35 Burst results for "Ten Year"

How's Life After Graduation?

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:47 min | 21 hrs ago

How's Life After Graduation?

"So tell me about the other three. Well, before I do that, I just want to make this other point because I think it's important with regard to the obsession my peers have of going into these big fancy firms. Yes. We are the most as Harvard students, we are the most privileged cohort in the country, and that means the world. We, I mean, Harvard has such a vast network of people in many different industries. We have so many resources. Honestly, if you're at Harvard, it's more likely than not that you come from a family that is financially well off. And that to me is all the more damning why those people go into a financial services industry. I have a period Harvard who both of his parents died before college. He grew up in The Bronx. He has to care for his ten year old sister, and he went on to one of these companies because he needed to make really big money off the bat. Totally understand that, I would do the same thing if I were in his position. But most of my friends, Dennis, who go into these lines of work, they're not in that position. They could take a risk. It's not a do or die situation for them. And yet they still go and work it. I'm saying Goldman because that's not where my two friends are working. They go and work in a place like Goldman. Clearly, okay. The other three. The other three, two are unemployed. And the reason if you're unemployed after graduating Harvard, it's your from thank you. Time 51. If you graduate Harvard from, you've really chosen to be unemployed and the 5th one. The 5th one, I'm very proud of her. She moved to a southern state, and she's working at a local newspaper as a crime reporter.

Harvard Bronx Goldman Dennis
The Numbers Don't Look Good...

The Trish Regan Show

02:06 min | 1 d ago

The Numbers Don't Look Good...

"Let's turn to the overall economy right now because as we get more and more earnings in, I don't think it's looking so hot. I mean, I've been watching this market and you know I've been watching it with a ton of skepticism because since October, we've been watching it just go up up and away. I think up about 13% on the S&P 500. But what happens once the panacea that investors are planning for doesn't actually pan out. Then what do we do? And I don't know if it's going to pan out. I just want to point out, we're looking at basically the slowest earnings growth for the third quarter sends 2020. I mean, in 2020, it was really, really bad. Corporate earnings are just not coming in. And we've got, well, nearly 95% of companies reporting already. And so I would just say, if it's that bad in the third, what happens in the fourth, when you get those numbers in? What are people really going to say? I do know this week are going to be watching a few biggies. We get Dollar General coming out with get Salesforce. We've got Kroger, the grocery store. And what we're looking for here is whether or not we're starting to see much in the way of pullback on behalf of consumers. One of the good things about companies like Dollar General is that sometimes you see a trade down effect when things get kind of tough. People start trading down to the walmarts to the dollar generals, so we'll be watching all of this to see what the consumer trends really are. I would just say a lot of companies having reported and this is all according to facts at which trax and for the third quarter we really are looking at a pretty miserable showing. So unless things somehow turn around, big time in the final three months of the year and we'll get those reports of course in 2023. I would think that a slowdown in consumer spending coupled with a Federal Reserve that even if they're not doing 75 basis points is still trying to come through with 50 basis points each time I would think that you are going to start to see some softening. I would point out that the stocks are trading right now around 17 times earnings. It's a little bit higher than their historical ten year average. Not as crazy as it was. I mean, I think we're up around 21, 22 times earnings before. So we're back in a more normal range, but still in a very bullish optimistic range. And

Salesforce Kroger Federal Reserve
Scott Powell and Eric Reflect on the Pilgrim-Wampanoag Peace Treaty

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:02 min | 4 d ago

Scott Powell and Eric Reflect on the Pilgrim-Wampanoag Peace Treaty

"Whenever we talk about the Indians, of course, it's complicated because there's no such thing as the Indians. You have all of these Native American tribes, many of whom were, you know, genuinely bloodthirsty savages, and many of whom were absolutely wonderful and kind and gentle. So when we're talking about the wampanoags and it is interesting to me that it so happened that it was possible for them to have this wonderful beginning. Tell us a little bit more about that. But it is really, it's just astonishing when you talk about 50 50 year treaty with massasoit that was that squanto helped to broker, obviously they never would have been able to get a foothold these pilgrims and these English souls on American soil if it hadn't been for that. That's very true. It's true. You know, the hardship that they endured, the backstory of the pilgrims is equally fascinating. I mean, they were on ships that almost sank twice. First of all, they fled Great Britain because they were persecuted. You know, the leaders of the pilgrims went to jail for their beliefs. And anyway, they were released, and they made a second attempt to escape England to go to Holland, which was more tolerant, more religiously tolerant. They lived there for ten years, meanwhile, the Jamestown colony was successful, and they heard about that. And they realized that we would be better off going to the new world. And they viewed the new world in her brave terms. This is what's so remarkable about the pilgrims. William Bradford wrote the first 20 pages of his narrative of pilgrim's progress in Hebrew. He was a Christian, and yet he could write in Hebrew, and so he did.

Indians Great Britain Holland Jamestown England William Bradford
'Fighting for Justice' Author Mark Shaw Exposes the Truth

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:53 min | 4 d ago

'Fighting for Justice' Author Mark Shaw Exposes the Truth

"Folks, I am so excited to have as my guest this hour mark Shaw. He's the bestselling author of the reporter who knew too much, the new book absolutely fascinating. It's called fighting for justice, the improbable journaling journey to exposing cover ups about the JFK assassination, the deaths and the deaths of Marilyn Monroe and Dorothy kilgallen. We're getting into it here. So it is really fascinating stuff Mark and we had Johnny Russo on this program a few times and he said, you were absolutely dead on and he was somebody that was deeply connected with the mob and Frank Costello's boy, so to speak. Very nice kind of amazing to have him ratify what you're saying. But let's just keep going. Well, I'm probably one of the most least likely people who could have ever done this area. I was a college dropout at Purdue. It took me 6 years. I'm not the smartest guy in the world, but I was a criminal defense lawyer for a number of years and then a network legal analyst for the Tyson case and other kinds of Bryant and OJ and all that. I always look at motive when you're looking at who's responsible for a homicide. And so the next book, as you mentioned, it was the reporter who knew too much. And that's where I met this incredible human being journalist, media icon, Dorothy kilgallen. Most people know about her from what my line, the quiz show on CBS for ten years. That's all that I knew. And then I started looking into it and I found out that she had really gotten involved in the JFK assassination. They called her the most powerful female voice in America, the post did. And so I found out that, hey, wait a minute, Dorothy got into this. And she decided that she needed to go ahead and look into it because she and JFK were very close friends.

Dorothy Kilgallen Mark Shaw Johnny Russo Frank Costello Marilyn Monroe Purdue Mark Tyson Bryant CBS Dorothy America
Steve Kuclo: Keep at Least a 90% Good Diet

The Dan Bongino Show

01:08 min | 5 d ago

Steve Kuclo: Keep at Least a 90% Good Diet

"Here's a cool one I want to get your take on this because you know Steve I know you work out really hard I mean I follow you on Instagram I see it You're strong too But most bodybuilders are strong but even if you go back in the day and you look Arnold for a bodybuilder Arnold Schwarzenegger who was the guy at the time at 7 8 time Olympia champion whatever it was a comparatively speaking he didn't really lift that heavy compared to like a Franco Colombo or a Dave Draper type You're a strong guy You throw around you Nick walker big Raimi you throw guys throw around a lot of weight But I think you'd agree a guy told me in the gym about ten years ago All of you guys work out hard The real key 90% of this is the knife and fork the diet isn't it When you're in your professional bodybuilding space you live in A 100% I always say you can't out train a bad diet You know whether your goal is putting on muscle or losing body fat or just general health and wellness altogether you need to make sure your diets I always say like at least 90% good because it's 90% of what year will be able to achieve in or out of the gym So it definitely died is huge

Franco Colombo Dave Draper Nick Walker Arnold Schwarzenegger Olympia Arnold Steve Raimi
Lawyer Sentenced to 15 Months for Fireboming NYPD Car

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:07 min | Last week

Lawyer Sentenced to 15 Months for Fireboming NYPD Car

"I think most of you are familiar with the very famous Asian Indian prostitute, Uruguay, actually no, she's not a prostitute. She's a lawyer. I don't know if that's. I don't know if it's a big difference. Uru drama is a public interest lawyer in New York. And if it seems like I'm defaming our well, it's very well deserved. Why? Because this is the woman, the activist who firebombed a police cruiser during the 2020 George Floyd riots. She's one of these so called social justice warriors. And she was arrested and she was facing ten years in prison, which seems appropriate if you try to fire bomb a police vehicle. But the Biden administration decided to start protecting her. And pushing a judge and this is U.S. district judge Brian kogan of the eastern district of New York liberal Democrat to give this woman a very light sentence and in fact he did. So here's what she gets 15 months in prison. Wow. This is outrageous. You got January 6th defendants nonviolent who've done nothing who have comparable or worse sentences in this, not to mention this woman was never in solitary confinement, in fact, left wing activists came forward and put up money for her to be bailed. So she was given the opportunity to have bail. Why? Because she was not deemed to be a danger to society in the way that, let's say, just say some mom or grandmother or some guy in January 6th, there's a danger to society. We got to lock him up right now and keep him locked up until trial. Why? Because he's an election denier. Now, this woman Uruguay drama and her accomplice a guy named Colin Ford Mathis. These are people who they've been getting these glowing media profiles. And now they evidently have this kind of sweetheart deal with the Biden DoJ and with a judge going along. So, I mean, justice is really about proportionality, the it's not just so you get punished, but the punishment should bear some resemblance, some proportion to the offense.

Uru Drama George Floyd Biden Administration Judge Brian Kogan Uruguay New York Colin Ford Mathis U.S. DOJ Biden
Melinda Gates, Amal Clooney and Michelle Obama Have Joined Forces

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

05:45 min | Last week

Melinda Gates, Amal Clooney and Michelle Obama Have Joined Forces

"Also a writer, they talked to none of you are going to remember this, but you should. You should look her up. Selma diamond. You know, back in the day, there were ten sitcoms. And each sitcom had ten writers on the show. That's a hundred writers. Only one was female, and that was Selma diamond. Could you imagine the story she had to tell? She became a prolific comedy writer, worked on a lot of shows and these shows normally only had men, tough fall, broad, New York City, Jewish chip, she didn't give a fuck. I just wish the women today could sit down and watch a couple of hours of Selma diamond talking about what it took to make it in the world. But nowadays you can watch Amal Clooney and Melinda Gates and Michelle Obama talking about their problems. I put up an I put up an Instagram with these three rules, their picture saying, please remind me not to watch this. They've all announced a collaboration between their foundations to advance gender equality and get this to end child marriage, I didn't even know we had a huge problem with child marriage. Is that a new thing? Is this the next thing? Is that going to be a new ribbon? What's that gonna be colored? Magenta? Child marriage, what is this all about? You can introduce all these new things to me. I know these three women don't care about the price of gasoline, how much groceries cost and living paycheck to paycheck has never ever happened in their lives. So they got bigger issues to tackle. I mean, Melinda was married to Bill Gates, one of the wealthiest men ever in the world. Also a man who knew of Jeffrey Epstein's predilection for underage girls and still made him a best friend. Also a man who has his hand in vaccinations and is treated like some kind of king when he goes to the G four summit or other smarty art functions. Why is Bill Gates treated like he's an elected official? It's a fucking computer nerd. With money. So listen, ladies, pay attention to what these women have to say. Especially Melinda Gates. Here's what she said. About, what is the issue? Of our lifetime. She said, my mom always told me, set your agenda or someone else will. A bullshit, your mother didn't use that expression. No one talked about agendas in the fucking 50s and 60s. It's a lie. She never said that. Set your agenda. That wasn't an expression. It just wasn't. It's like saying nowadays, oh, you gotta go to the link and cut and paste the link and we understand that today. one would have understood that in the 60s. No one heard set your own agenda. She's full of shit. And she said, and the agenda of our lifetime is making sure women can take their full power in society. Women have these unpaid burdens. Take our children, of our elderly parents, but what I want to say to women is you need to take care of yourselves first. Once you do that, then you can fully take care of others. But if we name the unpaid labor that we do, society can help us. And if good policies are put in place, it makes our jobs easier. Everybody has agency. Hate that expression. Everybody has agency, but being able to use our full agency to be fully in our female power isn't always possible. But if you start and empower someone else and they're going to empower everybody around them and you'll see what happens. I don't know where to start. I don't know where to start. I love our female power. Imagine if I began a speech by talking about our male power, I'd be booed off the stage and pelted with old bread and eggs. Such a double standard of bullshit and then what she's saying is something I haven't ever seen with the women who raised me, maybe you did, did you? I don't think you did. I didn't, did you? My sister rosalie takes care of all of us or two sons, her husband, her fucking brother who's on his ass and not knowing what the fuck's what two grandkids or 6 dogs and anybody else who wants help or attention. I've never heard her say, um, I can't do anything until I take care of myself first. But rather, the companies coming over in 15 minutes, what can I do? Didn't you hear me? I'm taking care of myself. I'll be down when I'm down. Don't imagine my mother when I was ten years old or so. Mom, you didn't pack a cold lunch. And I got no money for a hot lunch. What do I do? My father takes me, she's like, your mother is taking care of a

Selma Diamond Amal Clooney Melinda Gates Jeffrey Epstein Bill Gates Michelle Obama New York City Melinda Rosalie
McClellan has career day, No. 8 Bama tops Austin Peay 34-0

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | Last week

McClellan has career day, No. 8 Bama tops Austin Peay 34-0

"Jase mcclellan and Jermaine Burton led CFP number 8 Alabama to a 34 zero win against Austin P mcclellan rushed for a career high 156 yards and two touchdowns for the crimson tide who forced three turnovers in their second shutout of the season Mcclellan started in place of jameer Gibbs and helped the tide improve to 9 and two I felt good you know just doing ten years before my coach has a book It felt good to just go behind the old Burton had his first 100 yard receiving game since transferring from Georgia grabbing 7 passes for 128 yards and two scores I'm Dave ferry

Jase Mcclellan Jermaine Burton Austin P Mcclellan Jameer Gibbs Alabama Mcclellan Burton Georgia Dave Ferry
US home sales fell in October for ninth straight month

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | Last week

US home sales fell in October for ninth straight month

"U.S. home sales fell in October for the 9th straight month Sales of previously occupied U.S. homes fell in October for the 9th month in a row to the slowest pre-pandemic sales space in more than ten years Owned by his grapple with sharply higher mortgage rates rising home prices and fewer properties on the market The national association of realtors has existing home sales fell 5.9% last month from September to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.43 million cells fell 28.4% from October last year I Norman hall

U.S. National Association Of Realto Norman Hall
2 Hawaiian men guilty of hate crime in white man's beating

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last week

2 Hawaiian men guilty of hate crime in white man's beating

"Two Hawaiian men have been found guilty of hate crimes in a white man's beating I Norman hall a federal jury in Honolulu has found two native Hawaiian man guilty of hate crimes for the 2014 beating of a white man who was fixing up a house he purchased in their remote Maui neighborhood in an unusual move the Justice Department sought to prosecute kalana alo ko Nani and Levi ake's junior and secured a federal grand jury indictment in December 2020 charging each with hate crime punishable by up to ten years in prison local attorneys said they've never heard of the federal government prosecuting native Hawaiians for hate crimes before this case sentencing is set in early March I Norman hall

Norman Hall Kalana Ko Nani Levi Ake Honolulu Maui Justice Department Federal Government
Is Jenifer Seibel Newsom Really Any Different Form Harvey Weinstien?

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:42 min | Last week

Is Jenifer Seibel Newsom Really Any Different Form Harvey Weinstien?

"Misses Newsom struggles to balance her need for access to power and the price it carries. That's it. Period end of story. Not once did I hear her say to testimony that she said, stop? I never heard you say she attempted to get away. No, because she was still thinking about what she could get out of Harvey Weinstein if he stopped and if she let him rape her and maybe if she made pleasurable noises, he's a pig for sure. But sell us some of these women. You know, it seems that Newsom's wife had sex to get a project done and make money and her project failed and now she sees another way to make money. In my mind, she's no different than Weinstein, just not as smart. And her husband's no different. By the way, as a woman, never would I ever associate with my rapist never. I understand if an incest victim does it or children do it because they can't leave home, but a grown-up, no. Anyone doing that is so suspect. I don't want to blame any rape victims because saying no should be enough. But I can't help but wonder why they all allowed themselves into these dangerous situations. They knew it was reputation for this sort of behavior. I would never go to someone's hotel room or a house along without knowing them or having someone with me. Married women, you got to be even more cautious and never allow yourself to be alone with another man, aside from your family. If you don't put yourself in potentially dangerous or compromising situations, you don't have to worry about what might happen. So is it worth the traumatic experience for an acting gig? That never came? She must have known. Otherwise, why would she have contacted him in 2007 when her then boyfriend, his scandal broke that he had a drunken in office affair with the wife of his best friend and campaign manager. That was ten years before the news stories broke about Weinstein and me too. She must have known that Weinstein had been putting out fires in the press for years about his sexual misconduct, but here's some irony. You want irony? She's crying about being a crime victim. Yet her husband is handing out, get out of jail free cards to everybody in California. I guess it's only an actual prime if the governor or his wife says it is. Then if the hearing a lot of testimony against Harvey the last three years methinks heart rate allegations are highly suspect.

Newsom Weinstein Harvey Weinstein California Harvey
How TikTok Tracks and Collects Data

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:10 min | 2 weeks ago

How TikTok Tracks and Collects Data

"Take tick tock off your phone. Delete the app. There's one thing that came out of every panel. Take TikTok off your phone, delete the app. It collects data on you every day. Every place you go, every person you call every email you send every TikTok, you look at everything you pause over, every place you search from TikTok, and they don't, you know, they're not reading it in real time. They just keep a file on you. It's not that hard. And you are your children as well. So if you're a ten year old loves watching TikTok videos of people doing a baton practice, you think that's harmless. It's not. It will tell them a lot about it and they're not going to use it today. They may not use it to marvel when they come across your child in ten years. They'll go back and find the TikTok. Get it off of everyone's phone. They follow you around. I appreciate this to my son's fiance yesterday. Who enjoys your participation post on its just enjoy some of the video. They said, wait for people to send you the videos. Do not use the app. Do not use the app. Get rid of the app.

Midterm Results Continue to Roll In

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:15 min | 2 weeks ago

Midterm Results Continue to Roll In

"Midterm results continue to come in and of course one question is why are they coming in so late? The New York Times keeps talking about technical glitches and Republicans are calling into question these elections and to my knowledge, no one has actually said that the elections of fraudulent, the 2022 elections, but there are lots of there's lots of frustration, law, why does this happen only in swing states? Why is it taking so long to count a relatively small number of votes? How come other countries do it so much more quickly? So yeah, my cousin, Venezuelan cousin, is like wondering, hey, guys, what's going on? I mean, you know, third world country can do it faster. What are you doing? What's going on? What's going on? Two big results that did come out. One is that Blake masters lost in Arizona. That's a disappointment I was hoping that masters would make it master's campaign kind of together would carry Lake and holiday. They were kind of campaigning as a team, but of course what happens is you got to realize that even if they're campaigning as a team, they're not going to be judged as a team. People are going to judge masters against Mark Kelly and this guy is very chameleonic, very clever, and playing the astronaut car. You always thought he said that. And also the other cardi plays very well is his wife, congresswoman Gabby, is that yeah, yeah. Yeah. So, you know, she was shot ten years ago, 11 years ago. And so he plays, he plays that card really well. The combination. The combination of gun violence and all those things. So I knew that he wanted to go to Washington to kind of hammer at the gun control issue. On a happier note for us, in Nevada, a big result, Joe lombardo running in the governor's race, knocks out the incumbents. Yeah, and he's like so cute. He's like this old sheriff guy, you know? It's like I loved his I love this campaign come up with a sister I kept announcing and saying he's ineffective and so on and but so I can give him a speech basically saying that sheriff and the country is right here Joe lombardo stand up Joe. Let's have a round of applause for Joe so lombardo just played that as his ad saying listen, this is coming from my apartment. Very effective.

Congresswoman Gabby The New York Times Mark Kelly Joe Lombardo Blake Cardi Arizona Nevada Washington JOE Lombardo
$3.6 Billion in Bitcoin Seized

The Bad Crypto Podcast

01:59 min | 2 weeks ago

$3.6 Billion in Bitcoin Seized

"Let's look at the news. Very first thing that's popped up here, the U.S. Department of Justice has seized over $3.36 billion in Bitcoin, allegedly tied to the Silk Road, years after the Silk Road has been shut down. So what is the statute of limitations on some of these crimes? I guess there's no statute. I mean, you think there's like a lot of times it's like 7 years is a statute, but this has been going on for ten years. They finally got this guy, James Jong, and he stole 51,680.32 Bitcoin from Silk Road. He's definitely said that he was guilty and doing it. And what's really wild was the fact that he basically was stealing this in certain ways and then taking it, sending it to multiple wallets, then those wallets were doing multiple transactions and then eventually it all got sent back and he had these Bitcoin in a, I guess his own wallet and it was in the bottom of a popcorn tin. Hidden under the floor or something like this in his bathroom, right? And so or somebody's bathroom and they went in and they found it. They were able to track down all of these bitcoins. They had over a 140 transactions and rapid successions dispersing into these multiple wallets and to mobile addresses. And then started depositing them. I don't know dude. He thought this thing out pretty good. For thinking about it being 2012, you know what I mean? Yeah, but, you know, you would think with that much money in your hands you would do an identity change. Not that I would encourage anybody to do anything illegal. And find yourself, you know, somewhere on a beach and have these Bitcoin transfer to multiple wallets, but it's a little late for that now, and I am not a financial adviser, James Jong, nor am I a lawyer. I can't help you.

James Jong U.S. Department Of Justice
The World Blames the US for Harmful Ideas

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:23 min | 2 weeks ago

The World Blames the US for Harmful Ideas

"Know that the former a former prime minister of Denmark, her daughter, woman, her daughter, had her breast removed? Former recent prime minister of Denmark, they told me, obviously, in Denmark, I didn't know that. And do you know how many Danes blamed for this? America, and you know what? They're right. The sick crap that comes from this country is the first in American history we are a net exporter of harmful ideas. You know how painful it is for this America loving patriot to say that? We are a net exporter of bad ideas for the first time in American history because the left dominates American culture. This is one of the themes of contemporary life. What bad idea will we hear from America next? To think to think, God, from 1776 till about, I don't know, ten years ago. America was associated with liberty. With family life with the being the most religious of the industrialized western democracies.

Denmark America
Why Can't We Count Ballots on Election Day?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:55 min | 3 weeks ago

Why Can't We Count Ballots on Election Day?

"Nathan from Tennessee, Charlie, I'm really worried that it's going to take a while for us to count all the ballots, what are your thoughts on that? Doesn't it open the window for cheating? Yes, it does play cut 97. In Pennsylvania, counties are only able to start processing at 7 a.m. on election day. 98 to 99% of the votes will be counted by Friday of election week. That means in some cases we won't know the winner of the election. For a few days until after a few days after the election, it takes time to count all legitimate ballots. It doesn't mean there's anything nefarious that's happening with the election system. Is somebody has got to answer the question or ask the question, why is it in 2008, 2010, 2012, 2014 and 2016, and largely 2018, we were able to get election results instantaneously. Why is it that ten years ago we all remember our 6 years ago when Donald Trump was elected president of the United States, why is it that we were able to have election results right there? Or a hundred years ago? And now all of a sudden they have to take more time. Why can nobody answer that question? You got to outvote the fraud. It's that simple. We have to rise up in record numbers every single person hearing my voice. You need to vote and get 5 others to do the same. You do that, the republic is going to be safe. The math is very simple. We have a massive audience, praise God, millions of listeners, cumulative throughout the week. Your podcasting radio all that, if every one of you multiply your impact by four or 5, it's at the republic is saved. The Democrat parties on the ropes and we are on the verge of annihilation event at the Democrat party. However, if we stay at home and we sit on our hands, they have a chance to sneak away and it won't be that good will be a little red ripple, which is a little red ripple. So it's a big concern. I share that concern and but the only way to do that is show up in person and shock the world.

Nathan Charlie Tennessee Pennsylvania Donald Trump United States Democrat Party
Decentralizing the Film Industry With Alveena Khalid of Filmio

The Bad Crypto Podcast

02:44 min | 3 weeks ago

Decentralizing the Film Industry With Alveena Khalid of Filmio

"Promises of blockchain is to decentralize all of the things and few industries in the entertainment are larger than the film industry, which is why we have gone down this rabbit hole with some other blockchain companies that are attempting to. Make decentralized filmmaking a thing of the present, not just the future, and today we are pleased to welcome elvina Khaled. She is the director of growth. It fill me O, the website is film dot IO, but make sure you pronounce it right. Fill me O is the site alvina. Welcome to the bed crypto podcast. Thank you so much. Thanks for having me. Yeah, you are the director of growth, so that means you go around in water all the employees and make sure that they flourish. Is that where your position is? Yes. Craig, hold us. Strategy. This is what I really do. Awesome. Well, let's talk a little bit about film and what is broken in the movie industry that this solves what problem are we solving here? Right, so there are different problems that I can, you know, really categorize them. First, let's talk about diversity. So if you take a look at some of the movies that were really used in the past 5 to ten years, most of them are actually prequels or just remakes of some of the popular comic books, some of the larger industries or some of the larger movie makers are the one weeping all the benefits. While all those indie filmmakers or low budget films can not really get push either didn't release because of low budget or just don't get that much attention like the other, you know, the big film filmmaking guys get. That's definitely one thing to keep in mind. The second thing that, you know, that there can be put into perspective or something that's sort of broken. In the current industry, is that if you are a filmmaker and you want to create and you have a really good idea and then you know if you're creating this industry and that unless you are part of this exclusive group of the best agents or the best crew the best script writer and the best distributor, you can make a good movie. But if you don't, it's just really hard for you to not really in your favor to really scale your movie and get to the same level of attention.

Blockchain Elvina Khaled Craig
UN weather report: Climate woes bad and getting worse faster

AP News Radio

01:17 min | 3 weeks ago

UN weather report: Climate woes bad and getting worse faster

"The United Nations warns of worsening global warming as world leaders gather for key climate talks Envoys gather in the Egyptian seaside resort of Sharm el Sheik for a UN convention on climate change amid the war in Ukraine high inflation food shortages and an energy crunch This comes as the UN's weather agencies annual report shows shocking new data The sea level rise in the past ten years is double what it was in the 1990s rising by .2 inches per year and is opening speech outgoing conference president alok Sharma said that countries had made considerable progress at their last meeting in Glasgow but more has to be done How many more wake-up calls Does the world do world leaders actually need A third of Pakistan underwater The worst flooding in Nigeria in a decade this year the worst drought in 500 years in Europe in a thousand years in the U.S. and the worst on record in China Over 120 world leaders will attend the talks but the absence of Chinese presidents Xi Jinping and Indian prime minister Narendra Modi two of the world's biggest polluters means many are doubtful on whether the talks could result in any major deals to cut emissions long term I'm Naomi Shannon

Sharm El Sheik UN Alok Sharma United Nations Ukraine Glasgow Nigeria Pakistan Xi Jinping Europe Narendra Modi U.S. China Naomi Shannon
"ten year" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

02:38 min | 9 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Social <Speech_Music_Male> justice <SpeakerChange> movements <Music> of our time. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> You know <Speech_Music_Male> I think about them so <Speech_Music_Male> much. <Speech_Music_Male> I think about Trayvon <Speech_Music_Male> so much. <Speech_Music_Male> He <Speech_Male> would have been <Speech_Male> 27 years old <Speech_Male> now. <Speech_Male> He would have had a birthday <Speech_Music_Male> in February <Speech_Music_Male> of this year <Speech_Music_Male> on the 5th. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And I just think about what <Speech_Male> I was doing when I <Speech_Male> was 27. <Silence> And it was <Speech_Male> so much fun. <Speech_Male> I was living <Speech_Male> in the city, <Speech_Male> I had my first <Speech_Male> serious job, <Speech_Male> I had a roommate <Speech_Male> who I loved. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> life <SpeakerChange> just seemed <Silence> like a sitcom. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And I <Silence> never got <Speech_Music_Male> that. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> about it all the <SpeakerChange> time. <Silence> Sorry, it's not a question. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And all he was <Speech_Male> doing was going to <Speech_Male> 7 11 <Speech_Male> to get some <Silence> candy <SpeakerChange> for his brother. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yeah. <Speech_Male> Skittles <Speech_Male> and tea. Skittles <Speech_Male> and Arizona iced <Silence> tea. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You know, it's funny I'm having <Speech_Male> this conversation with you, <Speech_Male> not even realizing that <Silence> I'm wearing a hoodie right <Speech_Male> now. <Speech_Male> And I remember after <Speech_Male> he died <Speech_Male> being <Speech_Male> so afraid to wear my hoodie, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and <Silence> <Speech_Male> I don't know. <Speech_Male> I don't know how to, <Speech_Male> I don't want to <Speech_Male> overthink the symbol <Speech_Male> of what <Speech_Male> this is. But I'm wearing <Speech_Male> it now. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> And <Speech_Male> let's say I'm wearing <SpeakerChange> it for him. <Silence> That's what I'm going to say. <Speech_Male> <Silence> And I'll say right on <Speech_Male> my brother. <Speech_Male> Yeah. <Speech_Male> His memory <Speech_Music_Male> be a blessing. <Speech_Male> May the <Speech_Male> memory of Trayvon <Speech_Male>

"ten year" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

05:30 min | 9 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Previous racial justice movements always had one leader who was often heterosexual, black man who was very charismatic and when something happened to that man he was killed or discredited just moved on, the movement itself also died. They didn't want to repeat that mistake. And so they said, this is a movement that's not leader less, it's leader full everybody's a leader. And at the end of the day, you can't argue with success. The movement for black lives is really the most transformative civil rights social justice movement in American history. You know, I think about the last ten years and how it's changed me. I had to cover a lot of this stuff. I covered Trayvon, I covered Michael Brown's funeral. I wrote about a lot of these killings. And I think the biggest aha was realizing, oh, it was never just the hoodie. It was never just the hoodie he was wearing. It was never just the way one of these men had his hands on the steering wheel. It was never just the way that Sandra bland was talking about her cigarette. We can find reasons to justify a death. But I think the big takeaway from these last ten years for me is that none of them are justifiable no matter what they did. And once you see that, it's like everything is, it's hard to look at it the same way. It's not an issue of individual cases, it's a systemic issue. And every one of these deaths is part of a larger system that needs to be questioned. And I think questioning the totality of these systems is a place that I think a lot of Americans have gotten to over the past ten years. It's never just the hoodie. And I'm sad that it took us a lot of us this long to get there. But I think we're there. And I think I'm hopeful about that. I hope that you're right. I'm concerned that these iterations where there are a lot of people concerned about racial justice are just that. There are moments that come and go. The cliche is, is this a moment, or is it a movement? I don't think we have enough data to have an answer to that. We know that the common sense recommendations that would be made law by the George Floyd justice and policing that are stalled in Congress. They're unlikely to succeed. At the same time, we know that after the murder of George Floyd, a number of states all over the country did enact their own statewide criminal justice reform and it's still too early to get the data to see whether that's making black and brown people safer on the street. So I think there are reasons to be hopeful and there are reasons to be cynical. I suppose that's my last question. In this chat with you, I've heard you said you kind of feel inspired and have hope on hope and white people and that this is perhaps the most transformative civil rights movement. In American history, or at least recent American history. But there's some parts of this conversation where you've said, I don't know if some of these things that have changed that are will change. What does the next ten years look like? Hearing that ambivalence in this conversation. What do you think it looks like? Are we going to be stuck in the same loop for the next decade or more? A death, a protest, and right back to normal, or is there something bigger a foot? The police are not going to stop killing black people. They're not going to stop killing LatinX and Native American people in situations in which they would not kill white people. And we must always resist. We must never accept that even when it looks like we're not winning. And I don't know if we're going to win on this. But during this black history month, I know that Sam, you and I come from a people who don't give up. And that's my work. You know, sometimes I wonder who what I would have done if I'd been an enslaved person back in the day, and I hope that I would have been a runaway. I hope that I would have been one of those people who led uprisings. The reality is that's not what most enslaved people did. And then if I've been active in the 60s, when my mom marched with Martin and took it to the streets with Malcolm, I hope I would have been right up there with her. The reality is that's not what most black people did. And the movement for black lives, the expression is if you want to know what you would have done back in the day, so what are you doing right now? Because this is one of the most important.

George Floyd Sandra bland Trayvon Michael Brown Congress Sam Malcolm Martin
"ten year" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

01:52 min | 9 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Does not materialize into concrete things. Coming up, what's changed since Trayvon's death. By the numbers..

"ten year" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

09:41 min | 9 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Message comes from NPR sponsor madewell, good days, start with great jeans. The denim experts at madewell use premium fabric and the latest denim technology to make super comfy never want to take them off jeans in fits and styles for everyone. In other words, your perfect pair is waiting, ready to step up your denim game, visit madewell dot com and use the code NPR denim for $20 off your online genes purchase. Terms apply, see madewell dot com slash promos for full offer details. Draymond's death spurred nila summers polite to action. She got involved with some protests and activism at her college. And then a few weeks later, she joined something bigger, just three day 40 mile march from Daytona to Sanford, Florida. My at the time boyfriend was living with me, and I was like, I can't not do this. And I'm really scared to go alone. So this person that had really no interest in getting involved, I dragged to Daytona. Just so that I would have somebody there that I knew. But I felt a deep obligation to be there. And so how does a three day march look logistically? You're sending this up with other students and faculty. Are y'all planning stops and water breaks and bathroom breaks and where do you stay and what are you wear, like how do you plan that? Yeah, so it looked like sleeping on the floors of black churches in Daytona and in the land and these sort of small towns in Florida along the route. The churches played a huge role. I mean, I think at a couple stops there was spaghetti and garlic bread and little plastic tubs with epsom salt so we could soak our feet because we all had blisters. We're walking on the sides of highways and in small towns like the land where people are yelling at us and flying confederate flags. What would they yell at you? Somebody definitely yelled nigger and I remember that distinctly and that it happened in the land. And it was, I think, unsurprising. Given the setting, it was a dark point and what became this life-changing experience where the support far outweighed the negative. People generally that saw us would honk their horns at us and put fists out the window. It was like, I think my first sort of experience with, oh, maybe this is what solidarity is, right? How did that feel? Oh, it was so affirming. And just, you know, other people recognize what you're doing and other people feel enough about the 17 year old to say something or honk or give some sort of nod in your direction that you're doing the right thing. I heard y'all saying, as you marched, what did you sing? Oh gosh. We sang all, we sang lots of things. This is also my first experience with, I mean, really movement, right? There's this deep tradition deep history of singing and chant. One of the songs that was made up along the march was when Zimmerman gets arrested. When Zimmerman got so rested oh how I'd love to sit on that jury wins the merman gets arrested. Dreamers are good. You know, that's all we wanted. We didn't have an abolitionist sort of politic at the time. We just knew that this man killed a 17 year old that looked like us that looked like our brothers and cousins and our people. And that he had gotten away with it, Scot free. And so the deepest desire what justice looked like then was putting that man behind bars. So after that three day march, what happens? Do you keep protesting? Are you like an activist at this point? What is next for you after the March? Yeah, I mean, the last day is when we went to the Sanford police station to demand the arrest of Zimmerman. So that was an experience in itself. This sort of confrontation with power was a totally new experience. And so the 40 of us go 6 of the people from that group dress up in hoodies to represent Trayvon lock arms and sit in front of the door of the Stanford police station all day long. And, you know, it was definitely the first thing of that nature I'd seen towards the end of the day. We get a call from Angela Corey, who was the prosecutor in the area. And it was basically like, what do you guys want? And then Vanessa Baden, I think, was one of the people that took the phone call and she's one of our founding members. And, you know, Zimmerman got arrested. I think three or four days later. You know, there's a difference between getting someone arrested and getting someone convicted. Oh yeah, so then flash forward to the verdict. Right. Right. He's not found guilty. What happens then? And how do you react in that moment? Oh my gosh, you know, we wanted to set everything on fire. I mean, we were everybody. Everybody was heartbroken. It was inside our organization outside of it. The country. It was heartbreaking. I was at a crappy little gym in an apartment complex with my friends and Gainesville. We were watching the verdict happen. And you know, at that point, it started to seem like something was amiss, right? They were making a big deal about the lawyer that he hired. And that I think Sandra ground was becoming more and more a part of it. So we felt like there was anticipation, there was a little bit of trepidation, but I think ultimately we were still very young and thought that Shirley justice would be on the side of this kid. And so when it didn't happen, you know, tears and anger and the response was basically like, this can't just be business as usual. Y'all are going to do your thing locally, go ahead and protest, but dream defenders have to show up differently. It can not be marching in the streets anymore. And so I think maybe a week or two later, I don't remember what the time difference was, but a week or two later, you know, we're on the way to the capitol. Yeah, and not just on your way to the capitol. From what I understand, y'all occupied the state capitol for 31 days and 30 nights. What did that look like? Wow, it looked like this old historic building where. So many bad things happen. And so many bad people work in cutting their eyes at us, and wondering when the hell we're going to leave, but it looked like a whole lot of excitement and at the beginning, not a whole lot of plans. Pretty quickly, the plan turned into like we actually have to ask, we actually have a demand of the state of Florida to ensure that this does not happen anymore. Demanding that Rick Scott, the governor at the time, call a special legislative session for hearing on Trayvon's law. What we had dubbed Trayvon's law. What was Trayvon's law? Yeah, it was a law to combat the school to prison pipeline. Then there was the repeal of Sandra ground, there was bias training for police, right? Even then we were talking about police, even though Zimmerman was a regular guy, obviously with a God complex, but we knew that there was something about the culture of policing that had to be undone then. So did that happen? Did the things y'all ask for come to be? Absolutely not. How does that feel? It was one of the biggest lessons that we're still taking into account ten years later, right? I mean, the governor did not call a special session. He met with us about three days in. You know, was totally totally blew us off like we're confederate flag boots to the meeting with the dream defenders. We were telling him at some point like where we were from, one of our members Curtis was like, I grew up in Hialeah, Florida, and I was homeless for a time. And Rick Scott's response was, oh yeah, hi Leah, I know that. I own some hospitals there. So we show right. We showed up, we did our damnedest. We had lots of support, you know, Jesse Jackson came, Julian Bond, who was the communications director for SNCC, came by to live while we Nas shouted us out on Twitter. We felt like we were on to something. And so as time went by and it wasn't happening, we were like, okay, we've got to switch something up. Yeah. You said earlier that scene Rick Scott not doing anything that y'all asked of him taught you a lesson that is still kind of clear ten years later. What was the lesson? Visibility does not equal power. You could be on the news every day. That does not amount to power. It does not amount to the power to change systems in this country to change laws, maybe to change some hearts and minds, but in and of itself, it.

Zimmerman Daytona madewell Draymond nila summers NPR Trayvon Florida Sanford police station Stanford police station Angela Corey Vanessa Baden Sanford Rick Scott Scot Sandra Gainesville Shirley
"ten year" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

02:10 min | 9 months ago

"ten year" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Let me start by saying that the purpose of today's rally is to call on Sanford PD to bring mister Zimmerman to justice. By early March, Trayvon Martin's death, galvanized a wave of activism all across the country. Outrage over the fatal shooting of 17 year old Trayvon Martin is activism over the unnecessary killings of black and brown people. At the hands of police or at the hands of people trying to act themselves as police. Trayvon became the face of that struggle. You know, you saw pictures of him in his clothes and wearing the hoodie and there were so many things to identify about Trayvon and it was one of the first things that I think really hurt our generation that deeply. You're listening to its been a minute from NPR. I'm Sam Sanders. At this episode, Trayvon. Ten years later, ten years of activism, ten years of Black Lives Matter. Ten years of more deaths and more grief and 9-1-1 tape. But maybe also ten years of progress. We'll hear more from naila and how Trayvon changed her after the break. And we'll also hear from Paul butler. Over the course of his career, he's.

Trayvon Martin Trayvon mister Zimmerman Sanford Sam Sanders NPR naila Paul butler
"ten year" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"You talk to obama for this book and he. He appears in the book on the record. I'm just curious what that conversation was. Like what would you feel like came through in terms of how he sees. Yeah so stylistically. And i'm sure you've already. I'm always struck by the fact that the man speaks in the longest sentences. I've ever heard in my life like he stops more dependent clauses into one periods there also so insanely hedged and calibrated. Yes doesn't wanna make news and he's he's sort of one step of you and his critics by then like anticipating and rebutting critical interjection in the middle of a sentence of nothing. Right right right and right. It's probably closer. Strengthen his weakness. It's what's good and bad. It's what you you like that. He sort of thoughtful. And you hate that. It's like so hedged in whatever so you know it struck me that he had certainly learned the lessons of the right. I mean he was fairly candid about that. I thought it struck me that number one. I think he is someone who's sort of being his whole existence like his premise. On the idea that you can have an adult conversation and that there are reasonable people even who you disagree with who basically share your values and we'll be committed to some notion of public interest. And i think it's still shocks in that that didn't turn out to be the case. I mean you know. It's funny a never. I've heard him talk about the aca and and we talked about it the thing that bothers him the most right. Is that republican governors and republican state officials not expanding medicaid. And it just like it's like it doesn't compute he's like i don't get that like this is easy for them they can say they're doing it for their business community and it's just it's basically almost free money to help their people and they won't do it and i think that just like it upsets him in a way that i get and i think he's learned that lesson i think he has come around he will tell you..

obama aca
"ten year" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"A lot about comparing the affordable care. Act to the reconciliation bill. And how you compare the two in terms of what their impact and the challenge and you look at the numbers involved. The reconciliation bill is is bigger dollars. If everything in that bill becomes. It's it's bigger than the affordable care act. But one reason that i think they might be able to do that and they weren't before is that it's not like trying to tear down anything. Is that trying to take money out of anyone's pockets. Except rich people pay more taxes and that is a limiting factor on. It's not nothing. The problem is not nothing as we're seeing. It's a big thing. But controlling costs inevitably involves taking money away from the healthcare industry. The health care industry is super powerful. And it's not just the drug industry which by the way is probably the easiest. I actually ironically. Because they're sort of people argues to sort of demonizing drug companies. Like you can build a political argument polling ideas on controlling the drug costs. That always pulls really. Well we're it gets hard is like so much of the money is in hospitals like we pay too much. Hospitals thing is hospitals. don't push back by saying. Don't take our income away. Hospitals push back by putting on stories. Hey we're going to have to close the trauma room in your neighborhood. The board of every hospital is like the brother or neighbour or close friend of a member of congress and they're huge employers hospitals are like car dealerships. Everyone's got one in their district or multiple gallons like just hospitals have a lot of power. Yeah on capitol hill have imagined on this. I will say this. I do think that it's a long term process like these things often are. I think all the publicity we've gotten about surprise billing inconsistent building. And i'm thinking a of this media so people like sarah cliff at the new york. Times was with rosenthal who runs kaiser. Health news used to be at the time. A great book on this. I mean steven brill's book all this sort of attention. The more people realize that our pricing system is crazy. Which is the harder it becomes for the hospital industry to defend that and it's similar starting me with there's different versions of that for every part of the health care industry. I just think it's a difficult thing to do. In one shot. Maybe it can happen. Maybe bernie sanders or.

board of every hospital sarah cliff steven brill capitol hill congress rosenthal new york bernie sanders
"ten year" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"The homework they would have quickly discovered that the idea of repeal which was driven very much by this coq brothers right wing government is bad let the market was just fundamentally unpopular that actually for all the problems of obamacare and there are lots of problems and lots of people were not happy with the wind sheri- they ended up afterwards. That for all of that. There were many parts of the law that people valued and there were a lot of people getting coverage for and i think this is an important point i think the republicans in congress who were so enthusiastic who thought this would be so easy were high on their own supply. They watch fox news they read. You're right and you go back through the clips you'll go back to the articles. There is almost nothing in the right wing media about people who are happy who are benefiting from the aca. I remember you know the fiasco with the website crashed and that was bad or i mean that was as close. I actually think that's as close as it came. Along the supreme court case to really coming onto unraveling and they came back. They fixed it and they got these very big sign. Ups and like fox news didn't even cover it right. I mean it's just not a news item uninsured rate plummets to a lowest lever. It's no one's and so. I think you talked to these conservative members of congress. They genuinely had no idea there. Were people out there who cared about this. Who are benefiting from it. And so when they go out to their town hall meetings in two thousand seventeen and they get hit in the face with these protests. Which are this kind of mirror. Bizarro image of the tea party protests of two thousand ten. Only now it's like people with disabilities coming out and saying hey you know you're gonna take away my medicaid. You know you're going to take away. My guarantee of health insurance and people are angry with. They were genuinely shocked. They had no idea people were going to care about this. The reality was that the law had done a lot of good for all of its problems and republicans. You remember. this is really important. Donald trump didn't say. I'm going to take away the and leave you with nothing. His line was. I'm going to take and give great healthcare and return. Everyone's going to have insurance you sent is. They did not have a better idea. They have no ideas and it came back on them. So the big question for me now is huge. Debate about single payer medicare for all in the democratic primary. There is zero appetite among the republic among the democratic establishment. This professional class of democrats even people that are believed in single payer for that fight. And i don't think it's crazy. I mean i might disagree with them. But i also think like political capital fairly fixed and there's a lot of things and i think in the end. I would prioritize climate to spend that political capital just. Because there's a time. Ticking on that..

fox news congress aca supreme court Donald trump medicare
"ten year" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"The michele bachmann the world and the jim demint dementia the world and it was just so striking to me that the people who were defining where the republican party stood where these very new very junior members of congress who twenty thirty years ago would have ever heard of right. Now they're driving the debate because they know how to work the system. They know how to work social. They understand the currency now. It isn't getting dollars for your district. It's getting donations. That getting you on hannity getting a big re tweets and all that i feel like that world changed even in ways that surprised a lot of republicans. I wanna talk about repeal and why repeal failed because that i think is also a really crucial lesson around if we take this break on september eleven two thousand one sixty amateur sailors were at sea filming a reality show on an eighteenth century replica. Ship there weeks from land in the nearest tv aradio nine morning with single message was conveyed through their one satellite phone. Four planes hijacked two towers down pentagon attacked thousands dead now. Was it not a single other piece of information for weeks. What was it like to experience nine eleven in isolation and how would they make sense of the radically different world. There returned to. This is just one of the stories in nine twelve. The new podcast series from amazon music and pineapple street studios in each episode of nine twelve hosts. Dan burski tells the stories of characters whose lives would never be the same. After september eleventh and through them we begin to realize that there are new lessons to be learned and that we just might have enough distance now from nine eleven to make sense of some things. We couldn't understand before. Follow nine twelve wherever you get your podcasts. Or you can binge all seven episodes right now on amazon music or with wandering plus so they tried to repeal obamacare twice failed both times and i always think about is so insane when people these arguments against the filibuster like cinema mansions like well. How would you like it if the republicans just came in and try to undo the stuff. It's like we literally just lived through that. Like what are you talking about. What are mike my high. Am i losing my mind. I think i covered that. They tried to repeal the aca with fifty votes. What kind of universes it were. You need sixty votes to pass the aca but only fifty to repeal it. How is what's that friend of progress. And yet even though they went through reconciliation even they only had to get fifty votes and they had a few votes to spirit failed. Why i mean. There's a lot of reasons they failed. I think among the reasons they failed number one was we said before policies hard legislation is hard it inevitably involves taking your big ideals your big slogans and translating them into actual legislative language and then modifying that language to deal with the brazilian people who have a stake in it who are going to want to change it right. I mean that is a difficult process to do it. Takes years of work. Democrats had done that work. Republicans ever did they are not a policy anymore in the book a bunch of republicans. On the record saying yeah. We don't care about policy anymore. We just don't do that. Regrettably because i was talking mostly the narrow the small few who actually did care about policy. So that's that's one part of it second though. I think fundamentally if they had done that work right..

Dan burski michele bachmann dementia hannity republican party amazon aca congress pentagon mike
"ten year" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"I've always told the well massachusetts does this mandate and then that becomes the model for the character never actually knew how important it was and it was amazing to me. Reading the old memos interviewing people interviewing obama about this like the first thing out of his mouth my so. Why did you like well. We saw what worked in massachusetts and we were all like aha we can do. This and that's becomes built into the affordable care act. The funny thing is and you were this earlier right. People forget that in the two thousand eight presidential campaign hillary clinton who was the front runner who is like all over healthcare. 'cause she'd done the clinton healthcare plan when her husband was president. It's like she had the mandate and obama was the one who instinctively said. I'm actually not so sure. That's a good idea. Not so comfortable. The idea of telling people that have to get a product they might think is too expensive and by the way. Is it going to work. And he gets eventually once. He's in the white house. I think we talk about obama at some point. The great thing about obama and ezra refilling of obama's he's very much. he's a substance guy and he's very much a part of the intellectual establishment which was absolutely convinced you needed the mandate to make this thing work. The congressional budget office who's projections. Were essential the passing lower convinced to work and so we ended up endorsing it. And meanwhile of course the second it becomes part of the democratic plan right all the republicans who had in some cases like weeks before said mandate turn against it and it becomes a symbol of everything. That's wrong with your character becomes passes. There's the lawsuit challenging it. It barely survives. Because john roberts for reasons. That only john roberts will know eventually decides. He doesn't want to kill the whole law. And meanwhile at the end of the day as it happens republicans end up. When they can't repeal under trump they failed repeal the healthcare law as a whole they decide to get rid of the mandate and. There's lots of predictions that well and take away. The mandate and the insurance markets will collapse. And they didn't in fact it doesn't seem like it had much impact on now. There's a there's a really important astras. I wanna talk forever. But like there's a very solid argument that if you hadn't had the mandate in the first place the you know you needed at the beginning and then you don't need such theirself. We'll see. But i definitely think at the end of the day like the amount of time we spent clearly not as important as we all thought. It was a central fight. It was essential fight the debate. It was a central fight in the construction of plan than the aftermath. Then the lawsuits than tax repeal and the whole argument and like every. This was like complete. This walked cannon. Okay you will get into a death spiral because here's what will happen. Young people healthy people won't buy insurance because they're not required to they will be outside the risk pool..

obama massachusetts john roberts hillary clinton congressional budget office ezra clinton white house cannon
"ten year" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"I have no clue. I don't know it's there's nothing about this interaction that resembles any other mark interaction. I participate in. I don't go to the store and take a carton of milk. go home with it and drink it. And then they send me a bill for seven hundred and fifty dollars two weeks later by the way that's what the carton cost that work that way. Nothing works that way you don't you don't pay contractors that way there is nothing in life. There is no market interaction that works this market interaction works and it is enraging that. That's the way it works this anyway. That's my rant on that well and look. You are as equipped as anybody to be able to deal with this right. I think to myself all the time. When i open a bill and it says oh oh seven hundred dollars i think to myself god damn it. I am lucky that i could just write the check dollars. There's times in my life when someone just sent me a bill for seven hundred dollars. It'd be like i don't know seven hundred dollars we talking about i can come up like and that's the way the system works for everyone and i'm yes. I'm in the ninety nine point nine nine nine hundred ninety nine percent tile people with i still think it's nuts right. This is one of the things that i think for a long time. Even on the democratic side of the the experts in economists who are helping to craft policy they kind of wave their hands into smith is not a big. It's like oh. Yeah it's a hassle but we're not really going to worry about that and i think and i actually probably writing about ten fifteen years ago. I think i was probably one of those people like. Yeah you know fine. It's bad but whatever we'll move on and the more i think about it in the more evidence we're seeing now. It actually is a significant factor in interferes with people's ability to get healthcare causes financial problems because a lot of the people most of the people who are in this situation. They don't have the kind of resources you or i do. They don't have the wherewithal. they don't have the knowledge. And what are they end up doing. They owe the money. They bill collectors or they don't get the care they need and then they're in trouble. So this is a huge thing that i think. The affordable character did not address the big things that addressed were sort of recognizing and regulating. What insurance was getting rid of this differential institute. What's called community rating. Which is you basically got a charge. Everyone essentially the same. There are some exceptions for if you're a smoker or not and guaranteed issue right. You can't deny became tonight people's everyone everyone.

smith
"ten year" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"There's this disconnect right between the sort of old intellectual conservative class which still exists right. I mean it exists. In some think tanks it exists exerts lobbying influence. I mean we still have the coke brothers who are to some extent about very old fashioned. We don't want regulations. Don't tax us as you say. It's a complete mismatch with their base which is perfectly happy to have a generous welfare state. As long as it's for that we see in european democracies. There's a kind of more coherent version of this but we don't really have that here at the moment and the contradictions between those two. I think do explain a lot of what happened. In the trump era why they weren't able to govern successfully because those are two very different worldviews right and they they tried to take run at repealing and that to me talk about. Let's talk about the affordable care act. And let's start with this. Sometimes i feel about the affordable care. Act there's a very funny joke. Obama once told the white house correspondents dinner where there's some battle over whether npr is going to be defended and he made some joke about. He's like an npr has a table here. So i guess you guys are so funded. Where do we end up on that. And so i think that about the aca. It was so central to all of our lives who covered politics. Those of us like myself. Who is in washington during the big fights over it. The multiple challenges the court. I've covered it like. Let's start with the now. How is the doing under the strain of a national pandemic. what is it status. right now. status depends very much on your baseline for comparison. I would say on the one hand on the negative ledger right. We are still the only country in the developed world that doesn't have truly universal healthcare. We have many millions of people who do not have insurance. We have many millions of people who have insurance but they still can't pay their medical bills right. 'cause got these high deductibles. The premiums are really eating into their into their wages. We have people who they know they have to. You have.

npr coke aca white house Obama washington
"ten year" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"This is the price of milk now. And this is what these durable goods costs and it was like. I had this weird thinking like That's normal politics. That's the kind that's a. That's a recognizably conservative argument about the fact that if you're spending too much money that might have some deleterious effects inflation which could then hurt people like. That's a recognizably intellectually coherent political argument to make. I don't agree with it at this moment. But it was just like looking at the the etchings of a lost civilization of like when conservatives used to make arguments about political economy. I think all of that has gone away. It's very hard to find anymore there. They'll still talk about spending and deficits but the heart is not in it. And i think the inflection point for this is obamacare. I think the was the last big fight about a fundamental aspect of political economy and it was messy and the outcome unclear still but they basically definitively lost it and then donald trump kind of finished off whatever the remnants of milton friedman version of conservative. Might look like and now. They're left with very little. And i think you have to. You can't understand modern politics without understanding the fight over the aca and the currency there's a substantive aspect to which will get into about how american healthcare works doesn't work particularly during an era of pandemic. But there's something about that. Fight that i really think as a turning point in a certain kind of question of the realignment and the big battles about political economy and so the best person to talk about that is probably the most dog and informed chronicler the aca jonathan cohen who writes for huff po and has a great book out called the ten year war obamacare and the unfinished crusade universal coverage which chronicles both. How the law was passed. And what's happened. After and jonathan great to the firm having me on the show i what do you think of that thesis. I think you're right. I mean i've been amazed just watching these last few weeks and months right here. We have the democratic party embarking on this incredibly ambitious effort really to remake whole swaths of the welfare state. Right i mean. We're talking about huge initiatives on childcare on paid leave college tuition and then not to mention climate right and fighting poverty any of which you can imagine being their own sort of knock down drag out ideological substantive fight on the merits right and i've sort of been bracing because you know i'm a policy writer right so i've spent the last you know i'm reading. Cbo reports and i'm like going through conservative think-tank reports like so where where we know the childcare. For example there is an argument to be had right..

jonathan cohen huff po milton friedman donald trump aca jonathan democratic party Cbo
"ten year" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"This is jalen yang national editor at the new york times. More than seventeen hundred journalists work the times. They come from all over from iraq to iowa. They speak arabic spanish korean. But there's one thing they all have in common. They have dedicated their lives to helping us understand the world everything. The new york times publishes starts and ends but their commitments times subscribers keeper journalists focused on their stories. If you're not a subscriber yet you can become one at ny times dot com slash subscribe. We are still the only country in the developed world that doesn't have truly universal healthcare. We have many millions of people who do not have insurance. We have many millions of people who have insurance but they still can't pay their medical bills right. 'cause they got these high deductible. The premiums are really eating into their wages. We have people who they have to fight insurance bureaucracies to get treatments. They deal with mind. Boggling level of hassle. Hello welcome to. Why is this happening with me. Your host chris hayes as one of the weirdest things about the politics. The current moment to me is how the american right has evolved in such a way that it ceases to have anything to say about the major questions of political economy in our time. What i mean by that well. I came at a time. When there's a certain kind of ascendant intellectual right people call it neoliberalism. It was embodied in figures. Like friedrich hayek and milton friedman and then in figures like reagan and thatcher that made these arguments about markets. I the state about big government and about the need for smaller government and how markets were both better for human flourishing as a kind of moral and philosophical matter and better for prosperity as kind of efficiency question and that entire universe to dominant university chicago economic school economics all sorts of think tanks all sorts of writers. This huge era of big government is over as as bill clinton famously said in one of his major speeches all of that is basically collapse in on itself. Like when you go to the american right today like they'll get real worked up about certain things like if you're gonna make their child who's unvaccinated. Where a mask to help to prevent on the margin the spread of an incredibly dangerous and transmissible respiratory infection. Like they will get worked up on that they will get worked up about ten year old showing up the border desperate and afraid and seeking asylum. They'll get real worked up on that they will get worked up about whether twitter bans nazi or someone nazi adjacent that. They'll get very worked up about. They don't get worked up about these big questions of political economy. The way they used to fasten moment. Where rick scott of florida did a big thing about inflation. And he was doing..

ny times jalen yang chris hayes iowa friedrich hayek iraq milton friedman thatcher reagan bill clinton chicago respiratory infection twitter rick scott florida
"ten year" Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

Coaching for Leaders

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

"It <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Music_Male> requires <Speech_Male> love <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> and trust <Speech_Male> to be able <Speech_Male> sometimes to <Speech_Male> step <Speech_Male> back and <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> believe <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> the choice <Speech_Male> that the person has <Speech_Male> made a with <Speech_Male> you is <Speech_Male> the right <Speech_Male> choice and bonnie <Speech_Male> has been <Speech_Male> wonderful for <Speech_Male> me over the years <Speech_Male> in so many ways of <Speech_Male> an and coaching <Silence> leader specifically <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> asking me <Speech_Male> the tough questions and challenging <Silence> me at the right times <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> also always <Speech_Male> trusting <Speech_Male> and putting <Speech_Male> her full support <Speech_Male> behind me <Speech_Male> and behind <Speech_Male> what this has been <Speech_Male> about. This show <Speech_Male> would not <Speech_Music_Male> be here without <Speech_Music_Male> her <Speech_Male> support and her trust. <Speech_Male> Thank you bonnie <Speech_Male> for it as <Speech_Male> always <Speech_Male> and then finally <Speech_Male> i think you to you especially <Speech_Male> to those of <Speech_Male> you who have <Speech_Male> listened to the <Speech_Male> show for <Speech_Male> so long <Speech_Male> some of you from <Silence> the very beginning. <Speech_Male> I get <Speech_Male> emails <Silence> regularly <Speech_Male> from <Speech_Male> people asking me. <Speech_Male> How can i support <Speech_Male> you in your <Speech_Male> work and <Speech_Male> my response is <Speech_Male> often the same. <Speech_Male> I'll say <Speech_Male> pass along <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> episode. You've <Speech_Male> heard that you are <Speech_Male> emailing me about <Speech_Male> someone else that <Silence> would benefit from <Speech_Male> it and <Speech_Male> so many <Speech_Male> of you <Speech_Male> have done that <Speech_Male> over the years <Speech_Male> thousands and thousands <Speech_Male> and thousands <Silence> of times. You've shared <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> podcast <Speech_Male> as a whole where you've shared <Speech_Male> an episode with <Speech_Male> appear <Speech_Male> or mnt <Speech_Male> or <Speech_Male> direct report <Speech_Male> Or amazing <Speech_Male> to me your <Speech_Male> boss or your board. <Speech_Male> I get <Speech_Male> villes <Speech_Male> fairly regularly <Speech_Male> for people who are sitting <Speech_Male> down with their boss <Speech_Male> and listen to <Speech_Male> upset from a whole team <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> it and it's <Speech_Male> it's very <Speech_Male> overwhelming <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> i feel a tremendous <Speech_Male> sense <Speech_Male> of gratitude <Speech_Male> that you have <Speech_Male> put your trust <Speech_Male> in me not <Silence> only to support <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Music_Male> but then to take <Speech_Male> the additional step <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> be to <Speech_Male> put your trust in me to support <Speech_Male> those <Speech_Male> care about around you <Speech_Male> those in your organization <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> family members people. <Speech_Male> You care about <Silence> and care about their careers. <Speech_Male> Thank <Speech_Male> you so much for <Speech_Male> that privilege. <Speech_Male> A for all <Speech_Male> of you who have done that. <Speech_Male> So many thousands <Speech_Male> of times and <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> those of you who <Speech_Male> are and will <Speech_Male> continue to do that in <Speech_Male> the future. I <Speech_Male> am eternally <Silence> grateful. <Speech_Male> Several related <Speech_Male> episodes <Speech_Male> that. Today's conversation <Speech_Male> inspired. <Speech_Male> You bet i hope <Speech_Male> he'll dive into as well <Speech_Male> one of them's episode. <Speech_Male> Two seven <Speech_Male> a while ago. I had <Speech_Male> mark barden on the show. <Speech_Male>

"ten year" Discussed on This is Actually Happening

This is Actually Happening

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on This is Actually Happening

"Three Ten year nightmare..

"ten year" Discussed on Thinking Poker Podcast

Thinking Poker Podcast

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"ten year" Discussed on Thinking Poker Podcast

"Flush you mentioned maybe turning your hand into a bluff seduce case for for betting the river not betting. Because if i'm trying to bluff guy this point trying to bluff from off up and over pair and i don't think abet is going to be big enough to get that done. Even i guess i just like rip But i that seems a little bit suspicious to me also do still have a decent amount showdown value here. So i don't wanna i wanna preserve the equity of my Clean as king By checking here and benefit from the times it goes check check. And i win against king queen as queen as jack type hands Or even something like king queen off with the king of hearts like maybe that's a hand where the guy would better turn but basically. Yeah there's a lot of hands that i'm still ahead of So got a little equity preservation here. And i don't I still retain the option to blow off if i check because check raising his on the table. So you do check. He have pots it again. He's betting forty three fifty and eighty seven hundred. You have thirteen thousand seven hundred and sixty four binds so you've just a tad over three x his bat. I see here that you do decide. Turn the hand into into a bluff and shove it sounds like your objective. Here is to get him to fold. Like seventy eight or something. Yeah says as and Like those sorts of hands. I think if i were to just leave myself for like three three quarters pot or even pot i think they might find a call I think it's harder for people to find a call on a because you i mean. How many times have you said that on his podcast. People don't shake raise bluff. The river often enough. So i know. If i'm a villain shoes and i'm sitting there with like seventy eight i even if i have a hard my hand. I'll say this is probably supposed to be called hashtag. They always have it. And then i'm gonna fold in that spot where way more likely to bluff cats versus like three-quarters pilot or something. Now i will say this. The reason people don't check is bluff enough on the river is that people don't thought enough on true but this is a you know a two fifty on wwl dot com. Which honestly. I tried to play closer to theory on this site. Because you can actually look these people up in a lot of these people as opposed to Boulevard which is what i normally play on I can see if these players are reasonable. Not and i would say will be. Larger percentage of the players on wwlp dot com in the highest stakes are reasonable enough candidates where this becomes possible..

thirteen thousand seven hundred forty three fifty three sixty four binds two Flush eighty seven hundred seventy eight Boulevard three quarters pot three x wwlp dot com dot com hands wwl fifty -quarters