40 Burst results for "Ten Minutes"

Wake Up And Dance With Claudia Colvin

Mentally Yours

02:32 min | 6 d ago

Wake Up And Dance With Claudia Colvin

"Today we're going to be checked into the kovin. She's the founder of. Nobody's watching an online don's party organization. They also not challenges. We're going be chatting about anxiety and how great dances so welcomes mentally ause nodia. Thanks so much for joining us. We appreciate you coming on. Thanks so we're gonna best about don. So can you tell us a bit about your business and also yourself yes. I'll start from my business. So it's nobody's watching. And the way operates now is quite different to how it started. Obviously like many. Johnson fitness instructors have had to adapt to a pandemic weld but originally it was just born from my love for dancing and the fact there as i was getting older i wasn't really finding the same occasions to dance as when i was of Uni student and i was really really missing it. So originally i was doing silent disco vents in london and they were aimed people who love to dance but deputy. He went to make a huge night outs of it so it was just one hour and really uplifting songs and just have fun basically instead of going to the gym for an hour. Doing your for now is just an hour a freestyle dancing and it's really uplifting greater Two walkout and then when When the pandemic hit. I had to think quickly and adopt. I was quite alien. Counseling my vents. Actually on the eleventh of march. I can't do my impasse in events moved online. And since then i've been doing online dance classes and effectively very similar to what i was doing before but just online and without retarded discreet headphones. At more recently. I started something which has really been very successful and has spread and grown a lot. Which is the up and dance challenge. And so that's just ten minutes three songs starting your day with adults on its release. Easy accessible There's no you know you can't do it wrong. It's through january of just finished effect today. Wake up and dance challenge and it's just a really big difference. Anyone who's having a tough time in lockdown. So that's that's what's that's what's happening with. Navies what she

Don's Party DON Johnson London
Fresh update on "ten minutes" discussed on The Story Song Podcast

The Story Song Podcast

00:32 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ten minutes" discussed on The Story Song Podcast

"Puppies met. I know if that's true. But that's what the movie posters telling me. The tagline is the newton. Family is going to the dogs yet. They already went to the dogs. Oh i guess this is the second time beethoven's second night right now i see what they're saying. There's multiple dogs now because they had a big dog. Yeah yeah yeah they got two big dogs and and then the third one is going to be puppies. I'm sure the puppies in the second one got puppies. Let's get for them okay. We've spent ten minutes talking about. Let's move on charles. Grodin seems so annoyed in that moving dog why he loves the dog but the grades eight within the anti lows the dog he found love. Coney dolly parton and james ingram. He found a dog wait. Was the song about charles grodin falling in love with the dog crazy about the dog falling in love with the other dog. Oh that's a good question. Yeah hey hey hey. Can we talk this academy award nominated song from the perspective of one of the two big dogs. Sure i'd be. Probably what if we watch and it's totally normal like dumb ninety s comedy. Two-thirds part the dog starts singing a song. About how it's falling in love the amazing dolly's things on the soundtrack but in the movie like she'll sing it over the end credits. It or say the doug goes ladies and gentlemen miss dolly parton. The song i got to see this movie was nominated for a golden globe. Sounds awesome and an academy award End to tony. The stage show was tune as soon as charles. Grodin brother's musical of just beethoven second. Now they just doubt the second one for this stage i think the stage production would be like what's that disney movie about the dog. Yeah it was clearly a person. The dog suit whole jaggi. Da had version would be like that but in that dog suit. Michael crawford the opera. That has the voice of the nizhny. I think we have to move on. But i've enjoyed this time. We had to move on five minutes ago here. We are so anyway. In addition so it was in poetic justice which was released in the summer of nineteen ninety-three and then this was included on janet jackson's sixth time multi platinum album janet in nineteen ninety-three and it was released as the third single The single by the way also went platinum with sales of one million. I mean i don't mean to derail again but something no suddenly just occurred to me okay. I am surprised that that music video does not include clips of the movie poetic justice. There are two versions of the video. Never mind wanted to include the clips. Forget it 'cause i just you know that was a big thing. In the ninety s was the was the music video with the clips from the movie that it was from yes and then like a slow then like a slow fade into the singer singing. Yes oh my god yes yeah. Yeah and she. And she's sitting on a chair in the cameras dallying in super faster face. Yeah that's right. Yeah makes sense. Gone michael so rolling stone ranked the janet Number fifty eight on their list of best albums of the nineteen nineties saying it was her most musically ambitious record and in their original nineteen ninety-three review Basically it acquitted jackson family to like musical royalty and said janet was like the princess of the family. She was the youngest And they also said that while she was popular and had an mtv friendly image. She was critically underrated And they said quote janet's complex sexual and diverse. Musical statements should win her critical respect along with pleasing her ottilia fans. Yeah i don't know what octane means. But i otherwise. I agree with that first of all. That album is killer. It's got an insanely iconic album cover like it's incredible. It's it's it's a. It's a really really terrific album. I mean would you say that. This is the one i mean. I guess this is after rhythm nation. So it's almost like a. Would you say this is almost like a like a reinvention a bit or a. You know there's a there's a different feel to it then rim rhythm nation. Yeah i mean every album. I think there there is definitely a statement of independence in this album right I think rhythm nation was our political but it was it did deal with political issues And this was a little bit more about like her own personal growth in personal threaten. It was much more sexy. Yeah yeah it was. This is That's the way love goes on this right. You're this. I mean come on. That song alone is just insanely good. A lot of feelings with that song by the end. Yeah ottilia n- i is like Twenty seven zero so like okay. She literally just has like an octavian. Fill choose like billions and billions. Got it. yes i understand. Yeah i think it's like a million billion. I don't know whatever big number it's it's you know what it is. It was rolling stone trying to be smart. Yeah well i mean. Yeah i mean i i. She's criminally underrated Which is amazing to say because she actually had a obviously fantastic career and got you know mental. I mean Yes but i'm saying like you know has many you know great reviews and millions of fans or whatever But i still think you know not surprisingly but was still always compared To her brother which shows the second by you know just couldn't get out of tito show. But yeah i mean just you know i mean the fact that she was able to be as popular and as respected as she was while always being compared to michael like just goes to show how incredibly talented she was that she was able to overcome that even though it did probably hold her back a little bit back commercially. Or.

Michael Crawford Coney Dolly Parton James Ingram Second Night Charles Billions Jackson Sixth Time Two Versions Janet Jackson One Million Second Time Two Big Dogs Second One Michael Third Single Third One Five Minutes Ago Millions Of Fans ONE
Baylor Takes NCAA Men's Tournament Title With Win Over Gonzaga

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

00:44 sec | Last week

Baylor Takes NCAA Men's Tournament Title With Win Over Gonzaga

"While while while the title game of the two thousand twenty one ncaa tournament. It was played monday night inside. Lucas oil stadium downtown indianapolis. It was a beatdown. I can't imagine many people coming final score. Baylor eighty six gonzaga seventy total domination from start to finish baylor opened on a nine zero run lead by double digits barely. Four minutes in led by twenty with a little more than ten minutes to go. Gonzaga never got closer the nine points in the second half. It was a blowout in every possible way. So scott drew's bears. Are the two thousand twenty one. National champion shouts to bill. Henderson shells to jared butler's family. Just terry

Baylor Lucas Oil Stadium Ncaa Indianapolis Scott Drew Gonzaga Bears Jared Butler Henderson Terry
Fresh update on "ten minutes" discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

The Steve Warne Project - Sports

00:43 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ten minutes" discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

"A new podcast week james. How're things today. Stevie things are fine. Things are my friend. Yeah i had a nice chat today. Steve this'll bring it back and for those who listened to magic one hundred back in the day i understand now. It's not move one hundred by the way i heard that. Yeah i was just stole my whole thing. I was going to know. They changed the name bill. Parker member. Billy sure absolutely wonderful guy he used to the morning show of course longtime running morning show with kevin nelson Anyway he he's he has a he's got a big family is really close to his family and he. He has his own little radio station. That that's that has His i think his brothers on it and his kids are on it. it's played country tunes and stuff anyway. he Reached out to me and we did a zoom call today. I anyway. lots of edmund. Lots of ottawa. People would remember bill parker and of course big friendly bear sixty five years old now lives in bells corners off. You know kind of retired really is what he's doing but i got a ton of time for bill. He was great. I really really really liked that guy. He's just a great guy so we did a zoom. Call me and his brother to brother. Jim does me and my brother went fishing with bill and his brother. We had a competition brothers against brothers. Oh yeah yeah and we were doing well until my brother grabbed by the neck and helped me underwater for ten minutes on and that's pretty much standard us. The brother i know you love those stories stevie anyway great great little catch up there with was billy because i know you like them to new like i say everyone in ottawa knew that show anyone of any age you know. Yeah so buoyant chain since. Then that's i mean bill was there. I don't know ten years ago as were you. It's just a it's massive. Massive changes that have happened in the ottawa..

Steve Kevin Nelson Bill Parker JIM Stevie James Ottawa Bill Magic One Hundred Billy Ten Years Ago Today Ten Minutes One Hundred Sixty Five Years Old Edmund Parker
Empowering your Marketing with Hayley & Katy from OH MY DIGITAL

The Next Level Life Podcast

02:10 min | 2 weeks ago

Empowering your Marketing with Hayley & Katy from OH MY DIGITAL

"Tonight on the podcast. Ivan chalian katie digital to share all things marketing and business. Janney all along the way and so as a partnership as well. So i'm really to welcome to the podcast. Thank you so excited to be here. Sorry graceland heavy heat today and option having used. They love what you did. Collective event recently had such positive feedback about you shared. And i just love that you'd be women are all about sharing so much value can give gave it so incredible to say and so generous in your time as well so get lousy juries to share of your johnny high on my digital began and the and did not get us names just to get people in if you have an idea of how you'll saw it absolutely sorry it's all started probably a bit. Maybe four years ago now sahelian actually give us a few might have had distorted before we love to share it but I simply highly was actually managing a digital marketing studio and actually ten minutes in intern on in the really early days. And then we say decay like working fulltime and his team and I'm this was frowned at twenty jane. Twenty sixteen when i came into the future and Really at that time like digital marketing had realistically it had been around for a while but it was still relatively new to a lot of businesses and people still jinro standard and it was still very much kind of wild west parties. Where like you could sell anyone anything. The letter people just really did not understand. It knew it was something that they should you be doing. Select marketing manages. That would be like. Oh my god nature be doing all this digital marketing stuff. That have the skills so that would just like hunting Agency came along and said hey we can all the stuff that would jump at that and We just noticed there was a bit of a debt. Between i guess what people were being sold to people were being convinced that they need and then what they actually

Ivan Chalian Katie Janney Jane
Fresh update on "ten minutes" discussed on The Tech Guy

The Tech Guy

00:47 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ten minutes" discussed on The Tech Guy

"And i tell all my friends about your program nice. Well it's good to hear from you. Welcome my problem is. I does check computer. Keep upstate state. I got twenty four. Gigs of ram All of and. I run all kinds of of program for antivirus and repairs. And so on all this. I don't know where doesn't matter whether it's warm or cold computer research in the past. I've always found this to be eating problem either. One of the fad isn't running or the cpu getting hot you're absolutely right. I could tell. There's an engineer in there. Because that's the first thing you suspect. When you get this sudden reboot but you said it happens when it's hot or cold so maybe it isn't a heat issue. How quickly after you boot up. Does this happen all maybe ten minutes. So remember that a processor heats up very quickly so if if there is a cooling problem it so there's a couple of things that could be it could be that absolutely for instance Not at all uncommon for the pace thermal paste on the processor attaching it to the cooling system the passive fan radiators or or liquid cooling. Or whatever it's that thing is very important that conduction and that's very important. It can dry out and stop conducting the processor overheats. The computer says Not going any farther. I don't wanna fry this thing. You get exactly what you just described. Maybe more like that could happen in fifteen minutes so it you know it could happen. It could happen in thirty seconds. The processors going up very quickly. If it's not getting cooled it will die right away and other possible and you can check this There are programs that you could put on your computer that will tell you the almost all modern computers have Measure you know. They're not thermometers. But thermo couples everywhere and you can get the temperature you processors and you're so forth so you can see that going up very rapidly maybe even see if it gets to one hundred degrees celsius you can see the the you know..

Ten Minutes Fifteen Minutes One Hundred Degrees Celsius Thirty Seconds Twenty Four First Thing ONE Of Things
What Binds the Hands of Love?

Solid Joys Daily Devotional

01:57 min | 2 weeks ago

What Binds the Hands of Love?

"Christian March thirty one. What binds the hands of love. We always thank god. The father of our lord. Jesus christ when we pray for you since we heard of your faith in christ jesus and the love that you have for all the saints because of the hope laid up for you in heaven colossians one three through five. The problem with the church today is not that there are too many people who are passionately in love with heaven. The problem is not that professing. Christians are retreating from the world spending half their days reading scripture and the other half seeing about their pleasures in god all the while indifferent to the needs of the world. That's not happening. The people of god are not so full of love to god that they spend half their days in his word. The problem is that professing. Christians are spending ten minutes reading scripture and then half their day making money and the other half loving and repairing what they spend it on. It's not heavenly mindedness. That hinders love for the lost. At hurting of this world. It is worldly mindedness that hinders love even when it is disguised by a religious routine on the weekend. Where is the person whose heart is so passionately in love with the promised. Glory of heaven that he feels like an exile and sojourner on the earth. Where's the person who has so tasted the beauty age to come that the diamonds of the world looked like marvel's from the dollar store and the entertainment of the world feels empty and the moral causes of the world are too small because they have no view of

Saints Marvel
Fresh update on "ten minutes" discussed on Sleep With Me

Sleep With Me

01:01 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ten minutes" discussed on Sleep With Me

"That was eighty bucks built in Cb with channel nine priority. We had a car to use car. My parents bought station wagon. That came with a cd. Cb built into it. This one is eighty bucks And then fm had set walkie-talkies for like. Oh these are the ones that kids had on. Some of the kids had our dustin headed. I think and Something like this on Stranger things the pay. A pair is ninety bucks and then mobile. Cb over seas between one forty in two hundred dollars then ba some sort of catastrophes. In lcd malta. Meters twenty-seven range testers mike or not Stirs acm eater so this is like the electric side e c converters for holidays abroad So yeah you could use it for others that you could use for non motorized appliances Fifty y converter sixteen hundred y converter plug again adapter set of four and then values in time for christmas. Giving a mike granada courts travel alarm so folding alarm those so recall as nineteen ninety five then. Lcd travel twelve dollars. Miniature travel clock ten dollars. The old projector collect. It's still popular projects in the ceiling. Forty two thirty four ninety five even had one that was a countdown. Look at this one. The exclusive vox clock talking alarm tells the time hourly see i mean. This is where they are headed. There's time perfect gift for you. Know for someone. I if if they're you know they don't look at the sites impaired It's a twenty four hour alarm announces the time five minutes before sounding the alarm does then delivers awaken melody. Timer counts down the time at ten minute. Intervals down to ten minutes. And then every minute. So that's that's what. I use one of my smart speakers for then. Led alarms or clock radios with the battery backup Those range from twenty dollars. Twenty one nineteen fourteen They had pans with time built in to him and calculator a calculator. Watch creek question. Thirty one ninety five they have. Led lcd timepieces. Stick on calendar clock. I think teachers would have those Three dollars eight cents Cordless clocks you know. Those are traditional ellie. cd's Stop watches to twenty five dollars. Are saunas stick clocks. Dad had one in the car. Let's see oh cherry pick some other stuff. Vhs rick video recorders. Five hundred dollars a color portable tv three hundred dollars a portable black and white tv that you could put in your thing image. Jaeger like later the different ones which we in one ninety nine hundred dollars boombox is ran from one..

Ninety Bucks Twenty Dollars Ten Dollars Ten Minutes Five Hundred Dollars Eighty Bucks Twenty Four Hour Three Hundred Dollars Twenty Five Dollars Ten Minute Three Dollars Twelve Dollars Eight Cents Five Minutes Two Hundred Dollars Christmas ONE Thirty One Ninety Five Nineteen Ninety Five Sixteen Hundred Y
Abide And Remain With Priscilla Shirer

The Grove Podcast

01:56 min | 2 weeks ago

Abide And Remain With Priscilla Shirer

"Hey their passion. I'm so glad to be able to have an opportunity to be back with you. I have been waiting for the opportunity to be back with you and so despite the craziness of the circumstances that we are all in right now the fact that it has given opportunity for me to be back with you in this way feels like a gift. I'm excited about god's word to continue what it is that he's already been doing in your heart and in my heart and life. So why don't we pray and go to god's word together lord we thank you for this privilege that we have to know that you were speaking to us and that no matter where in the world we are right now we can hear your voice. So lord i pray that you would take this one little simple message and you were divided however many multiple thousands of different ways you need to so that every single person under the sound of my voice no matter what culture or or continent they may be on no matter what country lord i pray that every single one of us right now will know we have been in the presence of god in the mighty name of jesus i pray amen amen well for about ten years or so. My family and i lived in a fairly rural part of the dallas fort worth area. We planned it that way when our children were little. I've got giants now. My oldest is eighteen like six foot three inch tall than i've got a sixteen year old. He's about six foot two inches tall. And then i've got a twelve year old but he stands the exact same height as me. So i am being outgrown very quickly in my household and when they were younger we spent ten years living about ten minutes away from the city so we can get there quickly but we felt like we were worlds away. We would drive back to our home that was on a lazy little two lane road and we enjoyed it back there because you know there were things that three sons need in their lives like bugs and mud and trees and stuff like that

Dallas Fort Giants
Fresh update on "ten minutes" discussed on Journey to Wherever

Journey to Wherever

00:24 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ten minutes" discussed on Journey to Wherever

"Any of these stacked to the rim of plastic full of all box full like full of so much so that you know when they're coming because he gets a whole bunch of nights to come in in that morning run to help him unload these like second hand. This box people thrown in the trash. That's just like all stacked on top of each other people's cleanups and stuff and i go and grab embarks. Yeah right. So he's got gets barks and he legitimately modifies you bike really modifies rule by hopes. If you go there and you look. I want this kind of frame. Our balk got there a reluctance. Handle boss dec- that show whatever. I'm terrible with my back things right but see that shimono channel. This shimada chain with this friend with these handlebars and these kind of feels shown his family got you alleged legitimately he he he tells you go away and obviously because he's not gonna be able to do right then and there and then he gets to work man like this guys like rare grinding. The sparks flying everywhere. He's good. He's full building suit on he. Full does a legit like bike. Phosphor maybe six twelve months ubisoft. Pick up momentum this guy. It's not a does not a day does not. That doesn't go where i walk out. My clinic gopher woke up straight. And i see bouba. Dry uber guys outside. He's premises getting something modified and these guys are getting like costume like. I don't know what the things are back with where they put the bags on. He's always he back and then he puts mode is on these things. These should be paying like the some of these blocks. Like i've i've picked up like keep it on. The the time is how far away i love. I love the you can do with these city delivery. Yeah i mean it's that away when you not pulls up i'll just say this about ten minutes. I'll say when he pulls up because if they ring the doorbell it's gonna disrupt my video and it's gonna interrupt podcast. I'll go pick it up so as soon as it says it's coming give them give them space just going. Open the door anyway. Go anyway so people that hang out like at the front and they'd like bother day. There's been times i've gone like.

About Ten Minutes Six Twelve Months Each Hand Gopher
Only in Hollywood

Criminal

02:38 min | 3 weeks ago

Only in Hollywood

"There's a soviet film from nineteen seventy five called hedgehog in the fog. It's only ten minutes long. It's been called the best animated film of all time for the You're at your committee. Runco she said. I know surgeries now truly. Actually russian animation is a kind of an art. Form the cartoons. They're they're made without the restrictions that your typical american cartoons are like they don't have to be twenty six minutes long space for commercials didn't have to have these continuation of a story. Once the episode this over backing the soviet russia the cartoons were made purely as a way to sort of entertain the kids of course but also as a kind of as kind of arts. They were only as long as they needed to be. The only told the story the way it ought to be told without anything else. And i think people who have seen them. They would easily agree with my statements. It's really something to be seen in may of nineteen twenty eight. Mickey mouse was introduced by walt disney within a few years. Disney animation's were so popular that they're being shown around the world including at a film festival in moscow in nineteen thirty three soviet viewers including joseph stalin fell in love the slogan. Give us a soviet. Mickey mouse became popular and three years later in nineteen thirty six the animation studio so use multiple opened in moscow. A version of it still exists today and many of the films are admired for their sophistication and lack violence as one director. Put it in our films. There's always been less aggression. We stake darla not on action but on psychology humor and a dialogue with the viewer. It came out of the tradition of russian folktales hedgehog in the fog follows a worried seeming hedgehog who gets lost in a thick fog. He surprised by all the animals. He encounters who he writes a fish even by the end when he safe. It doesn't feel like a happy ending definitely not a disney ending in the final frames. The hedgehog is still anxious

Runco Mickey Mouse Soviet Russia Moscow Disney Animation Joseph Stalin Walt Disney Darla Disney
Spain thwarted in draw with Greece

ESPN FC

00:47 sec | 3 weeks ago

Spain thwarted in draw with Greece

"A little later on your klinsmann and onto your entire will be joining us to reflect on impressive win for germany. The same word of course comedy usa spain. They manage a one one draw against greece. Well lovely go from murata ten minutes into the second off. they can see a controversial penalties. David do you think it was a pen. mountain as is clear on the ball. Actually these we don't follow through his a and these leg and he's never in does come all but inevitable because of because because of gone back and say test we convert the penalty and it would prove to be the equalizer and that's how it would finish. Spain one greece one Sweden top of the group after beating georgia by one goal to

Murata Greece Spain Germany USA David Sweden Georgia
The number one way to show you care and connect with clients

The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

05:09 min | 3 weeks ago

The number one way to show you care and connect with clients

"Eileen welcome to the show as a way of getting status tolls about yourself. Thank you hello. Brian great to meet you. Thanks for having me on this show. So i am the founder and ceo packed with purpose. We are a corporate gifting company with a social mission so we provide an alternative to the traditional corporate but all of the products in our gift boxes do good so they create a social impact in how to come up with this idea. Yes so my background has been wonderful. Dance between social impact in business and marketing. So a few stops along the way. I was a peace corps volunteer years ago in paraguay then also worked in social impact advisory work so right. Before i started packed with purpose i was actually consulting to chief sustainability officers in marketing executives. Trying to help them figure out how to invest their corporate social responsibility dollars to both have a business return but also a societal impact so it was a typical cold day in chicago in december and our office was riddled with ubiquitous holiday. Gift and i was just looking around saying there's gotta be a better corporate gift. There's gotta be way for a vendor or a client to say thank you. And that's when. I had the initial idea behind putting together gifts where all products had a really unique story and actually contributed to the greater good in their community. Cool and so. How do you start. Where do you start. Well i i always say you just have to start somewhere and it's definitely not perfect but you have to start and if you start talking out loud and getting people's feedback you can hopefully start taking it down the path of what eventually your target market is going to be interested in so I actually founded the company in two thousand and sixteen. And the way i got it. Initially off the ground was put together a really low fidelity prototype so i- crowd. Sourced logo came up with a name but together that was passable and i had a first birthday party for my daughter and is a parting gift to all of my friends in the adults there i gave them a pack perfect gift and i told them that i'd be following up with them for a five to ten minute market research call to basically elicit their responses into get their thoughts so that was the first version of packed with purpose as we know it. Obviously it's evolved a lot. Since then where do you find the people generating the gifts. Yeah so we affectionately. Call our suppliers purposeful purveyors and our purveyors primarily are based all over the states so their social enterprises or purpose driven companies in l. a. Detroit chicago miami. I can give you a few examples because it really helped bring it to life so that people can and how are gifts created an impact so we were with the wonderful social enterprise. Right outside of washington. Dc that works with women who might have previously been homeless. They might have various various to To employment they could also have been survivors of abuse in their part of this incredible social enterprise at basically teaches than baking and cooking skills through the production of various products that they make like granola cookies which we then source for gifts. And it's a way for them to get their safe certification so that they can find gainful employment actually land on their feet half financial stability when they graduate from the program so we're the recipients of their products that we carried in our gifts or another example. There's a wonderful organization that provides employment to adults with disabilities and they make a whole range of cookies than toffees chocolate covered pretzels. And it's through both the housing program and a personal professional development program to these adults with disabilities and we source those products in our in obviously in are providing them with all of those amazing opportunities through that organization. How do you find your clients. Yeah so you know. One dominated do the work that i've been doing. I was exposed to a lot of social enterprises through my particular job and it's really a tight ecosystem so we started working with some organizations. Let's say in detroit. They would ask us. We'll have you heard of these other ones or when we worked with an organization that may be served a particular population whether it was youth or women or individuals that were previously homeless. You know there's a tight ecosystem where they wanna help each other. So i would say if i. It was a lot of referrals Also then his evolved towards a lot of the research that we do in that were looking for you know certain types of organizations where they have to have truly a high level of impact. They have to have high quality products. Whether it's something that you're consuming or it's highly functional like a journal or tumbler. it's gotta look good

Eileen Paraguay Chicago Brian Detroit Miami Washington
The story of Cars - Gary Numan

How Good It Is

05:51 min | Last month

The story of Cars - Gary Numan

"Gary numan was at the forefront of a punk band called tube way army at the age of nineteen back in nineteen seventy seven. It wasn't long after that in nineteen seventy nine that the band appeared on the show. Top of the pops newman seven an interview with billboard magazine that. The appearance was a fluke. Top of the pops had a regular feature during which they showcase bands that were incoming and during the week in question. It was between them and simple minds. According to newman two-way army was selected. Because it was a more interesting band names and simple minds but the appearance led to the band's songs are friends electric. Which is what you're hearing now. Going to number one on the u k pop charts and stayed there for four weeks. It was also top ten in ireland. The netherlands and top twenty australia and several countries in europe bad. I know what you're thinking. Because i thought much the same thing you're thinking this sounds more like new wave than honking. It'd be kind of right and kind of not see here in the us. We have this image of punk music being all rapid fire. Hard cords and lyrical content. That advocates unindo spitting on your mother or some such but acts like patti smith. The ramones for runaways and i would even include early joe jackson. All part of the punk movement is wealth so while two way army had a little bit more sensitive it was still a punk band. That said numan did want to move away from punk and into more of a pop slash new kind of sound so he jettisoned the rest of the band and he began working solo album. Now when newman began work on what became the pleasure principle said his intention was to write a whole bunch of throwaway pop stuff for it because the previous album was just so heavy. Newman said the two thousand and eight interview with mojo magazine that the song was inspired by road rage. Not his other people's. He said he was in london and a couple of guys started peaking in his windows and for whatever reason they took a dislike to him so he had to take evasive action. He locked the doors he swerved onto the sidewalk scattering people everywhere even hit him scared them away any made his escape from. That incident occurred to him. That when you're in your car in the modern world you feel somehow safe. He said in a two thousand and one interview that quote. When you're in it. Your whole mentality is different in a car. it's your own little personal empire with four wheels on it unquote so while on its surface. It sounds like an ode to people getting around. It's really got a little bit of a darker intent to it. It's a feeling of isolation created by being in the vehicle. In retrospect gary numan has said that he don't really know why the song has done so well over the years he wrote it on bass guitar. He says and it took him about ten minutes to compose the keyboard. Parts came later. Voting had the main melody and the arrangement locked in pre quickly newman said in that. Same two thousand and one interview that he really couldn't even play bass so we bought a bass guitar in order to learn how to play properly. He never did get very good at the face. He says but those opening notes of cars was among the purse. Things he played did make a video for the song of course because nineteen seventy nine. But it's actually kind of hard to watch because of the video effects us which are a little bit on the silly side nowadays but they were pretty cutting edge then but when. Mtv launched in the summer of one thousand nine hundred eighty about a year later. They didn't have a lot of videos in their library. So this one got a lot of airplay early on and that meant that. The song's popularity kind of endured in the united states. The record was released in august of one thousand. Nine hundred seventy nine and went to the top of the charts in the uk and canada was a number nine record australia and on the billboard hot one hundred chart here in the us and a top forty record in a few other european countries the song has re chartered a few times over the years in the uk because of remixes being released now over. The years newman has updated a lot of his older material but cars seems to resist that kind of treatment. He said he's tried to update. But it doesn't sound any better too so when the heavy metal band fear factory approached him in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight about doing remix slash update. He was getting a little paranoid about having that one thousand nine hundred eighty s tag on fear factory. It turns out to have been playing the song shows since about nineteen ninety six so they sought his input. Newman said the experience was quite positive and actually learned a lot from it. The fear factory version is a little bit more guitar heavy which makes sense since aren't any guitars on the original version. And you've got every middle band here and in some verses newman's voice has actually been allowed to bubble up a little bit more prominently and at the same time. It's a weirdly bright recording considering fear factory's usual pretty good track the album is a whole is one of their bestsellers and the single did okay on the uk singles chart but it managed to reach number sixteen on the billboard mainstream rock chart and number thirty eight on the modern rock tracks chart and yes. There is a video and it's a little easier on the eyes and the nineteen seventy-nine version

Newman Billboard Magazine Gary Numan Unindo Army Mojo Magazine Joe Jackson Patti Smith Numan The Netherlands Australia Ireland United States Europe London UK MTV Canada
Observations From Bayern Munich's Smashing 4-0 Victory Over Stuttgart

ESPN FC

01:59 min | Last month

Observations From Bayern Munich's Smashing 4-0 Victory Over Stuttgart

"Will stop in the bundesliga and you might think well. Why are we buying one. Four now against god. What's the big deal i miss. The big deal is afonso davies of buying sent off in the twelve. Th minute nil nil ten minutes later buying a three nil up welcome in fueled softer reflects on something. And i don't think i've ever seen before. Well this is sad day for german football because they have said that if buying played with ten players they will be beatable so they tried that today. Davis was rightly sent off after wa wa in the wind because he got a yellow. I and eleven does scale and robbery miller. The restaurant just did something. That is like unbelievable. There were four nil suddenly against the stupid cat team. That is later. Be quite good. Foam unbelievable to watch and just show you this buying team got that extra gear that i can use. They often down but it come back dortmund zero to winning four two champions league. They just win when i want to win. A now stood tried another thing. Eleven gets ten still losing four nil at the psychology from both sides. Yan here well. First of all studio will have a good conference. They're coming to 'alliance now now fans there. I think well we can have a chance. We've seen gerona result home advantage. Not as good as it usually is and a ban on their side. Thank you i will. We have to concentrate because our lives winning the day before and then stood would want more. They think well no. We really have a chance. But what do they do their team. Levin does get a team they just take another gear up. I think okay. No we have to concentrate. No we have to play quicker. We want to touch. We have to give a loverdos even better the ball here to goals and the ending a hat trick

Afonso Davies Dortmund Davis Football Miller YAN Levin Loverdos
Mark Morris: Buying a Home as Investment Can Become a Heavy Burden

My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

07:18 min | Last month

Mark Morris: Buying a Home as Investment Can Become a Heavy Burden

"When you hear the name mark morris. I want you to high cashflow. Portfolios mark is an expert at building developer relationships and helping house builders achieve discrete volume sales at speed alongside in. It freelance career. He has been a property investor for the past twenty years building a portfolio of biden alette apartments and houses across greater manchester. He is also built a solid income generating portfolio in the mid west of the us. Including ohio. where. I grew up outside of cleveland. So mark take a minute in philly for tidbits about your life. Sanju sheddings absorption. So yes she switched on. I was was in icu. Freelance i was employed full sudafed mid twenties and then when we came to the what would what you may remember the Units thousand mobile. Everybody believed that when the clocks when the diet changed nine thousand nine hundred ninety two thousand. Who's going to be magadan. None of the computers worse on in those sort of times. You know companies. I work for finance initials. Just paying ridiculous amounts only for contracts is just to get bums on tested and as we all know now it was a complete dump squib in the wall a really lights the freelance world. All the who wants to two thousand dollars over loss of come shots. As if finished the assignments finish they could find new signings and allow people became employed or went back to just the danger. I was really really adamant levels. Gonna do the fumes out an illness you know it. Nearly money was tight. And i was struggling on a realized needed some way of raising faceting to government with these to kuwait for these breaks in between science. And that's really started looking at property. I was really keen on. I started building very small. Folio parents were involved in property. And i really realized that was chain to enable mix to continue a freelance career. And that's really where stars interesting and you said your parents what experience today they were places or yeah they were they were actually renting holiday homes and a cold the lake district which is about an hour an hour and a half wave on. When i was very young i used to go. There needs to clean and they used to take book in. So i could see how the property the property business. Words open cell becoming a freelancer. Never at any sort of money at the anger means so i needed started actually finding the walls. A cash should the under the move on a bit of fox together. That's all yeah let's start invested in bronson. It's an interesting story because sometimes what we learned in our youth comes back later to help us so well. Now it's time share your worst investment ever since no one ever goes into their worst investment thinking we'll be tell us a bit about the circumstance leading up to tell us your story. She'll so probably around the year. Two thousand five prophecy prices about point very boyens. No you went down to the pulp. Everybody was talking about. Everybody was getting surprise. You not taxi. Drivers rids tropic is getting closer with you know with all the height how to threaten to was an estate agent and he said look you know i two or three approaches but i got gotta cashcall together wanted to try and create more cash to give me this sort of space for when i was out the contracts so he suggested. Why don't we go. This loss of new build new built developments in a place called wales. Which is you know in the uk on marinas. And let's go and have a look. And i was quite impressed by him because he owns his own business. Not saying yeah yeah. Let's show enough with when which sold round the few places. In wales armed with came on warm marina development was being sold off clump so all the walls literally we went to the agents. All the world's a big model booth this arena development was going to sell useful the ashtray by the marina. The guy that wo- he was selling like a dream was these properties are selling. Those should off planet two hundred k. You know within his twelve pro build within eighty. They'll give you two fifty six day boy. Was i just call in the height within ten minutes of full a deposit down you know never really saw that was it. You know how solta. I was gonna make quick this quick book. Wow brilliant advocacy was gonna to go so well how was i. Think he's probably hounds with all developments with side gets in delays so twelve months into eighteen months eighteen months tune into years. All this time it was thinking. She's great of a to k reservation. Fee doubt on this property is increasing crease in talk about gray leverage on a suitcase investment and then after about two years start completing development lit chalet within me completing in two thousand seven with about two months. The crash happened know would so can big time. Us england every you know suddenly. Wow a suddenly realize on this fifty sixty k though is gonna make was gonna become essentially a fifty sixty k loss because very quickly. Nobody was buying. These apartments wasn't gonna turn. I wasn't going to turn over the thing. So many i mean it was. It was a castle varis. Now only because i felt was though a wasn't to be keeping old at the time used finance put a small deposit down and offensively but not finished. I couldn't i couldn't remortgage because i was in negative atwood said just couldn't evaluation would have been sixty k. Down i would have thought another eight just to get another

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S6 E6 - How to get a good job - Full

Courage to Fight Again

19:30 min | Last month

S6 E6 - How to get a good job - Full

"You know nothing is easy. I mean not a single thing in life is easy. Sometimes it might feel easy and then you realize wait. There's more to this than meets the eye so to speak and it ends up not be easy so let me give a little background so i am getting some work done at my house and i'll just be honest with you. It is some really cool work. I am getting a bucket list. Item checked off and we are getting pool. Installed sounds awesome. It also sounds expensive. It is both. It is both awesome and expensive. But here's the thing. They were digging the pool today or digging the hole for the pool right and everything was going fine except going a little slow because where we live there a lot of rocks in the ground. It just took him longer than it. Typically would i guess but it was. It was going fine until they hit a sewer line. And then i'm like man. You know it the. They've obviously hit sewer lines before so that wasn't the big deal but the big deal was now. I've got to get a plumber out here. And now i've got to go through the process of not just getting out here. Hope and pray that i get an honest plumber that they are going to not Fleece me so to speak and not going to just take me for all. I'm worth because they know. I need this work done. And i'm like man. This is just another thing that's going on and my wife has been sick for a while and we've been dealing with that and the kids are in school and my daughter was sick at school. Had to go pick her up today and there are so many things in life can seem really really hard. Sometimes and let's be honest it is you know. So that's what i mean by. Nothing is easy but when it comes to what. I want to talk about today how to get a good job after the military honestly sometimes it is really easy and sometimes it's not hey. My name is aaron perkins. I'm a us army combat veteran. Binned daddy to my to amazing kiddos author of resolve a book which is a step by step guide for you the veteran to rediscover purpose meaning and passion and your post military life and if you hadn't guessed and the host of this podcast this podcast since i fail to introduce it at the very beginning is called we served now. What an on this show. I do my very best to answer the questions that veterans and their families are already asking and today as you just heard me mention. I'm talking about how to get a good job after the military. Because i put out a poll of sorts and a few facebook groups. That are full of veterans in a said. Hey what are some things you like me to talk about. Or what specifically would you like to talk about and tadpole on the next episode of the show and this is the one that the people have demanded so to speak so this is it how to get a good job. And here's the thing. Your mileage may vary. I'm going to give you a few pointers few strategies. You can use but every person you run into that has found that quote unquote good job. Probably have a different version of this story. So first of all you have to do the important work of determining what to you constitutes a good job. What is it good job. Think about that for a second. What is a good job is a good job. Something that pays really well or is it something that allows you a lot of flexibility or does it have a great work environment or is it the type of worker the industry you're in or is it all of those things you know. Is it a government job or is it a private sector job what what is a good job to you. And so here's the thing you have to figure out what it is you want to do. And a lot of times your passion in life or your experience in the things you already enjoy doing. What kind of guide you toward the type of work. You would consider to be a good job so if you're interested in let's say plumbing for example maybe that would be a good idea for you and again please. Don't take this as my recommendation. This is only a suggestion of an idea right. I'm not saying if you like plumbing that you should go be a plumber. I'm not saying that at all but it is an indicator like. Hey maybe that's something that would be a good job for me or maybe like electric and you would want to go being electricity. Maybe like cybersecurity. Like i do and you want to go to the cyber security field. You know there's a lot of things. I mean literally countless things. You could consider a good job. Maybe you want to go work at a convenience store. I don't know what you consider a good job. What you want to do is completely different. From what i want to do. Or what my kids want to do or what your kids want to do or any one else. No one is going to be able to tell you what you want to do. And no one is going to be able to define that for you and to say hey. Here's what you should be doing as a job. So here's the thing. There are a lot of different tools available that can help you kind of narrowed down that job field for you. Do you want to work at a company. That is focused on only on making a difference. You know a nonprofit type or are you wanting to work at a company. That is focused on making money and also making a difference right so he. Here's the thing. Let me just a just a side note here. Just because company is focused on making money does not mean. They are not making a difference. It might be a good difference in my bad difference positive or negative difference but they are making a difference right and again. I don't want to go too far down that road. But that's not what this show is about. This episode is about today. But what i want to say here is that you are the only one who can define that that. What is that good job for you. Okay so back to what. I was saying tools available. There are several tools available. Personality assessments. things that can help you determine what you are kind of set up for They're also tools. You can find online that you can just google i. This was my mls and you know this is the these are the jobs that might be in line with my mos had in the military. Now i will say this about those emma west to job translators. Most of them are pretty much garbage. That just being really honest. I mean they like i'll put in my intel. Mos they'll be like. Hey you should go drive a garbage truck you know. I think that there are a lot of tools. You can use so use a variety of tools so resolve that i just mentioned at the top of the show is a book i wrote and that book takes you through the process of rediscovering purpose but in part of that process is identifying your skill. Set your personality what you are naturally good at what you are naturally drawn to. What sparked that fire in you and helps you develop that one year two year five year ten year plan so you can move in the direction that you want to go now. Here's the thing when it comes to getting a good job right. You have to consider your phase of life if you're seventy five years old and you want to be a medical doctor. Chances are that are that is not going to happen. If you are a twenty year old who has you know. Been really good at golf your entire life. You played varsity golf when you were in high school. You are just about to get out of the military. You've played golf as much as you can. While you were in and could you possibly get a scholarship to go play golf. Go become a professional golfer. You know maybe so. I mean who knows if that's something you're passionate about. Maybe there's something you should pursue. He you consider being a professional golfer a good job but for those of us who are not those professional athletes right. Who have to you know more or less clock. In and clock out every day those definitions of what a good job is can probably be narrowed down more to the things. We're good at and the things we're interested in. Now i want to say here too is just because you don't have a skill in something does not mean you can never do that. I'm going to say that again. Just because you do not have a skill in one area or another does not mean. You can never do that. Thing i'll relate a story from a one of my jobs that i've had we were looking for a person and again i'm not going into the details of who this was or what positions was looking for a person to hire and as we're looking saw candidates who were just top of the line really really great skill wise. They knew what they were doing. They had the skills that the company needed. And then we had other candidates were a really good fit from the personality side of things and guess what we hard. The candidates that had the personality that met our criteria and criteria is probably long term. But that met our culture that matched our culture because for our company the culture was far more important than the skill because we can teach skills. We can teach anybody skills as long as you have that attitude and that aptitude to learn it we can definitely teach you the skills so just because you don't have the skills does not mean you will never have them if there's something you're interested in doing and you think that would be a good job. Then go for it. Go do that next. I want to share a couple of things with you. That are just again. Take them as suggestions. These are just some practical tips for those of you. Who either have never done this or you're not sure about the importance of it. Once you figure out once you determine for yourself what a good job is what you identify as a good job create a linked in profile. I know i know you might not think he linked in profile is important. You might think. Hey man i'm going to go do some blue collar work and i'm going to you know i want to go. You know. cut down trees for a living but I don't need a linked in profile. Well it's not going to hurt anything and the truth is maybe you don't but again i would still recommend you to create a linked in profile because you never know the connections you will make on there and you never know the connections. You will need in the future. I highly recommend you create lincoln in profile. And frankly i highly recommend you a lincoln profile before you even determine what a quote unquote good job is for you. Just get the process started. It takes five minutes or maybe ten minutes if that get started and get your information on there also if you don't have one already develop a resume and if you've never done a resume. There are a ton of resume services. Don't go paying a ton of money for someone to develop resume for you. You're gonna waste your money. get someone that you know. Who has a pretty good idea of who you are to look over your resume man. All you know how to write a resume. Your resume is basically just the things you've done in a little bit about you and your experience okay. Your experience education your military service again google. It look it up. You can find a ton of different examples of what a decent resume looks like and again. I don't have time in this show. Go into all the details of what your resume needs to contain. Maybe that'll be a show in the future. Or who knows but right now. I'm just saying you need to develop a resume because just about every job not every job but just about every job is going to require you to have a resume and so if you want to apply online dark sure fill out your application upload your resume or just links to your linked in profile so we can check you out there again. Cradling profile develop a resume resume or you just need some help. I am more than happy to help you with that. Drop me a line at podcast at courage to fight again dot com and put in the subject line resume. Help and i'll do everything i can to help you with. That and truth be told. If i get enough of those request we will put together a another complete episode on developing a resume. You might be a specific podcast episode but we can meet together. Virtually socially distance on a zoom. Call or something to where. I can just walk you through developing a resume and again i've been on the outside so to speak of the military for a few years. Now got out in two thousand fourteen. It's twenty twenty one. And so i've got some experience. Not only developing resumes but in helping others develop their resumes as well again. I'm not selling you anything. I'm just offering you the help if you want to. Draw me line at podcast. Courage to fight again dot com and again. If we get enough people interested then we can schedule a separate call where can walk through it with you altogether. Okay another thing. I would recommend again. I know said. Don't take these recommendations okay. Another suggestion i would make create an indeed profile an upload your resume their indeed dot com upload your resume their so that way people who are searching for candidates with your skillset can find you. Okay you say hey. This is what i'm interested in. Here's my resume. This is my experience that and those hiring managers those recruiters who are looking for people like you can find you on indeed so if you want work for the federal government however you're gonna need to create a usa jobs account and explore that and frankly creating a usa jobs account and applying to federal jobs could take hours to go into all of the details of that and the number of keywords. You need and how those need to be structured in the way the resume needs to be worded and how you need to apply and all of that. I'm just hitting the highlights of the steps. You need to take on this particular episode. So what was it five six steps. Maybe let's do a quick recap you need to figure out you need to determine what constitutes a good job to you is it. Money flexibility work environment type of work. The industry are going to be in. No one is going to tell you that. No one is going to be able to tell you what you want to do. You have to determine that for your life you have to consider your phase of life but you also need to create a linked in profile and this is regardless of your phase of life. Credit linked in profile develop a resume. And as i mentioned if you don't know how are you need some help with drop me a line at podcast kurds fighting dot com. And i will do my best to help you with that. Create an indeed profile is the next thing you need to do upload your resume their and again if you want to work for the federal government create a usa jobs account and explore that or here we are almost at twenty minutes and i have barely scratched the surface of what it takes to get a good job in fact it was just talking to a friend of mine. The other day Last night in fact and He has a great job He's had great jobs ever since he left the military. And a lot of those have been timing. A lot of those have been Just who he has known people he has met and things just fell into place for him but doesn't always come that easily in fact it rarely comes that easily a lot of times. What you're going to find about getting a good job as you're going to have to put some work in toward developing some relationships with people who can view when they say. Hey i know someone who knows how to install acoustic panels. And i know i could call because i know they are good at that. I know they've done that before i know. I've seen their lincoln profile their resume or i worked with them at one point so again there are so many different directions. You could go with a good job. And what constitutes a good job for you but you're the only one who can decide that easy but hopefully this has answered your question of how to get a good job. Look we all have a lot of questions but the most important question that we can ask ourselves is this have. I accepted the forgiveness of sins. That only comes through faith in. Jesus christ thanks for listening. We'll see next time.

Aaron Perkins Golf Emma West Us Army Lincoln Google Facebook Intel USA Federal Government
Some Capitol Hill Lawmakers Back Amazon Workers' Attempt To Unionize

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:22 min | Last month

Some Capitol Hill Lawmakers Back Amazon Workers' Attempt To Unionize

"Nearly six thousand amazon employees who work at a warehouse in bessemer alabama are voting by mail on whether to unionize. If they do this will be the first union amazon facility in this country. Here's jennifer bates. Who works there. I keep butterflies and butterflies. Normally come to calm me but hey this is my stomach faithful. It seems like it's getting bigger and bigger full of butterflies. Because there's no break in. Think i don't know how kogo nerve wracking. The election ends later. This month and i should mention. That amazon is a financial supporter of npr. But we cover them like any other company. Some lawmakers support the union. Including senator marco marco rubio or republican and of course president biden also michigan congressman andy levin earlier this month. He and a group of democrats traveled to bessemer. Good morning congressman. Good morning noel. How are you good thanks. What did amazon employees. They're tell you about why they want to unionize. Well you know a union election so often are about basic dignity and that was really true here. I was shocked to learn what it's really like in there They work in a facility. That's like fourteen football fields and it can take ten minutes to walk to a break room. They've to half hour breaks in a ten hour shift so they might get effectively ten hours to eat lunch be by the time they walk there and back lot of them. Don't feel like they can go to the bathroom. Except on their break. And they're watched and quantified every second they're monitored visually a listening geo positioning and every second they're not on task is measured and if they have a certain number of minutes off task in a week they could be fired sometimes might not even be a person involved it was really kind of dehumanizing to me. Here's the argument. That amazon makes amazon. Says look our employees. Earn fifteen dollars an hour which is a good wage in a place like bessemer alabama. Some of them have health benefits. 401k's essentially they have got the benefits that a union would get them. They don't need a union. What do you make of that argument. I'd like to tell that argument to any national football league player and the actor and a movie any presenter on major television or radio networks all of whom have a union every single one. The idea that unions are only for people who are the most poorly paid. It's ridiculous the one person who is unionized. That every airline is the pilot so this argument is ridiculous. These workers deserve a seat at the table to discuss a safe workplace. During a pandemic they deserve a seat at the table to have a workplace. That's human and a real person can go to and great make fifteen dollars. An hour amazon should pay them a lot more the owner of the company. The main owner had his wealth increase. Seventy eight billion dollars during a pandemic and they're about pay jeff bezos in their bag bragging about paying people fifteen dollars an hour there. What's wrong with workers having their own organization just that they can have input in their in in their work lives. And that's all these people are seeking is a seat at the table during this trip to alabama that you went on your colleague congressman jamaal. Bowman said this doesn't stop with amazon. He mentioned lift. Uber tesla and walmart as well. What is the ultimate goal here. The goal is for workers to be able to form a union and bargain collectively. If they darn well please. Noel were down to six percent of private sector workers in this country needing union. We're gonna pass the proactive in the congress and the president is going help. Lead into new era when workers can have a say at the table. It's long pastime in this country. Michigan congressman andy levin. Thank you

Amazon Jennifer Bates Senator Marco Marco Rubio Andy Levin President Biden Alabama Bessemer NPR Noel Football Michigan Jeff Bezos Uber Tesla Jamaal Bowman Walmart
Becoming Part of the UK EV Supply Chain

Electronic Specifier Insights

04:52 min | Last month

Becoming Part of the UK EV Supply Chain

"We'll be speaking about the company's production techniques the benefits of using wise products and of course have the company's been adapting an pivoting during the covid nineteen pandemic so flip welcome to electric specified herein sites Coup think to kick us off. I think what will be good for. Our listeners is if you can give us a bit of background about track. Wise more what. The company does not on your involvement in the company. If the is so truck wise we were founded in nineteen eighty-nine nine designs limitation started as a printed circuit design. Bureau mood soon. Enough to manufacture and in the mid nineteen nineties was asked to make a nine foot lem prince a second vote and this very large nuts circuit was one of the la gsm gsm nine hundred by station at tennis. Oh the company in fell specialized in the manufacture of them not really really conventional printed circuit boards but products using printed circuit technology. In this case would some in it was printing on tennis again. These very large Up to sell to two point eight meters length so really for the last twenty five years. Tuck wise as making provincial infrastructure. Tata's for Industry in that has been a big big business loris. So i joined the business and we but that the company had this set had this manufacturing capability which was dead. The manufacturer Bodes my feeling. Was that if we could sell it to one. Then one company we will be able to sell it to others and i joined net. She pulled business internet in two thousand on that basis remote keble. Oh i second customer office. New custom was based in melbourne. Seth australia and we ended up in shipping tons and tons of products. That to let and it to melvin. Indem ultimately go to queens exploit that Interesting journey and but yeah so that. That's that's where we started from. And what's what would you say differentiates the flex circuits the track manufacture for mother. Fpdc's yup in kosovo am flexible printed circuits. As as a not a not a new technology was people making ftc's long before trackways was ever ever involved. Am what what we did was. We took a our existing large large format manufacturing capability and really develop it to be linked limited so that is a fundamental proposition to the mockus normally flexible printed second Size are typically six. Ten minutes is twenty four inches in length. There's a handful of people on the worldwide macy's who can make make larger boats tip avail to a certain size but really check wise offering is is length unlimited. So awhile back. The longest product we made was twenty five meters. We've made fifty meter long products. I'm damn nici this week about to launch into To making seventeen eleven product. You know so linson. Limited is a real proposition of the market. Yes i think. The graph on the track wise websites of highlighting a kind of the lengths that you guys can manufacturer as i write the case Whether liberals are going to get on this something needs pulse. I we're pretty proud of this technical ability. And it's his set me of his has gained some interest on the worldwide that we keeps promote that so much space thorough menu image. Coming them in the press. Explain a little bit more about the use of. Iht's the wiring harnesses soup today. I'd like to say it was a minute my class to teach it thinking. That was actually a an approach. Were originally buy royce. Aero-engines who looking for place the why hanis inside the aero-engines with flexible printed circuits in order to excite white and decide space because the aero-engines bake roughly eight meters the from fight to oversee the flexible printed circuits with a big rolls royce at hud. We made them met made big Badges that the reason we colder to improve thomas. Technologies is is the same reason the was originally. I'm originally developed spec in the middle of the century so that they do wolf a significant improvements conventional lot hanis

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Draisaitl gets hat trick as Oilers beat Senators 7-1

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | Last month

Draisaitl gets hat trick as Oilers beat Senators 7-1

"The Leon Dr Seidel had a five point game as the Oilers hammered the senators seven the one price title registered his third career hat trick and had two assists in Edmonton third straight win I thought our start was really good I think we we put them on their heels a little bit early on that that always helpful on Connor McDavid added a goal and two assists to help the Oilers improved to six and against the senators this season Darnell nurse opened the scoring three fifty two into the game starting a flurry in which the order scored four times in less than ten minutes Mike Smith stopped twenty one shots a blank the senators until Evgeni to Donna scored midway through the third period I'm the ferry

Leon Dr Seidel Oilers Connor Mcdavid Edmonton Darnell Mike Smith Evgeni Donna
The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Heist

Everything Everywhere Daily

04:40 min | Last month

The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Heist

"The isabella stewart gardner. Museum was not surprising when he founded by isabella stewart gardner. She was a very wealthy woman who lived in boston and had a very large art collection. She was known to be very eccentric. Woman who would float the upper-class conventions of the boston elite she famously showed up to a concert of the boston symphony orchestra in one thousand. Nine hundred twelve with a white headband. That said oh you. Red sox and that was a really big deal at the time and caused much clutching of pearls and fainting. She was born into money was married into money and inherited a lot of money. She travelled extensively around the world and purchased are wherever she went. She established the museum in one thousand nine hundred three and worked with museum to curate. Its collection for twenty one years until her death in one thousand nine twenty four at the age of eighty four. She left the museum three point. Six million dollars will and she stipulated that nothing. In the museum's collection should ever be sold. Nothing new should ever be acquired. Any artworks shouldn't even be moved from the walls. She wanted everything to remain exactly as it was by the nineteen eighties. The building housing the collection was getting a bit rundown and security was very lax in one thousand. Nine hundred to the fbi worn the museum of a plan for our robbery but it only resulted in minor upgrades to the security system. The museum had no security cameras installed inside and most importantly the only had a single button with which they could call. The police which was located on the desk of one of the security guards other museums used a system where guard head to call the police every hour to notify them that everything was alright. If a call wasn't made then the police would come and the guards were also paid barely minimum wage. These facts would all become important. The robbers arrived just after midnight on sunday morning. On march eighteenth march seventeenth by the way is saint patrick's day. Which is one of the biggest holidays in boston. And this year. It was happening on a two men who were dressed as policemen there. Witnesses who saw them on the street but they assume that they were police. Never thought anything of it. There were two guards on duty that night. One twenty three years old and one thousand five years old from one of them. It was literally their first night on the job. Museum procedure dictated that one of the guards would patrol the building while the other said at the desk with the button which could notify the police at one twenty. Am the two men in police. Uniforms buzz the side entrance and they said they were there because of disturbance call. The guards didn't know of any disturbance call but they looked like real cops and it was saint patrick's day so something might have happened so they let the police in the men in police. Uniforms told the guard at the desk. Call the other guard down which he did one of the supposed cops then said to the guard behind the desk the desk where the buzzer was. Then he looked like a suspect they were looking for them to come forward which he did and then threw him up against the wall and handcuffed him. They've ended at the same to the other guard. And that's what. They notified them that this was a robbery. They then put tape over. The guards is and head and march them down into the basement where they were tied to pipes. The robbers took their wallets and told them that they knew where they lived in. If they cooperated they would get a reward in a year. All of that took about ten minutes from there. The robbers went into the gallery and started taking art in all. They took thirteen items an ancient chinese vase. A golden eagle from an unholy flag five sketches from gaza. Three works of rembrandt one from any one from flink and biggest of all the concert by vermeer one of only thirty four known vermeer paintings in the world. The robbers checked on the guards before they left. Took the security tape and left the building. The entire operation took eighty one minutes. The total estimated value of everything which was taken has been placed as high as five hundred million The vermeer itself was worth half the entire amount and it is believed to be the most expensive stolen object in the world when the next shift of guards arrived. They couldn't contact anyone to be let inside. They contacted the police who then finally found the guards bound and tied in the basement. With your work gone. The question then turned to who did it and whereas the art one of the things that stood out is that the robbers probably weren't experts in art and they probably weren't sent there to steal something in particular the way they handled the art indicated. Lack of familiarity moreover. They didn't take some far more. Valuable objects works by raphael michelangelo anticipations the rape of europa probably the most valuable object in the museum were untouched.

Isabella Stewart Gardner Boston Boston Symphony Orchestra Saint Patrick Red Sox FBI Flink Gaza Raphael Michelangelo
Increase your productivity with R.I.C.E

Run Your Day

09:56 min | 2 months ago

Increase your productivity with R.I.C.E

"Talked about this many many times the chaos of abundance and the trying to figure out which rich priorities to hunt out which things to do which tasks are more important. Which things are more urgent. We've talked about the stephen covey time matrix lots and lots of times. I've talked about this in references. So there is a decision making like a scoring method. That is out there. It's called the rice method Now to talk through each one of these acronym right and it stands for reach impact confidence an effort k now. What i'm going to talk about this in terms in inside the frame of decision making and goals and targets that you're chasing down right and there's a there's a a really great course that i'm in the guy. He he gives a lot more succinct view of it. And like a three to four minute type of synopsis. Obviously i'm not the guy in the course talking you so i'm going to do my best to kind of explain this to you a little more long winded -ly about really how this works right so our for reach right when you're thinking about a goal when you're thinking about target that you're hunting down whether even if it's a physical goal if it's a a racer trying to do or a Weightlifting circuit. You're trying to do or anything like that Or even if it's a business goal or a personal goal or weight loss or whatever the case might be right. The reach is in a lot of times us inside of marketing so instead of a marketing goal right. It's it's how how big is this gonna be. How how how much visibility can you get right but in terms of your goal setting area right. You're thinking about okay. When i achieve this goal. How far have i gone. Like how far have i reached how much how much have i propelled myself forward right. Because there's there's there's certain goals let's be honest. There's certain goals and targets that you and i pursue that when we actually achieve them we realized we set the bar too low right. And then there's sometimes we set that bar and we realized that we said it way too high because we were all gung ho. Yeah we're gonna we're gonna set the bar high. We're going to do awesome. And then you realize that it's completely out of reach okay. So this reach factor elect to think of in terms of my. Is it the right amount of reach. Is it just far enough of a reach for me. That you know when i actually achieve this target when i achieved this will like that's that's a good benchmark for me. That's a good milestone for me because it's allowing me to kind of live my life to do the things i wanna do but it's also challenging me in the right amount and not overwhelming me making me drink from a fire hose and regret that. I have made this decision right. So that's the are now. I is impact right now. This kind of goes hand in hand. I think in terms of goal setting again. I'm kind of adapting this from marketing perspectives. But the impact. I like to think of in terms of not only impact on my own life but the impact. I have on others right and i think this is particularly. I was going to say. It's particularly in every area but it's particularly applicable inside of business goals right or finance goals career goals right when you think of when i achieved this goal or when i hit this target or whatever it is you're chasing am i. Am i only doing this to be self serving or am i actually creating something of impact for other people or am i. In my leveling up the level of service. I gave her the level of business. I provide or the The the level of customer service have or is the product that i provide. Actually you know impacting more people able to reach more people in my able to impact more people's lives right because if if you start to see like You know just. Because i'm going back to the drawing board in. Revamping my website. This am i really going to impact a lot of people No not really. It's just going to be more of a self serving type of goal and there's nothing wrong with self-serving type of goals right. There's absolutely nothing wrong with those. They have their place in their their validity. Right but in terms of thinking about impact. You know you're you're thinking about okay. I want to reach people around me. I wanna reach like. When i think about this in terms of making apps that i make in the pot in even inside of this podcast like. What's the impact going to be on you the listener. What's the impact is going to be on the end user of the technology that i'm building i'm providing right and when you think when you think it through and that level that's like next level deep thought and that really gives you more clarity. Why you're doing what you're doing right. Move onto the third piece in that is see confidence in. This is pretty straightforward. This is the confidence that you have in yourself that you can actually chief this thing right do you have. What is your level of confidence. Do you have confidence that you can hit it in this kind of goes back to to reach part right like are you you kind of assessing this and being like i don't know like new. This this is this is really make him a button pucker. You know what i mean like. I'm i can't do this or are you like overconfident. Are you just like your should be able to achieve this quarterly goal in a week right. Then you need to do some some reassessing. You need to be like okay There's probably a reason overconfident. In this in. Maybe maybe that overconfidence will be prove to be Nobody no right. Maybe it'll be like. Oh wow. I was way too overconfident in my abilities or my resources or my ability. Actually get this done right But then you might go the other way and you might be like well on of any confidence that i can get this done right in in this when you look at it through this frame then you start to say well okay. Let's go back to to the reach in the impact of my really doing the right thing in my actually pursuing the right thing. Because if. I don't have any confidence that i can get it done. Yeah it might completely change my life in the lives of others inside of the reach and impact category. But if it's if. I have zero confidence. I can hit it. Why would i pursue that thing right like why i'm wasting my time. Mangum ahead against a wall. And i'm gonna be miserable in it's not gonna benefit anyone. Okay now the the last piece. The fourth piece is e for effort k. Now what level of effort like is this going to is. This can require sixteen hours a day of your extreme deep focused to achieve or is it going to be ten minutes a day. Is it going to be an hour a day. Is it going to be three times a week. Is it going to be just on the weekends. Right what level of effort. And i like to put resources in here as well. What level of effort and resources is actually going to require to pull off. And when you look at a goal or target through this frame you start to be like okay. I'm having some good reach like this is actually pushing me forward personally and professionally. Okay the the impact is also there. It's gonna be you know it's going to impact a lot of people. It's going to push things forward. It's going to actually provide some new things. I'm pretty confident. I can hit it. But it's also gonna take me ten hours a day that i can't dedicate to it also pull off and then it falls apart right so is this is a really crazy awesome framework that i really like to to think through in terms of all this because i hope you can see kind of how all these are interconnected right as you go through each one of them in you really take your goal your target or your your aim in life. Whatever it is. You're chasing her hunting and you put it through each one of these frames like filter it down to be a lot more clear in what you can do what you actually can hit and then you start to also get more clear on that. Why like all of these filter into that y right and it's it's amazing. I've started to do this inside of pretty much. All the different business goals that. I'm shooting for over the next two to three months. And i gotta tell you like it's a game changer. For me it really is because like i said it. Just it really frames your daily decision making on a whole different level because once you have this okay. I know. I'm reaching for something that is within my grasp but also challenging me. I know that the impact that it's creating is going to be enough impact that i'm comfortable with making but also not just like doing it just for me. I'm pretty confident. You should be at least over fifty percent confident that you can hit this goal right. You don't wanna be down in like ten twenty percent range but you don't wanna be like you know ninety ninety five percent range like yeah if you're up there that's great but you're also probably not challenging enough. You're not reaching far enough right and see how the reach. The confidence are kind of interconnected and the effort is is another thing that a lot of people don't consider in in this kind of threw me off a lot when i started when i first started going down this path and rely when i really sat down and was like okay to to achieve this thing that i wanna do in business or to pull out like when i started pulling off the the run your day apple. I completely underestimated the amount of effort. That was going to go into it like it ended up being something that yeah like. The impact was there. The reach was there. The confidence was there and then the effort. I completely underestimated. But i didn't put that through this type of framework. So i didn't. I wasn't doing this at that time right. And if i would've known out been like okay you know. There's a lot more effort involved in this. So therefore my confidence score goes down but the impact also goes up in the region goes a little bit

Stephen Covey Weightlifting Mangum Apple
It's A Wonderful Life With Gigi

Recovery Happy Hour

05:00 min | 3 months ago

It's A Wonderful Life With Gigi

"Hygiene. How are you. I am great. I'm so glad to be here. And yeah i'm so excited to be having recovery. Happy hour with you today. Thank you for taking the time to to share your story of recovery. I'm going to start this interview. The same way i start every interview and that is what is your name and your sobriety date and would you have described yourself as a high or low functioning drinker when you were drinking langer smy name and my sobriety date is february. Eleventh nineteen eighty six. And i was still a high functioning. I except in the area of romance in the area romance. I was extremely low functioning. I mean are we ever high functioning their love and logic those two things. Just don't mix well well. Why don't we just say that to other people. It looked like i was high functioning dairy cow. Mary go. I think i'll i think all of the above is super relatable before we get into your story. Tell me real quick just about what you're doing right now where you live. How old you are what you do for a living family hobbies anything like that. I'm retired. And i'm a little over seventy and i live in southwest florida. I grew up outside of chicago area and then travelled all over in my rambunctious years twenties and thirties. And most of my time. I've lived in michigan for the last several years just this summer. My husband and i moved down to florida. We have a little condo here. We have our kitty with us. And i don't have any children. Because i couldn't stay married long enough and snow grandchildren. So yeah life is good. I don't know what else you asked me. I think that hobbies. What do you like to do for fun right now. In south florida. Play a little golf You know. I have a blog and a lot of service work and a a nonprofit. I'm on that helps. Connect women in sobriety and i do a newsletter and i'm working on another a workbook for how to worry less and my husband and i play we. We just have a good time yeah. I'm very grateful that is fantastic. We'll let's get into your story and in five ten minutes or less. Tell us how long you drink. Tell us how long it was a problem and why you decided to stop you know. It really wasn't a problem for a long time in high school. I got drunk really drunk once and got deathly ill and had a blackout and everybody said how fun. I was a couple of times in college. I got drunk and did not stupid things. And and then i got married and started a teaching career and and he didn't really drink so i drank very little toward the end of that that it. It's kind of a long story about that marriage. But anyway i was very desperate at the end and i discovered marijuana so in my you know. Twenty three or so. I discovered that marijuana killed the emotional pain that i was going through. I really preferred marijuana. I could drink about six. Or seven beers. You know and i got through grad school by getting high and at night to ease the stress and it was really when i was around thirty four years. Old let's see. I had already been divorced twice. I was finishing my doctorate. I had gotten through that with the aid of drugs and alcohol just to calm anxiety and And i lived with two other guys long term. And so i met this guy who was different from all the other guys and i thought. Oh this is. The john and i moved to michigan and we got married very fast and within nine months of marrying him. I went to a bar picked up a stranger and he had marijuana and i started having this affair. You know with this guy. And and i went out to bars a couple of more times when my husband was traveling. My third house but my new you know went home with strangers. Finally i went running to a psychologist. I said what is wrong. With this problem. I have a brand new phd from stanford. And i have this private cd life and my professional life is looking better and better in my private life was worse and

Florida Michigan South Florida Mary Chicago Golf John Stanford
"ten minutes" Discussed on Ten Minute Medic

Ten Minute Medic

04:17 min | 9 months ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Ten Minute Medic

"The amount of kinetic energy increases to almost one hundred, twenty, thousand K. You. And when they say speed kills the really do minute. American energy increases were the white as a person goes from one hundred and fifty, two, hundred, eighty pounds. But really not quite that much. Understanding the anatomy of the human body coupled with basic grasp of Connecticut Energy You can begin to develop type six cents about the things that are going on with your trauma patient. Keep in mind outside out of mind, can often caused some real issues as far as having an effective assessment towards a patient of trauma particularly, any type of internal injuries we are looking at her patient and we begin to compare what has happened with the mechanism injury with injuries that we're seeing as well as the potential for injuries that are unseen we call busy index suspicion. Is Index of suspicion or your gut feeling will become much more accurate as you get more experience understand that early on your basic mistakes as far as what your gut is telling you. But that's okay. That's all in how you get your experience in your education as far as you're moving along and as you see more patients and USS more patients, the better off, you will get it this to understand the Bob Mechanics of trauma. We need to settle upon just a few definitions as we're moving through here. Now, for some of these definitions are going to be a no brainer. There may be others that you may or may not be familiar with it. That's that's okay. So, say penetrating trump penetrating trauma happens when objects such as a knife or a bullet or any other objects for that matter Pearson Protective Barrier of the skin and enters into the body. Any subsequent injury may be caused either directly or indirectly by the spin attraction will. Particularly Take A stronger deeper look at this type of injury causation. Particularly, we take a look at gunshot wounds a little bit later on. Compression happy injuries happened when a body stops abruptly while the internal structures are still moving forward. Now. The most common type of injury that we would see this in is a head injury with a coup contract injury to where the brain sloshes forward. You have an injury about the interior and sloshes backward and you have an injury on the post here. Stretching injuries are just opposite of compression these occur when part of the body is pulled away from from another in particular, you can see these types of injuries when you have sprains. In particular the ankle and the knee win differently, ovens and tendons begin to get stretched a porn. Now, a very medieval example of this occurred people were stretched on the rack is a type of punishment or torture or to exact a confession. In a share type of injury, the internal organs continue to move forward at varying rates Speedo. We talked about this while ago. When we were speaking about the car that stops the body shop's internal order themselves are still continuing to to pass on forward as the as the body of stopped. Win The body itself stops any type of limit or tendon that crosses the Oregon will cause it to be lacerated this quite frequently with liver lash rushes do the foul. Some four ligament crosses the interior surface of liver, as well as with injuries too theoretically or particularly within the lever. This fast inform legemaate acts much like a cheese cutter and that is very tough. It's very. Fibrous and it literally, the liver will continue to go around it on both sides until Liberte south could can become lashing right in the patient of lead to death. There are three phases of a traumatic event that we're GONNA take a look at in depth here..

penetrating trauma Speedo Liberte Connecticut Oregon
"ten minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

15:56 min | 11 months ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

"We need to understand and we need to recognize that they saw themselves as terrorists. That's what they saw the violence as and we have to allow them to be what they were. We can't sanitize our history. Just it makes us feel more comfortable and happier with idolizing women who have committed incredibly violent and dangerous actions for us to have the rights. We have today when these acts of happen. Then how does kitty start to be treated at the hands of the authorities? Well she's been arrested in force-fed a number of times before the violence as so many of the suffragettes were and I think what few people have have really understood because we haven't talked about the real violence and horror. Is that what it really pushed them to? Was that this the process of force feeding and government torture was a huge moment in the radicalization of a lot of these women that push them towards the extreme violence of their acts at one point in one single sentencing. Kitty as force-fed two hundred and thirty two times in one single set of four months and it destroys a singing voice. And you know when you're reading kind of her firsthand accounts or any firsthand account of the experience forcefeeding. It is torturous together. And you just you always have to carry in your mind that the whole reason why was happening was because she wanted me to have the rights. I have today and we wouldn't have them without her. What's also going on at this? Time is the First World War and Kitty obviously of German extradiction. She's betrayed by somebody. Basically reported there's women start that she's a German spy. It's you can't you can ask for a better story than the life story of this credible woman because it just goes from kind of one amazing extreme to another and the joys of being a historian is you get this autobiography with this amazing tale in and you then spent years going off making sure. It's all true because you quite suspicious because how can be true and yet it is. It is all true. It's all there so kitty. Because of her German blood it turns out that someone from her past decides to seize on the moment to. We don't really know what her motivations were. I think she was probably just mad to send a letter to the Home Office proclaiming that Kitty is at suffragette and a German spy. Now by this point kitty has been in England for over half her life. She's lost any trace of her German accent. She Nagas speaks German. She has no German friends. No German family. She you know she has no connection to Germany whatsoever. It is the distant dream of a child immigrant. A memory yet. Of course the government sees on this opportunity to try and get rid of them most dangerous woman. I find this to sort of things that happen at once. Kitties already on the run underneath the cut in mouse act because this is the moment where the first world war is breaking out the suffragettes on the run. They don't know still from all of the things. The amnesty hasn't quite taken off the what's going to happen. So she's hiding from the place already and she his reports that they're searching for her under this accusation of being jammed spy and she's trying to figure out if she can get out of the country or what's going to happen whilst the government's investigating her and trying to piece together if they can actually throw her out of country and one of my favorite bits of archive was sitting in the National Archives in Q. Reading the government reports of this investigation which are all in the you kind of all drawn from an important to the bank. But the moment when they realize there's literally no way of being able to accuse her of being gems spy for because she she has. She isn't one and that kind of gut isn't and they're like there anyway. There's all this kind of little scribbles in the origin of like. Is there any way we can do anything we can get rid of? And they realized that they can't and they will also fear terribly that because she so influential and important in the suffrage movement that if they do trying to pull her that the this suffrage at will kick off and might even stop bombing and by that point per society cannot take a domestic campaign again but while they are concluding this. Kitty is being kind of. Hof escorted by the police who've now found her and by the suffragettes who are trying to rescue her to the Docks Liverpool and they managed to put her on a boat and sent it to America to just get her out of the country and keep us safe and she arrives shortly after that into New York whilst the wars breaking out and from that moment on her life is again changed forever and so she's she finds New York and eventually will become involved. Margaret Sanger and the organization that becomes planned parenthood and she remains involved in activism for large parts of life. I WANNA pass over that period of time. It's a major part of a libraries. Want to get to like where she ends up. Where does where DOES KITTY END UP? After this what says she becomes a hugely eventual. Part of Margaret Sanger's control movement working between the US and the UK until really had death as birth control activist and kind of sneaking into churches. Live leaving bombs. She's leaving birth control pamphlets which I just love disrupting society wherever she can but she ends up back in New York in her. Seventy s in the forties and. She sits down to write autobiography because she realizes that won't her? Life is unique and yet shared then needs to be a record of it. She desperately wants people to know who she was. And the role. She played as well as all these amazing women around her and so she kind of sets down to kind of write it all out and and leave it to everyone and then dies as we're in the middle of Kennedy going into the Second World War and I really I when I was writing the book. I really struggled with that moment because I had no happy ending. Inequity dies surrounded by friends and family. But she's never married she's never had children. There's no record part from her words of life and who she was and I desperately wanted to find a way to have a positive ending I. I couldn't because everything that had happened to her. You Know Society hasn't changed and I was writing this in kind of August. September of last year thinking. Nothing's changed and thinking of my own life and thinking over the experiences of very good friends of mine and being angry and frustrated that nothing had changed. World is not different and ISO sitting down to chapter. Ten metoo happened and it was insane and I had to write to my publisher and Guy. Please can you. Can you just give me a couple more weeks so I can watch this happen because for the first time it feels like we might finally one hundred years after? Kitty was fighting for the same thing. An actress fighting against sexual harassment. Trying to change her world we might fund be getting somewhere and I was very lucky. They gave me the chance to watch it. Come out and say the whole of the last chapter is capturing that moment of history as it was happening which was an incredible thing to be able to do as a historian to start with. Mary wollstonecraft to tell US AMAZING. Life and then of Kitty Marian and then capture a moment of our own social revolution. The very end. I still can't get over that. That is what happens that I was there at that moment. And that is is how ended and it finally gave me a not so much a happy ending but a hopeful ending the buck because we should have one we should. I get really angry when all we do is portray women in the past victims. Because they're not they're so strong and they're so determined to change the world for the better and often that gets lost in kind of stories of just slowly of abuse or just of death or the end or an ending. That isn't quite what you want so to be able to end the burke today with where we are now felt incredibly powerful. Now I was gonna say changing the subject. Of course it's not really changing the subject. I'm not sure yet when this is actually going to broadcast but at the moment that we're recording it over the best. You've started a bit of a movement on the twitter. I think it would be very proud but I just home so last week. The Boston Globe and Mail decided that it was going to remove title of doctor from its interviews from anyone who wasn't a medical doctor and of course. I have quite an iron in the fire of this because I have I am Dr Edward L. and I work in the press. I work as a public expert. You know I do. Tv AND RADIO. The whole point having hd is so that people know. When I right? When I talk when you him speaking I'm doing it with authority. I know I'm talking about. I am not going to lie to you. I am telling you what the years of my career and research have shown me about our past and I I really do resent massively the world. We're in at the moment. Where style guides are removing expertise from the public domain? What is the point of journalists coming to speak to me my expertise if they are not going to acknowledge that because how else people know who to trust so I get very wound up very angry about this and I saw was happening online and I just added of my voice too many voices of academics talking about how that was wrong and so stating that I had my you know I am not ms? Oh Mrs I am Dr Andrew Del. That's my title and I've earned my authority and that's what I want to be referred to and did quite well and a lot of people kind of a lot of women kind of react to this and then almost instantly with sending that out a man slid into my mentions to say I think. What you've said is legitimately modest right. That's ridiculous because working on sexual culture we sexual MARCUS TO REMOVE. Women's voices from the domain. All the time I've been told I'm vulgar immodest I need to learn humility simply stating that in a public setting. If you're talking about my expertise you should state my title to show. I have expertise and I just sent off a Hashtag which I made this modest women as kind of an afterthought and over the next forty eight hours I had ten thousand ten thousand new followers and Hashtag went completely viral and in most insane an incredible way and he we all six days later and it hasn't stopped on. Twitter is full of absolute incredible women adding their titles to their handles to take home of the authority that they have. And I think that's an incredibly powerful and amazing thing you know so many kind of one of the awful things about it with so many women coming to me and saying I have I have my title but I never use it or I always downplay it because it felt like I was bragging and A. PhD. Is Plenty hard work? We work really hard as anyone does to add something original to the world around us to be part to show our case our expertise show why we know what we're talking about and yet women and solely women consistently felt that they should restrict to when they use it to say the simple moment where they might give a talk or lecture which is ridiculous because when women's marriage you don't call her ms time unless you ask you to refer to her as Mrs. It's because it is simply. Her title..

Kitty Marian twitter New York US Margaret Sanger Mrs. It England Home Office Germany Mary wollstonecraft Dr Edward L. Docks Liverpool harassment publisher Mrs I Kennedy
"ten minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

11:15 min | 11 months ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

"They is little atoms radio. Show about ideas and coacher with me. New Danny sweet dumped activist Austin and suffer. Jets Kitschy Maria in book in ten minutes doctor. Fernando Dr Fan. Redel is a historian specializing in sex suffrage and coach in the Victorian and Edwardian errors. She appears regularly on TV and radio and writes for The Guardian Huffington Post Telegraph and The Times Higher Education among others. And he's also a columnist for BBC magazine. Fern is also the author of death in ten minutes. Kitty Marian activists arsonist sopher jet which we're going to be talking about today Fan. Welcome to little. Thank you very much. This is the story of Kitty Marion. As a says on the cover and but for contacts you start looking at Mary Wollstonecraft. Unlike how some days were perhaps a bit radical for the feminists that came later in this era in the early twentieth century. So tell us why you wanted to start with. It's not so much. Just her ideas. It's also her life. You know we have so we struggle so much with women who do not fit a certain category were just supposed to be well married virtuous and thinking things and Mary. Wollstonecraft wasn't like that a tool. Shijo number of children out of wedlock and I was fascinated as to why this woman who was so influential in her time and so powerful in her time wasn't used by the Victorian period where I focused as I kind of a stepping stone to start off a really powerful feminist revolution. Because she wasn't an I was kind of investigating three and I realized that it's it's down to her life. It's to the fact that she did have lovers. And she did have children out of wedlock that Victorian feminists or at least the kind of dominant Victorian at that time really struggled with. And it's a very personal reaction. I think to kind of the world where in today I I tend to use my history to or at least my research to try and understand better why we have the world we have now why we have so many problems with sex why we have so many problems with women and going back over. The last hundred and fifty years is really what gives me an answer to that 'cause remarry and when did you first come across her? So I was working in the archives at the Museum of London I was doing research for my PhD. And I was researching Victoria kind of nineteenth century women in the music holes and kind of musical in general. Because that's what I was. Fascinated in my family were trick cyclists and the nineteen eighteen ninety s until the nineteen thirties. And so I grew up with a lot of stories about that and a little photographs. And I found that time really fascinating. And I'd always been told and I think a lot of people have the misconception. That music hall is own kind of knees up mother Brown and very stereotypically male and not a good place for women and my family were a troupe of predominantly female trick cyclists so. I already had this kind of background. Knowledge that the world wasn't quite what history had told us it was and I was fascinated by that and I was sitting in the Museum of London. Archive and the amazing curators. There who's wonderful woman? Go Beverly Kirk said Fern. I think your you're GonNa really likes something. I've got this unpublished autobiography of musical artist. That I think you're gonNA like but just see no she was also suffragette and I kind of massively roll my eyes at that point because I didn't want in that very millennial kind of Oh I know what my rights are. It doesn't matter to me anymore. I didn't want to fool into the trap of studying suffrage because that feels like if you're a female historian the first thing people assume about you as you're going to be doing gender studies or you're going to be doing suffrage. It's like the biggest kind of assumption female historians face and I find that very frustrating because we have incredible political and military historians. Who HAVE FEMALE. And they never seem to get the airtime will the exposure that male historians do so. I. I was very kind of anti being painted into a box. But bear gave me this kind of typed manuscript pages and I remember sitting down and opening up and kind of starting to read and within five pages on your wasn't GonNa leave because this absolutely incredible voice just leapt off the page and told me things I never knew I had no comprehension of about women about sex and about the fight for the vote and I realized very quickly that if I didn't know a someone who is studying history no one knew like the public don't know and that's the purpose of history for me and the purpose of being a historian making sure everyone has access to the research we do from this was unpublished most affair which you use in the books so how much of that is due to tight bound volumes in the Museum of London and Kitty left copies to the Museum of London to the women's library and to the New York Public Library where which is where she to life which is in New York in America. And it's kind of a bow. It's kind of two volumes. That are about three to four inches. Thick of this typed manuscript. And I just used to sit with it and just read and read and read and read these incredible firsthand accounts of life in the music. Halls and life is a suffragette bomber and then life is a birth control actors in the stories and and people and an a memory that as historians you dream of finding you dream of finding voice like this from the post that is so complete and tells you everything about the world they are and not just how they feel but how the people around them feel and I knew in that moment from kind of the I read that I had to spend the next two years of my life finding away to get her into print because everyone should know and so she's presently all those moments of history that you just almost movements that you just mentioned also of course I guess we could say to begin with to is also something of a minor celebrity. Why has she been forgotten? I this is a question I kept coming back to. You and I was really struggling to understand as a young researcher and in the end I found two reasons one. The suffrage s themselves really in the nineteen twenties with the connection some suffrage as kind of the main ones to the connection to you. Saxon Birth Control that was seen as of actually an anti feminist thing as it had been throughout the nineteenth century. Which is another thing that. I uncovered in death in ten minutes that I was fascinated by and so that kind of tainted I think her memory secondly she was exposing the stories of the bombers is that in the Nineteen Thirties. The surviving suffragettes did not want exposed. And when she sent her autobiography to them to be conserved to be protected it got put away and hidden and historians. You came off to that. Can only really go on the archive that they given. And if something has been hidden way it's not surprising that it hasn't come to light because we're talking about history that is ninety years old you know. We've only had democracy in England since nineteen twenty eight as less than ninety years so it is hardly surprising that we are finding so many new things now and yet to some people. It is a total shock that this has been hidden on this husband forgotten. It's kind of my mission where this Birkin with a lot of their kind of public idea to change people's minds. Let's talk about her early life. Because there's a couple of incidents that happened to her before she's involved in the self-rule movement particularly the acute influence on. You know home how she thinks going forward. She actually comes from ears initially. Yeah I think this is one of the things like under love Kitty. She was a gem child immigrant. She came here when she was fifteen years. Old came here completely alone because her her uncle had realized that her father was being incredibly abusive. We believe sexually IDA believe sexually abusive. 'cause he doesn't talk about that at all but physically abusive incredibly physically and emotionally abusive. And I think her uncle removed from that situation at the moment where potentially that violence could have become far worse and get far more towards the woman she was becoming and e basically packs are onto a boat with no warning and her to an aunt. Who's living WHO's emigrated far earlier and is living with her husband in Just outside the east end in London and Katie arrives in England. Kind of at the age of fifteen this kind of beautiful redhead young girl who has no idea of what the country is that she's come to know ability to speak English and she's kind of she was sort of coming into Liverpool Street and hearing English being spoken and thinking my God I am never ever going to get a handle on this language because just noise but she's still kind of the next few years. She teaches herself. English through deadwood deck journals which are kind like penny dreadful American stories of the wild west and her nieces and nephews Kind of schoolbooks and just ping up snatches in the street. And she has a few kind of accidents where she's picked up say swearwords language and she sorta gaily greets a neighbor or her aunt with this with this kind of swearword thinking that is just an everyday term. Says she's go to learning. She's learning about language and she's leading England and by the age of nineteen. She knows more than anything. What she really wants to do is be on the stage and it causes a lot of problems with her aunt's family. This idea that to be an actress is disrespectful and women who want to do that Bad and wrong. But she's determined now over through this book there are residences things that are going on today and the content of the feminist movement today and so of course kitties. You want to get into the music. All she's just start now so she leads an agent says she has a meeting with this guy. What happens Says she goes. She's very naive. And she's nineteen years old and she goes for her first agent and she's really excited and it's an agency on York Street. Just fortunately road just down by Woodley station I. It goes very well. The meetings fantastic. It's the offices full of acts and bustle and noise and she comes out kind of thinking. My God my life is made. I end zone catch. Is that the contract isn't ready quiet. Then and she needs come back the next day at five pm and I can remember reading that in the archive and kind of my heart sinking. Because I am I was by that point in my mid twenty s and had had enough experience with the world to recognize a trap when you see one and my heart just sank and.

Museum of London Mary Wollstonecraft Nineteen Thirties England Fern Kitty Marian Kitty Marion Fernando Dr Fan Redel Jets BBC magazine Danny sweet Victoria researcher Brown New York Public Library Austin New York Beverly Kirk
"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"Got to you know. Sit here but it doesn't equal the memories. I have of him. It doesn't it doesn't equal what I remember of him. That doesn't equal the beautiful memories. I have of him spending Christmas with me of going on a hike with knee of our phone calls and are weird emails and whatever. I'm just sitting at a graveside right now and it's not making you feel better. I'd rather just sit at home and remember the good moments and listen to the next. Ten minutes This is nor McNamee and this has been terrible. Things for asking or producer is Marcel Malecki. Boo PRODUCTION HELP FROM JAMAICA MALDONADO. Medina our project manager. Is Hannah Mikhak Ross? Jordan turgeon is our digital producer. We got help on this episode from the Wonderful Sasha as lenient. We are so grateful to her. This episode was mixed by John Miller. Our theme music is by Joffrey. Lamar Wilson. We are production of American public media. Okay bye guys..

producer JAMAICA MALDONADO Sasha Jordan turgeon Hannah Mikhak Ross Lamar Wilson McNamee Marcel Malecki project manager John Miller
"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"But he didn't <Speech_Female> get over it. <Speech_Music_Female> That's not how <Speech_Music_Female> it works. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> It's been twelve <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> years and talking <Speech_Female> about Jamey <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> still makes Oliver <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Smile. It still makes <Speech_Music_Female> him cry. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> I thought about their <Speech_Female> theme songs. <Speech_Female> How their <Speech_Female> relationship began <Speech_Female> with a request <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> for Oliver? <SpeakerChange> To <Speech_Music_Female> Be Jamie's for <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the next ten minutes <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and ten minutes <Speech_Female> more <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and how <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> grief is one of those <Speech_Female> things that feels <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> as big as love <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> just <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> is immeasurable and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> just as hard to explain. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> You can't <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> outrun it but you <Speech_Music_Female> can live with it <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> ten minutes at a time. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> That's the way <Speech_Music_Female> through those intense <Speech_Music_Female> early days. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> It's the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> way through the disappointment. <Speech_Female> The people <Speech_Female> you'd hoped would comfort. <Speech_Music_Female> You cannot <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> anger that you've been left <Speech_Music_Female> out of remembering <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the person who's love <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> has meant so much <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to you <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> because twelve <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> years later <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the pain of losing. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Jamie is different <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> and so is the pain. <Speech_Female> Oliver felt <Speech_Music_Male> from Jamie's <SpeakerChange> mom. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> And the <Speech_Music_Male> thing that I realize <Speech_Music_Male> is that <Speech_Music_Male> people need <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> the <Speech_Music_Male> condolences <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> that they're used to. <Speech_Male> They <Speech_Male> need to <Speech_Male> be reassured <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> the person <Speech_Male> they lost <Speech_Male> was who <Speech_Male> they wanted <Speech_Male> them to be <Speech_Male> more than <Speech_Male> the person they <Speech_Music_Male> were <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and I think I came to terms <Speech_Male> with it <Speech_Music_Male> that <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> there. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> They're suffering <Speech_Male> in their own way <Speech_Male> and they're <Speech_Male> allowed to do <Speech_Music_Male> that <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> if they're <Speech_Male> portrayal <Speech_Male> of him <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> didn't include me. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That's also <Speech_Male> okay <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> and I don't WanNa <Speech_Music_Male> take that away <Speech_Music_Male> from them. <Speech_Music_Male> I <Speech_Male> know how much <Speech_Male> hurts to lose <Speech_Male> someone <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> you try to come to <Speech_Music_Male> terms with it <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and I was okay <Speech_Male> with it not including <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Oliver <Speech_Female> did <Speech_Female> eventually <Speech_Female> get to <Speech_Female> Utah <SpeakerChange> to say goodbye <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to Jamie. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> finally found his <Speech_Music_Male> grave and <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> put the flowers <Speech_Music_Male> down in that <Speech_Music_Male> little <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> flower <Speech_Music_Male> thing they have <Speech_Music_Male> at the thing <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Music_Male> sat <SpeakerChange> there and <Speech_Male> I thought <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> okay <Speech_Male> great. <Speech_Male> I got to see <Speech_Music_Male> his tombstone. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> I

Oliver Jamie Jamey Utah Jamie.
"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"You think I'm going to see him again? He's not GonNa want me and it was the first time I told my parents that I'd be most comfortable if which is didn't talk for a while but then wasn't because I was angry at them but it wasn't because it was hurting me. I needed to heal before I could listen to what they had to say. Because I didn't WanNa hear what they had to say. It's very difficult to reject Something that's so well meant and so lovingly meant to admit that it's not doing you any good Jamie's mother never contacts Oliver again. He doesn't go to the funeral he never receives any Jamie's belongings. Their relationship is just gone. You're felt like I played with fire that I've been burned and that now I wasn't allowed to complain about it because I had been warned as much as I thought that. I wasn't deserving of the relationship or this connection now I wasn't allowed to grieve about it either. Oliver was back at work just a few days. After Jamie died in just a few weeks after their relationship had finally become official I was completely just. Shaken only shared it with my salon manager and another hairstyle site connected with really well. What got me through it was. I'm just GonNa stay silent about this. I need to keep it to myself. I'm GONNA go home. I'm going to drink a bottle of wine and I'm just going to get over it by myself.

Jamie Oliver official
"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"Alone grieving a man that nobody really knew he loved even his really good friends. You know when you're in a relationship and he don't really know where it's going and you don't really know what the outcome is going to be any. Don't really you know you don't necessarily want to put yourself out there and be like guess let I am with this great guy and we love each other because what if it doesn't work out and I think that it was the mind space I was in I didn't want to Want to ruin it. I didn't want to jinx at In any other circumstance says if Oliver had lost a boyfriend of many years one who had met all of his friends one. He had a photo of on a station at work. If he lost a wife a fiance. The grief industrial complex would roar to life. There would be cards. Leaves of absence from work a memorial for him to plan friends making sure he wasn't alone but this thing disquiet thing he's lost. His own is now a quiet ache. A quiet grief to share it with his family means coming out to them to share it with his friends means trying to catch them up on years and years of slow burning loved that just finally burst into flame but Oliver Tries. His parents are still in Switzerland too far to come scoop him up from the floor and hold him and let him weep and too far to physically turn a cold shoulder so oliver emails his father and he tells him everything about. Jamie and their relationship about Jamie's death of course we're Mormon so we don't swear but I remember the very last sentence I wrote that email was. I'm hurting so fucking bad. Oliver does not know what kind of replied to expect. He's just fed his father to huge pieces of information that he's gay and that he's grieving. It takes a few days to hear back from his dad. Oliver opens the email. There's no anger but there's no comfort either. It was this Very Mormon sort of. You're gonNA see him again. He is in a better place now. His his challenges are taken away. I forget the words they used but it was sort of along those lines and And the more was reading this. The more was heartbroken because I knew it came from a very very loving space. A very loving intention was hurting me. It was hurting me too. I knew that when these said that Jamie was freed of all his challenges that in their Mormon way they were saying Jamie's no longer gay and I was thinking he's dead again. Do.

Oliver Jamie Switzerland
"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"Officially taking a commercial break And we're back Jamie. Oliver are in love and they're together after five years they're going to make this work the next day the first of two thousand eight. Jamie and his friends or going out to a house on Long Island before Jamie flies out to Utah to see his family. Oliver can't get time off work so he tells Jamie. Go with your friends. I'll see you when you get back from Utah. He even books trip up to Boston. The first trip where he'd efficiently see his official boyfriend. Jamie heads off to Long Island and Oliver goes back to his apartment. I just fell to my Inflated Mattress and that moment of realization that everything that I thought would never happen to me is happening to me now. I was so happy I started crying and it didn't make sense like why am I crying? If everything that I want to happen is happening I went back to work. and I didn't tell anyone yet. I didn't know I didn't know how to process it really. I didn't I don't know what to do with it. It was so foreign to me. It was so new to me. It was so strange. I didn't know what to do with it and a few days later. Two three days later Jimmy called My phone I was at work so I he left a message and he said he was at the airport flying to Utah and the message said he was so happy that he'd seen me in that we have been able to be open more each other and sort of like make decisions. I forget exactly what words he used but he said that you would see me soon. A few days pass an oliver is missing Jamie. Usually he tries not to reach out to him when he's with his family. But hate this boyfriend now so on his way home from work he calls him. He calls his boyfriend has mother answered and she knew who I was. Jamie's mother had never met Oliver but she told him. We've heard so much about you in the past few days. Which wow that feels amazing. It's real older. Just didn't want to interrupt family time I was I would call back later. And if she could tell Jamie I called and the phone one silent and she said he passed away this morning Jamie had suffered epileptic seizure. He'd been rushed to the hospital. He'd been in a coma and he didn't wake up Oliver's shocked genie's.

Jamie I Oliver Jamie Utah Long Island epileptic seizure Boston Jimmy official coma
"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

09:09 min | 1 year ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"Beautiful relationship. It's such an intense emotional relationship. How at all do you define it or not define it and and what is Jamie to you? Well he was or is what I firmly believed throughout my Mormon mission and beyond. He is what I thought would never happen to me. It's like I mean as stupid as it sounds he was. He was the miracle that I thought I would never be allowed to experience. And when something like that happens to you I'm assuming you sort of shouted on the rooftops. You're so excited you WanNa talk about it and tell everyone all my friends would tend to like. Oh I just got this new girlfriend. I'm so excited or oh I just got engaged. And let's go shopping for the wedding list and whatever but to me. It was like this. I always had to sort of keep it very quiet and I think it sort of what may Jamie more meaningful it was. I mean again. I always go back to show tunes. Because that's an but there is a show tune that Liza Minelli things and The lyrics from the song are when it all comes through. It's a quiet thing and when everyone was shouting how they were seeing someone that they got engaged that well everything's turning out for them for me. Jamie was quiet thing. A quiet thing is so beautiful. Something you keep just for yourself. But it's quiet for another reason to be as Oliver's parents still don't know about Jamie and Jamie's parents know Jamie is seeing someone but Jamie was like we'll oliver and I had a bottle of wine at his house and we just cut it on the couch watching a movie and I was just like Jamie shut up like can you. Just tell your mom. I hung out over his house. That's enough that's all the information she needs. But Jamie sort of Always felt that need to sort of like. I'm going to provoke them. It's two thousand six now and Jamie. Oliver have known each other for three years. Oliver has graduated from college and he enrolled in beauty school so he can support himself as a stylist when he eventually moved to New York City. But for now he's still in. Utah and it's Christmas and Oliver can't get time off of beauty school to visit his parents. In Switzerland I ended UP BEING STUCK IN UTAH My last Christmas of beauty school and I couldn't I normally would have gone to be with my family in Europe But I was stuck at home and Is the first Christmas except for the? Christmas is on my mission where I was going to be by myself and it was very sad about it and I I tried to think of things to do in whatever and Jamie said that he was going to be visiting his parents and he was going to talk to them and He talked to his parents and he said well. Oliver is going to be all alone for Christmas. Can invite him over and his parents said No. Your siblings are going to be here. All your nieces and nephews are going to be here as going to be too awkward into strange. No we're just not okay with that and that started this argument with well. We're not making out on the couch. This is someone who doesn't have a place to go for Christmas can. Can you come over? And His parents insisted no. It's not going to happen and And I understood. It's not personal. Because they don't know Oliver so Oliver Understood. The Jamie did not. Jamie was upset. Jamie said that well if If Oliver is not welcome here that I'm not going to be here either. And he came to my apartment in Utah. We made made some dinner. We went to a movie that we both didn't like and it was fun because got the joke about it and he spend Christmas Day with me and again it was one of those magical moments were like. Someone loves me enough to do that for me. And for most people. It sounds like something so normal. I mean for my siblings. Maybe it sounds normal for their for their Spouses but for me which is so special. It was just so like it was just so unique. And so valuable. Their relationship is like this big meaningful displays of love and then time apart. They still live in different cities. A few months later Oliver was done with beauty school and moved to New York City to pursue his dream. Jamie was still working in Boston and they were still in touch. They talk to the emailed. They see each other when they can and they also see other people. I mean there was such a real relationship that I was able to tell him like. Oh well I met this guy and I went on a date with him and be able to tell him the details or like this is what we did and this is how it ended and there were a few people that I went out with where it didn't end the way I wanted it to end and I was heartbroken so to say and I was able to call j. knee and tell him. Yeah so I went out with this guy and I'm really disappointed because I really liked him and it didn't work out and Jamie always said well didn't didn't work out because this guy wasn't me and someday we'll be me and it was just the most healing words the most soothing words and how going through life's disappointments and rejections. He just knew how to take it away In December two thousand seven. It's Christmas time again. Oliver is in New York. Jamie is in Boston for the holiday but he tells Oliver that he's coming to New York City for new years and he wants to spend it with Oliver. He wants Oliver to come out with all Jamie's friends and celebrate the New Year. Oliver hates new years but he loves Jamie so he says yes. I will go out on the most annoying night of the year for you at this restaurant and his friends and we had just really great time. Just catching up looked so gorgeous. He was wearing white button-down shirt and I always told him like. Oh we should let me cut. Your hair would be cuter if it's a little shorter year little more style this way and he never did. Let me and again. This is where it goes back into type. It's like oh I wish is haircut. Were different but I remember because it was him. I just I loved his haircut. They passed some Bubbly around midnight and Jeannie hated sparkling wine. He was actually a very snobbish red wine drinker and he poured it into my glass and he was saying like. I know you like it. I hate it you can have. It was shortly before midnight. He recalled the time when we were driving in my car. That was playing the song by Jason Robert Brown the next ten minutes and he said.

Jamie Oliver New York City Utah Liza Minelli Boston Jason Robert Brown Switzerland Europe Jeannie New York
"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"They go on now gone to dates every weekend. The they do all that but this is the first time that it happened for me. Jamie has to leave in a few days. Sell the two of them. Take another hike. They make out on a mountaintop. And then it's time for Jamie to leave town. I thought well this is how it always goes. it's going to be over not going to see him again in whatever and I hugged him and we held each other and he said we'll see each other again. This is not. This is not the end. Their relationship moves onto email tons and tons of emails. The kind so special. That even seeing that name in your inbox feels like receiving presently. You don't want to open it right away because then that feeling will be over. Oliver is still in school. And Jamie who was just four years. Older is working. They see each other. When Jamie COMES TO VISIT HIS FAMILY IN UTAH? But only privately Jamie's family knows about Oliver but they prefer that the relationship private an Oliver's family has no idea about Jamie. We always didn't contact in the beautiful thing about the relationship was that we could go months without speaking but when we spoke again it was like we'd never lost touch and we weren't losing touch was just we were just living our lives and we were busy. There was one time we We went for a drive and I was playing of course Castro court broadcast recordings in my car. Because it's my car and I choose and I was playing. This cast recording of Jason Robert Brown musical called the last five years and.

Jamie Oliver Jason Robert Brown Castro UTAH
"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"And normal that. I didn't I didn't care I didn't care because it just so much felt like it didn't matter like it was just going to be what it's going to be and so we went and drove in the Canyon and We parked somewhere With a beautiful view and he kissed me and I was just perfect and we cast for five hours. I think it was. I mean. We didn't KISS FOR FIVE HOURS. Straits but Again it was this thing with like. Let's take a break and just hold each other or let's just talk for you. Know another half hour and I was five o'clock in the morning when he drove me back to my apartment and he parked on the curb and kissed for another three hours and it was eight o'clock in the morning and I thought. Oh Shit I have to go to class so I went inside and shower and changed in got dressed and went into class and I was so tired but I just felt so happy and I felt so happy because it was something that I had never experienced before but I felt so stupid because this is what my roommates do all the time..

"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"Back and Jamie and Oliver are finally going to meet up. They've traded secrets and dreams. They've stayed up late on the phone talking about life. They've exchanged countless emails. And they've missed each other on two continents and now they're back in the same orbit. They can an absolutely will meet in real life at starbucks. Which again was like a forbidden place to go because Mormons don't drink coffee and I drifted the starbucks. And I'm like so scared because like oh my gosh. I'm walking into a starbucks and I'm a Byu student. And whatever and Has the first time I saw him. He was sitting at a table in the corner. And a you're gorgeous and I was so and and I was so nervous and this is like you. Have you have to imagine like at this point. I'm a twelve thirteen year old teenager going through the motions of dating for the first time and I sat down and I ordered a mint tea because I was a law abiding. Byu student so I had my My herbal tea and I sat there and and I thought we'll have plenty of time. Whatever and we ended up talking the entire day I skipped my voice lesson. I skipped everything the entire there. I know the entire day I sat there talking with him and just exchanging and it was. It was so effortless that there was no like. Oh well okay. I don't know where to go next. I don't know what to say next. And sometimes there was silence or pauses but those positive didn't feel uncomfortable. It was just like all right. Let's be quiet for a minute or two. And it didn't matter and I remember the sweetest thing that I like. The first physical contact I had with him. I was holding my Mint Tea Cup and he grabbed my finger and held my finger. Just like I guess someone would hold someone's hand but he just held my finger and he said I'd really like to see you again. I wish I could describe it. And it wasn't like again. It was so it wasn't even like he grabbed my hand. He literally grabbed my index finger and held. Its between his fingers and I wish I could explain what it feels like pets one of those things. You only know what it feels like actually happens to you the best way. I can describe it as I hope it happens to you. Some time and that you'll feel it you'll know what it feels like Oliver.

starbucks Oliver Byu Jamie
"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"Theater program is where Oliver comes alive. He's doing what he loves even if he's far from being loved far from having a love of his own remember remember the first time I I. It was after an audition and I needed a ride home. Didn't have a car at the time and This guy from the audition gave me a ride home. And we had a nice little chat and whatever and he was very sort of like this extroverts. Super Guy Guy like whatever. He actually looked like a clean Mormon but he just had like this you know very extroverted personality which is Great. You know good for him. Living in Utah having the courage to be that way and We we pulled up in my parking lot at my apartment and we kept talking for a little bit and and that's when he said we'll Oliver Year you're gay right and it was the first time admitted like I said it out loud. Yeah I'm gay and it was like this weight was lifted off me and at the same time as the way it was lifted off me. Like I'm being honest about who I am. Another weight was put on me because I wasn't allowed to be gay and the thing is as an actor. You you have to. You have to be honest with yourself. You can't actually one of my acting teachers said you have to You have to always meet yourself where you are in order to portray whatever needs portray. It's not gonNA be possible until you're honest with yourself like this is who I am. This is where I'm at. This is what I feel and from here. I'M GONNA go on and be whatever I need to be on stage so oliver starts to be honest with himself. He's not going to pretend that he isn't a full person. A person who wants love and connection the year is two thousand and three and facebook is not a thing. Smartphones AREN'T IN OUR POCKETS. So Oliver goes to the computer and he gets online and kills to some website. That's about making friends was gay but it was not grinder but it was But it was very Premature facebook thing You were allowed to have nine pictures on your profile They had to be clean so like it wasn't it definitely wasn't grinder And the profile was very sort of bullet points. You enter your name your age. Your whatever your location. Oliver enters his location. And I was like Oh look at all the Byu music dance theatre students on here and the thing is it was saved because you really were an outing yourself but you you were just on their. You were trying to create connections. Oliver wanted connections outside of his university and his faith and after a few days he finds it so The way this website worked is that you were like it. Showed you okay this person. You know this person because you have this connection with this person so this person knows this person who knows you kind of thing. And that's when I saw Jamie's profile Jamie's beautiful dark gorgeous hair beautiful eyes. Oliver sent me a message and Jamie replies and he said that he was.

Oliver facebook Jamie Utah
"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"Ooh I'm Nora mcnerney and this is terrible things for asking in this family. Love a love story and we love a story and every grief story is a love story. You don't grieve what you don't love but for now this is a love story and it starts in my favorite place for Love Story to start the point where you're sure you just cannot will not could not possibly ever find love. That's exactly where Oliver was his Sophomore Year of college. I know his Sophomore Year of college. Really that was when Oliver was sure he would never find love. Sounds a little dramatic but at this point? Oliver has never dated. He has never kissed anyone and the people he goes to college with our pairing up and maybe even mating for life. He goes to a conservative college filled with people who share his Mormon faith. It's absolutely not weird for him to feel like by now he should have found his big true love. I saw two of my siblings. Meet their Well my brother met his wife. My sister met her husband I saw get married. I saw my roommate's Mccall remains Fall in love and Or have crushes or whatever and go on dates and My missionary companions from my more mission. I was starting to get wedding invitations. I started going to weddings and it sent me into like this. I know this. I guess what I would call depression. But you know you go through these steps of you know and so after the mission for quote Unquote Normal People After the mission you get married you have children. You know you have your corporate job you pay for orthodontists and whatever you know but those steps don't apply to Oliver. Oliver has completed one year of college and his mission trip where he traveled to the Netherlands to spread the word of mormonism and on that mission. He had realization not that he's gay. He's known that forever. I've always been very honest about my identity or about a not to other people but to myself as like I know like men. I know I'm attracted to men and I always thought well if God is the Mormon God. This is going to be taken away from me. And I'M GONNA be okay and there was on my mission when I sort of had this moment like this lightbulb. Going up where I realized this is not going to go away and I accepted it. I was like you know this is this is just who I am. And so on my mission. Add this moment where I realized that of all the checklist steps that you go through a Mormon. This is the end of it. I'm going to go home for my mission and I'm not going to do anything else that other people do. And at the time it didn't realize how obedient I would remain or whatever and since I was still at Byu to remain obedient because you have to abide by their code of conduct abiding by the Code meant going back to. Byu finishing his degree going to church and it meant not dating. Men Not expressing that attraction. Oliver's family doesn't know that he's gay. They expect him to study law to find a girl to get married and settle down. But there's another path that is calling to him the musical theater program.

Oliver Nora mcnerney Byu Mccall depression Netherlands
"ten minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

04:29 min | 3 years ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

"You're listening to little atoms i'm nailed any today i'm talking to dr phone redel and we took it about her book death in ten minutes kitty marion activist arsonist and yet and fan i guess we should talk about how to marry okay so jet we've talked about a few of the things that have influenced her away upon her joy in her early life how does she encountered the jets basically and how did she become one i love kissy story of how she became his job because i recognize it lot at this idea of i'm not actually interested in this feminism i don't want to be part of it oh gone to a meeting oh god i'm now committed i have to do this this is everything to me is that kind of moment of feminist piffle that i think many people recognize in their life's west suddenly something changes for you and that shifts your home worldview and she's been working the musicals for about twenty years by this point desperately campaigning to try and get protection for women in the industry and not getting anywhere and number of acting friends say we're going to march with the suffering jets in this huge hyde park marched hyper was happening and it's going to be amazing we're taking the banners of dentures franchise league come with us and could he goes no no i don't want to do those hooligans suffrage i've read about them terrible people i don't anything to do with it he's kind of convinced to go and she walks in this march hearing the women's march as seeing all of these banners listening to all of these lectures of all these women who want exactly the same thing as she does which is either protection in their industry the right to be heard the right to have a voice in government and the right to have a say in control of your life she saw disintegrates at that moment going oh my god where these women ben on my life this is everything i want an i need and she after that walks into the kind of the headquarters of the wspa which is the woman social political union who are the suffragettes that's the only people that we should be calling suffer jets at the members of the espn and so it says what can i do i'm here i will do anything and she gets kind of put to work as a magazine celera's telephone answer and then as the suffrage acts move into a very violent campaign she ends up becoming i kind of term at england's most dangerous woman so also today let's talk about some of the outrages as they were called in those days this me with something that just blew my mind because growing up i never heard about bombs again what does so many public talks and now people come up the first thing they say is i had no idea but kitty was part of a nationwide bombing an awesome campaign that really hit it's peak between nineteen twelve to nineteen fourteen that involved bombs on commuter trains in mp's houses in public parks in churches in theaters acid attacks chemical attacks asthma attacks in sundry devices left across the country from glasgow to put smith to ireland dublin angle i all the way through london they tried to up some polls they brought the tobacco they blew up lloyd george's house you know this is an ex exceptional absolutely exceptionally violent domestic terror campaign that we have never acknowledged before nothing what's really fascinating is again so the parallel to modern times i guess i naively imagine them going around with like you know round things we've fuses coming out of these literally pipebombs terrorists us now with bits of random metal put inside them to cause more damage again exactly the same as somebody blowing up something nowadays us i really struggled with that say this this became then of course my obsession my phd and i started compiling huge databases of every bomb attack that happened across the country that i could find through newspapers through office reports three police reports sort of visiting local archives national archives and just trying to mind data from wherever i could to create maps of the bombs to china identify the bomas all of it i really became a huge thing because in the entirety of our historial graffiti only one other historian has ever looked that let's mangled cj gammon in detail oh and he started to.

twenty years ten minutes
"ten minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

"The age of fifteen this kind of beautiful redhead young girl who has no idea of what the country is that she's come to know ability to speak english and she's kind of she remembers sort of coming into liverpool street and hearing english being spoken and thinking my god i am never ever going to get a handle on on this language because just noise but she's still kind of the next few years she teaches herself english through deadwood deck journals which like penny dreadful american stories of the world west and her nieces and nephews kind of school schoolbooks and just picking up snatches in the street and she has a few kind of accidents where she's picked up say swear words and language and she sort gaily greets the neighbor or her aunt with this with this kind of swearword thinking that is just an everyday to so she scoped learning she's learning about language and she's landing by england and by the age of nineteen she knows more than anything what she really wants to do is be on the stage and it causes a lot of problems with her own family this idea that to be an actress is disrespectful and you know women who want to do that bad and wrong but she's determined now all the way through this book there are residences with things are going on today and the concerns of the feminist movement today and so of course kitty she wants to get into the music all she's just starting now so she leads an agent so she has a meeting with this guy what happens say she goes she's very naive and she's nineteen years old and she goes for her first agent and she's really excited and it's an latency on york street just off of water lea road just down by wortley station i it goes very well the meetings fantastic you know it's the offices full of acts and bustle and noise and she comes out kind of thinking michael my life is made i and only catch is that the contract isn't ready quite then and she needs to come back the next day at five pm and i can remember reading that in the archive and kind of my heart sinking because i'm i was by that point in my mid twenties and had had enough experience with the world to recognize a trump when you see one and my heart sort of saying can i turn the page and kitty describes going back the next day discovering that the officers mt and yet her agent is there with the contract and she signs it and he moves around the desk deposit to her and attack sir knocks are unconscious and often that she staggers out and she staggered onto the bridge don't totally bridge and she looks down at the water and she has this moment where she decides am i gonna throw myself in or am i going to pick myself up and make the life i want and i think many women it's very recognizable moment that first time someone takes something from you that they have no right to and it was incredibly powerful to me and she kind of faces that for the next twenty years because it's twenty years until the suffragette show up she's in her forties and every time she goes to work if it's with an agent or a manager this keeps happening and it's happening to other actresses that she knows she's trying desperately to get the government to listen and change its mind and protect women in industry and they won't and it's incredibly frustrating to her you know you said that there's an awful resonances in the book i didn't write it that way that's just how it happened in this is our history it has taken us one hundred years and the reason why why i think it's such a powerful story and so many people seem to connect to it is because what happens to kitty whether it's the awful tax or her resilience and hurt and to change the world around her so many people recognize still the sightsee we have today one moussaoui through the the musical world and the theatrical world now obviously what could you experience him was what most women would have been experiencing at the same time they're all of these amazing women characters in that world the as one of eking out some sort of.

twenty years one hundred years nineteen years
"ten minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

"In the museum of london and kitty left copies to the museum of london to the women's library and to the new york public library where which is why she ended her life which is in new york in america and it's kind of about it's kind of two volumes that are about three four inches thick of this typed manuscript and i just used to sit with it and just read and read and read and read all these incredible firsthand accounts of life in the music halls and life is a suffragette bomber and then life is a birth control act with the stories and and people and on a memory that as historians you dream of finding you dream of finding a voice like this from the post that is so complete and tells you everything about the world they are in not just how they feel but how the people around them feel and i knew in that moment from kind of the i read that i had to spend the next two years of my life finding a way to get her into print because everyone should know and so she's presently all those moments of history that you just those movements that you just mentioned also of course i guess we could say to begin with to his also something of a minor celebrity why has she been forgotten i this is a question i kept coming back to and i was really struggling to understand as a young researcher and in the end i found two reasons one the suffrage s themselves really struggled in the nineteen twenties with the connection some suffer just kind of the main ones to the connection to your sex and birth control that was seen as ev actually an anti feminist thing as it had been throughout the nineteenth century which is another thing i uncovered in death in ten minutes that i was fascinated by and so that kind of tainted i think how memory secondly she was exposing the stories of the bomas that in the nineteen thirties the surviving suffragettes did not want exposed and when she sent her autobiography to them to be conserved to be protected it got put away and hidden and historians who came off to that can only really go on the archive that they give him and if something has been hidden away it's not surprising that it hasn't come tonight because we're talking about history that is ninety years old you know we've only had democracy in england since nineteen twenty eight as less than those ninety years so it is hardly surprising that we are finding so many new things now and yet to some people i it is a total shock that this has been hidden on this husband forgotten it's kind of my mission where this book and with a lot of the kind of public stuff that i do to change people's minds let's talk about her early life because there's a couple of incidents that happened before she was involved in the suffrage movement particularly the a huge influence on her house she thinks going forward so she'd actually comes from germany irish initially yeah i think this is one of the things i never loved that kitty she was a gem child immigrant she came here when she was fifteen years old can hear completely alone because her uncle had realized that her father was being incredibly abusive we don't believe sexually ida believe sexually abusive because he doesn't talk about that at all but physically abusive incredibly physically and emotionally abusive and i think her uncle removed her from that situation at the moment where potentially that violence could have become far worse and geared for more towards the woman she was becoming and e basically packs her onto a boat with no warning and sends her to an aunt who's living who's emigrated far earlier in his living with her husband in just outside east end in london and getty arrives in england kind of at.

museum of london kitty ninety years three four inches fifteen years ten minutes two years