35 Burst results for "Ten Thousand Years"

Legends of the Nahanni Valley

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

01:54 min | Last week

Legends of the Nahanni Valley

"Today and my month long search for strange places from around the world. Both man made and natural traveled. Canada's northwest territories and deadman's valley located a hani national park reserve in the whole region northwest territories canada surround miles west of yellow night. And it was eleven thousand square miles in area. Part of the mackenzie mountains reside. Within and the south nonni river flows through the center. It was named a national park. Nine thousand nine hundred seventy six and a unesco world heritage site nineteen seventy eight. The park is surrounded by huge peaks and features geysers sing. Kohl's deep canyons caves. Gorgeous and beautiful untouched. Forest within these stunning vistas lies. Virginia falls three hundred fifteen feet high or twice the height of niagara falls. This by the by is the last known. Location of the wahiawa abair dog and one ten thousand years ago woolly mammoth. The area is a true wilderness and has been largely unexplored as it is accessible. Only by air new hani's from the language of the indigenous dna people that have inhabited the region for thousands of years in means the people over there in reference to a tribe of mountain tooling people the naja who were once known to raid lowlands settlements before mysteriously vanishing there is speculation that they may have been ancestors of the modern day navajo over the years. There have been many mysterious stories that have emerged from the area. The names of park areas such as deadman's valley headless headless range and the funeral ranch relate to these strange stories and legends

Hani National Park Mackenzie Mountains South Nonni River Deadman Canada Kohl Niagara Falls Hani Virginia
English Is Plain Weird

Lexicon Valley

01:59 min | 2 weeks ago

English Is Plain Weird

"English is not normal the more you hang around and linguistics to more languages you mess around with the more language histories you learn the more you realize that this language that i'm speaking right now. Although it has many advantages for muendane and often unfair reasons this language is not normal and by that. I don't mean that it's extraordinary. I mean that english is weird as languages go and i actually find this one of the funnest things that i know about language and yet it's very hard to perceive it because it's the language that we speak and it's the language spoken by so very many other people in the world. English can feel so normal. But it's actually a highly abnormal thing. And i want to share with you. How it's abnormal and what i mean specifically is that when we think about language we have to think about the history of homo sapiens and the history of homo sapiens. As far as is known now goes back about three hundred thousand years and we might suppose that language emerged then. It's the way. I tend to think of it now. It's also possible. That homo erectus had language in which case language goes back about one point eight million years that is daniel ever another linguist view and i am pretty convinced of it but let's be conservative for now. Let's say that it's three hundred thousand years. The thing is for most of that time. Humanity was different from what most of humanity is now. The neolithic revolution that large scale architecture and the development of what we call civilizations. That's only ten thousand years ago or so and so what that means is that i say two hundred ninety thousand years what humanity was relatively small groups living on the land language developed there. So anything that happens to language after that is a departure from what language normally was what this evolved to be

Daniel
Ancient Dogs Had Complex Genetic Histories

60-Second Science

02:54 min | 3 months ago

Ancient Dogs Had Complex Genetic Histories

"Dogs were the first animals to be domesticated stuck with us as we changed lifestyles from hunting gathering to farming to city living. The dog is a species that is intimately linked to hyun history. Anders bergstrom a post. Doc at the francis crick institute in london. He and his colleagues studied the genomes of twenty seven. Ancient dog bones dug up around the world. They found by eleven thousand years ago. We see the dog to start to diversify united kalihi so we find evidence of at least five major lineages of dogs already at this time. Dog remains have been found in europe asia in the americas in a pattern similar to help. Humans moved mixed to a large degree. The history of dogs dog seems have been shaped by human history. So like the reflecting. How what you must moved. They would have brought her dogs with them. Ancient humans clearly found dogs to be very useful in the arctic. Evidence at sled. Dogs actually emerged very early on people. Use them for the purpose of leading perhaps as early as ten thousand years ago. A few modern breeds like the african basenji new guinea singing dog or australian dingo are similar to one of the five ancient lineages most other modern breeds derived at least in part from european dogs which came to dominate dog genomes. Back for five thousand years ago. There's a great diversity of dogs in europe but at some point there was probably a single population that expanded in basically replaced other populations in europe. So this was something that we did not predict sunday. You couldn't really see just from studying. Archaeology look the dna with all this diversity. In the past that is not represented in present-day dogs. The study is in the journal. Science where you'll find maps of dog migrations over time one odd finding about eleven thousand years ago it looks like dogs. Spread more widely than humans did does actually opposes. We don't understand. So how could the dogs spread so quickly widely. We're we're not aware of any human migrations. At this time that could have facilitated this spread of the dog but some of it spreads very quickly to two human groups all across the world perhaps because he was a very useful thing for his early human together. The groups humans were also useful to dogs prehistoric. Petco didn't exist so dogs. Probably humans did and is human started to form oath species quickly adapted to digest more grains. The number of copies of a starch digesting gene in both humans and dogs increased in the generation following the invention of agriculture. Yes oh that. That's a very striking example of convergent evolution between humans. And dogs. way it's gonna be interesting to think of the dog. As kind of a evolutionary experiment that runs alongside human history and undergoes. Same lifestyle changes that we do

Anders Bergstrom Francis Crick Institute Europe Americas Arctic Asia London Petco
Fish farmings future, and how microbes compete for space on our face

Science Magazine Podcast

09:03 min | 5 months ago

Fish farmings future, and how microbes compete for space on our face

"Now we have staff writer eric. Stock said he wrote a feature on the modernisation of fish breeding in this week's issue. Hi eric a great to be back. Sarah great to have you so fish. Farming is modernizing and on the rise. What's the big picture here. The big picture if you go back to nineteen fifty. And you compare what's happened. Over the last seventy years you can see with with wild caught fish. The overall harvests flattened off in the last couple of decades but aquaculture's continuing to rise that production of farmed seafood. Nearly half the protein that we eat from aquatic organisms is grown on farms. Most of it is freshwater and in asia most of the farm fish in the world coming from the land. These are ponds with carpenter them up. Harp common carp to loppy right trout. Catfish there are a lot of these Aquaculture species would are being grown on land. I was surprised to learn. That fish are behind the times. Humans have been keeping fish to eat or at least a look at for thousands of years. But as you point out in your story fish haven't been altered through breeding like other livestock. How things been different. The big differences that most of the seafood that we're eating it is closer to being wild than the terrestrial livestock. Do you think just because the people who did this intensive breeding the people who were interested in tracing lineages of animals and getting the best from their cows. They just weren't that interested in fish farming or in seafood. Is it just a coincidence of history that the focus of all this intensive breeding has been terrestrial animals. If you're talking about the last century or the last one hundred and fifty years worth you're talking about thousands of years right about thousands of years of thousands of years right so over ten thousand years where humans first domesticated sheep goats cows and then lived with them and over that time. Pick the ones that had the traits that they liked they gave more milk. They had more meat on the bone. That's been happening for a longer time. We've had a longer stable relationship for the most part right. There are some exceptions here for the most part a longer relationship with those animals that walk around. Then with the ones specially no from the sea and the other is that over those thousands of years. the terrestrial livestock went through population bottlenecks that reduce their genetic diversity. It's like when you bring a few parents cows to a continent but nobody's bringing around a pond full of fish right. That's a great point. It is harder to bring those with you as your trucking across the continent there is some archaeological evidence for aquaculture. There's a lot of i inference. There is evidence in australia. Aboriginal people in six thousand years ago. Where building ponds to keep eels. But who knows you know to what extent they were selecting. If you can control the life cycle that's really the key thing with domestication and being able to have it reproduce in captivity right and then you really can pick the ones that you like and selectively breed. Those for continued improvements now. Researchers are jumping way ahead skipping centuries of painstaking documentation breeding line analysis and using modern technologies to get what they want from fish. Well what do we want from fish. Eric it depends on who you are right on the one hand. If you're a fish farmer their key things that you want the first one is fish to grow well or not just fish. They'll probably say fish a lot but we're really talking about a huge range of organisms right fish. Crustaceans molluscs really hugely different organisms. But no matter what you're growing you want creatures that grow. Well they have a lot of protein that you can sell to the grocery stores new consumers. You want bigger fatter oysters. Send you want large fillets you want them coming from animals that grow quickly so maybe you can do more generations right more cycles per year. So that's the first thing you want. The second thing you want. is hardy. Animals healthy animals ones that resist disease. And this is. It's a huge issue in aquaculture breaks of disease can really hamper an operation in shrimp farms. You could lose forty percent of your entire crop. In all of those cases having disease resistant animals is a real benefit. Fast and good growers diseases in animals. Anything else that you want out of your domesticated livestock. Once you've made progress with that. Breeders will turn to traits like in what does that fillet look like was salmond consumers really like reddish pink fillets so you can read salmon to have naturally redder flesh color around her fish right rather than a longer fish war color apparently in japan trout with a bluer color and fewer spots or spots. Just in the right place on the outside of the fish that's desirable so chilean breeders of optimize their trout that they export for those qualities. What technologies are fish. Farmers livestock breeders using to achieve these goals. You need to do as a breeder is. You need to be able to pick the fish that you want to propagate so four a faster growing fish. that's not hard right. You just need a ruler. In a scale you can. And when salmon breeding got underway in the late sixties early seventies. They were getting gains in growth rate of ten fifteen percent per generation. Right at wow. And put that in the context right. If you're a poultry breeder a few percent is a really good thing. Yeah so you can measure that but it's not always simple if you want to measure the color of the flay obviously you need to Sacrifice the fish right. So you can't use that fish for a hattrick because it's It's dead so what the breeders of done is the used. Something called family based approach where they have crosses between two parents and then the offspring hundreds thousands in a tank and they can test some of those but they'd have to use siblings for the actual production of the fish that go off to the farms. How do they know which sibling. Which family members carry those desirable traits. So the technology comes into this is using genetic markers where you can look for. Little changes in the in the genome that reveal whether a favourable lille of a gene is present us. Take a little clip of the fin. If it's a fish in you can sequence that tissue for the genetic markers that are in it so that allows you to really get much more accurate selection of fish for the next generation. We talking about fish for while here. Let's move to some of these invertebrates we have you talk a little bit about oysters. Triploid oysters what is that. And what does that accomplish. Oysters in the wild. They've got like us two copies of each chromosome. You call them diploid. If you took a human and you added an extra copy of chromosome. They wouldn't survive. That moisture is our of stuffing with one voice to reader. Who know asked him. Why did you get interested. Your genetic trained as a geneticist. Why did you get interested in oysters. And he said there so tolerant of genetic abuse. Neka really manip- manipulate their genes. And they'll survive right so you can give them a whole half extra genome and they're fine or double it you can make them tetsuo -ployed and the really has a tremendous impact for improving the production of the oysters. If you make triploid waster it becomes sterile. It's healthy. it's normal. It might be hardier. More disease resistant to they. Mature faster you harvest them sooner and in some places that means you pull them out of the water. E four the disease outbreaks in the hotter warmer conditions. The next nother advantage of triplet wasters. Because they're sterile. they're not putting much energy into reproducing. Why bother so. They don't develop the same mass of sperm or eggs. That affirmative oyster does. There's more meat on them. So the real advantages to making a triploid bicester.

Eric Sarah Asia Salmon Stock Salmond Hardy Australia Japan
Fish farmings future, and how microbes compete for space on our face

Science Magazine Podcast

09:03 min | 5 months ago

Fish farmings future, and how microbes compete for space on our face

"Now we have staff writer eric. Stock said he wrote a feature on the modernisation of fish breeding in this week's issue. Hi eric a great to be back. Sarah great to have you so fish. Farming is modernizing and on the rise. What's the big picture here. The big picture if you go back to nineteen fifty. And you compare what's happened. Over the last seventy years you can see with with wild caught fish. The overall harvests flattened off in the last couple of decades but aquaculture's continuing to rise that production of farmed seafood. Nearly half the protein that we eat from aquatic organisms is grown on farms. Most of it is freshwater and in asia most of the farm fish in the world coming from the land. These are ponds with carpenter them up. Harp common carp to loppy right trout. Catfish there are a lot of these Aquaculture species would are being grown on land. I was surprised to learn. That fish are behind the times. Humans have been keeping fish to eat or at least a look at for thousands of years. But as you point out in your story fish haven't been altered through breeding like other livestock. How things been different. The big differences that most of the seafood that we're eating it is closer to being wild than the terrestrial livestock. Do you think just because the people who did this intensive breeding the people who were interested in tracing lineages of animals and getting the best from their cows. They just weren't that interested in fish farming or in seafood. Is it just a coincidence of history that the focus of all this intensive breeding has been terrestrial animals. If you're talking about the last century or the last one hundred and fifty years worth you're talking about thousands of years right about thousands of years of thousands of years right so over ten thousand years where humans first domesticated sheep goats cows and then lived with them and over that time. Pick the ones that had the traits that they liked they gave more milk. They had more meat on the bone. That's been happening for a longer time. We've had a longer stable relationship for the most part right. There are some exceptions here for the most part a longer relationship with those animals that walk around. Then with the ones specially no from the sea and the other is that over those thousands of years. the terrestrial livestock went through population bottlenecks that reduce their genetic diversity. It's like when you bring a few parents cows to a continent but nobody's bringing around a pond full of fish right. That's a great point. It is harder to bring those with you as your trucking across the continent there is some archaeological evidence for aquaculture. There's a lot of i inference. There is evidence in australia. Aboriginal people in six thousand years ago. Where building ponds to keep eels. But who knows you know to what extent they were selecting. If you can control the life cycle that's really the key thing with domestication and being able to have it reproduce in captivity right and then you really can pick the ones that you like and selectively breed. Those for continued improvements now. Researchers are jumping way ahead skipping centuries of painstaking documentation breeding line analysis and using modern technologies to get what they want from fish. Well what do we want from fish. Eric it depends on who you are right on the one hand. If you're a fish farmer their key things that you want the first one is fish to grow well or not just fish. They'll probably say fish a lot but we're really talking about a huge range of organisms right fish. Crustaceans molluscs really hugely different organisms. But no matter what you're growing you want creatures that grow. Well they have a lot of protein that you can sell to the grocery stores new consumers. You want bigger fatter oysters. Send you want large fillets you want them coming from animals that grow quickly so maybe you can do more generations right more cycles per year. So that's the first thing you want. The second thing you want. is hardy. Animals healthy animals ones that resist disease. And this is. It's a huge issue in aquaculture breaks of disease can really hamper an operation in shrimp farms. You could lose forty percent of your entire crop. In all of those cases having disease resistant animals is a real benefit. Fast and good growers diseases in animals. Anything else that you want out of your domesticated livestock. Once you've made progress with that. Breeders will turn to traits like in what does that fillet look like was salmond consumers really like reddish pink fillets so you can read salmon to have naturally redder flesh color around her fish right rather than a longer fish war color apparently in japan trout with a bluer color and fewer spots or spots. Just in the right place on the outside of the fish that's desirable so chilean breeders of optimize their trout that they export for those qualities. What technologies are fish. Farmers livestock breeders using to achieve these goals. You need to do as a breeder is. You need to be able to pick the fish that you want to propagate so four a faster growing fish. that's not hard right. You just need a ruler. In a scale you can. And when salmon breeding got underway in the late sixties early seventies. They were getting gains in growth rate of ten fifteen percent per generation. Right at wow. And put that in the context right. If you're a poultry breeder a few percent is a really good thing. Yeah so you can measure that but it's not always simple if you want to measure the color of the flay obviously you need to Sacrifice the fish right. So you can't use that fish for a hattrick because it's It's dead so what the breeders of done is the used. Something called family based approach where they have crosses between two parents and then the offspring hundreds thousands in a tank and they can test some of those but they'd have to use siblings for the actual production of the fish that go off to the farms. How do they know which sibling. Which family members carry those desirable traits. So the technology comes into this is using genetic markers where you can look for. Little changes in the in the genome that reveal whether a favourable lille of a gene is present us. Take a little clip of the fin. If it's a fish in you can sequence that tissue for the genetic markers that are in it so that allows you to really get much more accurate selection of fish for the next generation. We talking about fish for while here. Let's move to some of these invertebrates we have you talk a little bit about oysters. Triploid oysters what is that. And what does that accomplish. Oysters in the wild. They've got like us two copies of each chromosome. You call them diploid. If you took a human and you added an extra copy of chromosome. They wouldn't survive. That moisture is our of stuffing with one voice to reader. Who know asked him. Why did you get interested. Your genetic trained as a geneticist. Why did you get interested in oysters. And he said there so tolerant of genetic abuse. Neka really manip- manipulate their genes. And they'll survive right so you can give them a whole half extra genome and they're fine or double it you can make them tetsuo -ployed and the really has a tremendous impact for improving the production of the oysters. If you make triploid waster it becomes sterile. It's healthy. it's normal. It might be hardier. More disease resistant to they. Mature faster you harvest them sooner and in some places that means you pull them out of the water. E four the disease outbreaks in the hotter warmer conditions. The next nother advantage of triplet wasters. Because they're sterile. they're not putting much energy into reproducing. Why bother so. They don't develop the same mass of sperm or eggs. That affirmative oyster does. There's more meat on them. So the real advantages to making a triploid bicester.

Eric Sarah Asia Salmon Stock Salmond Hardy Australia Japan
Digital anthropology with Genevieve Bell

UX Podcast

07:38 min | 5 months ago

Digital anthropology with Genevieve Bell

"I think i think many of us when when we actually think of technical systems we think of the modern digital technologies but technical systems. They've been around weavers an awful long time they have. And it's nice to get to talk to you. And per james and often when i start conversations not usually podcast but other conversations. I'd stop by actually acknowledging. I am and that's partly a story about an older technical system are today. I'm sitting on the lands of the wall and nambi people. I don't want to pay my respects to the eldest pasta present and to acknowledge that this compensation will be listened to on the lands of traditional owners and traditional elders all over the world. I wanna pay my respects to them to and from a pot of acknowledging the place where you're standing with the place where you're starting is whenever i want to think about technical systems or about build a future all telling stories about the future. I like to imagine that most of those stories didn't come out of nowhere right. They start somewhere with someone. And i'm lucky enough to live these days in a country where humans have been building technical systems. Well first closest forever as we can probably get so. There are technical systems in australia. That died back. Forty sixty thousand years. And i was thousand years. Yeah absolutely humans deliberately creating structures that changed the world in order to create different kinds of experiences. I was lucky enough. Two years ago to go visit one. I in a town called warrener was on the new south wales queensland border. So you're thinking of a map of australia. Go two thirds of the way up mostly to the right and the river system and there's a place where a large riba abandons basically and on that band there are a series of stone. Fish whiz archaeologists argue. About how old they are. But the running argument somewhere between four to forty thousand years old in either instance that makes them some of the oldest human built technical structures in the world and these are deliberate right. They extend columbia in distance. Downriver they are a series of stone u-shaped pens that were built to contain the fishes. The water moves up in flows down that river in the fish. Move up that are filters the fish. Basically in flow of their series of fish fish traps all they built like fishnets. That is the origin story of the one of the ancestors decided to build a stone. Fish nets they will lost photographed in use in the nineteen teens So a system that is thousands if not tens of thousands of years in the making it suggests incredibly on robust understanding of hydrology of fish behavior. These have been carefully tended and curated over seasons and he is in decades and they were not built for the sake of them are. They weren't because someone said got some startling lying around. We should do something with that comes from quite some distance. It's dry stone. If you know anything about that. Kind of technology said dry stone walls familiar. I suspect in your part of the world as mine and they were utilized with complicated social patents about who tended them who will job to the fish but ultimately what they was in the service of doing multiple nations to gather on the banks of that river and trade conduct rituals exchange information a human at scale and so he has this system that says the humans that lived in that place on the stood stone but amsterdam hydrology. They understood the behaviors of fish. And i thought about people and human society. And so whenever i think about technical systems in my now life twenty-first-century like to hold that idea in the back of my head that it is possible to build technical systems. That are not just technologies right. They are systems of knowledge. They are ways of understanding the environment ways of making sense all the end supporting human behavior and that those things don't have to be At all to each other they can actually exist as a system of systems. And so it's kind of this powerful image that sits in the back of my head most is not that system if it lasted that long forty thousand plus years then they have been managing it. I guess you mean they're they're also iterating it. Because the absolutely there's evidence of that system evolving and growing over time expanding and contracting in terms of where the storms will being moved. And of course it's also system that existed through a period of european colonization of australia so when europeans i turned up in that set of river valleys in the eighteen eighteen twenties. They sold the ways. They knew that average won't people had fish there by the time. The townships built there later in that century Europeans took some of the rocks out of the river because they were smooth and well shaped and use them to make the foundations of the towns nearby. Thus both changing the way that system work but also taking some of that knowledge and in some ways inserting it into a whole although structure and in the meantime new concrete ways will put on that river to redirect the water so that it could be used for shipping and that sort of changed those systems. but no. you're absolutely right. That's a period of time. So thirty ten thousand years forty thousand years multiple changes in global environment such that people would have had to have thought differently and continued to write and evolved that system and work out what worked and then they were willing to change and how to go about changing it and i think you know for me. I don't know about you to. I've spent a long time silicon valley and it's been a long time around engineers and the notion of site someone right. Here's the thing that system you'll building. I need to get at least ten thousand years out of it. Forty would be excellent but tanzi bottom is other than stewart brands long now foundation. I can't think of that. Many people who are thinking on a ten thousand horizon for a technical system given given that we've we've done those can achieve those kinds of technical systems of those kind of periods of time on scale given the frustrations with with how many the systems we're dealing with the developing six silicon valley valet or in the digital sphere. That feels frustration. Feels were not building stuff with that kind of sam. Not we're not just diligence but thoughtfulness and consideration for how. It's going to do what it wants to should be doing. In the beginning we do. Also i think we have not necessarily thought about technology inside those other relationships and responsibilities. Right when i sort of may one of the things about these fish traps in war and other systems like them is that they want just about starting right. This is not olympics oriented system. We have a phone system. It's not that right. It was designed with the intention of supporting human activity in known human activity and things that mattered and it was designed into the environment rather than pretending that it didn't exist with a blank slate right so there's a. I'm not sure that we miss the ball. I think it's that we allow ourselves to imagine different starting point and we haven't always thought about technologies that way you look back at multiple points in the history of the west in the history of technologies globally. We've often been willing to imagine. That would different starting points and didn't always start with. Oh have this technology. What will we do with it. It often started with this thing. We should look at how to do better. Or i think being trying to think about having a soul or or attention we need to resolve. And we're going to put technology in the middle to resolve it.

Warrener Australia New South Wales Queensland James Columbia Tanzi Stewart Brands Long Now Founda Amsterdam SAM Olympics
10 years to transform the future of humanity -- or destabilize the planet

TED Talks Daily

05:18 min | 6 months ago

10 years to transform the future of humanity -- or destabilize the planet

"Ten years is a long time for US humans on Earth. Ten turns around the Sun. When I was on the Ted. Stage a decade ago I, talked about planetary boundaries that keep our planet in a state that allowed humanity to prosper. The main point is that once you transgress won the risks, start multiplying the planetary boundaries are all deeply connected but climate alongside bio-diversity, our core boundaries they impact on all others. Back then we really thought we had more time. The warning lights were on absolutely, but no unstoppable change had been triggered. Since mytalk, we have increasing evidence that we are rapidly moving away from the safe operating space for humanity on earth, climate has reached a global crisis point. We have now had ten years of record breaking climate extremes, fires blazing, Australia set area California, and the Amazon floods in China Bangladesh and India. During heatwaves across the entire northern, hemisphere we risk crossing tipping points that shift the planet from being our best resilient friend dampening are impacts to start working against US amplifying the heat. For the first time, we are forced to consider the real risk of destabilizing the entire planet. Our children can see this they are walking out of school to demand action looking with disbelief at our inability to deviate away for potentially catastrophic risks. The next ten years to twenty thirty must see the most profound transformation. The world has ever known. This is our mission. This is the countdown. When my scientific colleagues summarized about a decade ago for the first time, the state of knowledge on climate tipping points just one place had strong evidence that it was on a sears downward spiral. Arctic Sea ice. Other tipping points were long way off fifty four hundred turns around the Sun. Just. Last year, we revisited these systems in I got the shock of my career. We are only a few decades away from an Arctic without since summer in. Permafrost is now thawing at dramatic. Scales Greenland is losing trillions of tons of ice and may be approaching a tipping point. The great force of the North are burning with plumes of smoke, the size of Europe. Atlantic Ocean circulation is slowing the Amazon rainforest is weakening and may start emitting carbon within fifteen years. Half of the Coral Great Guy Wreath has died west Antarctica may have crossed the tipping point already today, and now the most solid of glaciers on earth east Antarctica parts of it are becoming unstable. Nine out of the fifteen big biophysical systems that regulate climate are now on the move showing worrying signs of decline in potentially approaching tipping points. Tipping Points Bring Three threats I sea level rise, we can already expect up to one meter this century. This will endanger the homes of two, hundred million people. But when we add the melting is from Antarctica and greenland into the equation, this might lead to a two meter rise. But it won't stop there. It will keep on getting worse. Second if our carbon stores like permafrost enforced flipped to belching carbon, then this makes the job of stabilizing temperatures so much harder and third these systems are all linked like dominoes. If you cross one tipping point, you lurch closer to others. Let's stop for a moment and look at where we are. The foundation of our civilization is a stable climate and the rich diversity of life everything I mean everything is based on this civilization has thrived and a goldilocks zone not too hot not too cold. This is what we have had for ten thousand years since we left the last ice age. Let's zoom out a little here three million years. Temperatures have never broken through the two degree Celsius limit. Earth has self regulated within a very narrow range of plus two degrees in a warm into glacial minus four degrees. Defy. Sage. Now we are following path that would take us to a three to four degree world. In just three generations, we would be rewinding the climate clock, not one, million, not two million, but five to ten million years we are drifting towards hothouse earth. For. Each one degree rise one billion people will be forced to live in conditions that we today largely consider uninhabitable. This is not a climate emergency. It is a planetary emergency. My fear is not that Earth will fall over a cliff on the first of January twenty thirty. My fear is that we press unstoppable buttons in the Earth System.

Antarctica Amazon Earth System India United States Arctic Sea Europe Greenland Australia California China Bangladesh
The Now-extinct Castoroides Was a Bear-sized Beaver

BrainStuff

03:47 min | 6 months ago

The Now-extinct Castoroides Was a Bear-sized Beaver

"Brain stuff Lauren Vogel. Bam here. mammoths, mastodons and Sabertooth hats weren't the only giants roaming ancient America. The Pleistocene was a global epoch kicked off two point six, million years ago. It lasted right up. Until Earth's most recent ice age ended about eleven thousand, seven, hundred years before the present day. When you live in a cold environment, being big has its advantages. Large animals tend to conserve body heat more easily than smaller ones. This is one of the major reasons why colossal mammals were so widespread during the frigid pleistocene. CASTA Roy was very much a product of its time. The largest rodent in Pleistocene north. America, this very big beaver grew to more than seven feet long from tail to stout that's over two meters and could have weighed as much as two hundred and twenty pounds or a hundred kilos or more. Rivaling the American black bear in size casta royalties utterly dwarfed the Beavers that lived today modern Eurasian, and American beaver species clock in just around three feet long a bit less than a meter and way somewhere between twenty nine, seventy, seven pounds. That's about thirteen to thirty five kilos. Proportionately castaways had a narrower tail and shorter legs albeit with bigger hind feet than its extant relatives. We also know that it didn't eat the same foods. What he plans are a crucial part of every living beavers diet. The critters use chisel like incisors that's their front teeth to gnaw through bark and take down trees. But. Even though castaways incisors grew to be a whopping six inches or fifteen centimeters long the teeth had dollar edges by comparison. Dental differences would have made it a lot harder for Castro to eat tree bark and indeed it looks like this was not really on their menu. Using isotopic signatures and castaways teeth from Ohio and the Yukon a twenty nineteen study found that the giant beaver mostly eight softer aquatic plants. The findings say a lot about the Rodin's ecological niche and why it might have died out. For starters, castaways probably didn't build dams. Unusual. About that the earliest known beavers appeared during the easing. A which lasted between about fifty, six, thirty, four, million years ago. New evidence suggests that the wood harvesting specialists came along much later perhaps around twenty million years ago. In all likelihood, these bark fanciers used would as a food source before any of them started constructing dams. Since as fed on aquatic plants, its survival would have depended on wetland habitats. The animal was highly successful for a time cast Roy these fossils representing at least two distinct species have been documented in the Great Plains the Great Lakes, the American South Alaska and numerous Canadian provinces. Unfortunately for the mega sized beaver north. America. became warmer and drier after the last ice age ended wetlands grew scarcer as a result. Today's beavers used their logging skills to reshape the land around them so that it meets their needs with some well placed would in the nearest stream, a determined beaver engineer brand-new Pons. Yet if Castro Reuters didn't harvest would or build dams, it couldn't followed suit. So theoretically decline in natural wetlands left the giant beaver more susceptible to extinction. Last of these creatures perished around ten thousand years ago.

Casta Roy America Lauren Vogel Sabertooth Castro Reuters Great Lakes Castro Ohio Engineer Pons Yukon South Alaska Great Plains
The earliest human footprints in Arabia

Science Magazine Podcast

07:54 min | 7 months ago

The earliest human footprints in Arabia

"Now, we have contributing correspondent and gibbons. She wrote this week about the likely earliest human footprints on the Arabian Peninsula high an hi Sarah how old or how early are these footprints but that's a good question. They threw a whole package of dating methods at them and came up with in the Ballpark of twenty, one, thousand, two, hundred, and ten, thousand years old. Now the dates are not absolute. There's some questions about them, but that's a pretty good ballpark. How does this age compare to previous hints or clues that humans modern humans early modern humans were on the Arabian Peninsula. Here's the. We know that early hominids members of human family have been migrating out of Africa for two million years because we find fossils of our ancestors in the public of Georgia we find them in. Asia. We find them in Eurasia place, but we don't know how they got out and the most logical route is they had to walk through Rabia because they couldn't fly. They couldn't paddleboats a at that point the one landmass in the way between Africa where humans arose originally, our ancestors arose and Eurasia is through Arabia. So we know they had to go through there, but there's a huge gap there are. No tools older than three hundred to five, hundred, thousand years, and what is there is not definitive. The only fossil have a member of the human family from Arabia is a finger bone that is about eighty eight, thousand years old. So the mystery is, where's the evidence of members of the human family marching through Arabia, and then the second part of that is modern humans specifically, our ancestors Homo sapiens arose probably in Africa, because we see fossils in the ballpark of one, hundred, eight, thousand, three, hundred, thousand years of Proto early Homo, sapiens arising and Africa, and then we find more of these sort. Of Early Homo Sapiens in Greece dating possibly back to as early as two hundred and ten thousand. So we know that they got out right now we're just trying to find evidence. Is there something that going on in the Arabian Peninsula that either people didn't want to hang out there for very long or that erased a lot of evidence. Reagan. Peninsula, has covered with desert's it's very dry today the food desert where they found these fossils is parched arid but there were periods in the past where the planet was cooler and wetter, and during those times hundred, twenty, five, thousand years ago it was. One of them, it was green radio was covered with tens of thousands of lakes. They were grasslands between them. If you think about these early human ancestors, it's not a separate continent or a separate place for them to go to its Afro Arabia, right? Yeah. So it's an extension of Africa if the client is good and they're following large game, how were they able to find these footprints? This is a very large area and it's a few remnants of human passing through. Yes. So this team will have by Michael, Leah and it's an international team of Saudi Arabians in a number of people on. Has Been doing a search of scouring the deserts of. Arabia. For the last decade, they start with satellite imagery which helps them see parched ancient lake beds which have sort of characteristic white halio souls often these ancient sediments that stand out in the satellites and then go down to ground truth what they see on the satellites, an airplane shots they go in on foot in jeeps, and in this case they saw this ancient. Lake better rolling out as white sediment. It had just been recently exposed by Rosen and they found the footprints of the animals which was amazing and as I looked closer to one hundreds of footprints, it was four hundred mostly animals but they did identify a small number. It was seven that seemed to be human footprints. So they knew right away they were very excited about that that this was something that was important how Can you tell that they're human footprints and not some other upright walking relative? There's not a whole science of studying human footprints ever since the first ones are found in la totally in Tanzania and Kenya there've been a number of footprints that have been studied people use three D morphometric dimensional analysis with computational imaging or can really look at the depth and they could model how much weight would have been needed to make. That footprint, the length of the foot, the stride between the steps, and then they've done studies living people in their footprints in Africa to sort of test out those ideas and Lo, and behold when they do that to these footprints, they seem to come up with somebody kind of humor that was taller and maybe a little lighter weight more like a modern human of Homo sapiens and say an Andrew Tall so based on that. They say, Oh, these probably were made by Homo sapiens although we cannot rule out that nanotubes might have been there to is there anything else can tell about these people by looking at these marks I think if they get more, they can start to tell about their social structure footprint studies in Africa. I've got quite complicated where you could see the direction that they're going in the payson different members of social groups you can. To see what they are the packs of humans look like you know, what size are they how many are in these groups? What are they doing a lot of the way in this case, they're not spending a lotta time. They're just sort of walking through. This is a bantering group. What is really really cool. Though is that footprint site these are a snapshot of a single moment in time a single day most of the. Time when you have an archaeological site in a layer soil that you get the fossils of the tools and the dates, all that took place. This fan is usually hundreds of thousands, tens of thousands of years. So if you find an animal bone near a prominent human early Human Boehner tool, you don't necessarily know fear there at the same time as parch with footprints like these these were lay down in the same day maybe. A couple of days and they dried out and then got caught up in preserved. So we know they were all there at the same time. So you get this really cool day in the life look at the and of the animals they were with, which is really cool in this case and lots of animals. Yes. Almost four hundred footprints of animals including very interesting. A wild asses which I don't think we're carrying burdens but. That's kind of neat and they were elephants and the thing that's interesting about the elephants as their popular disappeared for the Middle East, just in Africa. Thanks for three hundred years ago and here they are in hundred twenty, thousand in Arabia and the camps they also Campbell's it's kind of interesting that such large animals with Aaron. It begs the question were these humans following them where they attracted them. Going back to the, we talked about it being about one, hundred, twenty, thousand years old. There's some question about the date but if that were cracked, is there anything particularly Gordon about this time human history about what we know about migrations that we could link these prince two? Yes. So what is really interesting is that genetic evidence says that everybody outside of Africa. Came from migrations that happened in the last fifty to eighty thousand years. So this state predates that we happen to know that early Homo Sapiens were in the Middle East pretty quickly after this or at the same time they're fossils in caves. At school and cough so that our early sort of product Homo sapiens. So we know humans are at sorta suggests that because we don't have DNA that dates back this early these were failed migrations. These were members of the human family that went out they weren't shelled migrations for them they lived, but they did not contribute to the gene pool of letting people today that's one hypothesis but it also shows that there's more complex story of groups of humans migrating out of Africa constantly whenever the weather excitement is right that it's three to nothing that they can get water follow animals to meet and trek. Africa. They can cross the desert. It looks like humans were doing that whenever they could and so how do they contribute tour ancestry today a really interesting question and how many different kinds of hominids out there. Thank you so much an thank you. Sir,

Africa Arabian Peninsula Arabia Middle East Afro Arabia Gibbons Asia Cough Rabia Sarah Eurasia Saudi Arabians Reagan Georgia Tanzania
Overcoming Fear

Now For Tomorrow with Deepak Chopra

05:59 min | 7 months ago

Overcoming Fear

"Hello. I'm Deepak Chopra and this is now for tomorrow. A collection actions you can do now during this time of disruption and crisis. To. Make. Tomorrow, better. Than today I want to take a moment to help things -iety in a time of crisis. The current pandemic of the covid nineteen. Has brought in its wake a different pandemic of anxiety and uncertainty. Sigmund Freud said that things -iety is like an unwelcome guest that refuses to leave. You are forced to adapt to its presence. How do people usually adapt to feel Psychologically. The do most important with are denied and distraction. By knowing your anxiety or doing something that takes your mind off it. You might find temporary relief. But is this something more permanent and effective? Can you get this unwelcome guests to leave? Yes, you can. The secret is to make conscious choices that goes feel to shrink away because you no longer needed. Fear is a holdover from early evolution rooted in the fight or flight response. It lies in wait. Ready to spring into action as it did for Hamad ancestors. Over two million years ago. But for the last ten, thousand years. The higher or conscious breed has evolved. And with it came infinite resources of thought. Feeling. Creativity and choice making. We were set free from primal fear. All we have to do is choose the bottom of consciousness. which is the bottom of inner wisdom. This is a theme I would be returning to over and over. Because the true secret making tomorrow better than today. is to, choose to, wake up. To make the right choices you need to be conscious of what fear is doing to. Fear is a form of stress. And you can choose to release that stress. That's where today's homework gums. You need nothing this homework except yourself. And comfortable place to lie down. Once, you're lying down comfortably on the carpet or a Yoga Mat. I'll offer an effective and very simple yoga pose known as Shabas. Where you simply lie still. REAP. And consciously relax. Lying on your back. Place your feet eighteen inches apart with your arms at your side bombs up. Close. Your eyes. Settle into the position. And breed naturally. Put your attention on your bread feeling your jest rise and fall. On the out bet, let your lungs deflate with this guy. EASILY BREATHING Then exile with the CY. Feel yourself becoming deeply relaxed. And continue for five to ten minutes. Now think into this relaxed feeling. To, exit the bows. Don't just get up quickly or go into activity. Easily turn and stretch has if you will waking up in the morning. Open, and close your hands. Then Open your eyes and get up without moving quickly into activity. You are relaxed and in control. Remember this feeling. Later in the day, if fear anxiety comes back tap into this feeling of es and relaxation. Let's broaden the discussion a little bit. Modern Life makes room for many words but very few in what's. A stock fact in Morton life is that more money power status position don't bring inert fulfillment. In fulfillment is found along a different path. In the ancient wisdom traditions of India life presented to butts. The birth of pleasure and the but the wisdom. Every wisdom tradition east and West is based on waking up, which means in practice getting over your unconscious behavior and adopting conscious behavior instead. You're already doing that in our discussion of how fuel works. You are waking up to discover that fear doesn't have to be in charge. You might not think of this as. Budget. Tips. Every moment of inner wisdom is simply a moment of becoming more conscious and aware. I encourage all of you to try Shabas now. Taking five to ten minutes to read out stress and breeding relaxed. May Not seem like much. But such small steps will help you reassert control over your personal reality lessening the grip of fear and uncertainty.

Deepak Chopra Sigmund Freud Shabas Hamad India Morton West
How Much Vitamin D is Right for Me?

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

05:39 min | 8 months ago

How Much Vitamin D is Right for Me?

"Hello and welcome to this week's edition of the Green Wisdom Hell show I'm Janet Lewis after Louis and we are going to educate you today a little bit of `Bout Vitamin D. a lot of you already know about vitamin D or You're beginning to learn it. But I think that you know one of the burning questions that we seem to be having is how much vitamin D is right for me and there's really It's different for everyone and there was a book called optimal dose that Dr Louis Read. There was some other of our. Clients that ask about that book they wanted to know well, how much do I take because? I think it was very high levels and Dr Lewis is going to answer all that for you. Today he's going to help you discern how much is right for you because there are other factors involved as I just loading up on a bunch of D. and he's going to tell. You what can happen when you do too much of that, and we are also going to answer a whole lot of questions that we've received from our audience via our shooting straight with Dr Louis facebook group, and if you're not a member of that, all you have to do is go there and ask for yourself to be invited in either by email or send him A. Message on facebook and he'll accept shooting be part of our community. You can also answer or ask US questions online. There's an online forum for the PODCAST. So anything we don't cover here today that you still want to know or any other topic Please reach out to us that way we try to work it all in and make it a very enjoyable show. So Dr Louis. Vitamin D seems to be the thing immune system right now can you tell us how much what the difference is and is there anything wrong which is loading up on it? You ever been just one drink away from telling people what you really think. Never. have been quite often Yeah, you know I'm GonNa talk a lot about this, and you know it's absolutely amazing facebook The shooting straight has been a good thing. There's people that follow me there that actually work for some really big. Supplement. Companies. Which is afforded US Janet and may an opportunity to do some really big things I was called salt of the Earth yesterday which I thought was funny. In longhorn Texas as well as we thought, that was even funnier. We've renamed our town from Longview to Longhorn now I I love it. I guess SOCI- eight that we owe steers and Texas I. was kind of funny Yeah. But I've got lots of and this all started about five years ago when I was on a podcast as guests from Jack, Speer Co, the survival podcast, and he is crazy crazy smart, incredibly intelligent. man he he really knows what he's talking about and he's tastes certainly blonde by giving his opinion and you need to listen to him. But I got a lot of people from being on his podcast and people would say there I'm taking five thousand or ten thousand years and you know of course I'm looking at Lamma. It's not working. But I'm taking over ten thousand I said, it's not working MO- supplements don't work. And some of them are actually very toxic to you and there's reasons for that too. I finally did the percentages on it with the help of my count it because I'm not good at percentages good Lord I skipped that class in high school probably when fishing or something and ninety three percent of what people were buying and taking not working ninety three percents your odds of getting something niche. Good. Yeah and Jack Speer Co was talking about it and again spare 'cause a really crazy smart guy. You check him out he's he's really good he. He'll tell you what to do during times of stress and trouble where I'm just good for telling you how to be healthy, which is not bad too but. And I was in Tulsa. and. He he was talking about that Nina is getting involved in his facebook group and he said, well, you ought order this book and you know it'll change your per-. Paradigm about what you think about bottom of day and I said with the books already been ordered. It's on the way coast read books all day long. And Yeah, I don't know this change paradigm I try to push it in any way but I do think what this book outlines, which this guy says take thirty thousand a day. It's like one Manana don't do that not without testing and that this is from the book. Now from Jack Sparrow one of the things that people talk about is I can't sleep dog do you have any kind of thing for sleep? Well, if you're low in Vitamin D. That can cause you to not sleep well. At date threes plays a very pivotal role in the body achieving the state needed for deep sleep and very, very important and I have people at tight. You know five, thousand, ten, thousand and some it gets them up for you need to be I think the sweet spots hundred. Seventy, five or this book says more than that, and there's no evidence of it being toxic, but there's more to that some teach you that. But when you're three levels are optimal, you your your immune system, the depth of sleep in the rest that you get there and your metabolism, your metabolism becomes primed to function more edge greatest potential.

Dr Louis Janet Lewis Facebook Jack Jack Speer Co Jack Sparrow Longhorn Texas Texas Longview Speer Co Lamma Nina Tulsa.
Science briefs from around the world

60-Second Science

01:55 min | 8 months ago

Science briefs from around the world

"Hi, I'm scientific American Assistant News Editor Sarah Frazier, and here's a short piece from the August. Twenty twenty issue of the magazine in the section called it. He dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine. The article is titled Quick Hits And it's a rundown of some non corona virus stories from around the globe. From Canada a new study models how gigantic morphing Blob of liquid iron in Earth's outer core underneath the Canadian Arctic is losing its grip on the north magnetic pole a second intensifying. Blah below Siberia is pulling the poll away. From Scotland, a geologic dating efforts suggests the fossil of millipedes creature found on the island of Cara formed four hundred, twenty, five, million years ago making it possibly the oldest known fossilized land animal older land animals have been spotted indirectly through preserve tracks. From Tanzania researchers discovered Africa's largest ever collection a fossilized human footprints left in volcanic mud about ten thousand years ago. Many of them came from a group of Seventeen people mostly women all walking in the same direction. From Norway archaeologists excavating a twenty meter. Viking ship buried below farmers field to stop a would eating fungus from destroying it. Ground penetrating radar had found the ship in two thousand eighteen and a new woods sample analysis revealed that could not be preserved underground. From Zambia in Mongolia. Spring satellite tagged Kuku completed an epic twelve thousand kilometer journey from one country to the other. It had originally been tagged in Mongolia in two thousand nineteen and traverse sixteen countries in his round trip migration. From Antarctica, scientists found that King Penguin excrement releases nitrous oxide also known as laughing gas. It forms a soil bacteria eat the droppings nitrogen rich compounds.

Twenty Twenty Mongolia Sarah Frazier Nitrous Oxide News Editor Tanzania Siberia Norway Canada Cara Scotland Africa Antarctica Zambia Kuku
Why Do Cats Sharpen Their Claws?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

05:01 min | 8 months ago

Why Do Cats Sharpen Their Claws?

"Okay, they're covered. Infer they live in our houses sometimes they sleep in our beds and yet in a lot of ways they're pretty much wild animals. What do you think I'm talking about. That's right. Cats lots of you have questions about these enigmatic creatures with whiskers that word enigmatic it means mysterious by the way. So we thought we'd go right to the source to get some answers for your questions. So Clooney, here's a question from Jack How do you catch per? Schmucky could you translate that for me? All right that's not gonNA work. Let's get a human who can actually answer. My name is Abigail Tucker and I've recently written a book called the line in the living room about humanity's long strange history with house cats. Wow Lyons in our living rooms think about it. The cat that curls up in your lap is related to a lion shaking its main on the Savannah in Kenya. But somewhere along their evolutionary path some wildcats decided that life was better near humans. Now, if you want to know more about evolution, go back to our previous episode, the one, we just did all about human evolution and you'll better understand how different species are related but have evolved into different kinds of animals. Most domesticated animals, farm animals like cows and pigs and pets like dogs have brains and bodies that have evolved or changed over time to make them look and act differently from their wild cousins. But Abigail Tucker says, that's not the case with cats. That's because their domestication story is a little bit different. A lot of times with animals that we domesticated. We saw things about them that we wanted like we thought we cows, we want their milk or oh sheep we want their will with cats. We didn't really do anything to attract them to us because humans ten thousand years ago when we are just transitioning from being hunter gatherers to being farmers, there wasn't anything about cats that we said we have to have that. So what happened was that cats actually kind of domesticated themselves we didn't. Bring them into our farms they came on their own, and that's because humans in these early settlements maybe ten thousand years ago had a lot of big piles of trash around and cats were kind of drawn to eating those and they came in almost more like raccoons, foxes than something like a cow that we might have intentionally raised. But over a lot of time in our company, cats began to change their brains and bodies in the same ways that other animals have changed there's and have. Become sort of more cuddly. So to speak pigs and rabbits, other domesticated animals have become cute over time with floppy ears or spots. Cats have changed to have some of those traits but not all you know you might have a black cat with some spots on it. That might look a little bit different from a wild animal or you might have a cat like the one. My mom has which looks very much like the kind of wildcat that still lives in the Near East today. And that's because you could almost say that cats are partially domesticated and that they came into our houses not because we wanted them to combat because they wanted to come. You said that there's nothing about cats that we need the same way that we need milk or we need wall or we want those things except I. Guess these days we would say the thing that we want from our cat is love and we don't always get it. Some cats don't seem to like people very much. That's a really good point. Yes I think one of the secrets about cats is that even though they're not any more closely related to humans than an animal like say a pig as and certainly they're not as close to us as a monkey as but. Cats have faces that look a lot like human faces for reasons that have to do with the way that cats hunt they have round faces because they have these really short jaws 'cause they're ambush predators and they deliver like a really hard killing bite. When they catch things, they have small noses because they're not sent predators like dogs falling over long distances and most important they've got these big round is planted right in the middle of their faces new just kind of how our is our two and. Cats have is like that for different reasons they have is like that because they need good depth perception so they can pounce on things from their hiding places, but this mixture of facial features that cats have looked a lot like the way humans look and actually a lot the way human kids luck and that's something I think that tends to make people put human emotions onto cats the fact that they really resemble us.

Abigail Tucker Wildcats Schmucky Savannah Kenya Clooney Lyons
Misplaced Science

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

05:35 min | 8 months ago

Misplaced Science

"Night Welcome to kids Miss Mystery Cyber your host kit chrome today. I'm going to talk about how some Mistakes made it into text books and I'm going to start with the woolly mammoth arose about five point one million years ago in Africa according to the curator of the American Museum of Natural History in New York from Africa the mammoth migrated through Eurasia North America their evolution continued over millions of years eventually producing what we know now as the wooly mammoth beginning roughly two, hundred, fifty, thousand years ago. mammoths were extinct about ten thousand years ago. OOPS more like three, thousand, five, hundred years ago scientists now believe an isolated population of mammoth persisted on Wrangel Island off the northeastern coast of Siberia. And deep in Canada's Northwest Territories, World Heritage site in hunt, valley until about three thousand, seven, hundred years ago. Unfortunately, the ten thousand year mark of extinction is in most textbooks. But let's take a closer look at that date the prominent theory that made it into most textbooks. Encyclopedia's remember those was ten thousand years ago because it was believed for decades at the mammoth migrated from the African continent through. Eurasian North America, driven by the last ice age, they were following the food supply. If that's the case, then it makes sense that some moms ended up into Hani because it was never touched by. The last ice age and yes bone. So the mammoth have been found in that region but this isn't the first theory published in Texbook. As fact that there's some founded expend believed and yes, made it into text books that the continent of Antarctica has been covered by ice for millions of years again hoops the Perry reese map drawn in fifteen thirteen shows the northern coast of Arctic as ice-free. The most puzzling aspect of the map isn't how it managed to be. So accurate three hundred years before Antarctica was discovered but that the map shows the real Coche line under the ice geological evidence. has confirmed that the latest date and Artika could have been charted in an ice free ages. Four thousand BC officials sciences been saying all along the ice cap, which covers yet arctic is millions of years old the Perry reese at Arctic map shows, but the northern part of that continent has been mapped before the ice covered it. That could make us think it has been mapped a million years ago but that's impossible since mankind did not exist at that time further and more accurate studies have proven that the last period of ice free condition and already got ended about six thousand years ago. The question is who map Queen Maud land at Arctic six thousand years ago which unknown civilization, how the technology or the need to do that I wanNA touch on just one more scientific nestled in the ancient city of Komo. Polka Bolivia are stone blocks that were used to make up a series of Pyramids Wayne from two hundred to four hundred tons each block nothing unusual there the city dates back to five, thirty, six AD. Yet. The blocks are riddled with carved indentations and in the surrounding grasses were found. Staple shaped clamps that fit in place were used to hold the blocks together. How could the indigenous people? No knowledge of urgency have created these clamps and where did the metal they use come from? This isn't the only case of metal clamps being used to hold giants don't together in Cambodia's anchor watt giant sandstone blocks way nearly two tonnes were brought to the site of the temple from nearby mountain via series of waterways. Close inspection of stones that are scattered around the site have revealed carved indentation receptacles for metal clamps perhaps. How about an eerie coincidence just outside the magnificent ruins of anger what stands an ancient pyramid temple known as backseat clump core now from Cambodia. Travel over eight thousand miles to Guatemala in the ancient Mayan city of Tacoma all among the long forgotten structures at the call is the Temple of the Great Jaguar although the Cambodian pyramid is much smaller than the pyramid in Guatemala the similarities between the specific design features are uncanny both. These pyramids both these ancient structures have an unusually steep slope angle that didn't exist in many other pyramids or temples however, and perhaps most importantly they both feature a stepped formation. There's a massive stairwell going up the middle of both temples and there's a domed area located on the top of both once there you can see there's a small door that goes inside the pyramid on both and there's another internal structure that looks the same. Basically what you have here is an ancient civilization. Cambodia. Another one in Mesoamerica despite the fact that they are separated by more than nine thousand miles, they feature incredible similarities that no one not even science has been able to explain

Cambodia Arctic Antarctica Africa Wrangel Island Guatemala Canada American Museum Of Natural His Polka Bolivia North America New York Perry Reese Hani World Heritage Texbook Pyramids Wayne Mesoamerica Artika BC
Could Science Build a Better Grain?

BrainStuff

05:34 min | 9 months ago

Could Science Build a Better Grain?

"The ever increasing need to feed Earth's growing population and not always cautious ways that we grow our food are some of the factors that have put our plants environment in peril. Farming accounts for nearly a quarter of human emissions that are warming the atmosphere, and as much as half of that comes from plowing the soil to grow crops, such as wheat, corn and soybeans, which releases carbon, dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide, the latter byproduct of fertilizer use, but researchers have been working on ways to reduce the harmful environmental effects of agriculture. One potentially promising innovation is a grain the goes by the trademarked name, her Kneza like familiar grains it can be made into flour for use inbred breakfast, cereal, and other foods, and also as an ingredient in products, ranging from beard ice cream. But unlike many other grains, Kerns is a perennial plant meaning that once it's planted. It'll keep coming back up year after year. It doesn't have to be replanted from scratch year, so it cuts down on labor. In addition, Kerns a has a deep root system it reaches over ten feet or three meters into the soil, and may help to sequester or capture atmospheric carbon that root system could also make more resistant to the impact of drought related to climate change in some areas. Currency was picked by the Land Institute a Salina Kansas based organization founded in Nineteen, seventy, six, the founder West Jackson recognized that a big problem of modern agriculture was that it was wearing the soil by focusing upon monoculture, growing a single crop in a certain area as that practice intensified on modern farms. It's destructive. Downsides became more and more evident in the form of erosion and worn out soil that required increasing amounts of fertilizer, creating increasingly polluted groundwater Jackson saw the development perennial grains to replace annual ones as a vital part of the solution to those problems. The Land Institute's website explains given that grains makeup over seventy percent of our global caloric consumption and over seventy percent of our. Our global croplands, transitioning from an extractive annual model to a perennial model is the best chance we have create truly regenerative food future, but developing new food crops is difficult and time intensive challenge back in Nineteen ninety-three scientists at the Rodale Institute and Other Research Organization identified a plant called intermediate wheat grass species related to wheat as a promising candidate that might be developed into a perennial grain. They worked with researchers from the United States. Department of Agriculture to breed the plant and improve its fertility and seed size in two thousand and three, the Land Institute began working with intermediate wheat grass as well after years of breeding the plant. They developed Kerns the trade name for their variety. In some ways, the process of developing a new crop hasn't changed much since prehistoric times. It involves breeding generation after generation of a plant taking the best from each new batch, and reading them together an effort to promote whatever desirable characteristics your seeking, however plant breeders these days have some tools that the ancients lacked the land institute employed a process called molecular breeding, in which they use genetic analysis to determine the traits of the plant should have even before it grows to full. Full size in order spot plants, but the most potential for breeding. We spoke with Rachel thrower the institute's Chief Strategy Officer. She explained it's taken us ten thousand years, and an intensified two hundred years of modern reading to get the crops. We have today. It's taken twenty to get Kerns to where it is, it might take another twenty to get it to competing at scale with the annuals. But in the effort to turn Kerns a into a commercially viable crop. There's a lot of work ahead. Stroller says that researchers are now working to increase the size number of seeds produced by each plant, and to increase the height of the plants. One drawback of currency is the unlike conventional wheat. It doesn't yet lend itself to free threshing, in which the edible grain is easily loosened from the plant. It instead requires another step called D. hulling to remove the skin of the seed before it can be turned. Turned into flour, that's because the stems remain green, after the plant matures conventional wheat withers, and is thus more easily separated in addition to breeding currency to make suitable for free threshing in the future, scientists are working to make the yield produced by real working farms match what they've been able to achieve on their research plots to that end. They're gathering data from the farmers to help figure out how to time the harvest. What settings would optimal for combines and other factors that might make the fields more productive. Researchers are also working with Baker's chefs, brewers and distillers to develop products that utilize curtains to help create a future market for it. One product already on the market is long route. Pale Ale who's maker Patagonia provision sites Kerns environmental positives in its marketing and last year general mills. CASCADIA and farms brand produced a limited edition. Honey toasted Kerns, a serial, which it sold to raise funds for the researchers. We also spoke via email was Steve, Coleman and assistant professor in the School of Environment and Natural Resources and Ohio State University, and the CO author of two thousand eighteen bioscience article on Kerns cultivation methods. He said up and working with Kerns F for ten years, and it's been a fun adventure. I think one of the things that I've really come to appreciate. Is that successfully? Domesticating developing a new crop requires more work than anyone can really appreciate.

Kerns F Land Institute Nitrous Oxide United States Rodale Institute Department Of Agriculture Stroller Salina Kansas Rachel West Jackson Chief Strategy Officer Cascadia Founder Baker Assistant Professor Steve Ohio State University Other Research Organization
When a myth becomes a mystery

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:22 min | 10 months ago

When a myth becomes a mystery

"Owls Welcome to kids Miss Mysteries! I'm your host kid crumb today. When a myth becomes mystery for today's Podcast, I decided to begin with the definition of terms I started with myth I went to my webster dictionary and came away with the following a traditional story, especially one concerning the early history of people, explaining some natural or social phenomenon, and typically involving supernatural beings events, next I locked up mystery something that is difficult or impossible to understand or explain I needed a local place or event that fit both definitions and had more from myth to mystery, and decided on Mount, Shasta California Shasta a dorm volcano located at the southern end of the cascade range in Siskiyou. County. California is has erupted approximately. Approximately every eight hundred years for the past ten thousand years and vulcanologists will tell you it is overdue. It has seven glaciers, three small glaciers on the southern flank for the larger ones are located on the north and east flanks for those who live next to the volcano, especially on the north side in the Lake Shasta area remnant from the last eruption are easily visible, ranging from lava tubes amounts left by cry, pyroclastic flows Labra Shasta is an incredible site and occupies the lands of four native American tribes. The earliest myth was that the great spirit Scowl came down from the heavens and fought with the spirit of mountain. Ussamma known today as Crater Lake. Indeed this is how the ancient. Ancient people of the area explained volcanic activity for years. It was believed that Shasta contain sacred healing waters during the eighteen eighties, teenage psychic rhetoric Spencer Oliver who lived in the nearby town of White. Rica wrote a book a dweller on two planets. It was published by his mother in nineteen five six years after his death. It was among the pages of that book. That young Oliver, mentioned the many tunnels and chambers in and Beneath Shasta some will tell you that the publication of dweller onto planets was went. Myth turned to mystery for Mount, Shasta, remember now that myth is a traditional story, especially one concerning the early history of people or explaining some natural, a social phenomenon, typically involving supernatural. Supernatural beings or events and mystery is something that is difficult or impossible to understand or explain tunnels and chambers below Shasta is certainly hard to explain it and qualify as a mystery but Oliver, and perhaps hundreds of other authors claim that these chambers are occupied by the survivors of Atlantis still others describe Americans remnants of a lost civilization as the occupants who occasionally wander into the town of Shasta city to trade gold for supplies. Any locals of the area described little men from Shasta that only come out at night, wandering the surrounding woods collected herbal edibles Shasta has been variously described as a doorway to another dimension. I hidden UFO base, a time warp and containing a black hole, still malkin. will explain that CHASTA's Bass. Lava tunnels are filled with molten rock at it is the fifth most likely of all knows the United States to erupt next so there you have it. Mount Shasta Crate example of a myth that's turned into a

Labra Shasta Lake Shasta Shasta City Spencer Oliver Crater Lake Siskiyou California United States Chasta Rica White Malkin.
Eric Ward on Racial Justice

People of the Pod

05:44 min | 10 months ago

Eric Ward on Racial Justice

"As. Our nation continues to grapple with the best ways to make progress on critical issues of racial justice. We here at people of the pod felt that we needed to hear from Eric. Award Eric is the Executive Director of the Western states center a civil. Rights Organization based in the Pacific Northwest Mountain states he is also a national voice, racial justice and a leader in the black community speaking up urgently. Urgently for the need to fight antisemitism, which he identifies as a leading driver of other forms of Bigotry Eric thank you so much for joining us I'm so glad to be here with you. All thanks for inviting me now as someone on the front lines of the Civil Rights Movement today, the first thing I want to ask is how are you? How are you doing this really busy, really crazy time. I think like everyone else I'm exhausted. I'm carrying a lot of weight. A lot of responsibility I'm not alone in that we are moving fast soaks at the community level has really mobilized around civil rights, and you know it's a responsibility to support that leadership as much as possible I think I'm both nervous and. We are watching kind of in a way, the end of one age a period of time, and the beginning of another, and we're kind of in this inbetween points, and so it feels a little chaotic can. We don't know what's next I. Don't know about the rest of folks, but that brings anxiety to me, but also joy Reid I watch folks every day across communities across religions, really coming together, trying to find one another struggling with one another and I think that bodes well so mile this chapter. The book is not ending particularly well. I think it tells us the story fact will. Yeah. We're clearly in something of a moment. Right? Historically politically. We're in a moment and I guess the question for someone like you and for anyone who wants to kind of be a part of making this elastic changes. How can we take a moment and turn it into something that really changes our society, so you know at the macro level I like wow, you know we are actually finally poised to acknowledge that everyone in our society are fully actualize human beings. That may not seem like a really kind of radical thing, but it's taken a lot of centuries for us to get to this point and I'm actually really excited to be here, right? Having a strong democracy. Means having strong participation, that participation doesn't happen if we only consider part of our society as fully human so at the macro level. I feel like. Wow you know. We are getting close to getting this right. And after ten thousand years you know or forty thousand years I think we finally earned the right to that right, so I want to own that and I. Hope folks own map for a second, and if it makes you feel good, good I so now here's what we should do. Its APP, we should get serious about some very specific things so. Twentieth Century. Policing has come to an end. It is a system that no longer works for the inclusive democracy that we are, and it is time for a twenty first century version of it that is grounded in community, safety, right, and the prosperity of our community them I think that that is exciting and I think we should be encouraging those conversations. We should be continuing to encourage folks to be dialogue with one another I. An I'll just be playing, right? We can't be a society that seals. It is okay to shoot and kill unarmed. Black people in our society are quite frankly folks were unarmed and running away. It is just not becoming a democracy so i. you know I think policing as. As a policy conversation is a topic of the day it will be the topic of the year will be the topic of next year, and we should not allow the sacrifices of those at the community level been working on these issues over the last three weeks or the last three decades to go to waste right now. So that's one. The second is look. We have to get a hold of the mission oriented hate crimes, and what I mean by mission oriented I. Don't mean the average hate crime. We experienced. You know that the random hate crime those have to be tackled, too, but untuckit about this rise of mission oriented targeting of vulnerable communities and their institutions whether we're talking about Anti Semitism. Racism. Talking about the targeted Latinos in El Paso or the targeting of Jews in Pittsburgh at a targeting a blacks in Charleston seeks in Wisconsin. It is time for our government institutions just step up and protect its citizens and its residents and A. We don't need new laws to do that. We need to actually start using the laws that are on the books. We have to bring transparency to those who seek to try to destroy democracy by terrorizing folks in our community. Those are the two things we could be right on top of right now.

Eric Civil Rights Movement Pacific Northwest Mountain Western States Center Executive Director Reid Wisconsin El Paso Charleston Pittsburgh
Pizza Pizza!

Gastropod

04:30 min | 11 months ago

Pizza Pizza!

"We eat a seriously astounding amount of pizza. Americans collectively eat three hundred fifty slices a second and one hundred acres a day more than five billion pizzas are sold around the world each year. It's a lot so we all eat it but are we all eating the same thing to get back to where we started with the donut. Pizza that is going to be haunting my dreams. Is there actually a standard definition of pizza? Oh No okay. The reason on laughing about that is because anytime I am asked i. I've become somewhat of an expert or authority on the history of pizza and anytime I mask. There's always someone who disagrees. With my definition Carol how Starsky is a history professor at the University of Denver and author of pizza a global history. So I WANNA be really careful about what I say here that this is my opinion as a food historian that I believe pizza is a yeast. It flat bread that has ingredients baked onto the crust dat is sort of the most basic definition of pizza. I don't get that specific Rice A-ok it has to be round or it has to be square or it has to be thin or thick or it has to have tomatoes and cheese on it. But here's the thing you ask to beat the experts definition of pizza you get two different definitions and I think that we need to kind of establish effect that pizza pizza until you put tomato sauce on it right because before that. It's a flat bread. I mean if not then you could argue that the Egyptians had pizza because had flat breads and that'd be absurd to say Francisco. Maguire is the head chef at modernist cuisine. They've already put out a five. Thome series called bread and now they're working on an equally exhaustive pizza book or books for which they have been doing a lot of research which sounds delicious although Francisco says. It's actually very exhausting to the tally. As of December. It's been two hundred pizzerias and it's just a number. That boggles the mind. Because I mean if we've been two hundred pizzeria fixture does at least five pizzas per pizzeria. And I don't want you to think that we eat the entire pizza. You have to pace yourself. It is a marathon of any pizza by the end of the day. You just want to like carrot or something vegetables something that feels a little bit better to your body to eat because there is such a thing as too much pizza. I'm convinced but I agree with Francisco that the definition of pizza is kind of a slippery thing. I call just any flat bread pizza. It's thirty year pizza. I'm from Mexico. I would say no but I thought about it because has sauce and it has cheese and it's a flat bread and cooked. You know an Camman which is very high heat so strictly defining it you could. You can see how. How some of these lines crossover each other. I think we can all agree that a Tortilla is not a pizza for starters. A TORTILLA is platte. But it's not really a flat bread. It doesn't have yeast but there are a lot of delicious Houston. Flat breads around the world. There's lava and pita and Lavazza non and those are just off the top of my head. Carol says there's archaeological evidence going back ten thousand years little instant pizza things. They were cakes of mashed grains baked on a hot stone and then topped with whatever was handy oil honey herbs or even more complex sources so a flat breads go back to the Neolithic the Dawn of agriculture and if they're yeast did flat breads in so many different cultures than pizza. Can't possibly be an Italian invention right. These are the kind of fighting words that will land you in court. Cynthia specifically the Court of Historical Review in San Francisco which is a fake court stopped by real judges. They've made some landmark rulings in their time on where the Martini was invented. And whether or not chicken soup is the Jewish Penicillin and in nineteen ninety one. The court gathered to debate. A serious question is pizza. Originally Italian or Chinese. The Chinese case was surprisingly strong prosecuted claim that pizzas descended from pink to which are rice flour cakes filled with sausage and spices. That were brought to at LE- by our old friend Marco Polo back in the twelve hundreds and then transformed with the use of local ingredients. Let the judge wasn't buying it even before Marco Polo made his way to the eastern back the attractions in what is now Italy around about one thousand BC. We're making little cakes at looked much more like pizza. The Italians won their day in

Francisco Carol Marco Polo Italy Maguire Lavazza Rice Platte University Of Denver Penicillin Thome Professor Camman Mexico San Francisco Houston Cynthia Starsky Historical Review
"ten thousand years" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"ten thousand years" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Going on in the world right now is well within any long term natural variability and if I tell you they keep saying well what we're going to get to degrees warmer and that's going to be the end of the world for the last ten thousand years it has been two degrees warmer than today for nine thousand of them. right and so that's amazing yeah well. your deal with climate you just had a record to prove what you wanted to prove. dental they're really really good at that yeah it's called cherry picking and and and of course there's been so what I'd just done is they give you the record temperature record over the last ten thousand years and it completely dispels what they're saying for the last thousand years when a minute why why I think what everybody is wondering right now is why do you hate polar bear so I mean they're on the ice shelf they're ready to die the poor little ice is is about to flip over and they're going to drown yeah and the baby. polar bears are going on yeah that's even more heart wrenching what won't drown in the reason they won't but either way I know just because they spent five years a search and rescue in the arctic song very familiar with polar bears but they've got two levels of of four or they've got a very short for close to the skin which is an incredibly effective insulator to the point where I worked with scientists that we're taking infrared photographs of polar bears and they don't show up on the photograph. really they don't give out any heat that's one sweat jacket that jacket that be great anyway yeah and then the longer hair is hollow so they float it floats you can swing yeah I think this was a preemie well in fact I I I personally.

ten thousand years thousand years two degrees five years
"ten thousand years" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"ten thousand years" Discussed on 600 WREC

"What's going on in the world right now is well within any long term natural very ability and if I tell you they keep saying well what we're going to get to degrees warmer and that's going to be the end of the world for the last ten thousand years it has been two degrees warmer than today for nine thousand of them. right so that's a. yeah well what do you do with climate you just. click to prove what you wanted to prove. good deal they're really really good at that yeah it's called cherry picking and and and of course there's this so what I'd just done it state give you the record temperature record over the last ten thousand years and it completely dispels what they're saying for the last thousand years when a minute why why I think what everybody is wondering right now is why do you hate polar bear so I mean they're on the ice shelf they're ready to die the poor little isis is about to flip over and they're going to drown yeah and the baby. polar bears are going on yeah that's even more heart wrenching what they won't drown in the reason the by the way I know your spent five years or search and rescue in the arctic song very familiar with polar bears but they've got two levels of of for they've got a very short for close to the skin which is an incredibly effective insulator to the point where I worked with scientists that were taking infrared photographs of polar bears and they don't show up on the photograph. really they don't give out any heat that's one sweat jacket that jacket that be great anyway yes that's a longer. hello so they float it floats. yeah I think this was a preemie well in fact I I I personally.

ten thousand years thousand years two degrees five years
"ten thousand years" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"ten thousand years" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"<hes> you know we Mona keys for almost the whole of the ten thousand years and when we stopped formerly being monarchy's we very quickly went back to having the strong guy in fact I think we I it's not just that we we we have this past. When we imagine the future when we when we right you know stall bibles? Look we fill it with an princesses. It's almost like that is the natural human condition and I think this is what Franken meant by if you can keep it right it's the U._S.. Is Extraordinary in the raiders created a a system of checks and balances where autocracy is is difficult but just because just because you've managed for a couple of hundred years doesn't mean the what you're doing is is naturally it's not it runs up against human instincts and intuitions and one of the things that really worries me is how easily people can go back to authoritarian politics autocracy my guy not your guy tribalism <hes> it. It's happened here with repeatedly that I found astonishing and and it's happening all over the Western world. So how do we keep this anachronism going. I mean given the fact that people seem to want to follow the strongman given the fact that the only type of politics people actually WanNa talk about is not the legislative sausage making or even the party interplay what they really want to talk about his leadership right here here. We've only talked about Donald Trump talked about Boris. Johnson took that Jeremy Corbyn namely the quote unquote big men of politics. How do we likely big men right a dictator classics that are fictional dictates that I don't know which of them is the least exclusively his the thing you and I are products of education system that an and most people watching that taught us a bunch of counter intuitive and countercyclical ideas for example the notion him that someone that you don't like may still have something useful to say that is a really difficult? I dare it does not come naturally. It were were much more prone to go with our tribal heuristic of my side good Yo side bad and you have to be told that you have to be taught. The scientific method you have taught empiricism you have to be told is difficult idea of assessing something by whether it's true rather than by whether you like the Guy Sang it. I don't think we're doing that now. I think not only in an most obviously in in in universities but actually in in secondary education patient as well we are instead of teaching these countercyclical ideas that make an open society and and Republican government possible were during the opposite what teaching identity politics we're going back to the premodern idea the your defined by the circumstances is your birth and I think that is turning backs on the enlightenment. I think it's a it's a really alarming trait. I'm generally hugely optimistic about the world in about the U._S.. But this is the thing that worries me more than almost anything else because having having built this extrordinary miracle where we are able to change governments peacefully without anyone being exiled or short we have free speech and Free Assembly and private property and all the rest of it if you lose that the other that it's just going to happen again when it really only happened the one time in ten thousand years. It's is kind of a big gamble so we you've got a constantly work to keep system going constant repower constant husbandry and and in particular that means teaching people all the time you know you can disagree with someone without his being an enemy our opponents in our enemies. This is one of the things that I find so odd about sort of our modern politics. We focus a lot on what government is doing what government actors are doing but it seems like the important work is being neglected. Sort of the upkeep of the ditches is to make sure the irrigation is flowing that these social fabric that requires stitching that is being allowed to fray meanwhile. We're focusing on sort of clubbing each other governmental level. It's become what Barack Obama suggested in two thousand twelve the only thing that we have in common government which means that if if the only tool of power is government and the only thing we have in common is government than control of government becomes.

Jeremy Corbyn Barack Obama raiders Donald Trump Franken Free Assembly Johnson Boris ten thousand years hundred years
"ten thousand years" Discussed on The Wolf's Den

The Wolf's Den

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"ten thousand years" Discussed on The Wolf's Den

"I gotta do ten thousand years for it to be fucking oh my god oh my god is pretty as well that's wack as fuck but he's a great guy and he gave me that tip so is that really so tell me about like what's they give me the best professional so what's the one you're breaking news at one video broke things open now man it was it's like a it was a six a series of viral videos a i mean i had had some big ones like i did the splits around new york and then eventually did like the splits around the world and that when splits defined splits in the like like i literally dropped down into the splits like i did the splits splits flexible wise this you didn't you saying like i look like i know i'm not i slept for like i would stand in front of in front of people they'd be walking dropping splits and that one one pretty viral a and then i had a couple of there's more stupid ones of meal is like fucking around getting hurt jumping over things to ask dude they're they're so like an insignificant now i don't even know i don't even remember that time of my life to be honest back where you were you like say why don't you understand your own success or or did you say i got it or is it like you're saying to wind people even watch out or you saying i know what people want i'm gonna give them what they want more of it yeah it was it was a ladder 'em i i i understand my success but like still to this day it it it does indeed baffled me like 'cause at my core i am just a kid from ohio who happens to like this thing that a lot of people like i like making videos and people like watching videos like i was born into the perfect scenario for me as a human a well yeah every day i'm i'm stunned when you're not you're mountain oh my sweet mother i met bob you're on your broker dealer i do i feel so bad for her mom i love you see we're just like hey i am 'cause now because now it's like you see proudly she's she she is she's only sweet one left in the family like just just a pure so an end so i try so hard till the corrupt her she just brakes on monday never basically 'cause now i'm testing her right when i was younger i test my jokes on her in my mom had her reaction good or bad right by the way products shave my content like a shock value i was like great she's reacting in some way shape or form but she she become like an apply like immune to it at certain point right yeah oh she like my dad he's way of the movie my dad right so yeah he reset button ads act right he was so fucking crazy that i'll tell you so conservative right and i just made up about ten million in two days right and andrew like nineteen ninety two i had a huge huge big win on wall street right and i said oh and expand on one of my twenty more deaths right and the hundred bucks that's so i went on place what if the deaths he worked for me is my bookie is cfl right and then asked him first he goes blizzard why why don't you fuck you talking to you guys are gonna make ten million dollars worth of do discovering 'cause you know depression era mentality resistant the change in any shape or form but here's the thing if you're in the first place money on did i took out to dinner thousand bucks how about this slash vote two years later right walks into my assistant a motive actress is it possible to spend twenty six thousand dollars on dinner like we warm down so bad like it was like oh my god oh.

twenty six thousand dollars ten million dollars ten thousand years two years two days
"ten thousand years" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"ten thousand years" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Was discovered. Ten thousand years old recent DNA analysis showed that he was blue eyed and dark skin. So the first Britain's very very dark skin that didn't know that before him. But there are the oldest evidence for human ancestors being in Great Britain goes back about nine hundred fifty seven hundred thousand years, but that evidence is only tools, we don't have the the bones to with them. We don't know the species, it was probably homo antiseptic, which is very early human ancestor, the first fossils are hyper against us as well. Five hundred thousand years ago and interesting because of Great Britain's and island, right? You can't just walk across except you can when the climate is when the seas drop enough like during glacial periods rights during glacial periods. You could walk to Great Britain interglacial period. You can't. So there were multiple waves of humans about ten separate ways of humans coming to Great Britain. And they all died out except twelve thousand years ago two thousand years ago is when there was the continuous presence of people in Great Britain. So there's a little bit of the history of people in Great Britain. But Piltdown man, there's so many lessons from this story. It is a classic. We can't forget it. Because we can't forget those lessons in the biggest of which is when you find exactly what you're looking for the very that's when you need to be the most sceptical, right? All right J last classics suicide, you're gonna cover his UFO's. So the UFO mythology is awesome. Because almost every story about UFO is kind of they all kind of rummage around the same things, they pull out all the same tropes. So I just picked one. I thought you guys would be familiar with the rental sham for us. You guys know about this. It's kind of like our area fifty to fifty one two. The to area. Fifty two is cool the UK Roswell. Yeah. Yeah. So the the brief summary on the story. I'm sure you know, it is that there's military base air force bases near the forest one of the bases. Like said, hey, we see some light. So they send out some people. They go take a look, then they're seeing light through the trees, and they think that they see some type of craft. They come back with the story that they're seeing, you know metal lights on their tree branches were broken and stuff like that. And this thing very quickly over the few days that that this all occurred. It went from like seeing lights to. They see imprint the ground of the ship when it landed imprinted the ground. Yeah, they saw they interpreted as the ship. That's right. Yeah. There were imprints there. Yeah. Of course. Part of the thing is, you know, you had these air force people that are one of them was quite famous, and he wrote this memo big memoir that he was keeping track of this is someone that has a career in the military, which should be respected. This is someone that's involved with the air force, which is air force people. They get things in the air. You know, what I mean anything that comes from outer space, whatever it gives them some added gravitas turns out that these people that claim to see all this stuff. It was all made up or they were confused. Yeah. The ones that don't understand how easily we can be fooled. Right..

Great Britain Britain seeing lights UK Roswell nine hundred fifty seven hundr Five hundred thousand years twelve thousand years Ten thousand years two thousand years
"ten thousand years" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"ten thousand years" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"That we would we could never possibly rebuild civilization ten thousand years down the road. I don't think so I don't know. I'm not in the biotech field. But from the outside looking in to the progression of the field over the last few decades in particular, it does seem like that's the direction. It's going. From my view, just mine, and I'm not an expert. But for my view the sentiment the sentiment that I've kind of tapped into as if you were microbiologist of the kind of cowboy ilk coming up with a contagious virus with one hundred percent mortality would be like your crowning achievement. Basically. And the whole premise of this is to study it. So we can figure out how to treat them. And that is like a that's a legitimate avenue. Research is the main avenue of research for Vala. Gee, that's the point largely. But do we need to force gain of function in viruses that don't exist like that in order to treat it? That's the question that I have. And to me, the answer is no, I think there are definitely other ways to do it. And we should be focusing our research and figuring out how to treat viruses that could conceivably get like that without creating them. I. So assuming that the world doesn't end we'll be right back after a word from our sponsor. This is stuff. They don't want. You to know is brought to you by our newest podcast on the network. Broken hearts telling the story of Marcus Hanna..

Marcus Hanna one hundred percent ten thousand years
"ten thousand years" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"ten thousand years" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"Which has it's very complex and beautiful system. Designed to regulate various aspects of the biology, which is now in an environment, which is entirely at least in many regards novel to the system, and it fails in the sense that there's a lot more obesity than there was prior to the environment that we've. Been able to create but it's not totally dysregulates. I think people are just now regulating their body weight somewhat higher levels than they were in other circumstances, again, I don't follow the statistics. I just not something I'm paying huge attention to but are the rates of obesity plateauing, or are they still increasing as the curve concave up or concave down. So several years ago. It looked like the rates were either slowing down or level. Now, it looks like maybe they're continuing to inch up but not as rapidly as they were a decade ago. So there's been some relenting of the rate of increase, excuse me obesity in both adults and and children. But it's looks like it's still rising. Although at a lower rate, do you have concerned that there are epi genetic implications of this that ten thousand years ago the? Prevalence of obesity, again, largely probably driven by the environment. That made it pretty hard to become obese not just in terms of food availability in terms of absolute calories. But presumably the types of calories that were available. I mean, I think my recollection is at ten thousand years ago nothing came in a package, right? As far as we know. So we didn't have pop tarts, we didn't have breakfast cereal with inev-, orange, juice. We didn't have French fries, and whatever else are the culprit potentials. So if Johnny got said jeans that were slightly sub optimal Johnny junior, probably got some of those sub optimal jeans. But there was nothing being imprinted on the genome that was being transmitted two generations in. I mean, what do you think about this idea that we could be reaching kind of a dangerous point in the evolution of our species where children may be critical windows of development, if exposed to again, in my opinion, it's probably a lot of the sort of really highly refined crap high amounts of fructose that we're seeing with the Nafil de that this is setting them up for a real problem later in life. It's gonna make it a lot harder. Not just for them to lose weight one day. But also for. Offspring. Is there any evidence of that? I think there there is evidence. That's not so sure I would use the term imprinting that has sort of specific biological meaning in implications. I mean, we could talk about that in a minute. But if what you're saying is are there, perhaps critical periods of development in a child in which if the child is caused to become more obese than he or she might be in some other environment that that will leave a Mark on the regulatory system that will then cause that individual to wanna sustain or maintain a higher body weight. I think the answer is probably or at least possibly yes that is that there may be critical periods in human development. Certainly, I think the data are also available. Billable to some extent in in animal. Studies that suggest that if you manipulate body weight or some of these systems at critical periods of development, you end up with an animal, which is more likely to be obese adult than if you hadn't done that. And exactly what the molecular and neuro anatomical or other physiological consequences of that manipulation are that lead to the maintenance of a higher body weight. This is obviously a critical area of study actually, something that people. My lab are quite interested in his whether we can impose by dietary or other manipulations, a higher body weight or higher sustain bodyweight an animal by early manipulations, either by diet or integration manipulations. I think the answer is probably yes. But what? What is the consequence of that?.

obesity Johnny ten thousand years
"ten thousand years" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"ten thousand years" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"As we talked earlier in the program today has come true. This is a bad bad storm. It's there now in the middle of it. And it's more. Devastating than we even thought it could be. Well, we had to going to a category for my company from Sunday. You know, my dad used to always say to me, if you have to tell somebody said, something, you must not have said it loud enough, but not everybody hears things a few days away. So it was actually a we put it out publicly with the patriot post, which is a conservative blog. I do Monday morning count people bad. It's going to be. But look here's the thing with this storm, folks, the first thing is this is not climate change or any evidence of it. Okay. So what are you could see this coming? You could see the whole pattern coming back. We talk to Sean on the sixteenth of September said I'll I'll be seen again in October. Probably because of a big golf swan right now, you said it right on the show. I know. Yeah. Right right on the show, and you could see the patterns setting up for this everything got together. And that's why and you see that every once in a while. But let me put it in perspective. This is the worst storm ever hit between mobile and camp. I that I can find on records. Okay. Now whether ten thousand years ago. It were. So we're not sugar coat that but on the other hand, it's not because of your SUV. All right. This is what nature is capable of doing. And you could see this pattern setting up pretty far in advance. It's also one of only handful of storms the last twenty five years including Harvey, by the way that hit at its peak and crew did that Camille did that Irma wasn't at its peak. When it came into Florida was weakening off its peak. Most of these hurricanes. Have we've been blessed or not like the thirties. Forties and fifties that hit on their peak. Now as far as the storm made landfall as a borderline category five, I'm. When it's all done. They may call it a category five, I'm not sure they're gonna have to go in and look at the damage, but there's a lot more left to the storm, folks. Because even though it's weakening hurricane-force winds are going to go all the way in the central Georgia. Now, that'd be gusting one seventy five, but they're going to be gusting to eighty ninety one hundred miles an hour, Atlanta, you will escape the worst of this. But Gusta it's probably gonna come right over Gusta, very close to Columbia, South Carolina, just north of Fayette Bill by this time tomorrow when we're talking and then it will off the mid Atlantic coast between Cape Hatteras in Norfolk Virginia very late Thursday night on out to sea to the south of New England just be a glancing blow in the I ninety five quarter. In the meantime for you folks in the Carolinas. All right. You're not going to have the kind of the kind of co long siege. But in a six to twelve hour period.

Sean Gusta Cape Hatteras South Carolina Carolinas Atlanta Columbia Harvey Atlantic Fayette Norfolk Virginia Florida Georgia Camille New England Irma ninety five quarter ten thousand years twenty five years
"ten thousand years" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"ten thousand years" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"The progressives an ally from this lawyer. Now, there is this. What do I think of this allegation? If you're lying about this. You have to ten thousand years in jail. Ten thousand years in jail. I also would be remiss if I didn't no. That what you're asking America to believe has just taken a massive jump. You see in the in the first story Blasi Ford. You have a story of a teenager. Who was not. Acting like an adult because they were seventeen. You can argue that it was wrong. It'd be hard to argue that that one incident would be preventing someone from being a supreme court Justice. You would you would have a tougher time with that. Now, he has. Gone onto state and nothing like it ever happened. No way. No. How not not possible while he is thrown the burden of proof onto him in regards to. Well, someone says this happened in you say didn't happen there. They're more people are there's proof. I keep or there's say and in many ways, you're out. We don't have the question that relies in any way, he's out he screwed. That's all there is to it. We went from a guy who groped girl. To a guy who exposed himself to a girl to a guy who was organizing the drugging of women and gang raping them for the benefit of his friends..

Blasi Ford America Ten thousand years ten thousand years
"ten thousand years" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"ten thousand years" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"Welcome back it is the goodfellas a couple of well i'll tell you one thing off the air the one thing on we're just waiting for a part that has been ordered to where we will begin facebook live on the morning show so we'll have facebook live coming up wow facebook live pictures does that means we can't we we have to actually wear clothes now and we're back to one nine hundred i told you oh calms once again and then we'll chat off the air about a great development for our program coming out special guests anyhow oh yes sir you're dialed in it is the goodfellas and jim bixby head a little bit of a thing when you went into a store and you had a thing yeah i didn't know about this i ended a pet store to buy some fish food i love fish food okay food food food defeat fish anyway i just need to clarify that guttering present company yes and so i guess there and she said oh it'll be fifteen cents for a and i don't want a plastic bag papers fine she's no fifteen cents also i didn't i never heard of their law i didn't know it got into effect now thinking you charge of fifteen cents for bags and is it is to keep the bags out of the paper bags then they ban that because they're cutting on onto many trees and with the plastic then they ban that because it's going to landfills so now i don't know where's the environmentalists on any of this thicker liquor plastic bags it will stay there for ten thousand years a narrow it doesn't matter at all because you're paying for it now route so it doesn't matter if you pay for it here's the thing i i realized i just saw this this homeless guy that used to go around with a shopping cart full of plastic bags he's driving a bmw he's selling those paper plus hey ahead wait a minute summer series plate lunch place they can't give you a plastic bag or they have to charge you for they can they care richard's idea thank you yeah okay okay so what if a company or whoever was just to take a five hundred bags bring him to a supermarket thrown by the counter and safe anybody wants these they're free they're on me well it was you print your name on them and your phone number but are they what is the law is the law say at the supermarket is not allowed to give it away or a half the charge anytime somebody takes a back i don't i don't know that's a good question according to this and this is vague among changes is requirement for businesses to charge a minimum of fifteen cents per postal recyclable bag or reusable bag mandatory they have to charge a half if you don't bring your own you're going to have to keep buying you have to keep buying the ads on the little dividers that you put groceries yeah right it's one eight hundred junk i think is right and and help you sell i got my wheels attorney i got an idea okay richard back have your own bags this plastic bags you know the people saved them from the us and and they're saving them now to go to the store i'll make a quick you're gonna hate me because i gotta go right now roaches if you're driving the.

facebook ten thousand years
"ten thousand years" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"ten thousand years" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"And fighting for food come back come back once every ten thousand years come back ten thousand years you'd right semiheroes apes forging and fighting for pursued no change you would write the same thing pretty much with some tweaks about immigration migration patterns and whatnot twenty three times two hundred and thirty thousand years the twenty time you see these amazing changes you'd see the first beginnings of like city states you see stone and even metal tools and some places you'd have you see the first emergence of something that is a novel thing and human experience called the home where people were leaving live in little huts or stone you know domiciles and then you come back in another ten thousand years and you can't can't wait see what happened your spaceship would be picked up by norad and you probably get your just in time to see i don't know miley cyrus torquing at the super bowl and which is to say that all of human progress that we is also that we associate with human material progress has happened in the last ten thousand years but that's misleading because it's sort of like me saying you know between me and the coke brothers are combined net worth is over seventy five billion dollars because almost all of that progress has happened in the last three hundred years and it happened because of one thing what i call the miracle this change that brings about western democratic capitalism liberal democracy you know the locking revolution wherever you want to call it i call it the miracle where for the first time in all of human history the average human being made more than three dollars a day start and life expectancy went up rapes and slavery started to go down all of the things that we associate with a prosperous society started to improve then and only then and what's interesting is those are all ideas it's in our dna for life to be nasty violent brutish and short it's it's the ideas that changed well in indeed in terms of raw computing power physical attributes etc the ancient ancient man is very very similar to us so it's not like suddenly you know we began breeding with some three ape or something in acquired a great naturally benevolent abe will right yeah it is ideas that have spurred this incredible growth that's right so like i think one of the core insights of conservatism is this idea that human nature really has no history in the sense that look if you took a baby from new rochelle and he was sent it back in two thousand years there's some vikings village to be raided by vikings when that baby grew up it would be pillaging the the english countryside if you took a viking baby from years ago and you send it to new rochelle it grew up to be an orthodontist suburbanites for questionable what am i favored intellectuals on aren't said every generation western civilization is invaded by barbarians we call them children.

ten thousand years seventy five billion dollars thirty thousand years three hundred years two thousand years three dollars
"ten thousand years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"ten thousand years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Your ten thousand years later and you're twenty fifth visit your spaceship would probably be picked up by norad you make it here in time to see miley miley cyrus torquing at the super bowl and and which is almost everything we associate with human progress happened last ten thousand years that's misleading because it's sort of like me saying that between me and jeff bezos our combined wealth is one hundred thirty billion dollars right because almost all of the progress that really happened has been in the last three hundred years since this miracle and the most persuasive explanation for what caused this change comes from an economic historian i'm a big fan of deirdre mccloskey who argues that it was really it just boils down to words ideas rhetoric the way we talked about ourselves all civilization is is a story we tell ourselves about ourselves and for the first time in human history that story changed i call it the walkie and revolution not because john locke created it because he's symbolized it and all of a sudden this idea that our rights come from god not from government that the individual sovereign that the fruits of our labor is belong to us that innovation is a good thing for most of western european history most of world history innovation was seen as where we get phrases like upstart was seen as a bad and tawdry think commerce was seen as a bad and tawdry thing and then all of a sudden this sort of bourgeois revolution in values occurs and the idea and the old sin what was called the sin of questioning the established order receives in england and you have the development of markets and market principles and property rights and contracts and out.

deirdre mccloskey john locke england miley miley jeff bezos ten thousand years one hundred thirty billion dol three hundred years twenty fifth
"ten thousand years" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"ten thousand years" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"As far as the ten thousand year existence i google the couple of things yeah i'm here i'm listening okay the first thing that came to me was cobb and dating and google data right it can be reliable up to fifty thousand years the second thing i thought of when i had heard it a million years ago shocks and one of the first nimmo's or whatever the fish they've been in existence four hundred and twenty seven million years two hundred million years before the dinosaur so i'm not buying ten thousand those guys will say that science is wrong sometimes in the science wrong about carbon dating and they will also say i do you know the fishes that old now the other thing that last caller about you have to trust scientists a star doesn't eliminate my back yet but it's a point of light famous george bush about points white but it's speech i do fair enough and doug the reason i i had to let you go is because all of a sudden we had people on hold and i just needed to get to at least one before the break which is right now we'll take that break six one seven two five four ten thirty this is very interesting what do you think and thank you very much doug.

cobb george bush google doug twenty seven million years two hundred million years fifty thousand years ten thousand year million years
"ten thousand years" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"ten thousand years" Discussed on KGO 810

"And fighting for food come back you'll come back once every ten thousand years come back ten thousand years you'd right semi hairless apes forging and fighting food no change you would write the same thing pretty much with some tweaks about immigration migration patterns and whatnot twenty three times two hundred and thirty thousand years on the twenty fourth time you see these amazing changes you'd see the first beginnings of like city states you'd see stone and even metal tools and some places you'd have you see the first emergence of something that is a novel thing and human experience called the home where people were leaving live in little huts or stone you know domiciles and then you come back in another ten thousand years and you can't can't wait to see what happened your spaceship would be picked up by norad and you probably get your just in time to see i don't know miley cyrus torquing at the super bowl and which is to say that all of human progress that we all stuff that we associate with human material progress has happened in the last ten thousand years but that's misleading because it's sorta like me saying you know between me and the coke brothers are combined net worth is over seventy five billion dollars because almost all of that progress has happened in the last three hundred years and it happened because of one thing what i call the miracle this change that brings about western democratic capitalism liberal democracy the walking revolution wherever you want to call it i call it the miracle were for the first time in all of human history the average human being made more than three dollars a day start and life expectancy went up rapes and slavery started to go down all of the things that we associate with a prosper society started to improve then and only then and what's interesting is those are all ideas it's in our dna for life to be nasty violent brutish and short it's the ideas that changed well and indeed in terms of raw computing power physical attributes at cetera ancient ancient man is very very similar to us so it's not like suddenly you know we began breeding with some cerebral ape or something in accord a great actually benevolent abe well right yeah it it is ideas that have spurred this incredible growth that's right so like i think one of the.

miley cyrus ten thousand years seventy five billion dollars thirty thousand years three hundred years three dollars
"ten thousand years" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"ten thousand years" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Our civilization is only about ten thousand years old but the universe is about fourteen billion years old for any of your life in the universe is likely to me much more advanced ten or so room it in that it has begun to evolve into former case the brig crew listening project should be able to cook hair radio transmissions that they are lows in a slip in the latter case one has around boring universe rule of potentially dangerous bacteria or a your life forms eric roy from the usual science fiction picture of glamorous aliens any we discover this likely to be artificial because robot with artificial intelligence or or better equipped and biological light to survive long duration and radiation damage vendors dolar bill thank you professor debts that's an interesting thought that it actually if it's alright you don't need to sit there at all time but if if you if you want to sign off maybe we will have a chance to ask you a question a little bit later also sir thank you for the answer.

eric roy artificial intelligence professor fourteen billion years ten thousand years
"ten thousand years" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"ten thousand years" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"The future i predicted that nonsense great predictions of course did not come true said the state of florida which is largely only twenty five feet above sea level will in data with water many have quit investing in florida because of the gulf of mexico in the atlantic reclaiming the peninsula of florida what was his prediction about florida and how did you turn out well well he predicted he actually showed on dramatic images of of the first film was florida underwater with the animation and what he says now it in what he said after you to a personal level ride if not accelerator need to understand people need to understand that people have been rising for over ten thousand years the last ice age rebel rive is what has always happened and there's been no acceleration it for and rising about the fitness of a nickel every year significant if a dime between a in a nickel so it not in places like miami were gorge sequel then start the show fish swimming in the street that food it because they're called king tied which had been historic i've always car in the street 'cause it's a sergio send cuckoo totally local phenomenon not related to any kind of global climate change the key is al gore misrepresented sea level it's not accelerating you can't even distinguish the issue of where it is showing a coming up on the store thinking miami actually called subsidence and a thinking and you saw in feet and the town hall with the mayor of the little island who stood up in talent belgore his iron is sinking had nothing to do with melting glaciers and everything else well so you're saying that for ten thousand years the sea levels since the last ice age had been rising about the thickness of a dime and those little or nothing human beings can do to change that absolutely i fully thing and in fact when alborz show hugh albeit glacier melted another fact is first of all we started our modern temperature record in about eighteen fifty eighteen eighty and now at the end of little ice age when new york harbor froze over when the famed river pains river in in england with free though over.

florida mexico miami climate change al gore river pains river england atlantic new york ten thousand years twenty five feet
"ten thousand years" Discussed on KPNW 1120AM Newsradio

KPNW 1120AM Newsradio

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"ten thousand years" Discussed on KPNW 1120AM Newsradio

"And everything else well so you're saying that for ten thousand years the sea levels since the last great ice age have been rising about the thickness of a dime and those little or nothing human beings can do to change that absolutely afterward thing in fact when al gore though hugh albeit glacier melted another factor for we started our modern chemical record in about eighteen fifty eighteen eighty the now at the end of you too little i paid when new york harbor over when it named river in in retreat over that we started our could mahmut already happened to coincide with the cold period career we've warmed at the end of the 19th century but most heard glacier des they'll proc about in alaska and and the arctic have had significant melting pot before world war two and it wasn't afterwards though that most of all our human to emissions would have gone on the atmosphere so these glaciers we're already significantly melting but it couldn't have possibly have been due to our our human thyatira mission did was due to natural warming cycle they won't mention that uh and and al gore salman so we actually did the film climate hostile to rebut that and we have geologist scientists ivey the university who like al gore who wrote it for al gore onesided went and solid movie and he was appalled at how al gore misrepresentative relationship of carbon dioxide in temperature and he said he had it exactly backward and he said it was deliberate misrepresentation or didn't understand the science mark morono of among other things greeting lying bastards normally weather was watergate or the clinton foundation you got to follow the money how much money has l gore made from this hopes and how much money would be involved if americans and others keep following this theory about global warming okay before donald trump told us out of.

al gore alaska arctic world war carbon dioxide clinton foundation global warming donald trump new york geologist al gore onesided follow the money ten thousand years