all that stuff. I wasn't pursuing those in the first place so Yeah i never wanted to fit in. I wanted to stand out. I never wanted to be normal. I wanted to be different. And i think that you have mastered the art of letting go in many ways for folks that are familiar with your story. It say whether it's stuff or places or attachments you're really good at moving on and I how do you determine when it's time to let go of a person place or things move on. ooh wow. That's a great question. I think it's personal development right. It's it's growth when you feel that you've learned most of what there is to learn here then it's time to move on. I love the metaphor that when you're playing a game like a board game or something like that video game board game whatever. It may be when you win the game. It's time to stop playing..

new zealand sievers sean Derek wellington auckland chicago england california
"ten year" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

The Minimalists Podcast

01:43 min | 2 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

"The fascinated in a frigging closet because joshua i can't sit in the office now and it's just too big in. There's too many distractions. And i couldn't do it in one day. I realized i gotta get back in the closet. It's funny you say that. I got so used to writing at all of our books at my kitchen table. I have a desk. Now that An i'll a work from there occasionally. But i still find myself writing at the kitchen table. Because that was the the habit i established. I established many years ago. Place that i feel the most creative at and and you're right any of these tools whether it's an office that can augment our experience alternately but not the thing that does the writing for she can have the same exact pencil as stephen king. It doesn't mean you're going to start writing horror novels tomorrow. It's never thing it's never the next thing it's never different thing Now this is the the lesson is an in by the way. I still have to learn everyday joshua like i still can convince myself i have about fifty six thousand bottles of potions in my bathroom and i can. I will still promise you josh tomorrow. I'll see something and be like this. Is it though. This is the bottle of lotion that will change my base in therefore changed. My life blake the amount. Get suckered into this stuff really is amazing to me marketing. His powerful man iranian all just want the longing we want belonging and we want acceptance and.

joshua stephen king josh
"ten year" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

The Minimalists Podcast

05:32 min | 2 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

"I mean you nervous. And i don't even mean anything big and bold. I don't i mean you know those things that we want to say. But we're not seeing them. The things we want a tribe or not trying them but just little things that that Right on other side of discontent. And i think that we are all afraid to admit that we have any discontent or any longing or that we can imagine anything better for ourselves because the met might mean that we have to do something about it so in a way we we long for sometimes the wrong things. The temporary pacifier is the the ephemeral pleasures. The things that don't make us better men and women that are human beings but That that distract us in the moment. Yeah i think makes perfect sense. We can be forgiven for that. I mean we live in a in a capitalistic culture. I mean you know marketers jobs. Their whole job is to sit in rooms and identify the basic needs of human beings and then attach products up. They do their job. We do all day. they're really good at it. It's not subtle. It's literally their job right so you know when people woman said to speaking of that. I put this in untamed. She said i can't go round trusting my longing or my desire. I long for a bottle. Malibu every night should i just go for that said no you don't you don't go for that new. Don't trust that first of all. I know you don't trust that because you brought it up to right right. You know know better when you start asking a question like that. The answer is often embedded in the question itself. Exactly exactly you already know and second of all when you when you have a surface desire like the one you just like what you just said about the things that we think we want. If you don't trust it have to look below it to the deeper desire. So what's beneath bat bottle of malibu. What human deep human need. Those marketers attached that to its west. It's escape right away. You really want deeper desire. The desire beneath the desire is for some freakin rest. Yeah and we have the why behind it right because if we don't ask why we go for that surface of thing whether it's the The bottle or it's the the rolex. And i know for me throughout my twenties which feels like a lifetime ago. Now i you know. I wanted the the nice thing i really longed for. The i thought. I longed for that. But i was really longing for what the marketers and advertisers were selling underneath that the the sort of acceptance of others the the the love or the uniqueness and and and i think that if we can get beyond that you realize that of course the rolex will never get you that but you can get what you actually long for no matter how many will lexus. you get. You will realize that it never works because you can't ever get enough of what you don't need right. That's why i mean. I have a friend. Put this in the book. I have a friend who was obsessed josh Getting the speech house mckay. She wanted to rent to be just for the whole summer. Did not have the money for it. It was very bad decision. We kept talking about trying to get to the desire beneath the desiring. She burst into tears when in the middle of our conversation. She said i just see all these people with their families at the beach. Look like they're having they're connected and they're having so much fun. And i just feel so disconnected from my family. Don't even talk anymore. By the time we got it to end the conversation. We figured out you know. Which do she had a basket and everyone in your family should put their phones in the frigging basket before dinner. You guys should sit together for an hour and look at each other and talk to each other and she tried that and we laughed now today because that you know fifteen cent basket was a lot cheaper. That'd be joss you can really by the solution to your problems your true. It's true that money does solve money problems but most of our problems once our basic needs are met tend not to be Money problems at all in fact we the house examples. Such a great example. I know that that often when there are failing relationships and we try to do is like well. I'll buy my way out of this. If we just had a better house that would fix relationship. I just had the right car. Or if i just had a kid with this person. I'm sure that would fix the relationship. Of course all that does complicate things. Say i mean josh. I convince myself that i would listen. A really should had this talk a couple of years ago with you. Because i convince myself i would be a better writer. I finally had an office. Because i am a started writing when i lived in such a tiny house that i wrote in the closet. I had a vote between like piles of underwear jeans night. That's where i wrote my books. And so i decided okay if i can write books in closet. Imagine how good. I would be if i had like a real grownup office so my wife and i moved. I got a big office in genoa. I write.

Malibu josh mckay joss genoa
"ten year" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

The Minimalists Podcast

02:01 min | 2 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

"Of the painful emotions that we know no one ever taught us to deal with because we live in a culture that worships happiness right the cracks in our relationships. Our dreams are dreams that we feel like a braver. Bolder version of ourselves would do but we're not doing them. All of our pain. Potential is inside of stillness and painted potential. Two things are very hard to sit with right. So that's why because it's easier to to distract ourselves from those things into face them but the beautiful thing is that anybody who's lucky enough to have gone through any sort of recovery program. We'll tell you why. I see all the real pain and yet have great. Hope for this moment or what comes next should say is that in my life. I have found that every single good thing. My marriage my health my career my my personality all of it is a result of sitting in that stillness feeling all of that pain and digging into that potential. End what comes next is usually something new and beautiful. You talked about finding a braver. Boulder self. And i like that. I think that sometimes we have a misconception about what that looks like. We think that a a braver version of ourselves is some sort of perfect infallible person. But it doesn't sound to me like that's what you're actually talking about here. Yeah i mean. I stopped waiting to become a grownup allante. I figured out that never happens. Right never get to that. They were all waiting for a keep just waking up everyday in keeping myself so dragic normal..

Boulder
"ten year" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

The Minimalists Podcast

04:01 min | 2 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

"My name is joshua fields. Millburn ryan nicodemus is out today. He has some sort of weird thing going on with his eyeball. And i think he was terrified to be on camera today. But don't worry. We actually have three guests today because today is a celebration. It's our anniversary q. Rafael cdc that. Tony tony tony. It's our anniversary. Podcast sean. and jordan no more in the studio with me as well. We have three amazing guests today. Really a celebration and a gift for all of you. We got you an anniversary present. It's been ten years since we started the minimum literally ten years ago this week. December of twenty ten ryan. I started the minimalists dot com. It was about a year and a few months. After my mother died my marriage ended. It was a few months after ryan had had done his packing party and we had simplified our lives. We wanted to share that story with everyone else. And so for seven bucks. We became the minimalists dot com and we started the blog and from there. There was this whole thing of the last ten years. And in fact on the maximal episode this week over unpatriotic the minimalist dot com slash support. If you wanna check it out we're gonna do a long episode ryan and i are together. We're gonna to along episode about the last ten years we're going to answer some questions from the audience over the last ten years but we're also going to really dive into some things that maybe we haven't even talked about on the podcast because the podcast is also has an anniversary this month. It's five years old as well. So five years into the minimalist. We'd already put three books out there. We had gone on a bunch of tours. We started a publishing company. We've been blogging for years. But then we started the podcast. We'd just finished filming our first film. Minimalism for net flex and actually was before it was the the netflix thing was even there. We just had finished filming it and thought. Hey let's start a podcast. We were both really enjoy listening to podcasts. So here we are ten years later or five years after the podcast started. And we have some special guests today. Ryan and i over the course of the last seven eight months. Something like that. We've been doing these quarantine conversations. In fact we switch them to quality conversations as the quarantines and the lockdowns began to lift in in different locales. And so we've done fifty different conversations these short conversations that are anywhere from ten minutes to twenty twenty five minutes. Long over on our private podcast. And what we wanted to bring you. Today were three of those conversations. Three of our favorites. It's really hard to pick because there are so many just great conversations and it's been an exercise for me in listening to people a lot more and i've really enjoyed these short conversations almost like calling a friend and then just recording it and putting it on a podcast. There's no definitive format. There is a -sarily an interview. It's a conversation between two people. And i've been listening to a lot of different viewpoints over the course of this year on these conversations and we've been spoiled conversations with a q. By the way corentin conversations or quality conversations. and so. we're going to dive into some of those. Today will also have an added value segment and Do right here right now at the end but i thought maybe we could go ahead and dive in right now. The first conversation we have is with glennon. Doyle now glennon. She wrote a great book this year. Call while she released a great book. This year called untamed. And it's really a story about a woman finding herself and so we got to talk about that. What it means to to find yourself. You'll hear that in the conversation but we'll also put a link to her new book untamed in the show notes. All right. i'll see in a few minutes. But enjoy this quality conversation with.

joshua fields Millburn ryan nicodemus Rafael cdc Tony tony tony ryan sean jordan netflix Ryan glennon Doyle
"ten year" Discussed on My Life of Crime with Erin Moriarty

My Life of Crime with Erin Moriarty

08:18 min | 3 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on My Life of Crime with Erin Moriarty

"Man who spent more than a decade tracking down the killer of his brother. We begin in. Newton falls ohio once the home of a local hero. Air force reserves pilot. Major carl harrick. The way i've heard him described his fearless as by all accounts. Paul eric's brother. Carl was extraordinary. He was handsome tough and truly fearless. He defied death countless times. Blind c. one thirty cargo planes on nearly two hundred combat missions to iraq and afghanistan but in two thousand seven. He was killed in his own home. Shot twice in the back and then again in the head at close range a decade later hall in their father. Add can't even talk about karl without fighting back tears. I don't wanna be seen on camera. Why not fall for. What makes it so tough to accept. Is that karl. Herrick was ambushed by a woman. A woman he loved. Let's go back a bit to explain to two thousand five. Carl had just gone through a divorce and was going on a steady string of dates. That's what he met. Claudius so browse online claudio was a brazilian accountant and english teacher who had moved to the us several years earlier and she was beautiful. Carl was smitten. Within six months they were married and living together. Paul says it was the women in the herrick family who i sensed a serious problem seemed like she was friendly to the males. More and the females in the family basically said something's wrong something just doesn't seem right with her wouldn't carl wasn't flying for the air force reserves. He worked as a pilot for southwest airlines which meant claudia was left home alone in rural ohio and she wasn't happy about it and insisted on buying a gun for protection carla's brother. Paul thought it was crazy. She had lived in new york. City and newton falls crime rate is substantially less than new york city's crime rate so i just wasn't buying the story a year after the wedding. The marriage was already falling apart. There were constant arguments and disagreements and yet carl seemed unable to walk away says his close friend. Gary dodge. 'cause you would say he's leaving but then it find a reason to stay and then he was leaving and then find a reason to stay in early two thousand seven claudia summoned the entire herrick families what she called an emergency meeting to complain about. Carl's demands it. All seemed a little strange to paul. He wanted her to help out with the house cleaning and cooking like a fifty fifty split and that just isn't how it was and we like well. That's just part of being an adult. That just what you do. And carl was just sitting there shaking his head in disbelief then just a month before carl killed claudia called her stepdaughter. Carl's adult daughter out of the blue eve. I'm just calling to tell you goodbye and it was like what do you mean. What do you mean. She's like that's all just by. Eva would learn that soon after they spoke body was in a single car accident. According to court she was driving under the influence. Was she telling me that she was going to take her life. That's what i guess now. What appeared to be a suicide attempt. Landed claudia in a psychiatric ward and that caused carl rush to her side again. Says his longtime friend. Chris wagon when the suicide thing happened. It was. I think her attempt to try to get him to stay. All these things are her attempt to try to get him to stay but this time it didn't work in early march. Karl may plan to move out running a small place nearby. So claudia could stay in their home. He wasn't gonna leave her high and dry. I mean he tried to help her one of the last people to see. Karl live was his first wife rhonda. They had two children together. Eva and his son brent. He called a check on the kids and we end up on the phone for as long as they let him stay on when he was. He was in iraq on march tenth. Carl on assignment for southwest airlines stopped off in north carolina to see rhonda and the kids before flying back to ohio. Carl told her that his marriage to claudia was over and that he planned to move out on march twelve. Did he seem sad about. Yeah he did said. Make sure you call me when you get home. Okay i will. And he didn't still didn't. I was scared and i don't know why that's the last time she or anyone else in the family heard from karl two days later he was scheduled to be at the military base for reserve duty. When he didn't show up for a flight his friends began to worry. That would never happen. Has he ever missed a flight. No i don't think so. No he would. he wouldn't have his. That's that's a big deal when you don't show up that's a big deal. Gary dodge couldn't reach carl the next morning. He left concern voicemail. Hey look. I don't know where you're at by if i haven't heard from you in the next hour i'm calling the police and i didn't hear from silly kabulis arranged for carl's father to let them inside when no one came to the door at that point. I'm on the phone with a police officer. And i heard his dad's scream so that's one nine knew that something is definitely wrong. Want land mine goes next. I have tough. Carl was dead and claudia had vanished. Chris weakened lays out what police thought had happened currently went up. There's got a weapon that he didn't know about and stood at the top of the stairs. Shot him from their two bullets. Hit his back one more in his head you think. She came down the steps in china. Get your point blank. range right. In the head execution style right in the back of the head retracing claudius steps. Investigators soon learned that two days before the shooting. She went to a gun shop and bought a three fifty seven magnum pistol. We took a similar weapon to a shooting range. And god help from the same gun expert. That claudia us. And richard slider don't jerk slowly squeeze the trigger job slider remembers claudia. Well she never once acted like she needed. My you know input pretty much had it down. She explained why she needed a gun. This size just mainly for she wanted you know. Stopping power is what she wanted. When you pick up something like this. You ain't messing around. It's time to get serious. What's more it appeared. The claudia put a lot of thought into her plan. Before she left the house she set up what investigators described as a booby trap. The pistol that she used to shoot. My brother was found in this closet. There was a string attached to the trigger and to the door so the who over opened the door the gun would go off from shoot. 'em fortunately the god didn't fire but before she left the house. Investigators say claudia covered her dead husband's body with a plastic tarp and then drove his car to pittsburgh some eighty miles away. Then she used his airline pass to fly free to new york city for getaway and then on to sao paulo. Brazil carl's friends. Were in.

Carl claudia karl carl harrick carl rush Paul eric Herrick iraq new york city ohio Gary dodge Chris wagon Eva Claudius Newton newton falls Brazil sao paulo
"ten year" Discussed on The Sustainable Futures Report

The Sustainable Futures Report

02:47 min | 5 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on The Sustainable Futures Report

"By <Speech_Male> contrast <Speech_Male> ten years to midnight <Speech_Male> is much shorter. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> It's much <Silence> easier read. <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> On finally, <Speech_Male> I leave you with <Speech_Male> the news that <Speech_Male> honey is better <Speech_Male> for you than you <Silence> might have thought. <Speech_Male> A study <Speech_Male> published <Speech_Male> in the Journal B. <Speech_Male> M. J.. <Speech_Male> Based medicine <Speech_Male> found honey <Speech_Male> was a more effective <Speech_Male> treatment for <Speech_Male> coughs, blocked <Speech_Male> noses and sore <Speech_Male> throats. <Speech_Male> Then many remedies <Speech_Male> more conventionally <Silence> prescribed. <Speech_Male> Well, <Speech_Male> as a <Speech_Male> Kiva on you <Silence> that. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Beekeeping <Speech_Male> is suddenly <Speech_Male> getting these celebrity <Speech_Male> treatment. David <Speech_Male> Beckham was pictured in <Speech_Male> the press this week with all <Speech_Male> his family wearing <Speech_Male> suits <Speech_Male> he built his <Speech_Male> own hives as well. <Speech_Male> Apparently <Speech_Male> Ed. Sheeran has <Speech_Male> installed hives on <Speech_Male> his suffolk estate <Speech_Male> could use. <Speech_Male> VP's <Speech_Male> good news for us. As <Speech_Male> aren't important <Speech_Male> police from food crops <Speech_Male> particularly <Speech_Male> fruit. <Speech_Male> If you have <Speech_Male> land time <Speech_Male> and a few hundred pounds <Speech_Male> despite you to <Speech_Male> join them in protecting <Speech_Male> the bees. <Speech_Male> If <Speech_Male> not gruesome, <Speech_Male> be <Speech_Male> friendly plans <Speech_Male> next year. In fact, <Speech_Male> if you PA crocuses <Speech_Male> now <Speech_Male> they will provide <Speech_Male> early food source <Speech_Male> for bees <Speech_Male> and the look nice <Silence> as well. <Speech_Male> On, <Speech_Male> just off <SpeakerChange> to give <Speech_Male> my babies some <Silence> winter feet. <Silence> <Speech_Male> Before <Silence> I go. <Speech_Male> Let <Speech_Male> me. Thank you for listening <Speech_Male> and especially <Speech_Male> those of you who support <Speech_Male> the sustainable <Speech_Male> futures report by <Silence> patrons. <Speech_Male> Thanks to <Speech_Male> Rachel Moreso <Speech_Male> being the very latest <Silence> supporter. <Speech_Male> If <Speech_Male> you'd like to be <Speech_Male> a patron, you'll <Speech_Male> find all the details. <Speech_Male> Patriot <Speech_Male> DOT COM <Speech_Male> SLASH SF. Oh, that's <Speech_Male> P. A. T. <Speech_Male> A. N. <Speech_Male> DOT COM SLASH <Silence> S. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> We're not going <Speech_Male> viral yet but listen <Speech_Male> the numbers are <Speech_Male> at record levels. <Speech_Male> Please <Speech_Male> Shah. <Speech_Male> I published <Speech_Male> the full text of every <Speech_Male> episode on the <Speech_Male> blog at <Speech_Male> www <Speech_Male> don't sustainable <Speech_Male> futures don't <Silence> report. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> With. Extensive <SpeakerChange> links <Silence> to all my sources. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> As being <Speech_Male> a bit of a problem with blogger <Speech_Male> recently, <Speech_Male> and that it stripping <Speech_Male> out all my formatting <Speech_Male> making <Silence> things difficult to read. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> A new website which <Speech_Male> will incorporate the blog <Speech_Male> and links to this podcast <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> will be live <Silence> later this month. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> In <SpeakerChange> the meantime <Speech_Male> I'll have more <Speech_Male> interviews for you. <Speech_Male> Moan useful you <Speech_Male> ideas for you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and do let me <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> have your ideas, your <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> comments, your criticisms. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> That we know what <Speech_Male> you won't be. To report. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> again for listening. <Speech_Male> That was the <Speech_Male> sustainable futures <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> report I'm Anthony <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Day. <Music> <Advertisement> Until <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> next time.

"ten year" Discussed on The Sustainable Futures Report

The Sustainable Futures Report

02:29 min | 5 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on The Sustainable Futures Report

"So perhaps, the most important thing we can do is to keep people's mind on the issues to to promote the message. Hit, and I think two things if you say, what could any individual right? The first one is get really informed in call the question of anyone who's who they they meet. They interact with a knife vote for they talk they're just just just being a good citizen a good employee a good. Consumer in that sense of good intent worrying about the sustainability of it. And then the second one is fine to play she love and a better. Right because essentially I think this is GonNa be. Ten million cities at a time kind of her that that dude a little bit villages, our cities or counties to a little bit at a time and adds up to something. It's really pretty massive because it's it's a it's more than industrial scale problem. It's a complete lifestyle issue that will have to rethink. And actually I think are if you look at all if you re Paul Hawkins Book, for example, the life you live if you go to the solutions is actually Wayne Nicer. Actually way better, and so it's it's not like we're asking people to give something up. We're asking people to move to a much nicer place at book referring to I think he's on trying to draw them throw down. Yes. I recommend people have a look at it. As, as we draw to the end of this conversation, I'd just like to quote the very last sentence in your book way you say, no one is exempt from the need to act. Please decide what Rhody will play on get to it. There's nothing more to say than I think actually that is the at Berkeley summary what we're trying to articulate in the book. So I'm glad you read. BLACHE EPA. Thank you very much for taking the time to talk to the sustainable futures revolt. Anthony Lot and good luck with your mission. I hope you're successful. That was blache shepherd. Global, leader for strategy and leadership odds WC. Ten. He has to midnight four urgent global.

Anthony Lot Paul Hawkins EPA Berkeley Rhody
"ten year" Discussed on The Sustainable Futures Report

The Sustainable Futures Report

03:46 min | 5 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on The Sustainable Futures Report

"Hello, and welcome to the sustainable futures reboard for Friday, the second of October. I'm Anthony Day. As you know I had a break. You know this during that time Rachel Morris became a patron and silver supporter. Sorry you've had to wait so long for your shoutout Rachel. Welcome to the sustainable. Futures Report. We live in challenging times. Which is a rather unhelpful cliche. Nevertheless, it's true as challenges like uncertainty to be faced and if not eliminated. To. Be Reduced a managed. At least if we identify the problems, we're on the white defining solutions. There are fundamental changes taking place to industrial social and political structures across the world. Changes which we have to face up to. Control. I spoke to the author of a new book, Ten years to midnight. Right well, my guest today on these sustainable futures report is shepherd. Is the global leader for strategy and leadership at P. WC which many of you have heard of it's a network of professional services firms committed to building trust in society and solving important problems. Blat is also the Dean Emeritus. Professor. Emeritus of Duke University's Fuqua School of business where he told thirty three years..

Rachel Morris Dean Emeritus Blat Anthony Day P. WC Fuqua School of business Duke University Professor professional services
"ten year" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Everybody so this episode of stuff to blow your mind is sponsored by the all new Mazda C X thirty which I actually just got to test drive recently in the beautiful beautiful mountains of southern California and I will say as some. We've told you on the show before we're not really car guys. We don't know a lot about cars. I'm sort of an automobile Philistine. But from on this auto Philistines heart. I will say this was a really wonderful car to drive. I truly enjoyed cruising around the mountains. In this thing. It was very smooth. It was very stylishly sung to my non Kar Heart in a way that cars usually don't so what's actually in this thing details wise so it has class leading standard horsepower horsepower and is active all wheel drive with G. veteran control plus for ultimate control and I will say there is a very special thing about this car. I have driven another car like this. When you go around a corner in it? something about it feels almost like predictive like it. You know you don't need to do like jerking around trying to correct your turn like everything in it is extremely smooth and continuous. And I think that's what's going on here but it's also got a beautiful design on the outside. Yeah Yeah I mean basically. The thirty is size to be agile in the city while still having the interior space in utility to go anywhere anytime encouraging an active life style and to your point. It's the the idea that you're not having to to wrestle the machine to get where you're going there is a. There's a meeting of the man in the machine. It's also very nice driving experience in a visual way. Where like the car doesn't have a touchscreen and a you know we're like you can see those touchscreens? Come up and kind of distract you while you're trying find navigate the the features and stuff driving instead. It's more traditional kind of command controls that you go with buttons and Levers from the steering wheel but it actually makes for a much nicer acer less distracted drive. You've got your eyes on the road. Yeah you're not playing video game the drive the car. You're driving the car but it's also got connected car features that give you convenience at safety peace of mind Got An in-car WIFI option. Remote engine start stop and door. Lock Vehicle Status Navigation Service vehicle finder automatic nine one one dialing in the event of an accident So it's really got it all and I really truly enjoy driving this.

Mazda California acer
"ten year" Discussed on Taste Of Taylor

Taste Of Taylor

16:11 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Taste Of Taylor

"Three zero at thirty six almost thirty seven. I don't Own a house. I don't have children. I'm not married I'm divorced. It's like it and I also feel like money wise career wise. I think everyone's like you're crushing and I'm doing great but like I want to be doing bad taste. Tae Is thirty two who I'm an older woman. Luckily she likes them old and she likes Chubby. Okay so anyway okay. So speaking of speaking of a jolly good christm- okay. So I'm thirty seven so when on instagram. The ten year challenge came out I was enraged and furious and but I just kept it all inside and I I feel. Society is always pitting all women against each other and I felt like the ten year challenge men first of all they really do get better with age. It's so fucking unfair most of them but like with women. It's like the tenure challenge. That's a fun game unless like you're Jaylo or fucking Jennifer Aniston. It's like in what world will any woman really feel like. She looks her best ten years later men years later. Okay okay so I was like really I was. I was against the ten year challenge. I ignored it. It's fun you should 'cause if something's triggering you online don't yes I I'm twenty eight. I look so much better than I did it. Here's the thing this is what this who tenure challenges for. It's for women who are in their late thirties. Early forties maybe even fifties who like our genetic aliens. Yeah and look better now than they ever talks or whatever or even just age gracefully. If you're tall and thin you kind of age fucking awesome. I because as I look at my friends now who are like really spectacular like Taylor will never mind girl from. We'll never be unattractive so she's elegant will always be and because so she's fucking six feet tall in like a string bean you know. I definitely peaked in my late twenties early thirties. I I have like a young face I have. I have like a like a feminine body so for me agents going to be rough. I'm just saying you know what's crazy. My mom had I'd like was a curvy woman had me and I changed her body. Type you bitch. She snow but she said that she all the Touching my network. And you don't have to do the sleep.

Jennifer Aniston Taylor
"ten year" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Aw and why that was avenue in five bucks just decide to move real slow. So we'll begin. saw ratcheted second so imagine renton is causing statement where we talk about all these different sort things stories that are going across the world and how our lack of laws and enforcing those laws laws against people who walk around stores is causing chaos amongst the world and it was guys we'd be taking it a little more space but we can't even get gun control because why we never into control right so the tangible goals in one another tangible goals. I think there's a lot of these. Sores regulated get off the street people in impeach him some classes about how will the sword and real responsibly. Because right now you can go to any comic CON Convention. Whatever grab when he's quote unquote replica? Swords and just be walking around stabbing people within minutes. There's no registration there's no Task for proficiency We don't keep like a list of Mosey sores or nothing and I think that's a big. That's a big problem. Sneeze a seventeen year old mister threatening another team with a Samurai sword over one hundred dollars Singapore unhappy that an eighteen year old. Oh Oh okay let me scroll down happy that an eighteen year old. His brother a hundred dollars a seventeen year old confronted with Semi Sore One night last September Muhammad uh-huh Leaf Moustapha admitted to one charge of criminal intimidation on Thursday. The court heard that he or she the sword inside the victim's home jurong east threatening to slash lashed older boy with the twenty seven meter weapon. if he did not come out of the house his charge sheet stays that Zach. Words come down with us if not I'll stab. You did say literally elite. who was sent to a juvenile home and twenty seventeen for commission in House? Trespass and theft may face imprisonment for his current charge. We're giving his young age. Debbie Prosecutor Angela. Hang call for probation suitability ability report before making representations. I'm like I mentioned one dollars. That's a lot of money it is. I mean we were just stab someone number five. I could see why you would want to stab someone over one hundred. That's why you shouldn't have a sore elite who was not represented by a lawyer requested to be placed on probation instead of giving jail time. My mother's not working I. I am the only support from my mother. District Judge agreed to the probation suitability report to be prepared and journey for the man on January. Thirtieth finishing He also claimed that the soil was actually just scared of victim. which I mean? That's probably true. I'd be scared of Nagata. So but You know wasn't there was trying to scare somebody with it and trying to kill them with it either one I. I can't be assuming assuming when you pull out like Oh scary it. I can't be assuming you know So yeah somebody out his brother some money so he asked for his friends between the ages of seventeen. Twenty one to meet him at Was this this Jason Mohammad Yassin. Daniel Rosalyn to meet a Yeltsin's flat to support him as he planned to confront Yassin Seen he decided to bring along the source so that he could use scare. You're saying and repaying the debt while the void deck of Yassin's blocked the group spotted a friend of him to get you to carry down to come down to meet him the free man he's pretty duplicitous. That was involved in this. They should charge this back luring to do down the free taxi I said. But there's there's no reply so they went up to his unit shattering come out yesterday. Opened the gate to unify and a Ruckus at the time at that point two members of at least company and Seventeen hundred eighteen against shouting Yeltsin about their own personal grievances against him. Oh he oh everybody's money he's taken the money. What does she say about my sister son? What isn't it don cut in? A fit of anger leave then unsheathed his sword indirect today housing threatening to slashing if you did not step out of his unit to talk things out. Well I'm gonNA tell you the coming out. Yeah I don't come. Natural pulled a sword out. That's eighty hours. Yeah I'm a lot less likely to come out. I don't think you WanNa talk frightening. I title legal aid needed five minutes to use the WASHROOM. I Oh okay major. Let me take a real quick because my parents are full of shit frightened he say okay. So you're seeing the doors unit. Cada police like a smart person. The group flare when they notice police cars in a car parked nearby but they were later traced interested. Dale one hundred dollars I get it but hale all right. That's it for today. So thank you so much for listening. Thank you I'm glad I show can be anything you want it to be and ten ten years down in hold only like I think this is a great. Alcohol is a great episode to put the proof A we can do whatever we want to. Apparently because our fifty minutes of this was nothing but seriously thank alpha listener and we appreciate. Ah well wishes and condolences to Karen And Our thoughts and stuff. So thank you and we'll let you guys know Or if you don't see more shows during the wine maybe traveling and stuff so you know I until next time I love you I love you..

Jason Mohammad Yassin Yeltsin renton Singapore Debbie Prosecutor Angela Leaf Moustapha theft Nagata Dale Karen Zach hale Daniel Rosalyn
"ten year" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"We are friends now now and I got people like I have got people I talk to maybe every four to five years but we taught we taught hager how you doing. Okay how you doing click and we. We are who we see each other again and as I understand that's a different love languages and other people trying to invalidate holiday. They love what I'm saying is the lack of understanding to the fact that we don't all have to connect on that level. We don't we're not all going to have these grand rained friendships. You know I look at my facebook. Hey I don't have to have like five or ten. Maybe that's okay you know. It's not that happen. Awesome happened to me. That's five ten people might they will probably show up or at least college check on me or something right. They know something wrong. There's a lot of people that aren't that way and I'm not holding it against is there but when you see like people expect this shit out of people as other folks don't have fucking lives man. I like why aren't you dropping everything and reading eating my passive aggressive facebook status in stopping coming over my house. That's not what the fuck happened. Twelve I think a lot of people treat friendships like like they did when they was in school. We're best friends. We got to go together. Walk together talk together. We got to be up each other as time. And if you don't treat me like that you're not a friend right. People people have motherfucking lives. It reminds you of that. Yeah of like fifth grade when you get your first best friend. People's definition is you do is just being each of the time it's like Dr. I'm I'm not GonNa be on the phone with you every day and at the same time I understand. That's what you need is just can't come from me not not but it's the weird judgment entitlement that I am expressing of that that I do find lie down. This is really turned a lot of us in the like really selfish self absorbed people who are constantly. Try to put our own light loneliness on everybody else. I own like insecurities. It's all. Oh everybody else to fix input. I know and that book conflict is not abuse and talk about people that have been victims of trauma and stuff. And it's like look win once you've been in the traumatic experience you live with this trauma by people. We live with it all the time right trauma at some point though it is your thing to deal with yes. It is and so you can't always function or be trusted to lead and Shit if you lead from a place of unresolved trauma trauma I but we've been able to reverse the polarity on that online and be like the person does the most traumatize have the most power in the most. Say so we wouldn't don't do that any other if you work at a job and somebody was like. I had racism happen to me one day and I never got over it. They wouldn't be able to walk into your job and be Eli okay. So because some racist she happened to me one day all the white people get the fuck out. We've like what no you can't manage cannot but online you can you can do that. You can kind of flip it to be like you know this thing happen to me. I'll never forgive this group of people. Everyone needs to act accordingly. Hey anytime you guys bring up this topic. I don't feel good so you gotta stop talking about it like that's not think that that has enabled us to really be like these quote unquote friendships. We talk about two. They're not really Because when we get to these moments a conflict it's over you know and I think that's really not good. It's not good. It's not healthy healthy And people are not like I said if people are not checklist and people aren't like you could afford it up though in tragic trashed forget Just can't do that but people do this all the time and is devastated. These can be devastating to people like you you know and it causes hurt. People continue to hurt people like like. That's the two statement but that's a real thing Yeah says the way we talk about. Friendship depends ugly patriots of the new notion of relating one seeks maximum return on minimum investment and allies in our exit strategy. Anytime a friend for fill our fantasies. These post reveal more about the toxicity of our society than a negative describing is a friendship as a capitalistic exchange instead of relationships relationships involving people who care about each other hanging out a helping each other through ups and downs house is enough to make you wanna cry into a beer with a confidante close friend kind is going out of town. Yeah Yeah and also I think for me I don't know if it's a generational thing saying but sometimes is nothing like hearing somebody's voice because so many people do on Lonzo much. Nah sometimes let me are you okay. Let me hear Your Voice your options. They physically see your face was again different love language. Some people need that. You know. I'm not necessarily. You GotTa Call Me and be talk. I don't i. I think there's been some chances sometimes where I reached that level. I might well. Maybe if I talk to this person right I understand maybe proceed as person and you know what sometimes their trauma so deep. It wasn't even matter you know but you know different. Love languages. Transacting relationships take for example..

facebook hager Lonzo Eli
"ten year" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

12:53 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Our female We don't have a non binary thing or anything on this one and is amazing. How a lot of the stuff? Asian in target date dare to embed about talk initiate towards women before why they act like women just fucking didn't exist. Yeah a lot of these. Ads Are Harry's razors razors and shit like that. Right Bevo was something where we had to be like. Hey women could use a student now. I work I shaved it before it was good. Good thirty four million women. Listen to podcast in two thousand. Eighteen is a lot of women is this is sixty eight percent more likely for podcast listening to have a postgraduate graduate degree. I mean mostly very highly educated. Yeah talk at forty four forty five percent more likely for podcast listening to have a college degree looking at gender differences in pockets of education female podcast users have a higher education and income than overall US population according to the podcast analytics newsbeat. So Wow Mormon. Listen and a lot of podcasts. Catered them in women are the ones with the money and education some shit yeah. Yeah did you audience don't exist. Yeah and he still was funny. Is that the decision makers Komo mostly seem to chase after the male demographic Because I think that's just tradition radio and TV so the decision makers there's Impact casting are quicker to give that like if I were running network. Okay let me reach out to a man who's GonNa podcast even if what the man does. It is something that pisses women off. You know. It's like okay. We want to be a network with Joe Button. We WanNa you know we gotta get Charlemagne we gotta get ti. See Ya and women might be like fuck them. I don't like them I don't WanNa but that's the people get the money behind. No normally you know not obviously not all and there's a lot of women at that. They've got it again too but it's just funny. How male dominated a lot of the official podcast are While women are the ones listening. Yeah and then you know podcast actually catered towards women feel like we're Goddamn Wad women. Didn't they get sponsors that catered towards women and everybody is Zahn was like almost like the thing with black become out and everything. Oh Shit Nigga movie yes women like this shit too and women's Bauer like you know. We get perks prowess ignorant to ignore this whole as audience. Yeah like obviously I see our donations. I see our premium listeners. And stuff like that and I don't. I've never looked to see like exactly what the percentages of women never done a survey or anything like that but I would say that is if not fifty fifty is like slightly majority. Women probably anecdotally off the top of my head and a lot of times. People will say. Well how'd you monetize. How do you how make money? How are we are able to do that? And I think a lot of shit really is because of our natural predisposition to be light light. We Love Women. We love black people. We love our people and a lot of that to me. And it's not vache putting on airs. It's not it wasn't like a branding decision where we say. We're going to get all this money like literally. I lost a job in cameras. We should try to make money so it wasn't like bydesign but I think by happenstance or whatever a lot of how we were able to monetize because of that type of inclusive cocoa just kind of like more fair minded thing now doesn't mean that these shows are very like women bash initiate and Black Women. This and all that those shows make money to do if you look at a lot of times. They make money off of like advertisers or someone coming in and and quote unquote pain them to do what they do right which kinda takes the listener almost out of the equation but as a listener funded podcast? I know a large part of this is because you know black women feel okay given us money as a point where we do you know because we're not just out here trying to like embarrassed embarrassing them but at the same time we're not our just pandering and you know at the same time you know to go. Listen to just be a pandering podcast as me and ain't Shit me and trash ask women. Is Everything please give us your money. Please gives you. You know like we just keep it real but it is also I think Not a coincidence that we're wondering if there's black monetize like this agreed. Forty three percent pockets. Man's use spotify to listen to podcasts. Yes spotify they are game changer for people and we we said years ago these music apps a like a into podcasting blend them and spotify lycopene now where anybody can get on and that change it because now you will allow people people when people go. I got a podcast. You can go as some of my podcast and then you go you gotTa spotify. Yes is this and they can just type into title. I don't have have to have a fucking separate. I don't have to Dalo nothing new. I don't have to take because once you start taking extra steps a lot of people fucking tap out. Yeah I it's also amazing because spotify hasn't been in the game that long no it hasn't because they both people get get their pocket is normally like a phone and stuff and apple was the first people that really put podcast into like the what they do into their phones and their ipads and stuff is interesting to see that like literally early. spotify came in and boom. Now we're doing podcasts. Their original stuff and just going and cherry picking the good shows from other places and now they can just you you can just submit your feet and they'll take anybody but yeah Forty three percent is a huge amount for somebody that just hopped into the thing and plus spotify advantage of being on android and right now all the other stuff right and also the thing particularly with the apple sticky keep dishes separate which is fucking dumb combined that Let's see thirty nine percent of smart speaker owners. Listen to podcasts. At least once week I know I do six percent podcast shows are downloaded from apple The average podcast listeners describes a seven different shows weekly. I stand stupid but yeah that that makes sense because you variety taste outage to fifty two percent or podcast scribes listen to entire episodes which is much higher than over fifty podcast consumers. Listen to between seventy six six to one hundred percent of all the podcasts downloaded devices. I will never be in that percentage. I have so many downloaded. I'll never get to a mom agreed around twenty twenty six percent of the podcast listeners. Speed podcast while listening. Yeah knows no say when a listen to this show and come in late day like a while. I'm so used to a union like speed. I just listened to the normal speed. I've never spared a slowdown. Anything like that. Yeah but that means somebody out there stores right now we are the chipmunks see eight RPM you Inca yes Alvin they do do do you welcome out there listeners. On three times speed or whatever Yeah podcast listeners. Being an average of six hours was in thirty seven minutes list the podcast every week Ninety percent of podcast consumers to listen to podcasts. At home I would think most people will probably. I be listened to on commuter style but I I was doing everywhere in the car at the gym. More than half of Americans do chair chores while listening to podcast. Ask Your cleaning up. Welcome to the fold. Okay I'm in hive. I'm in Chore Hive. I ninety four percent. PODCAST consumers are active on at least one social media channel channel which is a great way for most why we tell people between about to show us. TVD WT come follow us on instagram. Come be our facebook page. We love that stuff what have us. PODCASTS pay attention to the AD which is much higher than radio. Fifty four percent. A podcast consumers say they you think about buying advertising product and thing I said that one what was the other one that There was another one that that was interesting. I think about race But it might be down there AC- fifty billion episodes have been strained or download. It from APO Monday. Tuesday wins out our best as a release a podcast. That is so true because when we do the show I can watch our feedback in on our Hashtag I I we. Do you know Saturday Sunday Monday. And then you'll see like a boom boom boom feedback feedback but you get towards the end of the week. Our people want to get off work. Mark on twitter CASS. Now we gotta get you done a lot less Thursday Friday Saturday Hashtag like I'm listening to the show So that makes total sense Let's the Amazon. Prime podcast has one hundred and fifty million active users. What probably got August August? I don't I didn't know that. What all right tasers from June? Two thousand nine hundred. I ain't no problem. Had A podcast feed two percent in a survey to mega. Say podcast are too long because you know why Americans work too fucking much time. And that's why I always say don't make your show for for everybody because the bane two hours find interesting when people get podcasting advised they always tell you make it short. I always tell you not to you. Know don't go too long not too often not this. And I'm like Dr. If the person listening to you is like upset that your show is too long Dank. The one for you know gay not. You're title audience. They really ain't fucking what you anyway. Yeah because the thing is as a podcast listener they are short. Sure Park has its did are born is look and then there are long podcast. Is the entertaining. You normally is hard to have both you know. Most people don't do both so a lot of times. People don't WanNa admit I don't like listening because you're not entertaining Dr. I've heard the truth right light honestly if I roll my eyes podcast. I'm are is because I already don't really fuck with you and you know and I mean that's just an honest thing the people I'm not naming no names but I think and the same thing for us if people look at us and go oh two hours yet. They don't really talk with her right now. Because you know what. When I listened to the morning Jones I never once like three hours of this shit? I love the morning journals. I even longer better. Yeah I was listening to the commercials and Shit you now when you know win day. lebatardshow is on and he's GonNa be on effort three hours four hours out of the middle of the day. People look forward to that time and they don't. Oh you know the radios to me way worse than podcast throwing out his product placement advertising. And and you can't make everything confine you know yes so me personally like dogs. They spoke with us They GONNA fuck with us so it's going to be as long as it needs to be you know and also is one of those things where different people's lifestyle demands different types of podcasts. For Groping for change people leave all and you have some people who like you say I have three and four hour commute back and forth to work so they love. The traffic is going to listen to. I don't have to have fourteen episodes queued up because every ten minutes Gal finished and I've binged podcast before I have to have twenty thirty minute episodes. I just threw them because I you know I have the time and if if I like it I want it all right now. You know so you know we made our show it was you know we didn't set out with a go. I remember the first episode is US say Ashort it was GonNa be twenty minutes. It was how short it was GONNA be. We weren't gonNA talk about politics. Yeah we were just go have fun you know it and look at what the show came. Because you don't know you know another thing I would point out man be consistent. You know pick that thing you can do it when you pick that that thing that you can stick to..

spotify Black Women US apple Bevo Harry official Komo Joe Button Charlemagne facebook Zahn Bauer Sure Park twitter Amazon
"ten year" Discussed on Cold

Cold

11:24 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Cold

"Podcast. I've seen a lot of young women who are seventeen. Eighteen nineteen years old. Who are listening? Because of their age didn't hear about Susan when this was all happening and they're they're hearing it for the first time and having a very different experience than Either of US right in in living that in real time but they're but they're learning so much from it and they'll someone your age age who is what would you be. Would you be Susan's ages head so since you three years you delve. Lv into it. Did you have any clue how sick and twisted this stuff was. Even even with what I knew about Josh and Steve which which was enough to know these guys are not good role when you really look at with the close focus It is I mean the word disturbing can't even begin to cover and has changed who you are. Yes and it changed how you deal with people people and you are now better. Qualified are better able to help people and there's decisions and seeing these things differently really the thing. I was with the reason the police released. The file is because we were going to sue them if they didn't so then they released a redacted. Copy though you don't have to sue US okay. The reason they release reset the unredacted copy because we were going to sue them. Because try and get this because I want more people to look at it and work on it and the thing I didn't want because has rejected files and and seeing their files is they had all steve's garbage and I didn't WanNa look at it and I don't want to look at it I didn't have have to look at it because everybody else look a few other people looked at it and I thank you so much for putting up with it and going to that and and stuff. So it's it's just something that needed to be done in a story told that I couldn't have told as Susan's bother. I couldn't could've toll it with any credibility or any objectively would all be a question where somebody else could. And that's that's you you show me things I had no clue about the depravity or the how bad it was and I'm glad I didn't. There was one time I went to the House House. Josh was supposed to take care of the boys and Susan. I gotta go out and do something. I don't remember what it was anyway. A but she She forgot something. I have to go back and come with me okay. Let's be quiet we don't want to the boys will WANNA I don't want to have to say no okay so we're going up the stairs to the second floor and she retrieves something but as soon as I got the top the store the stairs I she looked at me she goes. Do you feel it. I go what I go. I feel uncomfortable. I not exactly happy to be here. She goes you feel the evil. She kept things in perspective that was Steep House House. Steve Pals Yeah. They reached something at the top of the stairs. Dart at I thought that was interesting that she would say that to me yet. I'll bring that up in all of that really ugly environment that she found herself in through no action of her own right aside from meeting the wrong guys for initial mistake. Yeah for her to persist as long as she did in being the champion of her own value beak so much to her character. And I honestly believe it's an inspiration. Two people who hear her story myself included so I think the boys are lot big part of it so those kids meant everything to her and she was a real good. Mother need to learn from lessons from the past for the future. And this this is one of those lessons that can be repeated off and on S. needs to be. It'll be a little differently but you know it's still the same story good versus evil trying hard and you know and one of my daughters who has rejected everything. She was raised on We'll say leave it there but anyway he's okay. I WanNa talk to you and I need your help and everything but don't tell me to about prayer or God and I'm going pray when you have a question and that's what I've done so I don't understand how anybody can handle it without that kind of support include including Susan when when I was reading through so so much of Susan's writings and she's talking about going to her bishop asking for that council going to the temple and praying about it and it seemed very important to me that that part of Susan's life experience be presented so that people can understand Dan. It's not just what any one of US perceives about. Our our personal feelings about religion aren't was important. It's what Susan believed right and doing doing justice and honor to that. And when Steve and Josh who were Steve This openly that he wants to destroy the church. Jesus Christ latter-day Saints when they say well. She didn't really like it he was all well. Let's let that was ridiculous and you know she was trying to live it Josh. We're taking advantage that when he was looking for a woman within the church search. You know the very thing he saying that he didn't care about in the only waste reasons. He stuck around. As long as she did is she was trying to follow every everything along those that the church taught and she was not given up on him. Even though it was clear to me in the beginning of this there was nothing to be true to begin as soon as I started but but once it did she was going down that road and she kept investing time and energy and and love and stuff to try. Try and bring him back and save him and all that when he was a loss case from the beginning. I don't know I would never dreamed. Winded Steve was as messed up as he was their families as messed up his. I don't know how you would ever comprehend that I don't think anyone who's not actually lived it and including myself can really understand what the dynamics of the Palley were how how strange it was. We stayed away from Steve because we figured it. He wasn't good news and wasn't a pro. We didn't have to be there so we stayed away from it. Which as most people would you just avoid those issues? He's so it's opener is to that I guess I believe there is evil. And there's certainly good and there's gardeners there's a disc Satan and I think when you go down that pass here you're subject told that aren't making bad choices you make like the responsibility was on Josh to to not make those decisions right. But also he was. Steve taught him to be who he was. And Steve's parents affected MSU brought out in there and is that a terrible i. It's just a sad waste of life. Waste of time and tragedy that his time life his steve ruined his family and his but is he a victim. And who's going to judge judge stat by STAT I. I don't know what his life was like a child. I don't know what his parents lice were. So as much as I he was and what he did in the situation he did. Who can judge that not me? It worries me when I see people. People Focus too much on Steve Right when the focus needs to be on Susan. It's about Susan and where she is. I think the right time she'll be found and if not you know there's a whole lot of people in the world let her missing people will never see they're gonna get so at least not on this earth but to to your point I mean I have that house as well yeah. There's hope so if it's been ten years years we still haven't found her living day to day as we always do and every time every time there's Zabad pound every time there's a you know could ever found somewhere we start wondering is this. The one is our awaken. Be Over. We'll we'll be able to put her whatever's left to her to rest with their but were fateful or whoever is found even even though it remains. It's still good. Take matter how hard that has to be. It's hard but I think it's harder not knowing I mean we don't know yet or you know I love to be wrong and she blocking the door sometime or get a call. Hey there's this person you know I've had dreams. Were that has happened waking up thicky. She's home they'll dream. Aw but it was a good dream you know for that day. It was a piece moment. That was If Susan story sounds familiar in your own life in other words if you or someone you know is experiencing domestic abuse in any form. Please get immediate help in the. US support is a phone. Call Away at the national domestic violence hotline at one eight hundred seven nine nine seven two three three four online at www dot the hotline dot. Org My thanks again to chuck and Judy Cox for their candor and continued. Willingness is to share their daughter. Susan's story thanks as well to my colleague Nina Ernest for her work. Editing this episode Michael Bond Miller composed the music for cold old with additional sounds and songs by me. Cold is a production of K._S._l.. podcasts thank you for listening..

Susan Steve Josh US Steve Pals Steve Right Steep House House House House Steve This Palley Christ latter-day Saints Michael Bond Miller MSU Nina Ernest chuck Dan Judy Cox
"ten year" Discussed on Cold

Cold

09:16 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Cold

"While not explicit listener. Discretion is advised. I this is a bonus episode of cold. I'm Dave Collie it's been ten years since Susan Powell disappeared. If you've listened to cold up to this point then you are very familiar with her story. If you are just coming to this podcast I encourage you to check out. All of the earlier episodes they will help provide context to what you are about to hear but for summary Marie Sake. Here is a brief rundown on December. Seventh two thousand nine Susan's two boys. Four year old. Charlie and two year old brayden failed to show up for daycare. It soon became clear that Susan and her husband. Josh Powell had also failed to arrive at work. That's snowy morning. Josh returned that afternoon with the boys he told police he had taken them camping. He claimed to have no idea where Susan might be or what might have become of of. Her suspicion immediately fell on Josh from both police and the public but josh was never arrested and never faced charges. Susan's body has never been found. The investigation uncovered a disturbing dynamic within the Powell family. Joshua's own father. Steve Powell had developed an infatuation with Susan. He even propositioned her. An advance. Susan refused Steph's crimes including voyeurism and possession of child pornography cost Josh custody of his sons but in two thousand twelve during a court authorized visit Josh killed himself and the boys by setting fire to a home he had rented in Washington. I recently sat down with Susan's parents chuck and Judy Cox to discuss their daughters legacy. And how the past decade has affected them. My particular things to judy for taking part as this marks the first time she has shared her perspective in the cold. podcast there's been. Something of a resurgence surgeons in the public interest in Susan Story. When I I reached out to you awhile back to me it felt like the attention had very much faded faded? And we're seeing now. You know the cable shows the dateline the podcast right and it's kind of like it's almost reaching fever pitch again. It feels like how's that been for you to see this kind of brought up again. It was hard for me reliving. The most I mean the days came back in the day. The boys died or problems. Ah they're not pleasant but I'll get through this. It's okay. Her story needs to be Out there and I can deal with that and I'm not as spokesperson as much as it's I just don't feel that comfortable in front of cameras is easy for him and just kind of personal of the family but also want to help others and I want people to know the story so so it doesn't happen to them and as you look at that ten year mark from where we were when Susan I disappeared until now how has your life changed forever. Changed in one day is forever changed and and now we become spokespersons against domestic violence and and our our path is kind of set out before us. I wondered when I retire from the way. What would I do not have to worry about that anymore? I'm going to keep doing what I can to help other people and then help Keep looking for my daughter and keep Helping people that are in this situation. Escape domestic violence possible console the The relatives and of those victims and their families and stuff. So they are they can deal with the situation that they're coming to That's great you and I when we talked For the PODCAST. You told me you know how many people had reached Out To share those stories in and when you said that to me then I hadn't had the experience of having that myself exactly and now that I've had even just a small glimmer of what you've experienced with those messages and phone calls. It's it's inspiring but it's also a very for me draining. Oh definitely it takes so much energy to show that empathy does that. Does that affect you. I think it comes natural to him. It does but it's in a good way. Yeah 'cause you know you're helping that person and and I don't take their problems on myself because you can't help them and I can't help them. They have to help themselves selves. They have to follow the advice. You give them and get to the professionals who can help them. You can't take that on you or you would go nuts the real quick so it's draining in. Its you had to be attentive immediate. Do your best but on the other hand. It's gratifying that you can help somebody in an. I'm not going to give them false hope but I will give them a realistic view and some positive things they can do for themselves. I have experienced a what they need to be watching out for and what am I can give them a realistic look. What they're smoking at? So don't base. Is your whole opinion with the police file. said I mean that's a really great point right. One of the things that has been very instructive for me is trying to understand the situation from the multitude of perspectives. EXAC as you experienced differently than the friends here in Utah experienced than the detectives experience. Then we in the media experienced absolutely ooh I'd also disliked can't believe I'm saying this. I do believe the West Valley city. Police gave it their all and they tried real hard and they did a lot of searches and they did do a lot of work a lot of people while they messed up. We always always can mess up and Do you do you think they plan that no. They were doing everything they could think of that that made sensor and they wanted a happy ending. Well it hasn't happened but they tried and may be with others. You know other stories. Police aren't Miracle Workers Third Their police in. They're trying to do their job. But we also felt frustrated about things but I I knew they were working hard and doing their best. Can you see a point Where either of you both of you say I? I've done this enough in. It's time to to stop being in front the cameras in in talking like this. I don't think he'll ever stop me. I might stay off for a period retire or something because it took me a long time to be willing to get in front of cameras or answer questions because it it hurts hurts it was nice. Things quieted down. I mean it was okay but then I get calls from a few people all about their situation and We'll see where that goes for them and and see. Maybe we can make a difference because I think it's something that people will help people. I know it house and also if they're not in this situation hopefully they're listening because who knows down the Rhode King come up an accident or you know family issue or something to where they can remember something that he said that will help them. We're going to take a pause here for a word from our sponsors but will return with more from this special interview with Chuck Can Judy Cox Marking Ten years since the disappearance of their daughter. Susan Powell right after this.

Susan Josh Powell Susan Powell Judy Cox Susan Story Susan I Steve Powell Powell family Marie Sake Dave Collie fever Joshua Charlie brayden Utah Rhode King West Valley Chuck Washington