17 Burst results for "Ten Twenty Thirty Forty Fifty Thousand Dollars"

"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

09:23 min | 1 year ago

"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Into the calls I want to talk with Randy from Churchill mortgage for a few minutes because let's face it a lot of projects we work on around our homes do require loans I mean most of us don't keep ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars sitting in an account to go do home improvements or make changes to our house most of the time we're looking at some type of financing and Churchill mortgage is one of the companies who can truly help you out with that so Randy welcome the Texas home improvement Hey Jim are you I'm doing wonderful how about you today I'm doing well you're down here Wilson here so thanks Hey let's let's talk about loans first because you know we we've all been hearing on the news doing gloom on rates going up and down and up and down and stuff but they're extremely low right now aren't day right up to the lowest point since a very brief period in twenty sixteen so order or about a three year low on interest rates right now which is just about the lowest they've ever been in the history of mortgage rates yeah because at twenty sixteen dropped the I mean that only lasted for a couple weeks didn't very very brief yeah three weeks if I recall we didn't have time to to help many folks before rates went right back up so this this is been a more extended period of rate drop in and one that we hope will stick around for for a few months but nobody really knows how long you know here in Texas it always used to be that one somebody want to work on their home they were looking at a home improvement loan but now they can do cash out refinance so it's nine one number one the money to necessarily have to go into a home improvement but it kind of makes it easier to get the money out to do home improvement projects than very much so the home improvement loans is kind of those kinda like construction loans so you got a a lender that's involved the whole way through kind of coming out do inspections of making sure the money is gone the property not somewhere else and with the cash out refinance your cash back re finance the money at closing those were directly your bank account so if you use an umbrella group months you don't have any time constraints and getting it done your delivery model but within a certain time to keep your home improvement lender happy you don't have inspectors coming out every week you're not paying those inspection calls because those banks do charge every down that inspector comes out so much easier way to access the equity and there's no strings attached once you do and unlike when rates dropped in and last in twenty sixteen and at other times earlier you know twenty two thousand eight two oh nine to ten home by user out so in in previous years when rates were this low week we didn't have access to all the equity that we do today with with home values begin up yeah they've really increased and and I will say one other thing on the home improvement loans just from the contractor side it's nice not having to go sit in the banks and sit in lobbies waiting for my turn to sign the paperwork because on a home loan contractors always had to sign up for the lean as well but with with the cash out all it's gone away yeah you have to use the approved contractors as well so if you're trying to use your if you try to do the improvement yourself or if you're trying to use a general contractor that's not on some approved Lister the doesn't want to be fully underwritten by the bank and the cash out funds do it that meant that help allow you to just skip all that hassle yeah so how is this affecting our thirty and fifteen year mortgages and stuff I mean out of people start with a thirty year mortgage and they don't necessarily want to start over again yeah let's forget point right now a lot of our clients are able to refinance and go from a thirty year mortgage to a fifteen year or or maybe even a twenty year and lower rates so much that their payment doesn't even go up to the thirty year mortgages are front loaded with interest which means you pay the majority of the interest and a thirty year loan in the first ten years so if you can drop down to a twenty year are you in a fifteen year you're you're talking tens of thousands of dollars for most Americans despite shaven those those for a few years off and if you can do it without your monthly payment going up and blowing your budget than that to a perfect scenario well and not you just real quick because I I didn't ask this but hi to people get in touch with you at Churchill mortgage so we are local here in the metroplex in our direct dial is two one four five four zero four nine six six we are around on the weekends we have some guys take it ships just because it is such a busy time right now we want to be there to serve our clients but if you do get voice mail just leave us a message with your name phone number and we'll get back to you as soon as possible or you can go to Churchill mortgage taxes dot com in and do a do a quick in Korea application there on our website whichever is easier okay now you touch on one other thing there that I want to to bring up as well because most everybody's familiar with a thirty and fifteen year but there are other terms available you mentioned twenty year terms and such so if you're not just pigeon holed into those two terms aria military good point you mortgage terms are in five year intervals starting at thirty going down to ten so sometimes will look you know if you've been in a very long going from a thirty year where you've only been in the year two down to a twenty or fifteen is probably gonna push I am a little bit so if we can't get all the way to the fifteen year loan that's when that twenty or even a twenty five year comes in handy and that way you're you're actually still potentially saving a few years all for at least keeping your you know current term about the same not going back to that new thirty so give us an example of where re doing the financing has really save people money really three main ways were saving people money right now you which first this is what we call you know thirty year refinance going back to a thirty year refinance reason we would do that would be to lower your payment as much as possible so if the home household budget is is tight you just need some relief a lot of times lowering the rate sometimes over a full percentage point or more even sometimes that can drop your payment a lot plus home values gone up quite a bit last few years so in many cases were able to refinance folks get him to go back to a thirty year low that rate over that payment and also get rid of the PMR higher the mortgage insurance that conventional loans and FHA loans come with would you don't put that twenty percent down when you buy the home so lowering payments in the first way the second way is shortening the term so if we have clients that are debt free other than their home or are fairly close and have the the budget to short term we can again take that thirty year down to it a twenty year worth fifteen year or even a ten year in some cases and again with rates as low as they are right now and we're able to do that in many cases about the mortgage payment even going up very much so that the great way to shave off years and and lots of money in interest another way is is kind of what your shows talking about today is the home improvements so we do the cash out cashback refinances I'm taking you can borrow up to eighty percent of your home's value so we get a new appraisal to assess the current market value of the home and we can take out up to eighty percent of that and that can be used for home improvements or home repairs necessary repairs you just don't have the cash for and you don't want to put all that on a credit card sometimes it's good way to do it and we can use it to cash out for debt consolidation help people pay off debt that and high interest rate credit cards for example getting rid of that and getting it down into a low mortgage rate where the interest is tax deductible that's a huge on the way to help help our clients and also I've got a lot of clients that are calling in and they've got kids nearing the college age so they're thinking how my gonna pay for college student loans are out there and they give them to anybody and a lot of times those interest rates are higher and a lot of times that interest is not tax deductible so I've got a lot of clients komand'r to try to help fund some of college well knows really Amos aren't quite as nice as they always try to make him out to be either well in college all right yeah yeah yeah you're gonna settle your kids with down the debt or yourself with with parent loans or if you have the equity your house you get all that into one loan and a fully amortizing one with a really low rate so sometimes that's a that's a great option really appreciate you taking time if somebody wants to call again it's two one four five four zero forty nine sixty six for Churchill mortgage that's right that's right number right.

Randy Churchill thirty year fifteen year twenty year eighty percent ten twenty thirty forty fifty twenty five year twenty percent three weeks three year five year ten years ten year
"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Ninety five nine F. what about to go on the radio show we're in the last segment here today I'm gonna go ahead and ship directionless and move on over to a question I got the email to me by the way if you like email me questions feel free to its asphodel at bell U. I. N. C. dot com that task Dale L. U. I. N. C. dot com and the CBO here is very common type of situation that I think most people get bad advice on and you know what would be like is the first day back without saying something about my idol Dave Ramsey in your local time you cheated they read a great guy but I just don't agree with his financial situation is financial teachings or if I do maybe it's for poor people but I just don't even think that's true in this is an example what I mean by that let's use a little logic here okay and get individual here needs your voice says can you please give me your advice on my situation musically I had eighteen thousand dollars in debt nine thousand as a student loan nine thousand on an interest free credit card zero interest credit card so we pay no interest on that loan right which is what I did for years to raise money tons of interest free credit cards because they're just give me the money for free it costs you nothing to get money right well you have to pay back yeah that's all you have to do is pay back they gave you a hundred thousand dollars you put a hundred thousand bags in each one to give them back ten or five at the end you have zero and they have nothing but you would have made all the money on that money that was invested so if you go over there and you borrow a hundred thousand dollars on a credit card I'm not saying that we discussed you do but I'm just give me an ideal why your ideas are wrong I could take that does does who invested make ten percent of my money and make ten thousand dollars a year zero interest and the credit card back by the time I'm done a lot to real state and have no debt but he respected that all parties were station he goes on says I have to get in savings two thousand settings no I already know for one kos one what the best route would B. to go about this out the debt first or just save for the first round house my credit scores seven fifty eight hundred to this guy's got great keep credit situation great credit score he understands where it's at totally and here's what this kind of a normal well adjusted individual should doing by the way he's normal well adjusted because he's not two hundred thousand dollars in school that a hundred thousand dollars in order to add other credit card debt dad do you have to pay interest on he has no interest on this credit card debt that already very logical statement right there that's a good move on his part right he's also smart enough to not have a four one K. in an IRA because that's a hard one for most people they've all believe they should do that people try talking to it all this money is his money so what should a guy like this too I wrote a balcony so it's quite simply continue to make the minimum payments on your student loans and your credit cards and say put your first red house because why because by the time you stations were first run house he might make enough of a capital gain of forced back we situations for Giles to pay that credit card off so that student debt and credit card debt off completely I see people make ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars instant games when they buy a rentals Barlow what its work they buy it below seventy eighty thousand dollars they put twenty or thirty years and boom they've got a fifty thousand dollar equity they would have paid off the debt they wouldn't have the money to buy the house and they would make the fifty grand they also go for five hundred dollars a month positive cash flow and the poor by the rules will pay that debt all while now we move on to.

hundred thousand dollars ten twenty thirty forty fifty seventy eighty thousand dollar two hundred thousand dollars eighteen thousand dollars fifty thousand dollar five hundred dollars ten thousand dollars thirty years ten percent four one K
"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Now, let me touch on, on refinancing just a little bit more, anyone listening who has an FHA or a VA loan a government loan. They have a program called streamline refinance. I call. Thank you very much loan. You have. To do nothing. You have to just show us that you've been paying your mortgage on your FHA, or VA loan on time in the month that it was due doesn't mean you weren't late. It means that you didn't go thirty days past due in the last twelve months. If your interest rate right now is, is over four and three quarters, we can lower your interest rate. And you say thank you very much. There's no closing costs because it's all paid by first preference. So the, the lender pays all of your closing costs and you just say, thank you very much for lowering my interest rate. So specially those people who have a four and seven eighths, or in the fives, or the sixes, and I know there are still some people out there with FHA or VA loans that are over five percent. There's nothing for you to do. We just lower your interest rate and you say thank you very much. It's called the this is the government doing. It's called the streamline refinance. There's no appraisal required, and first preference pay all your closing costs you lower your interest rate and say, thank you. That's it. That's a terrific, anybody who has a government loan, if you if you're over four and three quarters, call the office and tell them that you wanna just lower your interest rate at no cost whatsoever. It's a terrific program. You have to do that. They shouldn't be anybody with a government loan over four and three quarters percent. Now, if you don't have a government loan, you have a convention alone. Okay. If you wanna pull some cash out his the thing that a lot of people don't know, when you pulling cash out of your house. You know, your refinancing, and maybe you wanna pull out ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars whatever maybe you want to do some renovations to your home, pay off a credit card, maybe one of my an investment property and it's you know it's in rough shape, but you want.

FHA VA three quarters ten twenty thirty forty fifty twelve months five percent thirty days
"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"The lone officer if you give them permission to run your credit and with, with your credit in front of them with your monthly. Bills. If you tell them a little about your income, they can tell you in a matter of two minutes of what you would qualify for. And then you can talk to them about what programs you would want to use whether you putting down ten or twenty percent, or whether you're looking to get in for zero money, and there are so many programs. I've been talking about for the past month, and I'll try to go into them a little bit by the end of the show programs where you need zero money of some programs where you need very little money, but you have them all sitting in the office. And again, there, eight hundred number is three two one five five five. Now, let me touch on, on refinancing just a little bit more, anyone listening who has an FHA or VA loan a government loan. They have a program called streamline refinance. I quote the Fank you very much loan. You have to do nothing. You have to just show us that you've been paying your mortgage on your FHA or VA loan on time in the mud. Month that it was due doesn't mean you weren't late. It means that you didn't go thirty days past due in the last twelve months. If your interest rate right now is, is over four and three quarters, we can lower your interest rate. And you say thank you very much. There's no closing costs because it's all paid by first preference. So the, the lender pays all of your closing costs and you just say, thank you very much for lowering my interest rate. So specially those people who have a four and seven eighths, or in the fives, or the sixes, and I know there's still some people out there with FHA or VA loans that are over five percent. There's nothing for you to do. We just lower your interest rate and you say thank you very much. It's called the this is the government doing it. It's called the streamline refinance. There's no appraisal required and first preference. Pay all your closing costs you lower your interest rate and say, thank you. That's it. That's a terrific, anybody who has a government loan, if you're if you're over four and three quarters, call we office and tell them that you want to just lower your interest rate at no cost whatsoever. It's a terrific program. You have to do that. They shouldn't be anybody with a government loan over four and three quarters percent. Now, if you don't have a government loan, you have a convention alone. Okay. If you wanna pull some cash out his the, the thing that a lot of people don't know, when you pulling cash out of your house. You know, your refinancing and maybe wanna pull out ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars whatever maybe you wanna do some renovations to your home, pay off a credit card. Maybe wanna buy an investment property, and it's you know, it's in rough shape, but you want to buy it for cash, you can pull the cash out of your house. Now here's the thing you can only go up to eighty percent of the value of your home. So if your houses worth.

FHA VA officer three quarters ten twenty thirty forty fifty eighty percent twenty percent twelve months five percent thirty days two minutes
"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:13 min | 2 years ago

"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on KGO 810

"Heard of an opportunity, and you sort of put it off and thought well, no rush. And then all of a sudden you later found out you missed the deadline, and you could have kicked yourself. Well, I fear. Many of you listening who do not take action are going to do that when the current Trump tax cuts expire or they're replaced or our tax rates. Go back up to where they were even higher, which is what is on the democrat agenda, and we all know that whether it's a one term or two term president that the other party many times comes in and reverses and raises taxes. And tries to undo what the previous administration did. And this is going to happen again. So I want to address in this segment. Why many of you should pay taxes now on maybe your tax deferred accounts like IRA's and 4._0._1._K's at a lower rate. Probably the lowest rate you will ever be in. But especially on your tax deferred accounts like in 4._0._1._K's, and you may end up with as much as double the net spendable income during retirement and to illustrate my point here, I'm going to give you an example that I came up with years ago and I- Ella street this in several stories actual examples in my latest book the laser fund, but I'm gonna use a hypothetical couple here. A Mr. taxed to the max versus MRs I've allot more. Now, one of the original tenants of having a traditional IRA or 4._0._1._K held that you would likely be in a lower tax bracket when you retired then during your working years folks that has not been true or axiomatic for over twenty five years. Most people are finding themselves in his high or higher tax brackets when they retire. And then they were in during their working years when they were full-time. Why is that? There are two main reasons one most people no longer have the tax deductions and exemptions. When they retire that they had when they were working, for example, many retirees have paid off their mortgage. They no longer have that interest deduction. Dependent in the household. The the kids are gone now. Or if they're not gone, you can't deduct them anymore game and many people are not contributing money to IRA's and 4._0._1._K. So you don't have that deduction anymore, and congress has continually been raising taxes, even though it goes up and down a little bit. It keeps going up like a person with a yoyo going up some stairs. So people are not in lower tax brackets when they retire. And it is amusing in a way, but very disturbing also that it took the financial services industry until about three years ago to finally admit that was. Poor advice to tell people to put money in tax deferred accounts on the premise that you were going to be in a lower tax bracket when most people were not if you're in a lower tax bracket, it means you didn't save very much. So if a fiduciary is supposed to be looking out for your best interest, and they actually knew for years that you were headed for a higher tax bracket. What should they have done? They should've gotten your money out the taxes over and done with see I've been attacked strategist for most of my forty five years, and I've helped many people get Untrapped from that tax trap that they were sort of painting themselves into. So the second premise is that tax rates have been going up and would likely continue to go up. And if that's true if taxes are going up, why do you want to continue to defer to some future perceived unknown advantage, and then pull out your money down the road when we are? Convinced taxes are going to be higher that doesn't make sense. Okay. So especially if you're over the age of fifty nine and a half, and maybe even under age fifty nine and a half into certain circumstances. There are windows of opportunity where you can transfer money out in your current tax threshold many times people have room ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars of room where they can actually take money out of an IRA 4._0._1._K in a given tax year and not pay any higher tax rate than if they left it there and deferred and created a bigger problem by compounding that problem by delaying the inevitable so to speak, and so you get the taxes over and done with in these lower brackets sometimes people right now are in a twenty two percent. That's not gonna last it's going to go back up to twenty five or even twenty eight percent again when the Democrats maybe take over and so when that. Happens. People are going to be kicking themselves for not taking advantage of this opportunity. So why wait for your IRA's 4._0._1._K's to to recover from the the whip saw in the market and come back to that level or why wait around thinking? Well, I'm going to wait and see if Trump gets elected to a second term folks, this usually takes four or five years to do it. Anyway, you should be doing now, even if he gets reelected because most people it takes about five years to get your money out the taxes over and done with and the money repositioned is something that's going to be tax free from now on without sending you to a higher tax bracket. And that's why a lot of these articles that I often refer to like time magazine why it's time to retire the 4._0._1._K and do something better instead or the one that came out of the Wall Street Journal about two and a half three years ago that said, you know, the original champions of the 4._0._1._K lament the day they ever came up with that idea. Well, people are in lower tax bracket. So let's look at Mr. tax to the maximum MRs. I've a lot more quickly here. Let's say that this gentleman taxed to the max is a sixty year old and has a half a million accumulated in IRA's in 4._0._1._K's and the funds earning seven point two percent. And this person does not intend to retire or need the money until eight seventy so the accounts double during the ten years to a million tax deferred. This people are convinced to do by their CPA or whatever at interest only withdrawals of seventy two thousand a year beginning in eight seventy they would likely be paying about a third of that seventy two thousand in tax because of other income and so forth. So a third of that is twenty four grand a year. And you do that let's say you live twenty years. So you're paying twenty four thousand a year on the back end during the harvest years of your retirement because you used pretax money. You use the seed money so to speak that was tax advantaged on a traditional IRA 4._0._1._K. So over twenty years of retirement, this person's going to pay nearly a half a million dollars in taxes, and at third of everything's going to go out the window to pay the tax that they deferred and deferred and so forth. And when they finally pass away they're going to be leaving behind whatever's in there to their heirs and their heirs are going to have to pay that too. Let's compare that to MRs I've a lot more. She's sixty years old. She rolls out twenty percent of her IRA or 4._0._1._K's to my favorite vehicle a laser fund, which is tax free. She pays thirty thousand dollars in taxes. Let's say, and that's the probably the worst you'd have to pay as she does that today's lower tax rates over the five year period. So when she is a sixty five all of her taxes have been. Satisfied within five years..

IRA 4._0._1._K president Trump fiduciary congress time magazine Untrapped Wall Street Journal five years twenty years three years ten twenty thirty forty fifty thirty thousand dollars twenty eight percent twenty two percent twenty five years
"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:15 min | 2 years ago

"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on KGO 810

"Of an opportunity, and you sort of put it off and thought well, no rush. And then all of a sudden you later found out you missed the deadline, and you could have kicked yourself. Well, I fear. Many of you listening who do not take action are going to do that when the current Trump tax cuts expire or they're replaced or our tax rates. Go back up to where they were even higher, which is what is on the democrat agenda, and we all know that whether it's a one term or two term president that the other party many times comes in and reverses and raises taxes and and tries to. To undo what the previous administration did. And this is going to happen again. So I want to address in this segment. Why many of you should pay taxes now on maybe your tax deferred accounts like IRA's and 4._0._1._K's at a lower rate. Probably the lowest rate you will ever be in. But especially on your tax deferred accounts like raised in 4._0._1._K's, and you may end up with as much as double the net spendable income during retirement and to illustrate my point here, I'm going to give you an example that I came up with years ago, and I L astray this in several stories actual examples in my latest book the laser fund, but I'm gonna use a hypothetical couple here. Mr. taxed to the max versus MRs I've a lot more tame now one of the original tenants of having a traditional IRA. A 4._0._1._K held that you would likely be in a lower tax bracket when you retired then during your working years folks that has not been true or axiomatic for over twenty five years. Most people are finding themselves in his high or as higher tax brackets when they retire than they were in during their working years when they were full-time why is that? There are two main reasons one most people no longer have the tax deductions and exemptions. When they retire that they had when they were working, for example, men and retirees have paid off their mortgage. They no longer have that interest deduction. Dependent in the household. The the kids are gone now. Or if they're not gone, you can't deduct them anymore game and many people are not contributing money to IRA's and 4._0._1._K. So you don't have that did auction anymore, and congress has continually been raising taxes, even though it goes up and down a little bit. It keeps going up. It's like a person with a yoyo going up some stairs. So people are not in lower tax brackets when they retire. And it is amusing in a way, but very disturbing also that it took the financial services industry until about three years ago to finally admit that was. Poor advice to tell people to put money in tax deferred accounts on the premise that you were going to be in a lower tax bracket. When most people were not if you're in a lower tax bracket means you didn't save very much. So if the fiduciary has to be looking out for your best interest, and they actually knew for years that you were headed for a higher tax bracket. What should they have done? They should've gotten your money out the taxes over and done with see I've been attacked strategist for most of my forty five years, and I've helped many people get Untrapped from that tax trap that they were sort of painting themselves into. So the second premise is that tax rates have been going up and would likely continue to go up. And if that's true if taxes are going up, why do you want to continue to defer to some future perceived unknown advantage, and then pull out your money down the road when we can? Vince taxes are going to be higher that doesn't make sense. Okay. So especially if you're over the age of fifty nine and a half, and maybe even under age fifty nine and a half under certain circumstances. There are windows of opportunity where you can transfer money out in your current tax threshold many times people have room ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars of room where they can actually take money out of an IRA 4._0._1._K in a given tax year and not pay any higher tax rate. Then if they left it there and deferred and created a bigger problem by compounding that problem by delaying the Neville, so to speak, and so you get the taxes over and done with these lower brackets. Sometimes people right now are in a twenty two percent. That's not gonna last it's going to go back up to twenty five or even twenty eight percent again when the Democrats maybe take over and so when that. Happens. People are going to be kicking themselves for not taking advantage of this opportunity. So why wait for your IRA's and 4._0._1._K's to to recover from the the whip saw in the market and come back to that level or why wait around thinking? Well, I'm going to wait and see if Trump gets elected to a second term folks, this usually takes four or five years to do it. Anyway, you should be doing it. Now, even if he gets reelected because most people it takes about five years to get your money out the taxes over and done with and the money reposition is something that's going to be tax free from now on without sending you to a higher tax bracket. And that's why a lot of these articles that I often refer to like time magazine why it's time to retire the 4._0._1._K and do something better instead or the one that came out of the Wall Street Journal about two and a half three years ago that said, you know, the original champions of the 4._0._1._K lament the day they ever came up with that idea. Well, people aren't in lower tax bracket. So let's look at Mr. tax to the maximum MRs. I've a lot more quickly here. Let's say that this gentleman taxed to the max is a sixty year old and has a half a million accumulated in IRA's and 4._0._1._K's and the funds earning seven point two percent. And this person does not intend to retire or need the money until eight seventy so the accounts double during the ten years to a million tax deferred. This is what most people are convinced to do by their CPA or whatever at interest only withdrawals of seventy two thousand a year beginning at eight seventy they would likely be paying about a third of that seventy two thousand in tax because of other income and so forth. So a third of that is twenty four grand a year. And you do that let's say you live twenty years. So you're paying twenty four thousand a year on the back end during the harvest years of your retirement because you used pretax money. You use the seed money so to speak that was tax advantaged on a traditional IRA 4._0._1._K. So over twenty years of retirement, this person's going to pay nearly a half a million dollars in taxes and at third of everything's going to go out the window to pay the tax deferred in deferred and so forth. And when they finally pass away they're going to be leaving behind whatever's in there to their heirs and their heirs are going to have to pay that too. Let's compare that to MRs I've a lot more. She's sixty years old. She rolls out twenty percent of her IRA or 4._0._1._K's to my favorite vehicle a laser fund, which is tax free. She pays thirty thousand dollars in taxes. Let's say, and that's the probably the worst you'd have to pay as she does that today's lower tax rates over the five year period. So when she is a sixty five all of her taxes have been. Satisfied within five years. He's paid one hundred fifty grand in tax..

4._0._1._K IRA president Trump congress fiduciary time magazine Untrapped Vince Neville Wall Street Journal five years twenty years three years ten twenty thirty forty fifty thirty thousand dollars twenty eight percent
"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

08:14 min | 2 years ago

"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Heard of an opportunity, and you sort of put it off and thought well, no rush. And then all of a sudden you later found out you missed the deadline, and you could have kicked yourself. Well, I fear. Many of you listening who do not take action are going to do that. When they current Trump tax cuts expire or they're replaced or our tax rates. Go back up to where they were even higher, which is what is on the democrat agenda, and we all know that whether it's a one term or two term president that the other party many times comes in and reverses and raises taxes and. And tries to undo what the previous administration did. And this is going to happen again. So I want to address in this segment. Why many of you should pay taxes now on maybe your tax deferred accounts like IRA's and 4._0._1._K's at a lower rate. Probably the lowest rate you will ever be in. But especially on your tax deferred accounts like raised in 4._0._1._K's, and you may end up with as much as double the net spendable income during retirement and to illustrate my point here, I'm going to give you an example that I came up with years ago, and I L associate this in several stories actual examples in my latest book the laser fund, but I'm gonna use a hypothetical couple here. A Mr. taxed to the max versus MRs I've a lot more. Now. One of the original tenants of having a traditional. IRA or 4._0._1._K held that you would likely be in a lower tax bracket when you retired then during your working years folks that has not been true or axiomatic for over twenty five years. Most people are finding themselves in his high are as higher tax brackets when they retire than they were in during their working years when they were full-time why is that? There are two main reasons one most people no longer have the tax deductions and exemptions. When they retire that they had when they were working, for example, many retirees have paid off their mortgage. They no longer have that interest deduction. Dependent in the household. The kids are gone now. Or if they're not gone, you can't deduct them anymore game and many people are not contributing money to IRA's and 4._0._1._K. So you don't have that deduction anymore, and congress has continually been raising taxes, even though it goes up and down a little bit. It keeps going up is like a person with a yoyo going up some stairs. So people are not in lower tax brackets when they retire. And it is amusing in a way, but very disturbing also that it took the financial services industry until about three years ago to finally admit that was poor. Advice to tell people to put money in tax deferred accounts on the premise that you were going to be in a lower tax bracket when most people were not if you're in a lower tax bracket, it means you didn't save very much. So a fiduciary is supposed to be looking out for your best interest than they actually knew for years that you were headed for a higher tax bracket. What should they have done? They should've gotten your money out the taxes over and done with see I've been attack strategist for most of my forty five years, and I've helped many people get Untrapped from that tax trap that they were sort of painting themselves into. So the second premise is that tax rates have been going up and would likely continue to go up. And if that's true if taxes are going up, why do you want to continue to defer to some future perceived unknown advantage, and then pull out your money down the road when we are convinced taxes. Are going to be higher that doesn't make sense. Okay. So especially if you're over the age of fifty nine and a half, and maybe even under age fifty nine and a half under certain circumstances. There are windows of opportunity where you can transfer money out in your current tax threshold many times people have room ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars of room where they can actually take money out of an IRA or four one K in a given tax year and not pay any higher tax rate. Then if they left it there and deferred and created a bigger problem by compounding that problem by delaying the inevitable so to speak, and so you get the taxes over and done with in these lower brackets sometimes people right now are in twenty two percent. That's not gonna last it's going to go back up to twenty five or even twenty eight percent again when the Democrats maybe take over. And so when that happens people are going to be. Kicking themselves for not taking advantage of this opportunity. So why wait for your IRA's and 4._0._1._K's to recover from the the whip saw in the market and come back to that level or why wait around thinking? Well, I'm going to wait and see if Trump gets elected to a second term folks, this usually takes four or five years to do it. Anyway, you should be doing now, even if he gets reelected because most people it takes about five years to get your money out the taxes over and done with and the money repositioning something that's going to be tax free from now on without sending you to a higher tax bracket. And that's why a lot of these articles that I often refer to like time magazine why it's time to retire. The one K and do something better instead or the one that came out of the Wall Street Journal about two and a half three years ago that said, you know, the original champions of the 4._0._1._K lament the day they ever came up with that idea. Well, people aren't in lower tax break. Racket? So let's look at Mr. tax to the maximum issues. I've a lot more quickly here. Let's say that this gentleman taxed to the max is sixty year old and has a half a million accumulated in IRA's in 4._0._1._K's and the funds earning seven point two percent. And this person does not intend to retire or need the money until eight seventy so the accounts double during the ten years to a million tax deferred. This is what most people are convinced to do by their CPA or whatever at interest only withdrawals of seventy two thousand a year beginning in eight seventy they would likely be paying about a third of that seventy two thousand in tax because of other income and so forth. So at third of that is twenty four grand a year. And you do that let's say you live twenty years. So you're paying twenty four thousand a year on the back end during the harvest years of your retirement because you used pretax money you use the seed Ma. So to speak that was tax advantaged on a traditional IRA 4._0._1._K. So over twenty years of retirement, this person's going to pay nearly a half a million dollars in taxes and a third of everything's going to go out the window to pay the tax that they deferred and deferred and so forth. And when they finally pass away they're going to be leaving behind whatever's in there to their heirs and their heirs are going to have to pay that too. Let's compare that to MRs I've a lot more. She's sixty years old. She rolls out twenty percent of her IRA or 4._0._1._K's to my favorite vehicle a laser fund, which is tax free. She pays thirty thousand dollars in taxes. Let's say, and that's probably the worst you'd have to pay as she does that today's lower tax rates over the five year period. So when she is a sixty five all of her taxes have been satisfied within five years. He's paid one hundred and fifty. Rand tax. But by using the roll.

IRA 4._0._1._K president Wall Street Journal time magazine Trump fiduciary congress Untrapped Rand five years twenty years three years ten twenty thirty forty fifty thirty thousand dollars twenty eight percent twenty two percent
"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

08:21 min | 2 years ago

"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"You with insights into opportunities that maybe you didn't know existed before have you ever heard of an opportunity, and you sort of put it off and thought well, no rush. And then all of a sudden you later found out you missed the deadline, and you could have kicked yourself. Well, I fear. Many of you listening who do not take action are going to do that when the current Trump tax cuts expire or they're replaced or our tax rates. Go back up to where they were even higher, which is what is on the democrat agenda, and we all know that whether it's a one term or two term president that the other party many times comes in and reverses and raises taxes and and. Tries to undo what the previous administration did. And this is going to happen again. So I want to address in this segment. Why many of you should pay taxes now on maybe your tax deferred accounts like IRA's and 4._0._1._K's at a lower rate. Probably the lowest rate you will ever be in. But especially on your tax deferred accounts. Like I raised in 4._0._1._K's, and you may end up with as much as double the net spendable income during retirement and to illustrate my point here, I'm going to give you an ample that I came up with years ago, and I L astray this in several stories actual examples in my latest book the laser fund, but I'm gonna use a hypothetical couple here. A Mr. taxed to the max versus MRs I've a lot more. K now one of the original tenants of having a traditional. IRA or 4._0._1._K held that you would likely be in a lower tax bracket when you retired then during your working years folks that has not been true or axiomatic for over twenty five years. Most people are finding themselves in his high or as higher tax brackets when they retire than they were in during their working years when they were full-time why is that? There are two main reasons one most people no longer have the tax deductions and exemptions. When they retire that they had when they were working, for example, many retirees have paid off their mortgage. They no longer have that interest deduction. Dependent in the household. The the kids are gone now. Or if they're not gone, you can't deduct them anymore game and many people are not contributing money to IRA's and 4._0._1._K's. So you don't have that deduction anymore, and congress has continually been raising taxes, even though it goes up and down a little bit. It keeps going up like a person with a yoyo going up some stairs. So people are not in lower tax brackets when they retire. And it is amusing in a way, but very disturbing also that it took the financial services industry until about three years ago to finally admit that. Was poor advice to tell people to put money in tax deferred accounts on the premise that you were going to be in a lower tax bracket when most people were not if you're in a lower tax bracket, it means you didn't save very much. So a fiduciary is supposed to be looking out for your best interest. And they actually knew for years that you were headed for a higher tax bracket. What should they have done? They should've gotten your money out the taxes over and done with see I've been attacked strategist for most of my forty five years, and I've helped many people get Untrapped from that tax trap that they were sort of painting themselves into. So the second premise is that tax rates have been going up and would likely continue to go up. And if that's true if taxes are going up, why do you want to continue to defer to some future perceived unknown advantage, and then pull out your money down the road when we can? Vince taxes are going to be higher that doesn't make sense. Okay. So especially if you're over the age of fifty nine and a half, and maybe even under age fifty nine and a half into certain circumstances. There are windows of opportunity where you can transfer money out in your current tax threshold many times people have room ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars of room where they can actually take money out of an IRA or 4._0._1._K in a given tax year and not pay any higher tax rate. Then if they left it there and deferred and created a bigger problem by compounding that problem by delaying the inevitable so to speak, and so you get the taxes over and done with in these lower brackets sometimes people right now are in a twenty two percent. That's not gonna last it's going to go back up to twenty five or even twenty eight percent again when the Democrats maybe take over and so when that. Happens. People are going to be kicking themselves for not taking advantage of this opportunity. So why wait for your IRA's and 4._0._1._K's to to recover from the the whip saw in the market and come back to that level or why wait around thinking? Well, I'm going to wait and see if if Trump gets elected to a second term folks, this usually takes four or five years to do it. Anyway, you should be doing it. Now, even if he gets reelected because most people it takes about five years to get your money out the taxes over and done with and the money reposition is something that's going to be tax free from now on without sending you to a higher tax bracket. And that's why a lot of these articles that I often refer to like time magazine why it's time to retire the 4._0._1._K and do something better instead or the one that came out of the Wall Street Journal about two and a half three years ago that said, you know, the original champions of the 4._0._1._K lament the day they ever came up without idea. Well. People aren't in lower tax bracket. So let's look at Mr. tax to the maximum MRs. I've a lot more quickly here. Let's say that this gentleman tax to the max is a sixty year old and has a half a million accumulated in IRA's and 4._0._1._K's and the funds are earning seven point two percent. And this person does not intend to retire need the money until age seventy so the accounts double during the ten years to a million tax deferred is what most people are convinced to buy their CPA or whatever at interest only withdrawals of seventy two thousand a year beginning at eight seventy they would likely be paying about a third of that seventy two thousand in tax because of other income and so forth. So a third of that is twenty four grand a year. And you do that let's say live twenty years. So you're paying twenty four thousand a year on the back end during the harvest years of your retirement because you used pretax money. You use the seed money so to speak that was tax advantaged on a traditional IRA 4._0._1._K. So over twenty years of retirement, this person's going to pay nearly a half a million dollars in taxes and a third of everything's going to go out the window to pay the tax deferred and deferred and so forth. And when they finally pass away they're going to be leaving behind whatever's in there to their heirs and their heirs are going to have to pay that too. Let's compare that to MRs I've a lot more. She's sixty years old. She rolls out twenty percent of her IRA or 4._0._1._K's to my favorite vehicle a laser fund, which is tax free. She pays thirty thousand dollars in taxes. Let's say, and that's the probably the worst you'd have to pay as she does that at today's lower tax rates over the five year period. So when she is a sixty five all of her taxes have been sad. Spied within five years. He's paid one hundred fifty grand in tax..

4._0._1._K IRA president Trump fiduciary congress time magazine Untrapped Vince Wall Street Journal five years twenty years three years ten twenty thirty forty fifty thirty thousand dollars twenty eight percent twenty two percent
"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

07:20 min | 2 years ago

"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Independent in thoughts and punk rock in life. It's the Chad Benson show. The president applauding the decision over the weekend. Exciting things happened over the last twenty four hours Democrats quickly the decision, but former President Barack Obama posting messages on social media about his signature law encouraging Americans to enroll by Sunday's open enrollment deadline despite the ruling. Yeah. So judge strikes down the ruling, what's it mean very little for you. The reality is it's gonna take a long time. It's gonna wind its way through the system the fifth the fifth circuit will probably strike this. Judges thing down that could potentially go the supreme court need four justices to take the hearing. And do you have that? And I don't know, but it's not going to happen overnight. This is probably six months or a year before we even get to that point were speculating go from speculation to reality. It's just there's nothing to worry about. But the fight is still there and. Healthcare, still improved. Could it be improved? Not until cooler calmer heads prevail who want to find solutions, and it's not going to be hundred percent solution. Not everybody's gonna be happy with what they get. But it will be better than what we have. Now. No place is perfect. And if you're looking for perfection, you're not going to find it in healthcare or anything else that is the reality of life. That is the reality of this. But we can do better we can make it more affordable. And I will say this. I don't think you should go bankrupt. I don't I let you go bankrupt over medical. But I know when you start to take money out of stuff people that are smart people that make a living go elsewhere. And then you have the brain drain and nobody wants to be involved. So if you take money out of medical if you take money at a pharmaceutical, look how much of it is part of our economy. If you take that up. And say we can't do this anymore. We're taking this all up with you. We'd like you to kind of take half of what you're earning now and donate some of your time. People are going to buy screw that. This is a business. We're leaving. I'm not going to risk my money for no reward. It's a risk reward world. That's why people go into the industries like this. Because especially when it comes to drugs, the pharmaceuticals and all these things the risk reward. Is that thing that you're creating you could put a billion dollars into it two billion three billion four billion? And eventually, you could go it doesn't work. Back to the drawing board. So it's a risk reward. And when you take away the reward, why would anybody risk anything three two three five three eight twenty four twenty three at Chadbensonshow is your Twitter. You can tweet at us. This is something that we should be looking at. And I don't know about you it annoys the hell out of me. And we'll get to that. In a second the annoyance of it all, but it is growing fast survey found a dramatic increase in the number of teens who are keeping these numbers. Doubling for twelfth graders who reported vaping nicotine for the thirty days before taking this survey. This is the second year. Researchers have looked at these numbers. They specifically looked at eighth tenth and twelfth graders in two thousand eighteen over a third of twelfth graders reported vaping at all in the last year translating to about one point three million more teams vaping in the previous year, which is a dramatic number. Yeah. That is that is huge. And it's becoming a hip thing. That's what it is becoming. You know, you've got the the they've got the big vaping machines. They have all of these things, and and and you know, people blowing smoke it's ridiculous. It is and this weekend. So I took the boys to I went to see a movie we'll talk about that a little later, but then on on Saturday. We all went to Knott's berry farms for big family thing wrong with announce berry farm and the amount of people who were at this amusement park that were vaping just out of nowhere was insane. And and it's annoying. You know, I go for my walks around here and do the walks around the complex and stuff people vaping. And they blow the smoke everywhere. And it's annoying, and it's like become this cool thing and on the other side of stuff you've got Jew and Julius is facing some some real issues here that because of the way that they're growing there. Products. And what they were doing is. They're using social media influencers, if you don't have social media influencers, very interesting. There are plenty of people out there. Like, you've you unless you're in the know, you know, as far as social media you follow it all day long. You probably don't know about a lot of these people. But there are people that are influencers and influencers are people who have one hundred thousand two hundred thousand five hundred thousand million three four five ten million people to follow them and products and companies will come to them and say, hey, use my stuff right used my stuff and check this out. Right. Check check out. Check out this use my stuff will pay at ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars. If you can go on there and do advertising because we know you'll influence many people to do it and people coming out Joel say, well, we're we're going to get rid of this now. But that's because the ugly cat is out of the bag gills t reached out to me to work together. We came up with working on a sponsored posts, which is just a blog post, and then one Instagram post their budget was okay, we can offer you a thousand dollars. So that's one person thousand bucks. Somewhat of an influence, and when you get to a point where you have that instead of having to go to sponsor, you know, these things because that doesn't do as well, it's like when we do our reads here, we talk it doesn't do as well as when you go out there, and you say, hey, I'm such and such and I've got a million captive followers. They're going to do a lot of what I said try this. You're gonna love it try this. There's a whole world on social media, which people make tens of thousands and millions of dollars off this, and it's crazy, and that's the way jewel went after it again vaping and jewel little separate things. But it's because it's a hip factor. One of them is more about like, if I was like, I don't know if you have you ever vape film because you're you you've smoked for. I've never done have you ever Vate. I wouldn't call it vaping. I had an e cigarette. This is all the stuff that looks weird and stuff like, hey, check it out. It looks like a genie bottle, but I can smoke out of it. So check this out. These are some of the things. In vape. So you've got fruit pop food fighter juice, five ponds dinner, lady cut wood. They've got Yoda. They've got pinkies up. They've got mad Hatter juice. These are just some of the stuff that you get. And that's why you get all these weird smells. They've got like skittles and all kinds of crazy crap. Like that Yoda Darth Vader where you talking about e cigarettes e cigarettes or these things like jewel that's supposed to be like the alternative to smoking. And they're hypnotise.

Democrats Chad Benson Barack Obama president Twitter President nicotine Instagram Darth Vader Knott Julius Joel ten twenty thirty forty fifty twenty four hours thousand dollars billion dollars hundred percent thirty days six months
"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

07:31 min | 2 years ago

"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"KTAR news ninety two three FM independent in thoughts and punk rock in life. It's the Chad Benson show. The president applauding the decision over the weekend. Exciting things happened over the last twenty four hours Democrats quickly can the decision, but former President Barack Obama posting messages on social media about his signature law encouraging Americans to enroll by Sunday's open enrollment deadline despite the ruling. Yeah. So a judge strikes down the ruling, what's it mean very little for you. The reality is is it's gonna take a long time. It's gonna wind its way through the system the fifth the fifth circuit will probably strike this. Judges thing down that could potentially go to the supreme court. But you need four justices to take the hearing. And do you have that? And I don't know, but it's not going to happen overnight. This is probably six months or a year before we even get to that point. We're speculating we go from speculation to reality. It's just. There's nothing to worry about. But the fight is still there and. Healthcare. Still not improved. It's not going to be improved. Not until cooler calmer heads prevail who want to find solutions, and it's not going to be under percent solution. Not everybody's gonna be happy with what they get. But it will be better than what we have. Now. No place is perfect. And if you're looking for perfection, you're not going to fight it in health care or anything else that is the reality of life. That is the reality of this. But we can do better we can make it more affordable. And I will say this. I don't think you should go bankrupt. I don't I like you should go bankrupt over medical. But I know when you start to take money out of stuff people that are smart people that make a living go elsewhere. And then you have the brain drain and nobody wants to be involved. So if you take money out of medical if you take money at a pharmaceutical, and look how much of it is part of our economy. If you take that up. And say we can't do this anymore. We're taking this all up with you. We'd like you to kind of take half of what you're earning now and donate some of your time. People are going to be like screw that. This is a business. We're leaving. I'm not going to risk my money for no reward. It's a risk reward world. That's why people go into the industries like this. Because especially when it comes to drugs, the pharmaceuticals and all of these things the risk reward. Is that thing that you're creating you could put a billion dollars into two billion three billion four billion? And eventually, you could go it doesn't work. Back to the drawing board. So it's a risk reward. And when you take away the reward, why would anybody risk anything three two three five three eight twenty four twenty three at Chadbensonshow is your Twitter. You could tweet at us. This is something that we should be looking at. And I don't know about you it annoys the hell out of me. And we'll get to that. In a second the annoyance of at all. But it is growing fast survey found a dramatic increase in the number of teens who are these numbers. Doubling for twelfth graders who reported vaping nicotine for the thirty days before taking this survey. This is the second year. Researchers have looked at these numbers. They specifically looked at eighth tenth and twelfth graders in two thousand eighteen over a third of twelfth graders reported vaping at all in the last year translating to about one point three million more teams vaping in the previous year, which is a dramatic number. Yeah. That is that is huge. And it's becoming a hip thing. That's what it is becoming. You know, you've got the the they've got the big vaping machines. They have all of these things, and and and you know, people blowing smoke it's ridiculous. It is and this weekend. So I took the boys to I went to see a movie we'll talk about that a little later, but then on on Saturday. We all went to knotsberry farm family thing well with the knotsberry farm and the amount of people who were at this amusement park that were vaping just out of nowhere was insane. And and it's annoying. I go for my walks around here and do the walks around the complex and stuff. And I'll see people vaping. And they blow the smoke everywhere. And it's annoying, and it's like become this cool thing and on the other side of stuff. You've got you and Julius is facing some some real issues here because of the way that they're growing there. Products. And what they were doing is. They're using social media influencers, if you don't have social media influencers, very interesting. There are plenty of people out there. Like, you you unless you're in the know, you know, as far as social media you follow it all day long. You probably don't know about a lot of these people. But there are people that are influencers and influencers are people who have hundred thousand two hundred thousand five hundred thousand million three four five ten million people to follow them and products and companies will come to them and say, hey, use my stuff right used my stuff. And check this out. Check check out check out this use my stuff will pay at ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars if you can go on there and do advertising because we know you'll influence many people to do it and people are coming out you'll say, well, we're we're going to get rid of this now. But that's because the ugly cat is out of the bag gills t reached out to me to work together. We came up with working on a sponsored post, which is just a blog post, and then one Instagram post their budget was okay, we can offer you a thousand dollars. So that's one person thousand bucks. Somewhat of an influence, and when you get to a point where you have that instead of having to go to sponsor, you know, these things because that doesn't do as well, it's like when we do our reach here, we talk it doesn't do as well as when you go out there, and you say, hey, I'm such and such and I've got a million captive followers. They're going to do a lot of what I said try this. You're gonna love it try this. There's a whole world on social media, which people make tens of thousands and millions of dollars off this, and it's crazy, and that's the way jewel went after it again vaping and jewel little separate things. But it's because it's a hip factor. Right. One of them is more about like if I was like, I don't know if have you ever vape Phil because you're you've smoked for. I've never done have you ever Vate. I wouldn't call it vaping. I had an e cigarette. This is before all the stuff that looks all weird and stuff. Hey, check it out. It looks like a genie bottle, but I can smoke out of it. So check this out. These are some of the things in vape. So you've got fruit pop food fighter juice, five ponds dinner, lady cut wood. They've got Yoda. They've got pinkies up. They've got mad Hatter juice. These are just some of the stuff that you get. And that's why you get all these weird, smells like skittles and all kinds of crazy crap. Like that Yoda Darth Vader where you talking about e cigarettes e cigarettes or these things like jewel that's supposed to be like the alternative to smoking..

supreme court Democrats Chad Benson Barack Obama president Twitter President knotsberry farm nicotine Darth Vader Instagram Julius Phil ten twenty thirty forty fifty twenty four hours thousand dollars billion dollars thirty days six months
"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

07:43 min | 2 years ago

"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Details game sold separately. Independent in thoughts and punk rock in life. It's the Benson show. The president applauding the decision over the weekend. Exciting things happened over the last twenty four hours. Democrats quickly can the decision with former President Barack Obama. Posting messages on social media about his signature law encouraging Americans to enroll by Sunday's open enrollment deadline despite the ruling. Yeah. So a judge strikes down the ruling, what's it mean very little for you. The reality is is it's gonna take a long time. It's gonna wind its way through the system the fifth the fifth circuit will probably strike this. Judges thing down that could potentially go. The supreme court you need four justices to take the hearing. And do you have that? And I don't know. But it's not going to happen overnight. This is probably six months or a year before we even get to that point were speculating, we'd go from speculation to reality. It's just there's nothing to worry. About but the fight is still there and. Healthcare is still unimproved. It's not going to be improved. Not until cooler calmer heads prevail who want to find solutions, and it's not going to be on a percents solution. Not everybody's gonna be happy with what they get. But it will be better than what we have. Now. No place is perfect. And if you're looking for perfection, you're not going to find it in health care or anything else that is the reality of life. That is the reality of this. But we can do better we can make it more. And I will say this. I don't think you should go bankrupt. I don't I let you should go bankrupt over medical. But I know when you start to take money out of stuff people that are smart people that make a living go elsewhere. And then you have the brain drain and nobody wants to be involved. So if you take money out of medical you money at a pharmaceutical, look how much of it is part of our economy. If you take that up. And say we can't do this anymore. We're taking this all up with you. We'd like you to kind of take half of what you're earning now and donate some of your time. People are going to be like screw that. This is a business. We're leaving. I'm not going to risk my money for no reward. It's a risk reward world. That's why people go into the industries like this. Because especially when it comes to drugs, the pharmaceuticals and all these things the risk reward. Is that thing that you're creating you could put a billion dollars into two billion three billion four billion? And eventually, you could go it doesn't work. Back to the drawing board. So it's a risk reward. And when you take away the reward, why would anybody risk anything three two three five three eight twenty four twenty three at Chadbensonshow is your Twitter. You could tweet at us. This is something that we should be looking at. And I don't know about you it annoys the hell out of me. And we'll get to that. In a second the annoyance of it all, but it is growing fast survey found a dramatic increase in the number of teens who are these numbers dabbling for twelfth graders who reported vaping nicotine for thirty days before taking this survey. This is the second year. Researchers have looked at these numbers. They specifically looked at eighth tenth and twelfth graders in two thousand eighteen over a third of twelfth graders reported vaping at all in the last year translating to about one point three million more teams vaping in the previous here, which is a dramatic number. Yeah. That is a huge. And it's becoming a hip thing. That's what it is becoming. You know, you've got the the they've got the big vaping machines. They have all of these things, and and and you know, people blowing smoke it's ridiculous. It is and this weekend. So I took the boys to I went to see a movie we'll talk about that a little later, but then on on Saturday. We all went to knotsberry farm family thing wrong with announced berry farm and the amount of people who were at this amusement park that were vaping just out of nowhere was insane. And and it's annoying. You know, I go for my walks around here and do the walks around the complex and stuff, and I'll see people vaping. And they blow the smoke everywhere. And it's annoying, and it's like become this cool thing and on the other side of stuff. You've got you and Julius is facing some some real issues here because of the way that they're growing there. Products. And what they were doing is. They're using social media influencers, if you don't have social media influencers, very interesting. There are plenty of people out there. Like, you you unless you're in the know, you know, as far as social media you follow it all day long. You probably know about a lot of these people. But there are people that are influencers and influencers are people who have hundred thousand two hundred thousand five hundred thousand million three four five ten million people to follow them and products and companies will come to them and say, hey, use my stuff right used my stuff. And check this out. Check check out check out this use my stuff. Oh, pay at ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars if you can go on there and do advertising because we know you'll influence many people to do it and people are coming out jewel say, well, we're we're going to get rid of this now. But that's because the ugly cat is out of the bag gills t reached out to me to work together. We came up with working on a sponsored post, which is just a blog post, and then one Instagram posts their budget was okay, we can offer you a thousand dollars. So that's one person thousand bucks. Somewhat of an influence, and when you get to a point where you have that instead of having to go to sponsor, you know, these things because that doesn't do as well, it's like when we do our reads here, we talk it doesn't do as well as when you go out there, and you say, hey, I'm such and such and I've got a million captive followers. They're going to do a lot of what I said try this. You're gonna love it try this. There's a whole world on social media, which people make tens of thousands and millions of dollars off this, and it's crazy, and that's the way jewel went after it again vaping and jewel little separate things. But it's because it's a hip factor. Right. One of them is more about like, if I was like, I don't know if you have you ever vape film because you're you you've smoked for. I've never done have you ever Vate. I wouldn't call it vaping. I had an e cigarette. This all the stuff that looks all weird and stuff. It's like, hey, check it out. It looks like a genie bottle, but I can smoke out of it. So check this out. These are some of the things in vape. So you've got fruit pop food fighter juice, five ponds dinner, lady cut wood. They've got Yoda. They've got pinkies up. They've got mad Hatter juice. These are just some of the stuff that you get. And that's where you get all these weird smells. They got like skittles and all kinds of crazy crap. Like that Yoda Dr. Vader where you talking about e cigarettes e cigarettes or these things like jewel that's supposed to be like the alternative to smoking. And.

president Barack Obama Benson Twitter nicotine Instagram knotsberry farm Dr. Vader Julius berry farm ten twenty thirty forty fifty twenty four hours thousand dollars billion dollars thirty days six months
"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Can also go to my website, three ws, San Fran Mary and EMMY EMMY an N dot com. You know, how to spell San Fran. And if not it's S A N F R E N. Okay. So San Fran Marianne dot com. So we're talking about the market short sales are up the I mean, they're coming back. I had to if you go to equator dot com. You'll find me there Maryanne Dorna, and what are the things that is really telling is the map that they have up. And what does that mean? Well, right now, there's fifty six thousand one hundred and thirteen active are ios in the nation. That's just in a nation. Now funny thing is Florida's leading away. They're a red state literally speaking there also read with short sales are kind of leading the way in California. Hey, we're we're coming up pretty close. Okay. So we need to be able to offset that by knowing what to do and nine what to do is. A short sale is when before it was when the prices were upside down, the the heart the value of the loan was more than the value of the home. So it like drop by half if not more at some cases, and nobody wanted to pay those high mortgage. Head vertically those very exotic mortgages based on like eighty twenty hundred percent loans and all these. All these exotic loans, and all these really arms that grew hands a choke people. And so basically we're coming out of that supposedly, and it's more stabilize market, they're not pushing arms like they used to. Fix thirty year fix. It's always been the bread and butter of homeownership for working people. But Linda, curl out of debts. They end up. Charging too over their limits. And then you end up ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars worth of credit card debt. And then you end up refinancing your home start. Taking out your equity and one of the one of the downsides of. What's happening with those arms? You end up having to keep refinancing all the time in the Bank makes Pooku bucks. Every time you do that before the bank's only made money once every thirty years on that loan because you know, people paid for it and retired, and, you know, had homeownership, but that's not the case when now with a high debt and the card system that we're in because, you know, your car carrying worker which not necessarily meaning your status, but meaning your credit, so you end up charging too much, and that's what happens and soda every three or four or five years people end up refinancing their homes and taking the equity out. So you don't wanna do that the goal here stability. So now that we're in this market where it's been a ten year. Hike twenty sixteen kind of top that hike and 2017 is the pushback for the pricing. So what's happening at twenty and twenty next carried over into twenty eight. So what's happening is the price of the values are dropping? So if you're a seller. I'm gonna tell her you. You've got to move now because they are coming. According to this map, the REO's are coming. So you need to sell your home prices are still Glennon, you a good chunk of change. You can sell move and start a new chapter of your life. And especially if you're a senior, and by the way, I'm a very good person to work with if you're a senior, I'm very respectful very responsive, and you know, and I like to take care of people and even more so for people who need in a more vulnerable to greediness and more vulnerable to unsavory people doing conducting business with them. If you don't think that's the case go to Arp and find out those statistics. Anyway. I don't want you to go away. Because I want you to find out how not to sell yourself short. By staying connected with San Fran Marianne four one five eight ten one eighty date. We'll be right back with real estate buzz..

San Fran Marianne San Fran San Fran Mary EMMY Maryanne Dorna Florida Arp California Linda Glennon ten twenty thirty forty fifty eighty twenty hundred percent thirty years thirty year five years ten year three ws
"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Of them in fact i would say a need it probably did more executive function stuff than shelly did but in any case they've they've been bite of me out chicago i met with them and john centene great guy they put together air america off a wet i give you this kind of truncated biography of mao why self not to brag about my accomplishments in life for and in that kind of crap but to point out that if i had if i had left college and and you know given i did not graduate from college but you know i spent enough time to two tudor for colleges that i spent some money if i had if i had left college with ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars in student debt there's no way i would have been able enable assert those businesses there's no way that louise and i would have been able to take the chance of moving to vermont are moving to new hampshire and starting a community for abuse kids there's no way that we could have that we could have uh you know sold bought and sold while we didn't by any businesses but we every business that we that we ended up selling we literally started from scratch including the show kuna so i ask you the question how would your life be different if you know assuming that you're not a millennial if if you're if you're older than a millennial how would your life have been different if you had graduated from college with millennial levels student debt i think it would be radically different and what does this mean for this generation we've got an entire generation of saddled with one point four trillion dollars in nonda's chargeable debt you can't even declared bankruptcy to get rid of this debt i mean the banksters the student loan banksters have got an entire generation by of wrote we've got to do something about this the the predatory nature of of 'reaganomics is devastating us this is the thom hartmann program fact with more than use the day of calls for them and welcome back antoine in phoenix arizona a antoine what's on your mind that early tom i was thinking that the democrats have this being smart like public n no one way either be smart money president is due and they'll go around because they give them.

shelly chicago mao louise vermont new hampshire nonda arizona president executive john centene phoenix tom i ten twenty thirty forty fifty four trillion dollars
"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Thank you for the call but do not by an annuity now it's interesting because we were talking in the previous hour about lifetime income creating lifetime income and using things like annuities and i think people who were you know maybe only paying attention halfway or they've been listening to the whole show which we appreciate uh and i write him contradicting myself exactly so let's explain why in her particular instance she does not need an annuity and i will go ahead well she does not need income she doesn't want to spend any more money should as a wanna spend the money that's coming out of the required minimum distribution is come is not an issue here she doesn't want it so don't buy an income annuity that's what gets pushed the most right now the other side of it is let's put it in the something that maybe the required minimum distributions ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars a year let's put it into an annuity today every year so that it grows tax deferred it is growing fast efforts so that forty thousand twenty thousand whenever the armed is is not creating an ongoing taxable event yep but that ongoing tax will that if you're using index funds etf low turnover mutual funds if you using your tax sensitive growth investments really not paid much in the way of taxes in the first place and if you're trying to mimic that with a verbal annuity what i have seen for most people is that the feeds involved in the variable annuity we are equal to or similar to the taxes that they would pay on an annual basis anyway so you're watering down the growth anyway she's not going to spend this money anyway but if let's say i put it into an account that is taxed deferred and it grows to two hundred thousand dollars by the time i die and fifty thousand of its sixty thousand is the deferred growth on that account versus putting it into similar growth investments not it attacks the for the couch and i've had the pace some tax along the way those taxes are similar to the fees insides of the grove out the same and.

mutual funds ten twenty thirty forty fifty two hundred thousand dollars
"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Not the worst thing in the world they get tax free death benefit from that point now whether you are want to control the money at that point is up to you and how you go about setting up the beneficiary do you want to give it to them outright when you die or do you want to control a little bit longer if they're not old enough in your mind to manage the money appropriately same thing with the roth ira if they if they are older now in there are working and you're helping them fund the roth ira are they uh of disciplined enough mind to leave it in the roth ira but there's lots of things going on here but investment wise you've got to in my opinion things to do with this money either invested for growth because you're going to be here for a while still and you'll let it grow over the net ex fifteen twenty plus years and then leave it to them with a step up and basis other taxfree basis or you buy life insurance policy with it okay thank you for the call but do not by an annuity now it's interesting because we were talking in the previous hour about lifetime income creating lifetime income using things like a new itit's and i think the people who were maybe only paying attention halfway or they've been listening to the whole show which we appreciate anyway contradicting myself exactly so let's explain why in her particular instance she does not need an annuity and i will go ahead well she does not need income bright she doesn't want to spend any more money she doesn't want to spend the money that's coming out of the required minimum distribution chan come is not an issue here she doesn't want it so don't buy income annuity that's what gets push the most right now the other side of it is let's put it into something that maybe the required minimum distributions ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars a year let's put it into an annuity today every year so that it grows tax deferred it is growing tax deferred so that forty thousand twenty thousand whenever the are india's is not creating an on glowing taxable event yep but that ongoing taxable it.

life insurance policy india ten twenty thirty forty fifty
"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Thank you for the call but do not by an annuity now it's interesting because we were talking in the previous our about lifetime income creating lifetime income using things like annuities and i think people who were maybe only paying attention halfway or they've been listen to the whole show which we appreciate anyway anyway contracting myself exactly so let's explain why in her particular instance she does not need inonu any and i will go ahead well she does not need income bright she doesn't want to spend any more money she doesn't want to spend the money that's coming out of the required minimum distribution chains come is not an issue here she doesn't want it so don't buy income annuity that's what gets push the most right now the other side of it is let's put it into something that maybe the required minimum distributions ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars a year let's put it into an annuity today every year so that it grows tax deferred it is growing tax deferred so that forty thousand twenty thousand whatever the irony is is not creating an ongoing taxable event yep but that ongoing taxable that if you're using index funds ets low turnover mutual funds if you using your tax sensitive growth investments really not paid much in the way of taxes in the first place and if you're trying to mimic that with a verbal annuity what i have seen for most people is that the fees involved in the variable nudie are equal to or similar to the taxes that they would pay an annual basis anyway so you're watering down the growth anyway she's not going to spend this money anyway but if let's say i put it into the a an account that is taxed.

mutual funds ten twenty thirty forty fifty
"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Thank you for the call that do not by an annuity now it's interesting because we were talking in the previous our about lifetime income creating lifetime income using things like annuities and i think the people who were you know maybe only paying attention halfway or they've been listen to the whole show which we appreciate in any way contradicting myself exactly so let's explain why in her particular instance she does not need a new any and i would go ahead well she does not need income she doesn't want to spend any more money she doesn't want to spend the money that's coming out of the required minimum distribution in come is not an issue here she doesn't want it so don't buy income annuity that's what gets push the most right now the other side of it is let's put it into something that maybe the required minimum distributions ten twenty thirty forty fifty thousand dollars a year let's put it into an annuity today a every year so that it grows tax deferred it is growing tax deferred so that 40000 20000 whatever the rd is is not creating an ongoing taxable event yep but that ongoing taxable that if you're using index funds ets low turnover mutual funds if you using your tax sensitive growth investments ruin out pin much in the way of taxes in the first place and if you're trying to mimic that with a verbal annuity what i have seen for most people is that the fees involved in the variable annuity are equal to or similar to the taxes that they would pay on an annual basis anyway so you're watering down the growth anyway she's not going to spend this money anyway but if let's say i put it into an account that.

mutual funds ten twenty thirty forty fifty