35 Burst results for "Ten Fifteen Years"

Dreamcatcher Writer/Director, Jacob Johnston

The Graveyard Show Podcast

06:46 min | 3 months ago

Dreamcatcher Writer/Director, Jacob Johnston

"Jacob. Johnston is the writer director of the new horror film. Dream catcher which centers on to a estranged sisters and their friends who must survive a forty eight hour whirlwind of violence and mayhem at an underground music festival. The film can be seen on demand and on digital starting march fifth. Jacob has also written for the tv series the look see and sunny family cult and it is great to welcome jacob into the verge joining me appreciate the time. Of course. i'm gravity here. Well congratulations on the film for those that are not familiar with dream catcher. Why don't you tell everyone what the film is about. Absolutely i kinda going on what you said. It's all going to chew sisters who you know falling out in their relationship. Come together at this kind of nineties. Grunge underground festival and while while at the festival some traumatic drug induced things go down and the rest of the film follows the the fallout of a kind of traumatic event which also sees the appearance of a mass killer who is seemingly hunting down the kids. So where did the idea for the story come from. Yea when i known the producers brandon and kristen crystal for for a very long time and we both shared kind of a love for ninety s on samba. l- horror and so when they came to me and they're like. Hey we got the financing. We wanna make a movie. We want to love letter to the nineties. And we'd love some ellen of music to be involved in the story in some capacity and the rest of it was up to my own devices. So i took a couple of days started out what what could work. And what was great about the edm in was one at such as guys cultural movement. That is happening the last ten fifteen years but also you know the idea of introducing a character with a mask. It was kind of a no brainer. We got we got marshmallow death lungs and those are characters who who regularly wear masks so there wasn't really going to be a buy and for the audience to be like. Why is there character wearing a mask. And then you can take that mass and put it on anybody's head and it's not kind of like a strange Or or law mythos that we have to explain like where did this come from. Why does it exist. You know so. Those are the baseline elements in terms of the the foundation of the story. So you mentioned nineties movies and a fan of them. I'm wondering if there were any particular films from that decade that were influencing you for this. Because when i saw it i saw it as a part slasher part jallow and if there were any films from that time period as well that might have influenced you for this absolutely. It's it's exactly that its appeal to the modern audiences in terms of like for me a film like screen and i know what she did some great because it focuses on a smaller cast and really get to know the characters Before just you know. Axing them moss and with with the galaxy phones it was it was like ten abry these these movies that used color and and use them as a character themselves in what was great about again the world was there was a natural reason to use these colors. That wasn't just like color for the sake of style. you know. So is able to view those contracts elements that i really loved in a meaningful way. That didn't just feel like oh he's doing a neon horror movie because he thinks it's got a cool style to it so it was a nice thing to not have to be like well and doing it. You know you feel justified in a narrative sense to and it really turned out really well. And i actually. I'll hit you up on that in just a minute because what i one of the first things. That kind of stuck out with this film for me was that it's it's a slasher jallow but it's a very different type of slasher film. I noticed that you just don't set up a group of characters that are there for the slaughter you really rely on the cast and the characters with their relationships and also i mean you actually touch on something. That's rare. in horror films is grief. That happens maybe hereditary was is a movie that comes up recently that touched on touches on grief and carry supporting each other That you normally wouldn't see in a in a typical slasher film i mean. How much time did you put in when you started creating the story and these characters a lot of time but for me. That's where the writing process really starts. i think if i get bogged down in like plot mechanics then suddenly the characters. Just start to feel like a product of that it's inevitably you're going to have to find how those characters function as you know a mechanic within the story. But if i know who they are. And i know why they are before i start putting them into what needs to happen within the story. Then it gives me a more well rounded view and it also gives me a little bit of leniency with how that character evolves through the story at the end of the day. At least for me i believe that it relates to the audience. A lot more. Because you go into these films you can go with the mindset of light can deluxe people get gutted in the craziest wave or or if you if you can surprise people. Hopefully by saying we'll get that can happen but also like you said an element of support and seeing how trauma affects people. I really interesting because it doesn't just happen in one week. It's you know it's crippling for some people it's motivating for other people and there's you know there's this gray area when it comes to grief in incomes to trauma and i really wanted to see how that affected these different people who had the surface may not feel like they really come together and a meeting away but then you start to see how it affects all of these people differently and what drives them to throughout the film. Yeah i mean it really is interesting because i without giving anything away you have one character trying to console another character and basically saying you know one thing and the other character turns around is is basically like i'm in pain. I'm hurting. i'm grieving and it just really kind of stood out to make some like well. This is something. I would see a drama and it's really refreshing to see that in nfl. Mike this because yeah. I mean normally you know you back in the old days you buy your ticket you go into the theater. You know what you're going to get and with this you know. Obviously there are certain rules that you're going to play by but also you're you're going. Yeah but you may think that this is this type of movie but it's really this type of movie

Jacob Jallow Kristen Crystal Johnston Brandon Ellen NFL Mike
Anna Atkins and the Cyanotype with Josie Purcell

Jo's Art History Podcast

05:54 min | 3 months ago

Anna Atkins and the Cyanotype with Josie Purcell

"Today. We're gonna be talking about this incredible women on a cans. I have to thank you first. And foremost she was never on my radar. And i don't think if he hadn't written into me she probably would have completely surpassed me and i'm so. I'm really grateful first and foremost that. You've brought this incredible women to my attention. But can i ask. Where did you come across. Ana oh gosh and quite a number of years back now. I'm my background is working in and talk. Raphy lots of different certify options medical photographer But in the past ten fifteen years. And i really went back to my first love of traditional doc processes an alternative photographic processes so those tend to be processes that might be made without a camera. Even so. that's where. I really found out about anorak kuenz because my passion for one of those processes which is the science type and what is the tape for anyone. That's perhaps never heard that term before. Well hopefully there's a slightly in the name in the sense that it process that produces blue and white images at the end of it and it's a sort of photograph process of contact. Printing was invented back in eighteen forty. Two an anna was one of the m well. In fact she's noted as being the first person to create a photographic book and it was with that process that she created that book. So yes it's really fascinating process for me. It's really important because he's probably one of the the least impact on on the environment as in you can wash and they make out in the ocean. If for instance. So that sort of my my interesting is while it speaks to so took trying to lessen my photographic footprint as well so yet to really beautiful process. It's one the can be ease ready simply you can. But it's not Pony different things that you can. You can do within wasif using it. It's been really fascinating. Actually because although it was never going to be because of the just the two tones it was never going to be taken on into the history of photography when when it was being invented and developed it really is such a beautiful process that in the lawsuit of since i've ready been working with it again. I've really known in the last few years that white people getting ready entrusted in it. You can use it with chiltern new. You know you can. So it's got so much scope really as a as a netflix process that you can do at home and it's such a simple process in its in. Its by be basic forms. While i think. That's what's really intriguing for me. A about the process of of of purchasing these and the first thing i came across it actually by the i work in a sculpture gallery and it was one of our artis that has created a couple of prince using the process and i had never heritage before it's so so fascinated by thank first and foremost really kind of talk about ana yet and who who was anna can on why she important while the me back in the in the anna lindh. She was born in seventeen at nine thousand nine and she died in eighteen. Seventy one victorian period and it was obviously a period when there was an awful lot of invention and discovery recent Across numerous scientific fields happening photography itself was invented and developed during that period photography as we know it now was invented at that time by i. Think for me with anna. It was because women in particular that time when not necessarily considered sort of science wasn't considered to suitable pastime for them to to take part in so for me having women in a position where they could actually push the boundaries and rock the boat to everyday life then obviously. She came from a wealthy a privileged background to although women as a whole had less opportunities. She did obviously have a slightly better opportunity than other women. In the sense that have farther was a scientist and he really encouraged her her education and shared his knowledge with when she was a child. Mother died not long after she was born so i think that they became quite a strong partnership as it were and she grew up with a passion the science and a passion for botany in particular So she was actually a botanist and also an artist as wow one of the things she did for her father. He translated a polk and she illustrated it which was all about shelves so she was very good drawing beautiful illustrations as well so she had all of those interests and passion. It wasn't intellectual when she was a little bit older that she discovered the type process and the had the opportunity to actually share a collection. She'd been collecting numerous earned plants. Flowers see like in a herbarium over the years and it wasn't until she. She made this discovery with family friends around the science type process that she she was able to then shed on a bigger

Anna Anna Lindh Netflix ANA
The Evolution of SEO with Rand Fishkin of Sparktoro

Voices of Search by Searchmetrics

01:20 min | 3 months ago

The Evolution of SEO with Rand Fishkin of Sparktoro

"Curious to hear some of the beginnings where you started out in mas and when you look back and reflect where seo is today what are some of the biggest change is that you've seen in. How search marketing is interpreted as a digital marketing channel. I think seo's mantra for the first ten fifteen years that i was in it was basically rodney dangerfield. I don't get respect. I don't get no respect. Go on and today. That is nearly one eighty right. Every major publisher every major corporation every major website invest heavily in deeply in seo seo professionals on their team they contract and consult with seo agencies search engine optimization has become a standard part of marketing. In fact. I think you could argue. It's probably the top five marketing practices today. That was really never the case. While i was starting or even running mas i think it was maybe true my last couple of years of the company as an individual contributor. But it's a massive seachange from what it was and i'm sure many of your listeners. Right have been in the field for five ten plus years right so they remember those times when seo was fighting for even a tiny scrap of respect her budget and now it gets a

SEO Rodney Dangerfield
How to Create the Perfect Avatar to Grow Your Business with Julio Chavez

The Authority Project

05:43 min | 6 months ago

How to Create the Perfect Avatar to Grow Your Business with Julio Chavez

"Let's get right to it. Tell us first of all i. What is an avatar. Not the movie that the movie right is people who do not know what that is. First of all assure. Okay so these way to explain that an avatar is essentially the these sort of customer that you want to sell to in the most basic sense right What i'm going to be talking about today is essentially you creating that and i know there's probably many of you Listeners out there. That are like okay. Yeah i've heard about this. You know or maybe you think you even created one. But i wanna challenge you to revisit it because there are two big problems. I normally see the first being that when it comes to an avatar By the way is that noise too. Bothersome pio okay. I just wanna make sure could be low so the first being that you go to shallow so in other words if you are creating your avatar this person that you're selling to and you go to shallow. You might just be saying. Like i wanna talk to everybody. I wanna serve everybody. I want to help everyone in their different nations. And then you can go to deep where you're giving your nehring down search so much that it's not beneficial and it can just be more time consuming than anything so. Let me give you an analogy here. So we're talking about like Dating as an example right the primary one too shallow is like i wanna marry or date for In this particular circumstance literally anybody anybody who is you know. Eighteen to to to eighty five. I don't care let's go out. That is not beneficial to you. Especially if you're trying to find that one person you'd if that's what you're putting on your dating profile or that's what you're doing when you're walking in the club and you're just like literally anybody who's interested in me in me. Let's go out. It's probably going to work out for might be a bad example to you. Went to there you go right go right ahead yeah And then there's the other side to it where it's like it's too deep where you're like. Okay i'm only interested in guys or girls or whatever you know that are thirty to thirty one. And they only shop on whole foods on thursdays and they only drive yellow maserati. Something like that is so specific. That is actually very problematic. Because then you narrow down your search so much that it's just impossible to find somebody that to to serve in that. In that way right there was some benefit to that because you can now think about income level if they're driving new maserati Can think that. Hey they shop at whole foods so they might have some some of the same common belief systems. That i have so in. In that regard you did get a little bit into the right brown but it was just too specific if that makes sense. Yeah so the idea that you kinda wanna do this. Like goldilocks method. Where it's not too shallow Like you want to okay. There's a there's something going on power washing high windows or something. I don't know. I'm sorry. Everyone i know this is crazy. Police stick with me. It's important to understand that petar. So yes like i said. They both have their pros and cons in their own ways What you wanna do. As i mentioned is do that. Kind of goldilocks method. Where it's not too show not too deep and you want to kinda give yourself just the right Just the right amount of of a filter. I suppose as far as like who you can serve in how you can do that before i go into that. Brian was there something a question you wanted to ask that. I may be able to answer. In case i wasn't very clear or you couldn't hear me because of the incredible amount of noise that's happening decide. Just what people who maybe. Why is this important. Why why why. Can i just go ahead and just put my offer out there to for all to see. Why is it important for them to have this advertised to be so to be so defined in this way. Sure i'll tell you the first hand. It's because if you say i can serve anybody. You're really serving. Nobody like this mind. That might have been okay for you to do. Ten fifteen years ago online when facebook was barely starting out and all that stuff. Because you know you're like one of the only But if you talk about something as simple as like advertising. I think if i remember this correctly it was like twenty sixteen. There was something along the lines of like three point eight million advertisers on facebook. But today in twenty twenty. There's almost nine million advertisers like. It's it's such a large pool and we're all gaining and you know saying. Hey look at me. look at me on. People's news feeds mobile sites. And all that that. If you don't understand who you're speaking to all that money that you're going to be putting towards ads is gonna end up being wasted all that time that you're putting towards organic social media post things like that Are being wasted as well. Because you're just not gonna get the sort of engagement what that's likes or comments or click on your link in order to apply for your service or your program. You're just not going to get that because you're not speaking to this one person you

Petar Brian Facebook
The Psychology of Finding Your Voice with Emmanuella Grace

For the Love of Podcast

04:07 min | 6 months ago

The Psychology of Finding Your Voice with Emmanuella Grace

"What can we do to move beyond what maybe our perception of what we sound like. And i think come to terms with the actual voice that we have because you focus a lot on the psychological components. What else should we be thinking about. Or what else do you think about as a coach and as somebody that really does focus on boys. What are some other things that realm that that come into play. there's a couple of components. Amy cuddy did some amazing research power poses. Which i think if you're not living under a rock you've come across at some stage and what we understand. Even though that their research has moved on because it's been ten fifteen years now what we did understand from that research is that how he's our bodies effects. How our minds feel and so by getting into a good head space before you communicate in an important context. Let's say the word or even before you get up and connect with your family at breakfast table. Get yourself into a good head space but you can use your body to do that. Which might be doing some sit ups doing some power poses or We put on a record and debt seated or anything where you're feeling good in your body will affect the sound. That comes out if you think of your voice as the sound that an instrument is if instrument feels good like. Let's he's example of a trumpet because that would make sense for people right. You hear people talk a lot about the diaphragm. It's important if it wasn't working. You're not breathing. But i don't think that it needs to be the focus of voice training. It really is just the air that goes into the instrument so it's important inasmuch as the power behind the sound but it doesn't deserve the amount of tension i think it's gotten in the past diaphragm important. It helps you. Get the air through the trumpet. But if the trumpets been banged against a tree and filled up with mud and you haven't cleaned it lately and it's still got a bit of spitting. it's going to be bradley. And a bit outta choon and it when you hit a high note squeak and it's going to be a good sound right so if you don't look after the trumpet sound that comes out the other end of it however good the air going in is it goes through the instrument. Which is your larynx and your farrington your sinuses and it'll resonates in your face. If that part of the instrument isn't functioning well the sound that comes out. The voice that comes out of the instrument is not going to be great so that is also true that if we look after our minds which is the thing that controls the instrument we look after our minds i if we get off body feeling good straight away. Your voice is going to sound better because you're looking after the instrument does a whole. You're polishing that trumpet. Your removing this spit. You're taking care not to bang it around keeping it warm. All of those things will make your voice and your instrument yield a better sound. Would a fantastic analogy. I love that another analogy that you'd give it at least a thought is this idea of having childlike mindset. I absolutely love this thinking and we are so conditioned as adults to move away from this imagination that we have as children where sky's the limit and we could do anything we just have this. Everything's possible mindset. And i love the child mindset when it comes to voice and one of those things that you talk about is even singing in the shower. Oh yeah the hotel excelsior. Why why are you gotta get exercise. Firstly the acoustics are usually really good if all the rooms in the house where you get a sound great because it's like naturally some echo. It's good but one of the things that can make it challenging is your naked and so people will feel expose. what like. Hopefully you're naked shower. But even for me. I can have moments where i'll get in there. I'll be like okay. You know this is where it's few now saying all my mind will go blank. And after being a professional singer for more years than i want to tell you i will still have a member. I'll be like. I can't think of anything to sing. So then i'll usually go dance with somebody so always worse as port of call and hope that i don't slip and fall in the shower. It's one of those things where you've just got to set aside your inhibitions and be like i'm naked. This is the best thing in a sound. Let's go and just go with whatever goes into your head first because it's warm and steamy so your vocal folds are in a good space and you relaxed because hopefully no one's banging on the door and telling you they want breakfast and hasn't used the litter or to spin cycle isn't going in the laundry because now we're all living at home at a lot more than we used to. But it's one of those things where it's just somewhere where you can get really uninhibited and if you can feel uninhibited when you're naked. He's going to be so much. Easier to feel uninhibited. You're dressed in front of an audience. Like your rib

Amy Cuddy Bradley
Rebuilding the Learning Ecosystem for the Future of Work

Work In Progress

04:13 min | 7 months ago

Rebuilding the Learning Ecosystem for the Future of Work

"That we used to think. Let's get an education. let's start let's get into our career and then we retire but i think the numbers have been. You know any somebody who's Working now probably like ten or twelve jobs throughout their lifetime in each of those jobs are going to are going to require different skills so this idea of lifelong learning long-life learning as you have flipped it on its head a little bit here What what does that mean. Where what are we going to do. However however we addressing this yes so even early baby boomers today who are retiring are on average on average experiencing prop approximately twelve job changes. By the time they retire. So it's not just the millennials who are switching jobs pretty frequently it is it is even the folks who are who are close to retirement and so even if you extend the work life of individual five ten fifteen years we can only extrapolate that you know the number of job transitions. We might anticipate might reach twenty or thirty over a lifetime and then as you think about having to do all of those multiple career switches over time you start to realize how actually going to remain competitive in the workforce. How am i gonna stay relevant. It's going to require some sort of retooling and re-skilling or upskilling over time. But where am. I going to actually go to attain that extra learning and especially with the cost of college and graduate school so high at this point and the you know where we're exceeding you know unimaginable limits of student loan debt. It seems hard for us to sort of say. Oh yeah let's go back to college or go back to graduate school in the future. It just seems it just. It's not the answer here. it's and so. Where are we going to go for these more short burst. You know immersive programs. Where we can either broaden some of our human skills or access some technical expertise in artificial intelligence or whatever the technology may be that we have to be savvy about So this is this is where we really have to start getting a little bit more creative. About more seamless on an off-ramps in and out of learning and work and at the same time as work. This is an issue. And it's something that we've been talking about for awhile. But what is the solution. Not everybody can stop and be educated. Our business leaders are the ones who are going to have to figure out how to upskill their workforce is there going to have to be alternative education that's more price friendly. The onus is on all of the stakeholders involved in our education and workforce ecosystem so right now unfortunately almost all the burden is on us as individuals in as job seekers to just sort of figure this out on our own and skill up and try to ensure that we are competitive and market ourselves well and can get jobs. And all the financial risk is on us as well. Certainly, there are some employers who offer things like tuition reimbursement programs or tuition assistance programs, but again it is still hinging on the idea that you as the individual or the job seeker are going to figure out how to do all that on top of your fulltime or multiple part time jobs and your family commitments in your caregiving responsibilities. All of those things you're gonna have to add on that upskilling on your own and figure out how to do that. On top of all of all of that life so as we think about the future obviously there are real opportunities for employers to stop retreating from training like they have been over the last few decades and start taking on a little bit more of that onus and thinking about how they take their existing workforce and mold them so that they're more prepared for or merging jobs and jobs of the future

Skilling
What is Senator Cory Booker's Super Power?

Toure Show

07:12 min | 7 months ago

What is Senator Cory Booker's Super Power?

"What's your superpower because you have been a sort of superstar at life for as long as i've been aware of the name cory booker which was before you were mayor before you ran for mayor. I was hearing about this guy cory booker. who's coming and he's big and he's on point with everything. And what are you doing. i. I don't know what we're hearing it'll be before. I was mayor than in the time of public enemy. And you don't believe the height. Look i was the superpower that was evidenced for me growing up which was not exaggerating. I think it's actually. A superpower under underrated is kindness. Like i just. I just watched two parents who were really good people and would see people that folks walk past all the time. I one of my favorite quotes by humorous gave. Barry has this goes someone who nice to you but not nice to the waiter is not a nice person but you and i both know 'cause i know you have this kindness and you as well that when you are kind of people. Incredible things happen that you don't realize your favorite stories and i'll tell you the quicker version but you go into school at stanford i'd five back and forth across the country. I still remember getting on this plane as a stanford student and being is torturous. When you're like six foot three football player tight end just like coach. Was you know always like my knees. We're going to be banged up on this plane. I have two seats open next to the rest of the plane is full and just before the door closes. This woman walks in with a screaming baby and a little boy and everybody on that plane. Those where they're sitting because the only three bodies two seats. And i think that we all don't realize we have a choice that we make every moment of our lives which is to accept things as they are or take responsibility for changing and so something evolved thought for teenage college student. That point hit which was. This is either going to be the worst flight in my life where i can try to make the best so i just leaned in and started talking to her in the cry baby in soon as i got into my own drama. I realize. Oh my gosh. This woman has a crying baby. The whole plane is looking at her like she's evil as she did something outside and told her baby to cry. Purposefully right and and so we just having a good time. I still remember the movie. Think about this. How purposeful this moment for me. That i remember that movie was glory with denzel washington. And she's like. I haven't seen the movie and so long and i'm like watch this movie your son and i we're gonna play games. We played hangman. Killed them with all my best. Dad jokes that. I had even back then killed them and hangman mad. And by the time we landed. It was the quickest flight. I ever had cross country. You said we keep in touch. We exchange addresses back then no email and didn't and five ten fifteen years later. I'm running for mayor of the city of newark. And i'm getting like thumped and on one of my toughest ones frustrating days. I get this letter in the mail saying to me. You may not remember me but But i you were on this flight first time. I flew with my kids telling me what the kindness then meant to her and then she tells me by the way we. My family owns a big factory in newark and we have tons of employees. She ended up becoming a big part of my campaign. That kid that i tortured with my jokes became one of our best volunteers or per workers. Excuse me to take. Their churches introduced me. It was just an amazing full circle. Kindness is energy stanford. Professor actually studies this that you just doing one kind act witnessed by someone. It will affect people three degrees of separation for you. it is created a way to measuring it. it's a virtuous thing and so my life you know. I just think that that's is a superpower that we under related just a kind word to somebody at the right time can make a difference that you don't even realize so. I don't know if i don't have any superpowers. I'm really far more ordinary than the hype as you just said but i've just tried to go out of my way for me. It's it's a matter of my faith which is of radical love trying to do for people and you have parents like you. And i probably had two black guys who had parents would not let me forget of the struggle parents that were involved in the civil rights movement. That my i. I was raised up thinking like i didn't the privileges that i enjoy. We're not earned. They were paid for as my grandparents. Would by the blood sweat and tears of your ancest-. I definitely grew up thinking i stand on the shoulders of those who came before me. I have a responsibility to the people who march to died protested. Who were enslaved. There i remember being in college and thinking you know i was why and i didn't feel that responsibility. The past i mean cool to like pena. Cia but i can't. I have a responsibility. People came before me. I wouldn't be here without them. So i have to do something. And perhaps my think my journey in media has been something of being helpful black people in some way but you know that sense of responsibility that you talk about. I definitely felt and you have that has powered your life. It is the my faith earlier. But that is in trenton. Integral part of what motivated my life decisions. And very you know i. I'm here because a group of people fought for my housing rights. Like i grew up in the town. I grew up in harrington park. There was a group of activists when my parents were getting denied real estate agents were lying to them and telling this house is sold. It was called real estate steering at the time right and so they set up this sting operation where they would send white couples right behind my parents and so it i mean this was the story into making chapter my book because involvement at one point. My father's lawyer getting punched in the face and just like dog being signal. my dad craziness. But i'm a baby when that happened. Fifty years ago this summer that had happened and so imagine growing up with parents that could live. Look you in the eye. My dad be like boy. People had fight even get you a chance to be in the school. You're going to. You're going to get your out of bed and go to school and make the best out of yourself and so coming out of loss when i'm done and i always joke that my dad was like bat impressed. He was proud of his son but stanford oxford yale. He's like boy. You got more degrees the month of july. Which ain't hot life ain't about the degrees you get. It's about the service you give like. We're gonna do with all this privilege and so the first job. I had coming out of law. School was a tennis rights lawyer. People fought for my housing rights. I was going to go and fight for other people's and so my life. And i love you said this because we grew up reading bolt we reading voice and talented tenth and the obligations of that you get from getting the privileges that you know are denied to you. Got here is black. Men who i know the data i mean the leading cause of death for us murder fifty four fifty between fifty and sixty percent homicides in america are people look a lot like us black men and and so you feel this sense of. I can't rest. I've got to keep working. Got to keep pushing until we can make the society be what it is and by the way we never get there. At least we can try to pay that payback. What was given to us.

Cory Booker Stanford Newark Denzel Washington Barry Football Pena Harrington Park CIA Trenton Yale Oxford Tennis America
How To Become an Author Without Writing a Single Thing

Top Advisor Marketing Podcast

05:09 min | 8 months ago

How To Become an Author Without Writing a Single Thing

"Hello and welcome to another top advisor marketing podcast We love having repeat guests ones who've been super on the show previously and even better the ones who have their ear down to the proverbial marketing train track that is Something that we all want to pay attention to seth green founder of market domination. LLC. Dot Com is our guest again and I'm just going to be peppering him with some question south. Welcome to show my friend. Thanks much for having me back. Always. Two hundred shower and. NOT GOING TO BE FINE I See. I'll try to. Remember what we did the last show that you think it was. A It's been a little while even though that actually was. I. Was just on your show we recorded that yesterday but I want to ask you some questions brother because I know that we're kind of in the same space we do some of the similar things but you have some products and services that we obviously don't offer and you have a different perspective, right. So what are you seeing in your clientele right now that is really working not just in this covert environment, but this virtual environment we seem to have been thrust into. Okay. So we're recording this at the height of the first year of the COVID pandemic I'm going to put that out there. So it's time less because who knows how many how long has gotten to last right my crystal ball's a little murky. So, one of the things that we have found were recording this before the election, the presidential election of two, thousand twenty and the cost generate a lead. For example, I'm facebook ads has gone up significantly because of all the election spending. And our ads get lumped into because their financial related generating prospects for financial advisers, they get lumped into the financial slash political realm, which means they compete with all the election money in the last couple of weeks or cost per lead is dramatically gone up and our number of leads generated gone dramatically Dow. So, we have stopped that program temporarily until the election's over. So obviously, we've had to do on we been doing other things for them this whole time. So those taken more at the forefront that facebook ads in particular have become quite cost prohibitive. They were increasing throughout the pandemic since March because everybody went virtual, right every financial adviser who was doing seminars and can't do them. Now, a lot of them have switched to eighty percent at least have switched to webinars. So you can't go three scrolls on your news feed. Without seeing another ad for another Webinar, you can't do the same as everybody else and expect to stand out a couple of the things that are work really well for our advisors that are time less no matter why are podcasting program as you have one is well ours is focused specifically on getting accountants attorneys other professional centers of influence to be on our. Clients, the advisers show we've had turned the show into a book. We promote the book we host a monthly now virtual networking meeting of everybody in the book that the adviser leads and we coach them through that. So that still works because more people as you as you pointed out. So eloquently, on my show yesterday more people are listening to podcasts now than ever. Is I told my wife who's podcast lot I her second episode records tonight She's not a financial advisor. She is a mommy blogger is said to her this is the new ground floor podcast. She's like, why'd you say new five times? That's annoy and they said, no, it's because it keeps changing. The original PODCAST, ten, fifteen years ago. Every couple of years, there's a new resurgence, a new billion couple of hundred million people find podcasting. It's new. So. That's why I said. It's new new. Nubia see how many drinking game everyone watching every time I say we're. GonNa. Take a shot. I gotTA. Make it through the whole podcast brother their ten shots in already. So they're probably at the hospital by now. So don't do that maybe half a shot I'll sit I simply you're go. There you go. All right. So the podcasting model that generate centers of influence to drive accidental referrals is working really really well always has always will. Are Limited campaigns are working better than ever. Because if you think about it, so many people change jobs. Yeah. They got furlough. They got laid off. Or they decided if I'm GonNa work from home I can go work somewhere else. I can work virtually from any company. I don't have to stick with this boss I don't like so are linked in job changer 401k rollover campaigns are working better than ever before because so many people have changed jobs. Are Other Lincoln campaigns are working also better simply because people are checking Lincoln more than they used to. Yeah. They're paying attention now because even if they didn't switch jobs, they might think just in case maybe. Even. If I have a limiting belief and I only think of Lincoln resume, maybe Oughta, punch it up and updated I haven't touched it in a while just in case means there are more ripe to receive our advisers messages.

Advisor Facebook Lincoln Seth Green Founder Nubia DOW
Trump's Taxes Show He's a National Security Threat

Pod Save the World

02:46 min | 9 months ago

Trump's Taxes Show He's a National Security Threat

"On Sunday The New York Times published he blockbuster scoop detailing decades of trump's tax returns. You guys probably have some of the big headlines like the fact that he paid no income taxes at all in ten fifteen years examined that must be incredible. He only paid seven hundred fifty bucks in federal income taxes in two thousand, fifteen minute trump might face a one, hundred million dollars tax penalty depending on the results. Of An audit that is brutal but there are also some troubling foreign policy elements that we're GONNA cover today. So a couple specifics in trump's first two years as president he made seventy three million dollars from foreign sources that includes a million bucks from deals in Turkey three, million from the Philippines two point three, million from India those numbers are way bigger. When you look at decades of returns, he's got tons more money out of those places. He also paid more taxes of Robin did at home. So twenty seventeen, right the seven, hundred, fifty, year trump paid one, hundred, forty, five, thousand in India over one hundred, fifty, six, thousand taxes in the Philippines. So that feels a little bit un-american. So a couple of things you guys need to listeners accepting these foreign payments is illegal to violation of the emoluments. Clause feels like a more innocent time when we used to talk about that, it's also not the only way that these foreign countries can steer money into his pocket there've been countless stories of a government's and rooms at trump. In an effort to buy them off. But what's also now clear is that the he is just under a mountain of debt we don't really know who trump os four, hundred, twenty, some odd million dollars to. But we also know that he desperately needs any revenue he can get to stay afloat. So then as many people have pointed out a massive debt, like this will prevent you or me from getting a security clearance and having access to classified information in some ways you could argue that. This disclosure by the Times makes it even easier for these countries to find ways to bribe trump but I think they probably knew Venal to begin with. So ben anything jump out of you in this reporting especially in terms of potential for foreign influence the his financial challenges. Yeah. I mean I think there are two basic things that need to be really driven home here and they may be obvious people that it's worth really putting point on them. I who does he owe this money to and and does that give them leverage over him right and so presumably owns if he does tens or hundreds of millions of dollars to some foreign interest well, then the press, the United States is. Terribly compromise in terms of standing up to that interests let's say the Russian interests let's say it's a Turkish interest or whatever it may be. That's the problem and that's why the rest of us when we go to these jobs have to disclose all of those kinds of conflicts and that's why if we disclose too much leverage from a foreign source, we wouldn't get a security

Donald Trump Philippines India The New York Times Robin United States Turkey President Trump The Times
Tree Care 101

Your Gardening Questions

03:39 min | 9 months ago

Tree Care 101

"Now I know that you were telling me earlier the your company you're you're really busy right now with tri care and talk a little bit about when when somebody calls a landline number to come out to their house to take a look at their property and their trees what what are the first things you start to look at? Well, the first thing we really start to look at is how you know, we're we're looking at the the Leafs, you know, what's the color of the leaves are is it a full canopy, you know does a tree look thinner and canopy a lot of times that's a sign of a maybe an insect disease issue could also be a sign of like a route issue panicle issue, then we start to really look at the structure of the tree. You know. Are you seeing holes in the trunk of the tree? Are we seeing sawdust at the base where the branch is attaching to? These are all things that were evaluating. We're looking at these trees, you know, it's but the health is probably that first thing that I just I always go to you'll have to have a healthy tree to enjoy it and most of the time they're easy quick fixes, but song Times when we get called the trees already half dead. So that's the thing to to be thinking about when you're looking at your trees. It's don't wait till you wake up that morning. You're going my trees missing half its leaves what's wrong? So it's those little small tweaks that you gotta start to look for before before it's too late. And I guess you know looking at the health of a tree Fred always says never prune anything higher than you can reach with your feet on the ground. I know you guys are you go up in the trees because that's your job and and you're good at it talk a little bit about the pruning of the trees and and and home is do you take out a certain percentage or is each tree just individually different. It really depends on the tree and the situation. I mean, that's the hard part is there's there's some rule of thumbs. You don't want to take out more than twenty-five thirty percent of the canopy, you know of living tissue stuff like that, but that can even be different, you know on a small the you know adolescent tree to spend in the landscape a couple of years. You could make only two years. He cuts and take out 50% of the canopy, but that tree if it's healthy. It's going to be fine. You prune old and mature tree. Sometimes you only want to take out 10% of the canopy cuz you take too much out stressed that tree out, you know, you gotta think about is the Leafs or the the producers of the energy for the tree. So you take too many leaks out of that tree. It's not producing the energy and can stress it out, you know, but definitely am looking at bringing your tree, you know, evaluate the branch structure, you know, taking out the dead branches. It's not going to affect the tree and things like that, but definitely don't take too much of the leaf leaf structure out. I know Fred always talked about also looking into a tree and looking at the branches sort of as as the spokes of a wagon wheel he likes to take a look at a tree and then say, you know, how are the branches spaced apart? Definitely. So when you think about spacing to you don't want all the branches coming to one spot think about a pear tree and I guarantee if anybody has a pair to go out in their backyard and you're going to see this you're going to see a trunk coming out of the ground and about anywhere from five to six feet long. It's going to split into probably anywhere from 4 to probably I've seen ten different branches in the same spot and that's that's key is is really we really focus on structural pruning and and and took the branch structure of those trees and really anybody at their house can do the same thing because I always put it as like think about taking a kid, you don't throw them in the closet and then ten fifteen years later open the door to see how they turned out. Are you sure? Well, I don't but I never know but the same thing like the tree right you don't you don't just plant and let it go because it's going to develop horrible structure. It's going to be a nightmare. It's going to cost a lot more money. Yeah. It's just a couple little Cuts here and there will really go a long way on that tree.

Leafs Fred
Are We Approaching A Cyber Security Investment Bubble?

Task Force 7 Cyber Security Radio

04:38 min | 9 months ago

Are We Approaching A Cyber Security Investment Bubble?

"So it's been interesting because. From the sale side of things where I sit. As a C. So we're getting hit. All over on the sale. And it seems like there's so many companies out there so much investment happening and some folks feel like there's a potentially cyber bubble as it relates to investing what? What's your what are you seeing? What's your prediction there? Yeah you know. First of all, there's there's no way to a really predictable obviously. So anything you kinda assume as is both true and false the same time colleen Schroeder druce, bubble I think at the end of the day there is a significant amount of investment going on in cyber because there's a significant amount of opportunity also because it's it's a long lasting problem You know there's no such thing as secure computer There's no such thing as a secure enterprise and the reality is even in times of crisis when you look at the past six months. Everything has been increased in terms of the number of attacks, the number of people who are going after. Major enterprises who had a whole lot of change and a whole lot of. Adaptations, kind of the new normal and and it's those moments in time where all sudden you know they just the level of. kind of risk associated with doing everyday business become. So you know magnified So the reality is that yes, there's a you know a lot more investment going on, but I think it's for good reason and I think ultimately at the end of the day the truth is that you know. That that kind of investment is going to yield results from a innovation perspective and from an adoption perspective. Every bubble was really about investing in the right things at the right time. I think that the investments that are gonNA stand out and that are gonna be sturdy going to be the ones that will last the test of time. Is there money out there that's you know kind of being I'll call it i. they thrown around for sure. But I wouldn't call it a bubble. That's interesting. You know and it's interesting to with the pandemic Are you seeing folks? You know investors focus on dumping cash into? Maybe, more money into fewer companies or are you seeing you know a little more risk? You. Know I think it depends on the investor and look I know it's terrible answer but I think the reality is Kinda you know unpack it. Look at the major investors that you know. Basically, have been taking in and consolidating and trying to down. It's a very different investment methodology. Then I'll call the lottery ticket style investment. You know they think. More. Often than not is kind of the stalwart of these e. The private equity guys have raised a ton of money right and they have to put money out a mandated to do it. Which I think you know separates out a little bit of kind of what we do on a daily basis makes us a little bit more. Strategically oriented to to not have to deploy capital in that way But when I look at, you know how the investment maybe kind of market trends have shifted. The reality is I think you know you're you're seeing more investment in companies that are GONNA be Easier to to bootstrap right. And that's just been the trend for the past ten fifteen years ride the US to be needed to go raise a dollars to even start a company, and now you start company on a credit card right? So I think that anybody who is deploying capital the typical type investment that you're GonNa make is is much more aligned with where you see kind. Of the return horizon and given the pandemic I think you're GONNA see a lot more investments that are being made are smaller. Investments definitely staying away from alcohol at the stalwart markets as well. Right. So you know not putting money into kind of crowded space is not trying to reinvent the wheel not going after the space not going after know kind of. Major players, right not taking on IBM you know headlong. I. Think. It's. It's much more about how do I find those niche places where I think I see an exit maybe within a five or you know kind of even less year horizon those types of things that I think it'd be more viable in the short term. and. That's really where I see money headed.

Colleen Schroeder Druce IBM United States
The Future Of IVF with Dr. Zaher Merhi

Mom Brain

08:37 min | 9 months ago

The Future Of IVF with Dr. Zaher Merhi

"So My name is Dr Marie? Reproductive endocrinology further specialist. My is in Manhattan on Columbus Circle. The practice is called new hope for not center I. Am a father of two boys. Ryan is fifteen years old going through puberty and Adam is eleven years old and I love my boys and my dot com will be he's my favorite history years old any sleeps with me every night I literally feel like we're just gonNA continue a sentence from from before. So we were talking about all your. Treatments in all the different things that you can experience while you're having your IV thing that sounds like somewhat not want to call it a SPA treatment but there it just sounds. Nice. Amazing this it is treated. You know it's funny to warding job honestly, and I really love my job and a lot of time I get attached to my patients because you're helping them have a baby and you know I get Christmas cards every year and saying, Oh thank you give me a baby. What kind of you know it's it's really happiness I cannot explain and actually they send pictures of the kids and the children and I put them on the wall and my house. So I have a wall full of pictures of the baby, the baby's. Saying So let's go back because I. think part of this conversation was really like I the F. One. Oh one if you've ever been curious if you've ever thought about it if you've ever been, you know sort of confused about what it entailed. We really covered all the details. So those of you listening who are still curious about that providence to go listen to part one of this conversation part two is going to be more of like you. I mean, you're just so knowledge what everything. More of the cutting edge stuff because I think that that's really what your outfit specializes in and is so prized for is that you really are on this cutting edge of what does it mean to be able to bring Tila to a challenging situations and to do it in a really as noninvasive way as possible, which is actually fascinating Lee sometimes with better results. So I guess we got cut off at noninvasive chromosomal screening is that right? Am I like looking at this? Okay. Then noninvasive chromosomes screening our next is the following. Let's say Daphne has three boys and now she wants to have a car. And now she comes to my office and tell me Dr Marie I WanNa have a boy now are we gonNa do is we're going to do something called IVF. We suck the ads at your husband's sperm, and then we make embryos right sperm and egg may can embryo it takes down a week to make an embryo Now, a days in the last few years more and more centers are testing the embryos not just for the gender also chromosomal screening. You don't want to worry about having a down syndrome baby and then I'm Houston later on or have a miscarriage and then was centers. Do they take a piece of your embryo and then freeze the embryo and test this piece for the chromosome because it's coming from the embryo? We don't do that with the Knicks are noninvasive chromosome screening. We take the fluid at your embryo where it's growing. Just. A fluid water and with that fluid for the end without taking off your angrier. We're only has this technology and I can tell you a lot of people come to us because they were like you know I don't know if the biopsy off Ambrose rain debut and I don't want south sticking out of my my future baby you know they can out to be tested. So that's that's the knicks or none of his of chromosomes I can tell you I love it because it doesn't put on your embryo if you see how an embassy biopsies down the stretch like this and the Pum, a piece of snaps out. It's a little bit aggressive. So the next I think presents a lot of things and then you can also for tomorrow and you can have your boy if you want just journalists election. Yeah. Fascinating because the the a when it's growing remember we put it in a culture dish and over the week after we had the sperm and egg over the growth of. The DNA is thrown in that fluid. So that's how we do it. So that's I think is cutting edge technology reverted proud to have it at new hope fertility center. Why is it only you guys that have this technology you know other centers have done it for research and stuff, but I did not get a good result when we started this technology. I can tell you my secret sauce by the way to have fun. Waiting. But before we offered the to patients, you have to test it. Right. You have to do on the same embryo both technologies the old one and the fluid L. We got ninety nine point nine percent correlation other places they got sixty, eighty percent Max, and so it's the the lab hasn't really got the as good results if I wanNA, say that's Why it's not. So we have great technology. We have great lab, and that's why we have a thousand nine point nine percent correlation between both understood and has a nice. So we talked before about the Needle Free Ivf, we're you take pills instead of injections, correct pills and patches and everything. Correct. There's no patches. This fills by mouth by GINA NASAL spray. Spray interesting correct. Is it just as effective show? We have to be very careful because if someone is young and they have a lot of eggs, it's not it's less effective. Why because? The shots are more aggressive food for the eggs and younger patients have lot of eggs to feed. So they need more food. So the pills is not enough they need addition to shots but women thirty five years, and above it's as effective as the old conventional where patients plenty of shots That's so interesting and I told you I have a patient and Amazon me she wants to talk about experience about the. Home Ivf because she get, we sent to the house no shots just spilt and nasal spray and that we got a lot of eggs as she made four embryos and that's that's a lot I mean it's this is favor good. So yeah it's effective and then how long can you freeze embryos for twenty five years? So it's good and bad guy, and this is great question. Let me tell you why it's good and. It's bad. It's good because nowadays, some countries by some doctors are struggling with Beijing let's say you come to me ten years ago you've eggs and you at forty now you come to me after ten years. Now you're fifty years old and you. WanNa get pregnant with my own exodus froze ten years ago. Some doctors have issues with that because now they think well, what if something happens to you now you have diabetes and you know so we're GonNa be stuck in situations where actually have a patient I was doing a patient from Norway she froze her ex in Copenhagen ten fifteen years ago. Now she's fifty one and they said we cannot use your eggs because getting you're pregnant at this age is dangerous. But, that exactly so I mean I love the fact that twenty five years but also. Having Siblings Twenty five years apart. This we it. Let's say you do IV after they get pregnant and twenty five years. Oh, my my my brother is. So. There's a lot of things but last last part which is. The great thing about freezing for twenty five years is that there is a lot of abandoned embryos what am I gonNa do with them right. I mean some clinics in this country has adult fourteen percent of the embryos abandoned coupled who left Leftover Embryos And are gone and they're not being the freezing fees because they finish this they finished family. So that's why when you go back to the conventional idea when you tell me, I get tons of eggs but guess what kinds of embryos to that you're GonNa be stuck with for live. So I won't vicious the thing that, yes home ivf or gentle IVF or neither free IVF. It's good effective at your to be stuck situation where you're going to be freezing fees for twenty five years for embryos that you might not need. Right. A lot of my consultations are bishops will finish their family and they just WanNa talk to me about what to do that embryo and I don't know what to say, what are the different options, throw it out, give it to another couple or give it twenty such but

Knicks Needle Free Ivf Dr Marie Manhattan Columbus Circle Dr Marie I Wan Ryan Adam Gina Nasal Tila New Hope Fertility Center Daphne Beijing Diabetes Ambrose Houston Amazon
Jeff Simone of Reaction Recovery

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

04:35 min | 10 months ago

Jeff Simone of Reaction Recovery

"Hi Jeff First of all let me start by saying. Thank you so much for doing this episode with me. I am super excited to learn more about you and to get to meet you. I, guess not in real life, but in virtual real life. I grey. Hello Angela. My pleasure yet thanks for doing this. So let's just start with telling the listeners a little bit about you and what you do. Yeah. Yes. My Jeff I'm I'm a doctor of pharmacy. I'm a certified nutritional supplements adviser I'm a person in long term recovery from drug addiction specifically opiates amphetamines but I identify with. All of it. I started reaction recovery at this past summer reaction recovery is a snow online consultation service. You know specifically to help people following a drug detox stabilized physically attacked through diet nutrition supplementation. Kind of look at how all that? Plays in with any prescription medications that you're taking just like the whole picture moving forward into kind of help you glide into term recovery. Just, just a sort of bridge that gap between detox and long term recovery. Okay. I'm glad you said that because I wanNA dig into that a little bit. So are you more about the actual like a? Withdrawal Detox stage or are you a little beyond that? It could be both I work with people in both the majority is the Aq-. Okay. So so for my perspective, I believe that we have done collectively we've done a great job recently of getting people in detox forgetting identifying people get figuring out how to get them into detox physically separating them from you know whether it's drugs or alcohol, and even even long-term on long-term approach is whether the time-tested twelve step groups that have been around for eighty years that are doing their thing it even even even a lot of this. Yoka long-term approaches to dig into trauma history like how that plays into the root of addictions. I feel like we've done just in the last ten years even ten fifteen years phenomenal work I mean there's just incredible authors, speakers researchers in into that area that I feel like are making God they're just doing it's such good stuff but from my perspective and this is sort of the reaction I guess part of reaction, recovery is. Not Everybody makes it to that point. So most people do make through that I detox period you know one of the misconceptions there. So many one of the misconceptions out there especially as it relates to the OPIOID epidemic is. The problem. Okay. The big problem why it's not going away because these drugs are just so darn addictive in people get stuck on them. They tried to get off to get sick. Of course we've all seen the movies. We all know what that looks like, and that's the reason that everybody just stays in this cycle of addiction at. Yeah. Mean of course anybody who's in that world understands that if that were the case if the case were that the problem is that the the drugs ill whether it's heroin or Sticking to the opiates for the moment if that were the problem anybody that completes that detox is home free, you know you should only have to do a detox. Once if the problem is the physical addictiveness of the drug, you know it's terrible. You're all the you're sweating you can't eat your thrown up your diarrhea. You do that for seven, ten, fourteen days. If you make through a thirty day little treatments stint, you're done you. Know, you should never have to go back to that same facility began to another. Of course, that's just not the case. So there's something else going on, of course, something something bigger and like I said I I, you know I know people that are are able to easily make that transition from MMA treatment into say it is a twelve step group and they hit the ground running and they stay sober in that program in particular has. Created a some unbelievable sobriety. The everybody that is in this industry knows people that have just just these miracle cases where you hear their stories and you see them now and it's it's hard to even. Imagine that this person was this way before. So I just you. You've seen a miracle but not everybody not everybody can make it through that that first phase you know and it it's it's very uncomfortable for a lot of people's very painful

Jeff First Angela Diarrhea Heroin
Breaking Through at CVRx

MedTech Talk Podcast

05:33 min | 11 months ago

Breaking Through at CVRx

"Welcome to the MED tech talk podcast your host Pardo and I'm very excited to welcome the deem yard CEO CRX to this edition of the podcast Nadeem has had the lustrous career starting at GE and then his GM of MEDTRONIC's navigation business but his biggest and most important challenges come CPR which we're going to focus on today for full disclosure. I've had the pleasure to get to know Nadeem over the past eight plus years, and for the last four I've been on the beam sport and killed as an investor in Cebu. Rx. and. I'm really looking forward to the conversation today. Deem it is great to have you on cats. Thank you jeff it's great to be with you today. Terrific will good what we have a lot of things to cover today and really want to focus on CBS which is turning into I think an incredibly exciting story. But of course, their their roots to the CRX story and maybe you can take us through that a little bit the genesis of. Both. The CRT is therapy in heart failure but also barracks. Absolutely Jeff. So I talk about heart failure it is. A devastating disease. Very expensive from a cost perspective, but also from the human side of things, patients unfortunately suffering from heart failure, end up having those episodes of congestive offense way as they feel that drowning, it's like a continuous waterboarding expedient just how painful that is right and unfortunately one of those episodes could lead to their death and. In the United States hot figure is the second most expensive disease. If we consider cancer as one disease, if you stopped separating cancer between breast cancer by cancer sets that hot figure becomes unfortunately the most expensive disease in the US. What is hot forget? It's. When the heart over the years of. Insult or injury to starts becoming larger the walls of the heart becoming thinner. And the heart's ability to pump blood to the system is compromised. And that's. Compromise happening in multiple forms. One of them is called synchrony when the left side and the right side of the heart start becoming disconnected from each other. So think about it like a car. Engine where have the cylinders not kill into properly? Than the COD would not produce horsepower that you need. You need to tune the car that is what's Artie Cardiac. Surgery synchronization therapy. Was designed to do they. You know put two pacemakers right now it's only one pacemaker with two wires. That's why they call it by basic they based both ventricles and they tried to synchronize the left and right side. That works wild if the heart is distinct honest. However in heart failure. Only thirty to forty percent of the patients have synchrony. That s of the patient's heart become lodged the world's thinner. But the left and right sides are still beating in harmony but not strong enough. And for those patients, unfortunately crt devices did not produce the results that WHO, hoping for. Ten fifteen years ago when we're testing them. And that is where our approach berry. Flex. Therapy comes into play. The genesis of this therapy goes back multiple decades not gonna go to the whole history with Dr Professor Bronwyn than his wife and everything, but nevertheless indie. Let me take one paper from Dr. Abraham. From nineteen ninety nine and that is about CRT devices. In this paper that was published in the New England. Journal of Medicine Dr Abraham demonstrated the sustained. That's or the sustained benefit of CRT. Comes from the fact that when you should denies the left side on the right side of the heart, the pulse pressure of the volume of the blood leaving the heart. Activates the Beverly Flex. In the cutouts dodgy. Trusting. Right. So those patients with this synchrony, you recent combined the left and the right. Now you're sending a pulse pressure strong enough you activate the battery flex let a convoluted way to do it. How did you see that actually signed to do it well? Alex secrets wandered in the body we went with a Wyatt directly into those better receptors in the. Wall and activate though cells. Jackie with. Why go all around right now, our device would work in all forms of heart failure, but we have to go in developed the evidence one by one and demonstrates and in our first. Quote Unquote. beachhead strategy. We selected a large segment of patients who are not able to be treated by CIT devices. Why not the eligible for Siasi devices? Those patients are those who do not have distinctly. Right. So they left the right side of the heart beating in synchrony, but heart is not strong enough. The walls fin the muscles of the heart are tired at the. Pump, the blood.

Jeff Nadeem Cancer United States Dr. Abraham Ceo Crx Medtronic Journal Of Medicine Cebu GE Pardo CBS Dr Professor Bronwyn Artie Cardiac GM New England Jackie Alex Wyatt
Battling Drug-Resistant Fungal Infections

The Bio Report

04:27 min | 11 months ago

Battling Drug-Resistant Fungal Infections

"Marco, thanks for joining us. All my pleasure, then a four inviting me. We're GONNA talk about drug resistant Fungal Infections Sign Nexus and your efforts to develop Antifungal to treat these infections. Maybe, we can start with how big a problem resistant. Fungal. Infections. Today. It's a growing problem and simply because Antifungal. A unforgotten being to use many decades ago, and that are very few of them. Only free classes. One, the pollyannas introduce sixty years ago. That's all introduce four years ago, and Makino candidates introduced twenty if ago, and of course, we've all this time. Fungi had an opportunity to develop the fastest against these free classes. This is why we are developing a new class in order to overcome the growing problem of these. Phone. Calls. How threatening are these infections? Well the type section that we're treating. Difficult to treat an invasive fungal infections invasive from getting fashion. Infections meaning infection bloodstream of internal organs. Usually, they happen in patients water immortal compromised. So cancer patients with a undergoing chemotherapy or. Transplanted patients, solid organ transplant, bone marrow, transplant patients, and these patients. They don't have the emotional defense five vs infection. So using fictions. They are very aggressive. They can spread inside the body of the patients in mortality of visiting factions can be still. Now, we've a best treatment between twenty to fifty percent Wayne thirty to fifty percent, go extremely high mortality. You have, infections. Are Not internal like, for example, Mucosal infections of his office of the mouth of China. That, that can be very, very difficult to treat and these are we all the type of infection invasive and dilemma Khoza that we are trying to treat. Now we've our compound. We hear a lot about antibiotic resistance and the causes of that. Why are we having this problem with Resistant Fungal Infections? Very good, question Danny. Video. Not The resistance to antibacterial as being on the wrong line is because bacteria. Very. Quick in developing resistance and reason is because they are very promiscuous. Based chain the. Not Charlie between the same species, but also between different species of bacteria and very for development over resistant to antibacterial usually develops very quickly after a few years of being actual product on the market. I'm fungal. Infections and. July. Up the development is extensive slower. It may take ten fifteen years before the be significant amount of. Become, resistant, and these. These why? Now, we start to see the problem becoming bigger and bigger. When you start to see classes a been introduced point, you're forty years ago or even longer. And reason of the focus romantic materials is because They develop resistance. Very, quickly. And in very visas being before course over the last. Probably fifteen point years. But he's not Antifungal. 's is becoming a major issue and you have new species amounting like a candidate horace of. Be Shown to be more drag resistance with high mortality, very difficult to control infections.

Infections Marco Makino Charlie China Wayne Danny
Battling Drug-Resistant Fungal Infections

The Bio Report

04:33 min | 11 months ago

Battling Drug-Resistant Fungal Infections

"Marco, thanks for joining us. All my pleasure, then a four inviting me. We're GONNA talk about drug resistant Fungal Infections Sign Nexus and your efforts to develop Antifungal to treat these infections. Maybe, we can start with how big a problem resistant. Fungal. Infections. Today. It's a growing problem and simply because Antifungal. A unforgotten being to use many decades ago, and that are very few of them. Only free classes. One, the pollyannas introduce sixty years ago. That's all introduce four years ago, and Makino candidates introduced twenty if ago, and of course, we've all this time. Fungi had an opportunity to develop the fastest against these free classes. This is why we are developing a new class in order to overcome the growing problem of these. Phone. Calls. How threatening are these infections? Well the type section that we're treating. Difficult to treat an invasive fungal infections invasive from getting fashion. Infections meaning infection bloodstream of internal organs. Usually, they happen in patients water immortal compromised. So cancer patients with a undergoing chemotherapy or. Transplanted patients, solid organ transplant, bone marrow, transplant patients, and these patients. They don't have the emotional defense five vs infection. So using fictions. They are very aggressive. They can spread inside the body of the patients in mortality of visiting factions can be still. Now, we've a best treatment between twenty to fifty percent Wayne thirty to fifty percent, go extremely high mortality. You have, infections. Are Not internal like, for example, Mucosal infections of his office of the mouth of China. That, that can be very, very difficult to treat and these are we all the type of infection invasive and dilemma Khoza that we are trying to treat. Now we've our compound. We hear a lot about antibiotic resistance and the causes of that. Why are we having this problem with Resistant Fungal Infections? Very good, question Danny. Video. Not The resistance to antibacterial as being on the wrong line is because bacteria. Very. Quick in developing resistance and reason is because they are very promiscuous. Based chain the. Not Charlie between the same species, but also between different species of bacteria and very for development over resistant to antibacterial usually develops very quickly after a few years of being actual product on the market. I'm fungal. Infections and. July. Up the development is extensive slower. It may take ten fifteen years before the be significant amount of. Become, resistant, and these. These why? Now, we start to see the problem becoming bigger and bigger. When you start to see classes a been introduced point, you're forty years ago or even longer. And reason of the focus romantic materials is because They develop resistance. Very, quickly. And in very visas being before course over the last. Probably fifteen point years. But he's not Antifungal. 's is becoming a major issue and you have new species amounting like a candidate horace of. Be Shown to be more drag resistance with high mortality, very difficult to control infections. Given the.

Infections Marco Makino Charlie China Wayne Danny
China and the US are battling for control of 5G

The 3:59

06:10 min | 1 year ago

China and the US are battling for control of 5G

"China is really a leader in five G. Right now, they launched. Their network earlier than expected last fall, and they've really been going gangbusters in terms of deployment and racking up subscribers, and they have a big technological advantage, too, because they have some of. The the best technology for five g. that they've been developing with some companies. In House. Yeah, that's that's a real change. From previous generations A to three four G. allow. The stuff was led by Europe, or here in the US four was big leader in four G. L., T., technology There's been a shift curious how the approach to technology differs from between how U. S. and really the the western countries invest in the stuff versus China's doing it and how they're able to kind of. Move or advance so quickly for basically nothing to a leadership position. Yeah, so China really over the last several years. You know this fits into a bigger initiative. From the government to to have some advantages and technology it's part of their strategy to go out and try to develop is much technology in country as they possibly can in so they you know it's part of this push of wanting to get away from being just a a low cost manufacturer of commodity goods and you know. Folks who are just sort of always following technology and just trying to do it cheaper and really being a leader so they see this as a very strategic. Part of their development of their their national policy, and so with that that means that the government is investing a ton of money and is sort of all. N! It's a different structure than the US right so the the. The government has a lot more control to funnel money into sort of get. A more focused approach, whereas in the US, our technology development is really completely done by the private sector and so it's just a different approach, but it has allowed China to rapidly catch up. In a lot of areas like five G. to to the US and other Western. Insane reports the thing we saw report for last week that the White House had considered intervening on five G. whether that's offering tax credits or inducing companies to acquire other companies overseas. That might have intellectual property like network makers like. Eriksson or Nokia, which is funny, because a lot of that stuff actually originated here in the US and then got cobbled up or bought by European countries, so it's it's a weird. Mix or shift in the dynamic things now. Yeah, I mean it's really i. mean that's like a whole nother story that I should probably do. You're giving me another story idea, but to SORTA. Go back historically and look. You're absolutely right. I mean there was a lot of innovation way back. Out of at, and T. and which became Lucent Technologies and we had a lot of companies in the US at one point, who were developing this technology, and then over the years you know through acquisition and business decisions and poor management frankly. We lost it, and so now we are in a situation where none of the core technology for the networking equipment is really developed by an American company. I mean we've got CISCO, but they're not doing A lot of the stuff that while way, end, Ericsson Nortel or I'm sorry, Nokia and Samsung Zamzam exactly so. It, it's you know. I think it does sort of put us at a disadvantage that we didn't really. Maybe fully appreciate. You know ten fifteen years ago when a lot of this consolidation was happening for the US has made some moves to try to preserve ship position to basically attacked the the five G. Innovation. Going on here, look you run through some of steps take. Yeah, and you know it's interesting because it's. It's sort of you know trying to protect the market, but it's also kind of Intertwined with this fear of some security risks which are legitimate, so so basically, what's happening is we've got the US government and a lot of folks in the security world who are saying that they feel that China's dominance is a security risk, and so the US has developed a lot of policies around basically trying to keep out some of the core technology. That's coming out of China and we don't want it in the US networks because there's a fear that there could be backdoors. Put in there and that you know China is an. Authoritarian. Government and Things are done. There than in the US and so there's this fear in that sort of also gets intertwined with this idea of how I guess in a way. How can we slow China down? And so there have been some restrictions? Put on a quick, -ment sold here in the US so there's a ban on. Government purchasing any core equipment for a deployment five G. Gear in the US. There's a movement to try to get. Any Wa wait year that's in some small carriers sort of ripped out and replaced and then there is Some bans on selling intellectual property and technology to while away from American companies that they can use to advance their five G. Technology, so there's a lot going

United States China Nokia G. Technology Europe Lucent Technologies White House Eriksson WA Ericsson Nortel G. Innovation G. L. Samsung
Punit Soni Founder and CEO of Suki the Voice Assistant for Healthcare

The Voicebot Podcast

03:53 min | 1 year ago

Punit Soni Founder and CEO of Suki the Voice Assistant for Healthcare

"It's really an interesting perspective. You say that we're time as a superpower in fact. I think you can tell me if I'm correctly interpreting this where you're saying that the intent to be in it for the long haul is your superpower. Whereas a lot of other areas, people are just looking to get in quick and flip or exit, or whatever it is, they might be trying to do. You assumed it was going to take awhile in that by it. Taking awhile, you would build advantage over time. Yeah. It's a little bit more of the latter than the former. You know a lot of people's dot companies, not necessarily thinking. some do by all means, but it's a little bit less to do with what others perspectives. Motivations with mine. I am absolutely interested in building a very very large important company I want in a large part of this motivation who being healthcare, also pure ambition but. I do believe there are certain sectors. Let it takes a much longer time and. A multiyear strategy where you know phase the first three or four years based might be the next three or four years, and so on so forth, and then there are others where you're building a smaller feature, or you're attacking a area, or you're trying to do a slightly different vivid into five years. You kind of been there done that and you can actually Uber. An exit healthcare is a much more of the latter especially, if you WANNA been ambitious, big company it's it's possible to build something on the edges in healthcare, but it's never going to be very meaningful and impactful, because healthcare is so complicated so so then if I know I have ten fifteen years at my disposal through the next thing, and if I. I know that somehow I can pull together the right kind of people and resources to help me do that. It becomes a an incredible boat because everybody has prompted thinking about food. How do I survive the next quarter? And you know what metric should be i. can't about those things too But on the other hand? I'm also thinking about the fact that you know in. Twenty five. If you're lucky to be standing, we would be a completely different company. You know that would be interesting and important, so it's a little bit of perspective and time in some of the advantages. Time can actually give you. That's exaggerated in healthcare that another sectors. made it takes about five years just to be trusted. Even very basic level in the industry, and it typically takes that long to build an all the features that are expected it's. It's an industry that's. That it's very hard to do just a pure MVP model not the ad, certain extent, but the expectation level. Of An. MVP is really high because the. The risks are very high. No, you're exactly right, and you know it's actually interesting. A lot of people ask me. You know what are you? Why would you know you win? Are Sukey been and build it? I typically tell them okay. If I WANNA build the wise based digital, assisting offered legacy odor, will assistant. Alexa or doctors than I have been to a natural language You know a speech recognition system than language understanding system, a natural language parsing system than I bill intend extract Wrap it around in a stack the name to build a mobile APP than I need to. To actually figure out how to make that Super Privacy Aligned with you know privacy compliance than mediate need to have a high level of security that we need to multi tendency ended Indi- in major infrastructure is like that of a mid size, enterprise, company and Menu. All of these things than you can pilot in a

MVP Alexa
"ten fifteen years" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"ten fifteen years" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"Next ten fifteen years you know it's a different ball game but I think if you look out over the next six to nine months the other reason for investors to be a bit more cautious we're not seeing sell your equity holdings and you know load up on cash we still believe that you know it could be said of peace in investors portfolios we just feel that you know at this juncture with so many uncertainties over the horizon investors have to be a bit more careful we dip with cheeses and healthy and to the market so for example we are actually on the way to his ex defend because we think that you know what's happening with the US China trade wall high oil prices slowdown in China will impact is a defense saying got a sex offender believe always saying you know if you're making good money like the new look and reduce your holdings in your overall portfolio but of course not to get out of the investment but manager risk. Abbas who is the rotation on their way I know you will be seeing any evidence Albany to following that trend because the folks at JP Morgan say that this shift that we seen towards cyclical stocks it's not just gonna last but it's also going to keep the broader market rally going is that something you subscribe to. well you know cyclical stocks have done very well compared to value stocks now the economic growth numbers continue to come through of course you know they will be five times find some support but I think the valuations are now looking less compelling in in the case of cyclical stocks please press this are going to be more careful I mean I get the sense you know talking to two others including investors that you know they some degree of gravitation taking taking place what's the deal I mean interest rates have been cut by central banks around the world and you don't stop that offer you.

China US JP Morgan Abbas Albany ten fifteen years nine months
"ten fifteen years" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"ten fifteen years" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"I mean, it would use out the entire state budgets. So I my prediction is ten fifteen years from now politicians are Wisconsin who voted for this package, only pretending they never heard of it and people will point to this. Zastava the FOX gun case. The other issue is half the package doesn't depend on jobs grade. It just depends on best -ment. So a FOX goes in. And they robotics is this factory. So that the whole factory is being run by. Well, this is extreme that it's being run by one executive in China remotely, and it's all robots Wisconsin. We'll still have to pay half the money two billion for what no jobs. Just robots why that would be considered a good idea. Now who knows what's going to happen? I I don't know his the future of robotics in making flat screen TV's. Maybe Foxconn is not sure what the future robotics make your plan screen TV's out Rapley that technology will improve. But surely, there's a substantial risk that. In fact, the number of jobs created will be far less than promise. And so this won't be ten times usual package, this might end up being twenty or thirty. It'll be it'll be ill. You'll become a uh. People point us for years is what you shouldn't do an economic development. All right bringing good robots. But it's hard to see what the overall public good is of this bidding war between cities. I mean, sure maybe you can make the case for it in one city or another maybe the city that lands Amazon's headquarters will be better off in some way. But wouldn't we all be better off if there was no bidding war in the first place in Amazon just had to choose the city that worked best for it without getting them all to compromise their their tech structures and so forth. Well, there could be a game. If in fact, this this competition was something where the places with the highest unemployment or bidding the most. So you could say, well, gee, there's this competition, and at least what's going on as the place of the high unemployment or bidding more, and they're getting more jobs, and they need the jobs, and the places that already have jobs or not bidding. But that's not what's going on. It looks like a governor in mayor regards unemployment rate is is just wrong. Like a moth to the flame to. Wanna make these huge cash bids for large companies, especially long term incentive offers that someone some future government has to pay for. So, you know, we have this problem that the evidence suggests that every city and state does this. There's no sign that the more disadvantaged areas are benefiting so the only real solution to it is some type of federal regulation of it to hold back. The problem the challenges we have state sovereignity in the in the US, we have it all we Milana. What happens the US would says it be illegal in the opinion? Right. So let me ask you one more question one. I have a feeling my co-host April Glaser would ask if he was here who benefits from these jobs. I mean, I guess it depends on what type of jobs, they are Amazon, obviously has headquarters in Seattle. And that's done. One thing to Seattle Seattle's economy in real estate in a lot of other cities across the country. It has distribution warehouses. It's. Announced in fact, today as we're recording this announced that it will build a logistics hub in Nashville have you done any work on on what type of people benefit from jobs when a company is bought to ten brought to town. I've done work on that. I mean on the whole it looks as up job growth tends to have somewhat progressive effects on the issue of income and the sense that it helped tends to help the lowest the lower income quintiles like the bottom three festively income distribution the bomb. Sixty percent tends to benefit more than the top forty percent. Because the top forty percent presumably already had good jobs, did they tend to be more than non employed, and so the people in the bottom sixty percent, either tend to be on employ more are more likely to be unemployed or underemployed. Now, I do think it matters what the jobs are. So that's why I asked this Abassahs question..

Amazon Wisconsin FOX Foxconn US Seattle executive April Glaser China Nashville forty percent ten fifteen years Sixty percent sixty percent
"ten fifteen years" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen years" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Yeah, take a little bit. It's almost like yes to both the main. I think Alabama being spent in the same system. I, you know, that's just one of those that will never happen that I that I can see. And so it's almost a moot point to talk about that. We almost had over on schedule a few years down the road and it just kind of fell through, you know, I'm kind of the opinion. I love the fact that you know that Alabama fans can be for us and all fast can be for us. And you know, we've got a lot of both in this town, and I think especially where we're headed with our facilities and the new stadium that you know will play in in twenty one, you know, we've got a chance if we put a good product out there to get a lot of those fans. And you know, my word has been t, oh, you can be for us to, and you know, I think that's hopefully what's happening. So it's kinda just worked out that way from the oversight of it, but it's, it's good that maybe we can draw their fans in as well. Yeah. And you know, you've been in that state long time? I, I think that is the biggest. Change ten, twenty ten fifteen years ago. You didn't hear Alabama and Auburn fan, maybe Auburn a little bit, but Alabama fans, there was always this perceived friction, but it seems like that has dissipated. Yeah, I think so. I think there's still there's always going to be some just your your hard core fans that feel certain way. And and you know what we wanna do is we just want to put the best product out there and and give something you know a great. You know, some some great entertainment for people to see. And and you know, when you got the city of Parma ham and you know, this is I think you're number seventeen. We've lead the country in college football watching on on a Saturday by a long shot. You know, our folks wanna come see, good football. I think they're gonna pull for us..

Alabama football Parma ham Auburn twenty ten fifteen years
"ten fifteen years" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen years" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Today great to have you here in the studio thanks for stopping by so, let's kind of dive right into your the marks Have changed, tremendously over the last five ten fifteen years? And a, lot of people really don't understand how to get, started in the financial markets I, know you spent years in the financial industry you know one inch explain a little bit you know how. The markets have changed, over the, years and you know why is a good. Time, to get started in the markets well one of the biggest, changes is electrons back in the day back when. I started personally call their broker broker call them pitch them. A stock broker retake the order read it on a paper ticket run it to a trader the trader would make a phone call they would record a trade then it'd be handed all the way back, now you can do it, from your, own home you, can do it on your laptop you could do it on a cellphone you can do it from just about. Anywhere you could be sitting at the beach trading and making money. Absolutely so we talk about the you, know the how everything's changed in the technology and your listeners out there you know if. You ever, want to start a business. I mean who doesn't. Wanna be their own business owner I mean how. Many of you right now have a? Job you hate your in your car listening. To me driving to. Work driving home from work on the way to an Appointment and you're burnt, out you, hate it, you can't do it. Forever I have students who come in all the times they Blake knob in I've been at this job for ten fifteen years I? Hate, it I can't stand it you know I need a plan b the how many of you out there you, know have, one you, know everyone out, there you know, you're playing as obviously your business, your career and you know. What it is you do now but. You know the company you. Work for you know the company won't you might not make it through the next recession I. Hear story after story and I mean. I could probably write a book on. This about all the students I've coach or. Worked with over the last decade students who've been downsized from. Work. No lost their jobs government, regulations destroying, the streets we have a students Scott got Parkinson's disease has career. Bring a surgeon or.

business owner stock broker Scott Parkinson five ten fifteen years ten fifteen years one inch
"ten fifteen years" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen years" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Doing today great to have. You here in studio thanks for stopping by so. Let's kind of dive right into your the marks Have changed tremendously. Over the, last five ten fifteen years and a lot of. People really, don't understand how to get started in the financial, markets I know you spent years, in the financial industry you know why don't you explain a little bit how the markets have changed. Over the years and, why is. A good time to get started in. The, markets well one of the biggest changes is electrons back in, the day back when I started personally call broker broker, would call them pitch them a stock broker, retake the order read it on paper ticket. Run into a trader the trader. Would make a phone call they would record a trade then it'd be handed all the way back now you can, do it from your own, home you, can do it on. Your laptop you could do it on a cell phone you can do it from just about anywhere you could. Be sitting at the beach trading and making money absolutely so we. Talk about the you know the how, everything's changed and the technology and your listeners out there you know if you ever want. To start, a business I mean who. Doesn't want, to be their own business owner I mean how. Many of you right now have a? Job you hate your in your car. Listening to me driving. To work driving home from work on the way to An appointment. And and you're burnt out you hate it you, can't do it forever I have students who come in all the time they Blake Dobbin I've been at this job for ten fifteen years I hate it I? Can't, stand it I need a plan b the how many of you out there you know have one you know everyone out there you know you're playing, is obviously your, business your career and you know what it is. You do now but you know the. Company you work for the. Company you own you might not make it through the next recession I hear story after story. And I mean I could probably write. A book on this about all the students. I've coached or or worked with over the. Last decade your students who've been downsized from work you know. Lost. Their jobs you'll government regulations, destroying industries, we have a student Scott I mean he got Parkinson's disease has. Career bring a surgeon or doctors over I've students who've. Gotten in, trouble do you is lost their careers lost there's. Licenses husbands, gets her in trouble plan stuff in their cars, you know get felonies losing their, careers I mean terrible things and you know you have a plan b. would A lot of people really coming in to really understand. You know how the financial market works, and you, know how trading. And investing works like bread. Said I mean the technology. Has changed, tremendously over the last five ten fifteen years all the markets are. Electron now the question is you, know how do you get started, or. How does. The market relieving work well there's two actions in the, market buying, and selling, I mean there's, two groups that do. It you out there listening to us right now I'd, call you a retail trader you're, out there buying and selling and. Then you have the banks and institutions the. Hedge funds out there who are buying and selling as, well now the thing is you know your average retail trader e-trade fidelity counts you know you're probably. Buying fifty, one hundred maybe a few thousand shares depending on, the price price. Of the stock but then. When, these banks and, institutions are, buying and selling no they're?.

stock broker Blake Dobbin Scott business owner Parkinson's disease five ten fifteen years ten fifteen years
"ten fifteen years" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:57 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen years" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Much how you doing today great to have you here in studio thanks for, stopping by so let's dive right into the marks Change no tremendously over the last five ten fifteen years. And a, lot of people really don't understand how to get. Started in, the financial markets I know you spent years in, the financial industry you know why, don't you explain a little bit how the markets have changed over the years you know why. Is a good time, to get, started in the markets well one of the. Biggest, changes is electron IX back in the day back when I, started personally call their broker broker would call them. Pitch them a stock broker would take the order read it, on a paper ticket run a to, a trader trader would make a, phone call they would record a trade none of you handed all the way back now you can do it from your own home you, can do, it on your laptop. You could do it on your cell phone you can do it from just about anywhere you could be sitting. At the beach trading and making money absolutely so we talk about. The you know the how everything's changed, in the technology and your listeners out there you know if you ever want to start. A business, I mean who doesn't want. To be, their own business owner I mean how many of. You right now have a job you? Hate your in your car listening to. Me driving to work. Driving home from work on the way To an appointment and and your burns out, yeah hate it you can't do it forever I have students who come all the time they. Blake Dobbin I've been at this job for ten fifteen years I hate? It, I can't stand it I need a plan b the how many of you out there you know have one you know everyone out there you, know you're planning is obviously your business, your career and you know what, it is you do now but you know the company you. Work for you know the. Company you own you might not make it through the next recession in I hear story after. Story and I mean I could probably. Write a book on this about all the. Students I've coach or worked with over the. Last in just about decade students who've been downsized from work. Waas. Their jobs you'll government regulations, destroying the, streets we have students Scott mean he got Parkinson's disease his career. Bring a surgeon or doctors over I've students who've gotten. In trouble, you is lost their careers lost their licenses ex. Husbands you, know get your waist in trouble plan stuff in, their cars getting felonies losing their, careers I mean terrible things and you know you have a plan b What a lot of people really coming in to really understand you know how the financial market works and you know how trading and investing, worse like bread said I mean. The technology has, changed tremendously over the last five. Ten fifteen years the mar- all the markets. Are electron now the question is. You know how do you, get started or, housing the. Market relieving, work well there's two actions in the market buying and, selling I, mean there's two. Groups that do it. You out there listening to us right now I'd call you a retail, trader you're out there buying and. Selling and then you have the banks and, institutions the, hedge funds out there. Who, are. Buying and selling as well now the thing is you know your. Average retail trader e-trade -delity counts you know you're. Probably buying, fifty or one hundred maybe a few, thousand shares depending on the price is price, of the, stock but when these banks and, institutions. Are buying and selling no other buying..

stock broker Blake Dobbin business owner bread Scott Parkinson five ten fifteen years Ten fifteen years ten fifteen years
"ten fifteen years" Discussed on Outliers

Outliers

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen years" Discussed on Outliers

"So i don't have a good answer but yes in some context perhaps a little more people know of me as an entrepreneur in the last five ten fifteen years so if you want to sort of a corner to start pulling the sheet then entrepreneur could be static one of the things i always wanted to media and ask you is that you saw video early wave when it comes technology in india right i mean of course by being part of justify digital media and also being part of publications how would you like to describe that than and contrast out what we are seen play now i'm just trying to get a grip of how things back then and what were the battles that someone like you would fight or not fight so islands listen to you are very right that for two she asleep nor great foresight vision for my side i happen to find myself at the beginning of what was the internet raven in the sense that we started an internet company in nine hundred ninety eight the public internet come to defectively on if i remember correctly fifteenth august nineteen ninetysix before that there was earned which was the network that you could get it it was also very interesting times that we live in which if you remember is a chinese curse may you live in interesting times so i saw the rise of this dot com boom and i saw the best also.

five ten fifteen years
"ten fifteen years" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen years" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"Out in the last ten fifteen years they oklahoma state that try breakthrough exactly what you're saying zigging while the rest of the world zags instead of doing a more tepid version of the fighting irish fight song or michigan's or otherwise they said let's just create a whole new kind of different genre fights this is legitimate ace to listen to this this is called i think we are cowboys forever and they wanted this to be their fight song and the i don't think the fan base embraced it that much listen real themes to ridiculous ski draft jackie gets down in the middle of it you know but here's here's the thing about this can't work course what it's not that this is horrible it said it it can't work out onto the field you need a fight song this is not a fight he never worked after touchdown the other team starts laughing i guess i would have a certain impact all right there you go and we didn't listen to notre dame's but i do hear a on his michigan vote i agree i think that's the gold standard all right one more episode a good sports to go this week we'll have that for you tomorrow friday until then for adam corolla podcast one sports good sports damage shak out.

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"ten fifteen years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Political power and this is this is the efforts to rig the sense have to be seen along the same lines as the rapid gerrymandering we're seeing the voter suppression were seeing the attempt to byelections by conservative billionaires it's all part of the same system of undermining democracy the difference that the centers affects everything in democracy it affects literally every part of our democracy and so if you've rigged the census there's no way to correct it because it's the it's like the underlying basis for everything else that happens it only happens once every ten years and if you do it right there do it wrong aren't any do overs there's no corrective you can't redraw the senses like redraw district if it's found on constitutional so that's why this is so serious and if it gets screwed up all that information in the last twenty thirty so i just think that this is a walkie issue know that it's it's hard understand but it's so important that we try to correct what's going wrong with the census otherwise it's it's going to affect everything for the next decade this is in many respects the dna of the next ten years of sort of the the political organization of our country is let me ask you this i mean if we're to see this in the context of all the other means that the republicans have used particularly over the past ten fifteen years rollbacks of the voting rights act increased i should say obstacles to voting the rampant redistricting the gerrymandering so severe that we're seeing state supreme courts as well as perhaps the federal supreme court role these back is this what we're seeing with the sense is this a function of trump or is this simply republicans part of their longterm project to diminish the number of people vote.

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"ten fifteen years" Discussed on LA Talk Radio Channel 1

LA Talk Radio Channel 1

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen years" Discussed on LA Talk Radio Channel 1

"Situation and and you know i hope they could get some kind of peace move in four from everything that happened and that's pretty much it and then we got a lotta rpr's that i gotta do that people that like i said that passed away in two thousand seventeen but that's pretty much it for a year two thousand seventeen recap i know as little out other stuff that we could have talked about but you know i picked the high o two thousand seventeen myth meaning leaks returned to the real house buyers of atlanta she is the queen bee over there that is her stable and the rest of them are just pawns on her chest bore if you've got a little bit right yeah that's pretty much it with their oh and tiffany at is at got admitted her she had a awesome two thousand seventeen as she ended a with a bang there and i know two thousand eighteen is going to be lit for her because it like she always likes to say she knew eddie but you know that i had this like that in because it was not even on my notation but i remember back in the day ten fifteen years ago she was a up incumbent comedian trying to get her star and bill bellamy at this showcase called who've got jokes and she was featured on near and she was larry is so it's great to see things are finally turning around for her and cocoa brown was on there as well you know i'm all about that black girl magic so girl power to them yeah cocoa brown was also a part of that um bill bellamy who got jokes and she's doing great things right now as well working with tyler perry and all kinds of stuff so yeah that's pretty much to deal with that but as of right now i'm gonna get on another record of two and then we can chat a little bit mode and i want to thank you for tuning into guy really know what it is may the hostess with the most is the first lady felicia k the tuned into the first lady p o v right here on la tug radio alive and the next record is going to be by none other than bad luck and traded who's.

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"ten fifteen years" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen years" Discussed on /Film Daily

"His problem at the reaction movie of the past ten fifteen years you'd better in the first john whic a railhead it year yeah i think the action in this movie is better than the original jonrak 100 percent see a i think they need to watch them both again back to back by when i saw john with two i was impressed by the worldbuilding in i i did think that the action wasn't as good as the original but maybe that was me going into the original john work with low expectations uh going into this in with the know exceedingly high expectations but there's a there's a level of reverse whereas down dirty a vibe to it i love this one has a bigger budget by far and take advantage of it that that the shootouts are so detailed of fist fight you're so brutal there's there's a sense of comedy to it i was almost evil jackie chan was never a a a killer in his movies i always enjoyed how there was a comic timing to his physical violence that even though draw work is bloodier than judging ever was is it buster keaton asked sense of set up and pay off of it i think ties always names together in i in weird way keanu reeves and dr what he's doing jackie chan who's doing buster keaton and i find that this but i find that so far a my alley down i it lives inside of me it hit his movie that i could watch over and over again a k finally let's talk while you're number one film of two thousand seventeen in that is jordan peels get out get out is i i feel underqualified talk about it i write about this in my top 10 on those publishing a site whereas it's a great move could scary it's a great horror film it's a great movie because it's smart it's satire is so sharp and a cut so deep it's great we could it's funny i it's a heated visas humor at the key points to like really really allow you to foresee way through the harsh parts of the movie enduring appeal to filmmaker i he arrives so fullyformed this is his first.

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"ten fifteen years" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen years" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"Buy whatever you can afford you could buy whatever you wanted and look at what happened the internet yet grew and grew and grew in these people in washington were sitting there seething that they don't have any control over it they are seething that this massive thing which is getting everybody involved there was more free speech on the internet would it first started and for the next fifteen years then there's ever been anywhere there was more access to information the first fifteen years of the internet what it was on a regular than anything ever in human history new companies were born large and small slums succeeded some failed but it was a look at what's happened to the tech industry with a free and open internet for the first fifteen years that obama and his crowd figures out you know or we don't have any control over this we want to get our myths in it think back ten fifteen years how bad was the internet what can all that was there and it was free you want the new york times it was free you want anything it was fri because they didn't know how to monetize at first then they started doing pay walls but that had nothing to do with the internet regulation that had to do with profit so if you wanted to read the new york times on the internet and you didn't have a subscription lo and behold yet to pay for it why would that be will that costs them to produce it or anything else my point is the first fifteen years of the internet you could do anything you want an on it you'll get access and then you want an audit there was it was wide open he it grew in it created multibillionaire is left and right there was nothing wrong with it except the left didn't have their hands on it here comes obama net neutrality something you know net new lee is the same as affordable healthcare for all americans there is nothing a foreigner about obamacare was there remember you get to keep your doctor keep your plan if you like it they're doing the same lying technique here with net neutrality you must get away with it off thanks to.

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"ten fifteen years" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen years" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"I think in the next ten years bitcoin is going to go to about one hundred billion a sorry one hundred thousand dollars for a bitcoin i think that that's a realistic goal for let's say ten fifteen years uh i think a million dollar would be possible but in terms of like you know my personal target uh that something that i think it's realistic while and charlie the narrative yeah i think something that people aren't talking about is the additional things that segue on bitcoin now brings to that makes possible so people are sold to focus on scaling at the forget that segue is actually technology that allows for a lot of other things which which is in which includes like slowest thing signatures confidential transactions and massed all these technologies will come in in the new feature in all can be done with a software now in all because segment it was activated and like i'll go get a little bit like slurs think thinking shares allows you to have um signatures there are smaller selling help scaling off also helps of privacy waiting combine a transactions and signatures um mass would allow more complex contracts done on the bitcoin network um and confidants transaction will let you hide your transaction about so create making more make the core more fungible and more private and all these things are just gonna be amazing improvements to bitcoin and i think this is something that people are just not aware not talking about because they're all focused on secretarial scaling and all these other distractions while.

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"ten fifteen years" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"ten fifteen years" Discussed on WGTK

"Basketball program for what eight ten fifteen years leah the all new tobacco few years now you know well save of the other problem with their two that i see what and say hey eight two is you know it head of their land allow that uh there were people who were all them to put more black in in in to work in of the ncaa too yeah you know a i'm gonna have the jump man 'cause we got another call and not just meter data claim it's waller to pay it but i just wanted to do we are not put dental karlstad about obvious feel like it looks like uh uh old times flavor and a new way of grave the no we got we have to eat we we don't want to overrode do there because that takes away from the true suffering it's a real slavery it away with talk of we finishes next week jeremiah there is high hey orrick how are you sir i'm good what's up uh well i you know i heard you guys talk in a night and i heard you talking about there the flag in our had to avocado and sound off on it you know i have the utmost respect for the flag in the air forum and the pledging all that but one of the things that does make america spadare jim url right jim recall alert call alert carlos go ahead go ahead you do have a right to protest and that's what makes america special so even though i disagree with colin kaepernick taking the me i respect his right could do it now what colin kaepernick cash to understand is that everybody has a right to accept or reject you throw k and if someone rejects his crowd care it doesn't make them less of a person yep but they just don't see it in the same way as you do in that particular croquettes so i think everybody has a little bit in the right here now in the nfl does have a uh a regulation that great you're supposed to be out you're supposed to stance of the nfl kurt cake stronger action say you're going to be fined or you know you're going to be suspended did i don't necessarily think.

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"ten fifteen years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"ten fifteen years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It does have provisions that begin to phase out after ten years and up until fifteen years it's an agreement that his permanent in the sense of iran as a permit commitments and not over nuclear weapon but some of the constraints for negotiate for ten fifteen years what i would say to that though is why would be blow up this nuclear deal now over something were concerned about happening ten years from now seems lucked their pursuit keating a crisis that is totally unnecessary but when other key point of disagreement which is whether iran is already in violation of the deal from the evidence that you have seen is it no and that's not just might as'son the judgment of the us intelligence community the i'd eightyear the monitoring mechanism are closest allies even the administration itself and certified twice that iran is complying with this deal of that is a matter of fact it's not a subjective matter and so therefore to be threatening to decertify renewing compliances president trump is done flies in the face of the facts and frankly ailing agus from our closest european allies and gives international opinion pushes it in the direction of iran which is exactly what we don't want what about the argument again made by the trump administration that iran is violating the spirit of the deal with its missile programme with threats that that we heard again yesterday from from iran's president were honey as threatening to restart industrialscale uranium enrichment while that threat was made them the conduct of the us pulling out of the deal i would say that those threats abandoning to threats responding to threats but and there's a lot of elements of running behavior that we don't like it support for terrorism its missile programme among them but that's precisely why we don't want them to have a nuclear weapon you know you don't make nuclear deals with sweden you make nuclear deals with countries you don't want to have a nuclear weapons and that's why the steel focused explicitly on the nuclear program there are other ways of getting out other owns a rainy behavior but all of was will be worse if they had a nuclear weapon that's why the steel for guns one develop into quickly ask you about which is.

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"ten fifteen years" Discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"ten fifteen years" Discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

"Fewer amount of games versus the regular season um i think that's a pretty good sign is also indicative of gpus i've been of of the this opinion for a couple of years now i just feel as though that people invest more time on the whole talking groups massive groups millions of people redistribution ball that when the gains just have more urgency and relevancy and so that's why honestly unless you're an mba die hard the middle of january just feels like the desert when it comes to the nba but everyone gets super into it when it gets to the playoffs and then the storylines a and after the season the nba to me get as much run almost as anything that's not relates to directly to the finals with college basketball i think it's very similar you you hit this massive push because gambling is becoming more i don't accept it i guess gp like it just seems like more people are like yeah i'm i'm going to just tossed down money all these gave i don't feel like that was a nearly as common ten fifteen years ago with other sports outside of football so i think our investment in postseason play constables dealt with massive attendance issues going on a decade now um and these are things that i think sports are trying to remedy so i don't think it's necessarily a massively bad thing for called troops him in fact i would say just it's just come trends crossed the border i know your thoughts of what uh what's your takeaway on it it doesn't surprise me that attendances down because um all of the data suggests were raising a generation or even millennials who don't like don't enjoy going to sporting events the way we used to enjoy going sporting event we grew up not that were ancient but we are older than say you're ever twenty year old war um the at home experience is so awesome now that people would just you know i i'm guilty of this by the way i would always rather watch on tv and go to an event.

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"ten fifteen years" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

News Radio WGOW

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"ten fifteen years" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

"That the ability to for oil companies to frac in to use new technologies to extract more oil and natural gas out of deep wells has helped produce more product can meet the united states produce more oil and we've even when offshore and i think donald trump started by doing more offshore drilling he's writing about the keystone pipeline pipeline he's talking about repealing some of the vehicles to human so if you're saudi you know it's cuts both ways we make it more american production but you know get oil prices very well go could could come could go up if if we don't have the same limits on that subject by vehicles in the future it's just a it's it's it's really frustrating to me as somebody who's in the media because get the narrative is always everything is a disaster and all you have to do is turn on cable news to real everything is a absolute disaster well this is one thing that would allow and then you stop unrealized though there are many things that we're doing not only well but actually doing the perfectly in one of them is this path to energy independence that we put ourselves on you know ten fifteen years ago and where there and if you it's great news for the way in in the reason i bring it up as because when you do see stories like this i have now been following your columns in the times repress and every week we have a new entry about gas prices being at another record low when this has been going on for a couple of years now and i i think it's a direct result of the policies that we've taken or the markets tend to correct themselves overtime in prices get high in certain areas that the market adapts and correction where production went up in response to that the united states but also the vehicle vehicles got more fuelefficient mp right made a preference for that we're moving to electric vehicles which may ultimately wenas from fossil fuels altogether in the long term i just find to it i have to take a break here in a second but i also fido they were the days and especially the oil.

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