29 Burst results for "Ten Fifteen Twenty Years"

The Changing Seasons of Our Lives

Joyce Meyer Radio Podcast

02:48 min | 1 year ago

The Changing Seasons of Our Lives

"Just because you've done something for ken years or twenty years and it's been god the whole time that doesn't mean that god can't suddenly get done with it. I want you to go in a different direction. So i'm just going to tell you a story. Maybe help you understand a little bit about what you don't watch far one. It's time for a change in your life first of all. Let me say when something is changing in your life when it's obvious that there's a change maybe there's a change at your workplace and there's nothing you can do about it. You don't like it but they're changing something and it's gonna affect you. You can either sit there and be unhappy or you can go along with the change. Well i heard this one time. And i think it's very good when something is changing. The first thing you need to do is change your mind about the change. Say because if you're like. I don't like this and i'm not going to be happy with this. If it's going to change anyway then you might as well change your mind and say get used to this. It's going to be okay. you know. Things are changing in our lives all the time. I mean there's how many of you have had really good relationships at some point. Had a friend that you saw a lot for maybe ten fifteen. Twenty years ninety. Don't ever see him even people. There's certain people that are right for our lives and certain seasons and it doesn't mean it's bad when are no longer in your life is just time for a new season in. Maybe sometimes you've been helping somebody for a long long time and that's over god doesn't want you helping them anymore. Wants him to stand on their own. Two feet we had that situation with my brother. He lived with us for about four years. And we've got him all nice and healthy and he got off the drugs. He was addicted to and got his life. Straightened out working for the ministry and my brother was the of guy that he did. he did. Okay as long as somebody was kind of making them do what was right watching over him but he didn't do too good when he was on his own. Well he was a grown man and to be honest. I didn't want to take care of the rest of my life. I didn't think that was would even be good for him. And so the time came when it was time to stop helping him and that's hard to do. Sometimes and to be honest he didn't do very well. We stopped helping him. But i couldn't just keep taking care of him his whole life just so you can't give your whole life up to help somebody else. Stand on their feet. Who won't do their part. God wants us to help people but he never wants us to do so much far somebody else that they never ended up having to do anything for themselves.

KEN
Goals: Write it Down, Break it Down!

Los Compas Lounge: a PSA for Brown Men

04:52 min | 1 year ago

Goals: Write it Down, Break it Down!

"You know wanting that That you know the three of were talking. The other day was You know things that Things that we put on the board. You know What we wanted to accomplish this This year you know. And start thinking about goals man and What exactly are goals and do you achieve them. And then we started asking you know maybe not everyone knows what a goal is you know and and you know we're kicking back in the lounge and usa. Hey man this sounds like a topic you know and So that's where we're going to be talking about today is Are twenty twenty goals so compass. John's like a good topic to get into while for me. I like to think about goal as an idea of future result. Sometimes you put a vision out there. You want to see what would be your preferred south. Were look like or preferred result would look like and now is the best way that i learned about goes and believe it or not I didn't know what a goal and objectives. And how to define that nadia to like high school man. I mean not. I'm sorry into college in highschool shit you know it just didn't click but it was a big eye opener for me in college and i had to catch up right. I do think about this. Okay i got out to start writing down stuff. And i'm breaking it out so a goal is for example. You know an idea or a future something you wanna get like if you want to buy a new car or say you want to lose weight right so you say that's glow i wanna lose weight in twenty twenty for example so if you look at that you break it down further those would be your objectives so one of your objectives is to figure out what your exercise routines gonna look like have a plan for that. Another objective can be. How do you cut back on carbs. A third objective is. I want to lose five pounds week one. I want to lose ten pounds week to i to have these different milestones. That's the kind of example that i always like to use is the big goal and in the little steps and again as you were saying you just triggered or you said a word that i was gonna say that about milestones that when you when you have a goal you have to set out Like a path you know and it's good. It's nice sometimes. You have to have realistic. I mean you have to have realistic goal. But it's good to drink too but those are two different two different things. Yes it can be positive negative. Because i always hear my wife sometimes like there's nothing wrong with dreams. You have to shoot for the stars sometimes or have these your trees follow your dreams and it's beautiful dream To have nice things or whatever it may be and then figure out backtrack were work yourself when when sometimes when you're a little kid and somebody had that you amaze your. Here's a start. Here's the end times. It was easier to start at the work your way back. You know shooting. I don't know if you remember cleaned out with mazes not exactly as little kids i mean this vision visualizing stuff is very important and we shouldn't squash our kids dreams right. Had these really big dreams and then as you get older or if you're able to break down those dreams and you have to break it onto like what's the reality realistically can you do. Is this a far fetched dream that you want to be the best piano player but yet you don't wanna put in the time to learn piano then. Hey come on. that's just you know that's just a false dream where aruban. What do you call those kinds of dreams. Well i'm just going on on on dreams. I think dreams are great man. And i think as we get older we lose the magic of of dreaming big men and we get complacent and we. You know ten fifteen twenty years down the road. You're like ban. i'm still working here. You know what happened to my dreams. My aspirations what i was gonna be you know and And we get caught up in the day to day stuff you know and before you know it. One year two years five years ten years gone down. What wh- has gone have gone by. And what happened to your dreams.

Nadia USA John Aruban
"White Sox bring back Tony LaRussa" with Ryan Theriot - Episode 034 - burst 2

The Sportscaster and Her Son

01:21 min | 1 year ago

"White Sox bring back Tony LaRussa" with Ryan Theriot - Episode 034 - burst 2

"You know so. I don't see now if you could get chris carpenter to manage to coach and that'd be a great get car has some really interesting traits. We saw what he did on the field. You know i'm saying. Saudi did eleven in the world series. Great career prior to that but just a leader in every sense of the word players gravitated toward him when he spoke people listening. You know he's kinda got that commanding personality. You mentioned the game changing and get a little bit younger and and a little bit more. Flashy you know it. It's tony gonna have the ability to change. You know if you bring in. Chris rock and they're going to have the ability to change. Because it's not what it was five ten fifteen twenty years ago you know as far as the players expressing themselves differently and and the unwritten rules are starting erase as we've all seen so i think there's gonna be some give and take on both sides. Motorist this marriage to work. But i do think it's environmental higher anytime you can bring on and tony larussa. I think i think he gotta do. Y'all honestly i'm still just before and a few interviews talking about this. He's the greatest baseball mind. I've ever been around and i mentioned some pretty good ones and it's taking nothing away from the guys. I played for because they're all phenomenal managers but he just was excellent in a lot a lot of areas. That's really interesting.

#Sportstalk #Chicagosports White Sox Baseball Tony Larussa Jerry Reinsdorf Aj Hinch Alex Cora Chicago Theriot MLB Age Shaming Chris Carpenter Chris Rock Tony
Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

Between The Lines

28:17 min | 2 years ago

Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

"Tom Switzer, he and welcome to another episode off between the lines now today on the program will be commemorating the twenty fifth anniversary of Europe's worst massacre since the Holocaust in ninety, ninety, five more than eight thousand people died in Shrimp Nitsa. The town was supposed to be a U N protected safe haven in the vicious civil war that tore Yugoslav apart instead the civilians ended up being massacred by Bosnian Serbs. Were lightning fast with their superior weapons. They easily overran the lightly. I'm Bosnian government troops and the token full civilian peacekeepers. The UN's Valley to protect the civilians inspired Washington to launch unilateral action against Serbia and end the civil war. Would things be the same today now? That's later in the program, but first defense. Last week the Morrison. Government launched a defence strategy and force structure review now the move signals a major shift away from the strategy outlined in the last defence white paper. Remember that just four years ago in two thousand sixteen. It plotted out Australia's strategic costs for the next decade. But that White Paper has as we know been rapidly overtaken by Vince covert China or that now the new review has promised two hundred and seventy billion dollars over the next decade to enhance Australia's defence capabilities with renewed focus on areas like Saba and spice capabilities and the possible development of hop sonic weapons will be fitting aircraft with long-range anti-ship missiles, increasing underwater surveillance and boosting fuel ammunitions reserves. Now, underscoring the seriousness of the shift, the Prime Minister even drew comparisons to the nineteen thirties and the lead up to world. War Two that period of the nineteen thirties. Is Been Something I've been revisiting on a very regular basis and when you connect by the economic challenges and the global uncertainty. It can be very haunting, but is the money too much or not enough is going to all the right places, and we'll do enough to safeguard Australia from China's increasing assertiveness and is rapidly growing military capabilities. What's the role of Australia's diplomacy? And all of this will joining me to discuss this at three distinguished guests. By skill is professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University Holiday Bites. Thank you good to be here Melissa Conley. Tar is a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. Hi There Melissa could to speak again Tom. And Pay. The Jennings is executive director of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute. Tom No. Can you talk us through the top of scenarios and potential conflicts that the defense review is preparing us for the scenario that the review is focusing on is one involving a high end conventional conflict, so I've gone to the days of stabilization operations in t more Counterterrorism operations in Afghanistan This document is preparing foresight on onsite conflict. Involving countries that have sophisticated military forces. And, of course, the document doesn't say. I don't think it would be reasonable to expect it to say. That China is the problem. But let me tell you China is the problem that is the now neoplasia competitive that way of thinking about when we think about what's adequate in terms of the topic of military capability we need to have. and to does reflect to change. From past years Tom I recall when I started by defense career, we were thinking much more about the risks presented by Indonesia, and the so called low level in cushions in the northwest. Of course, that's no longer features in anyone's strategic thinking. Really it's about China and the risks that the People's Republic is presenting to all of its neighbors in abroad since in the Indo Pacific region and beyond I cabinet crudely putting it some sites laying the groundwork for fortress Australia US sign. This is preparing us to join a potential use LID. Containment slash war against China for example to protect Taiwan Peter Jennings. I think that is it covers a spectrum of possibilities. One possibility which I think is Epson you were in terms of language of the document is that we might conceivably end up having to face military conflict without being able to rely on the direct combat support of the United States, and that's what leads to discussions around extra stockpiling munitions and fuel insightful. But I think in general terms. Yes, the expectation is that Australia. Through its history has been a country that forms coalitions usually have like minded partners, the share the same types of objectives. And the the plan will design the Defense Force. Really gives us the capacity to do that with Rachel Ellis lecture, example, Japan but also with our traditional ally the United States okay bates skill. You've recently completed a review of China's defense capabilities and its recent military modernization, specifically looking at the implications for Australia Wind you expect the Peo- The People's Liberation Army and its navy. When do you expect them to have the capability to project power as far as Australia annual Pacific knives, well in many respects Tom, they already can I mean they have the long range missile capabilities to do that? Know as a from a standoff position launched from their own from their own homeland against hours. But what I think, the the new strategy is looking at is really the development of capability over the next ten fifteen twenty years, and that's by the Chinese own own acknowledged calendar that they would be able to by that time of mass, a large enough capability, both in terms of its long range strike, you know striking from their own homeland, but also bill to project. Project Power passed the so-called first and second island change and being a position to more directly threatened through those platforms Australian security. So you know we're talking ten or fifteen year window here and I think given the time it does take to try and respond to develop the the deterrent and defense capabilities for Australia. That's that's you know that's in some ways a short window. for Australia to be mobilizing in reaction Melissa Tali. What's the role of a strong diplomacy and all these well I think it needs to be growl. And one of the concerns when we look at the deteriorating strategic environment is we think all that's a defense problem? And so when the prime minister launches the strategic update with those comparisons with the nineteen thirties. It pushes US toward seeing in purely military terms but we don't just want to say things in that security lands, we want to think about all of the parts about national power projection, so that's diplomacy and development as well as defense I think if if people thought about it I think what we invest in all three strongly, but that's not where it is if you look at federal budget fifty. Fifty nine billion to defense and less than seven billion to diplomacy and development together the lowest point with ahead in our history and I think we missing that opportunity. If we don't take US seriously, the way that diplomacy and development can shape things in the world so I was struck. Today was a defendant looking at the latest poll on what are the major concerns that Australians have at the moment of the top threats in the world and the first five, a role nontraditional that drought, environment, disaster, climate change, pandemics, and downtown, global economy, and those places where you know military spending isn't going to help shape that environment. So we need to have an effect on those. We need to be thinking much more about what we can do in the diplomacy and development to mind Peter Jennings. What would you say in to Melissa's observations? Because they reflect a certain mindset that that perhaps we should be focused more on non state actors rather than say China for instance well, I think all of these you know threats that have to be taken seriously. I'm and simply because we're living in the middle of a pandemic for example, doesn't the climate change is gone away in this no longer going to present a problem to us. I guess what I'd say. Is that the you know the five things Melissa listed? That were in the featured in the low e Poland terms of popular concerns. Are also the things which could. In different ways late to the risks of conflict escalating in the Indo Pacific region generally so You know my my view, please while I would like to see spending on diplomacy increased. While I. Say Development Assistance is being something which is effectively the United soft in of Australian power, and the military is the hot end of Australian power. I think. The message against all of these areas is that we have just been underinvesting for decades underinvesting for decades, so we're we're all. High fiving ourselves at just reaching about two percent of gross national product, being spent on defense, but that is compared to what we spending in cold or years, which was sometimes between three and a half percent in four percent of rustic product. So what we have grown used to Tom I would say is. Free written on the United. States code tiles of security for for decades. We've dramatically under. Invested in the things that we need to do to strengthen Australia's position, not just militarily, but also diplomat. A now. We're rather surprised to hear the news that Gosh the bill is a lot more expensive than we really thought. It was only if you've got that confidence in the US. and. In fact, the whole trump stories, the story of the Americans really big being fed up with the rest of the world, thinking that the US can fund the bill for their security, so we're going to have to do more and I think we're going to have to do it against multiplicity of areas not. Justin sought the defense organization. We'll some scholars such as you want and James Current from the University of Sydney. They say that this document sounds a lot like an acknowledgement that the US might not always be there to help us out. By are we starting to plan for more independent Australian defense posture I think it would be a wise move to keep that option open when you think of the capabilities that the Chinese developing in which do have a direct pose a direct threat to Australia or could do so. In many respects, the I think the types of threats that you might not expect an immediate or even timely response on the part of the United States what I'm thinking here. Cyber capabilities is a huge priority for the Chinese. We already know what they see the sort of capability. They can wield against Australia and that's not the sort of thing you can expect a kind of cavalry to. Lead the charge from from Washington to come to Australia's defence slowly long range strike capability on the part of the Chinese capability. They already have in which are going to continue to develop. which could threaten Australia down the road now? These are capabilities that I think that Australia's going to have to develop their own defenses for. They can certainly do that with United States, but again it's not necessarily the sort of threat that we would expect some sort of traditional ally joint response not to make it well. Some of are in listeners will email me and they'll say that if Uncle Sam struggles to police. It's own CDs. Melissa. How on Earth Can Uncle Sam Police? The Asia Pacific region in the face of a rising China. What's your sense about us staying power in the next decade or two in look? It's difficult One of the things that strategic update looks at is more threats to the global rules order, and unfortunately the you know, the US is part of that. the US is not along with the strategies interest on things like global trading system, and a number of international issues like global health where we would say you need to be supporting. A Global Response that said I don't think the strategic update will be read negatively in. Washington, it's my guess. it very clearly couched in terms that I think the US will lock about Australia contributing more and having more self. that could be seen as a statement that we think that the US might not have outback, but can also be seen as something that the US has been for for a long time. I particularly liked a few elements of the update things like making sure that we have. You know material ammunition You know that aren't going to be disrupted. Buckle supply trying having more capability eight industrial cut suffering capability here antiques fuel reserves, which is not as long sane as an issue for us, so I mean those are things that are worth investing in. Regardless of US resolve because as we've seen from COVID, we know that supply chain can be disrupted very quickly and easily, and it's worth having eligibilities. Cepeda Jennings bite skill and Melissa Conley Toilet and Melissa. The Pacific step up last year. That realigned Australia's development budget to deal with some of the strategic challenges posed by China in the Pacific Do you think it goes far enough? The step up was followed recently by strategies new International Development Policy Partnerships for recovery, and that's made it very clear that strategies focus should be on the Pacific and also southeast. Asia including. Indonesia and team August. I think that has a very clear statement about what we want. In the region of being entrusted trusted development partner and influencing those societies that we think positive for four region. Again you're going to. You're going to say you. Hear this from me all the time, but again the problem is that we not really making much invasive lunch, so partnerships for recovery head no new money it talked about the massive challenges that covered as as creating for for the for the Pacific, and for for our region broadly, and the only funding announcement was that we're going to repurpose the money. We would have spent on sending Australian. Volunteers in scholarship holders. And we're GONNA use that so I I suppose I. Feel a little bit with all the areas, not actually include district update in that as well that what we've seen through the foreign policy, White Paper and International Development Policy through to to the defense. Strategic Updike is. We talk about how. how? What a time! These these frosty leaving a contested difficult awful environment that we've now got to leave in and the Dow L. Easy Times over, and then we say, and we're not gonNA. Give any new money so I mean the defense announcement is essentially just that we're going to continue to you know, extrapolate out the money that was planned to be spent in the twenty twenty six, and we're going to extrapolate that out to twenty thirty terabytes skill. Do we risk getting into a bidding war for influence in the Pacific? I don't know if it's a risk. If it is a risk worth worth taking. I mean obviously the Pacific region is so extremely important Australia's future. Both for for defense reasons for regional engagement for diplomatic reasons, developing reasons and the like. so It's quite possible that we're entering in a more competitive phase with China in this. SITES WRIST BYTES I'm talking about more the budgetary concerns he because in the wake of the Corona Virus Crosses. There'll be serious limits on how we can spend on these things scholley. Yes, there is and party left to be be developed for that, but you know when you're talking about your own backyard. I mean I I. I don't think it's the kind of country that can simply. Pretended it's by itself getting back pay to Jennings to the region, generally in the rise of what. Angus Campbell is of the Defence Force he's talked about the rise of political warfare, the idea of grey zone warfare things like cyber attacks, economic coercion influence operations that fall below the traditional threshold of war. He says we need a whole of government response to it. I, you seeing that whole of government approach happening in Campbell, or is this Manley focus on defense and the spy agency so far Peter Jennings. It probably is focused on the national security agency's Tom. That's not too surprising because you'd expect them to sort of pick up on the risks I. But General Campbell is right. It does need to be all government is. There's a whole lot of things happening there that simply cannot and should not be done by defense organizations. and. I think that realization is slowly dawning. Along as both of the speakers have said that actually ladyship comes with cost of infrastructure is going to play that role, but you know, give you a small example of this we. We have lost the ability to broadcast into the South Pacific and Southeast Asia. In a way that we used to very successfully over over decades to give us the capacity to do that. We're probably talking about you know that. He million a year forty million a year, which sounds a lot of defend. It's nothing if you're in the Defense Department. Let me tell you. But you need to be able to do things like that. To be the truth teller in the region to actually tell the region that there are alternatives to Chinese Communist Party authoritarianism I think that's what's needed with responding to this grey zone on threat. Is Actually to be the truth teller. In this part of the will and getting our system in Cambridge used to that reality to understanding what needs to be done. To starting at different type of conversation with our region. With our own people for that matter that that is a sort of a psychological change which I can see happening, but we're not quite yet. There's a bit of work still to be done to get to that point Melissa. Conley Tyler. Is, just responding on that. I agree entirely with what pitcher saying on on broadcasting. It's a small investment, such a an increasing influence. It should be Brian and I hope that did that's being seen. I think having defense voices. I will help a lot in a banks, seriously I'm but just went. When you ask Tom Balaton host government and what's happening there? There are some really good examples, so for example win. This Pacific step pop started an office of the Pacific was established in that apartment and tried and each job. He's to be that coordinating body, and it's bringing together the. The defense, the development and the diplomacy in a way that he's gone to maximize our influence. and I've noticed this a lot more discussion about that that three. How do you bring defense development diplomacy communities together? I'm involved in initiate the Pacific. Four Day and I think a lot of people not talking about what more we can do for that that joined up coordination to make the most about national instruments by skill. You're an expert on China. The elephant in the room of course is China doing need to be careful not to overestimate China's military strength. What about the weaknesses? Exactly right I mean you have to know your enemy's weakness as well as their strengths in the case of China, they are undertaking enormous reforming organization effort. They're pouring billions of dollars into new capabilities, but there's a lot of things we need to recognize I. Mean One is that the Chinese have not fought a shooting war and more than forty years. They are have no. They have zero experience in high end combat against a serious. Adversary, scenario, so that's not to downplay them, but to understand that they've got enormous obstacles to overcome that day. Themselves acknowledge that they themselves. No, they have to overcome, and that's why we had this window that we've been talking about. A fifteen to twenty years. to try and develop capabilities to get in front of the kinds of things that the Chinese want to bring to bear around. Around, twenty thirty or twenty, thirty, five, twenty, forty, paid-up Melissa to be continued. Thanks so much for being on our in. Thank you, tell my pleasure. Thank you, Tom. That was paid jennings. He's executive director of the Australian strategic pulsing suit by skill professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University and Melissa Commonly Tyler. She's a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. These between the lines with Tom Switzer. Coming next, we're going to replay a version of a segment from between the lines. I 'cause commemorating the massacre of Bosnian Muslims at shredded Nitsa on the eleventh of July nodding ninety. Five twenty five years ago this week. More than eight thousand people were killed by Serb forces. It was the worst massacre. Europe had seen since the Holocaust. Serve softening up Trevor Nature for the army's final push into the town. Town of course was supposed to be a safe haven protected by the United Nations, but the civilians ended up being sitting ducks as I woke Larry. Hollingsworth Remembers I. Myself Feel Devastated and ashamed I was there with them? When we told them that it was a safe haven I watched. Many of these people walk in with the minimal possessions into shreds, knowing that it was a safe haven, and now they're fleeing out because we've let them down, let them down to the extent that within dies. About Twenty three thousand women and children were deported, and about eight thousand Muslim men and boys left behind where executed and buried in mass graves. Now, reports from the time described, frightening scenes stiffen overawed from medicines on frontier. Speaking he. Loading some of the children and women into buses, but there's no indication as to where it was buses, going with seen some horrifying streaming, going on women and children going into the buses being taken away from their family This was going on with a lot of crying a lot of panicking. The slaughter had been planned carefully and executed with precision. All the wall Dutch. Pace is literally stood by, and did nothing indeed even when the Serb assault on Srebrenica was imminent. in-command is still rejected Kohl's racetracks. Positions. Pope John Paul. The second declared ribbon Nitsa a defeat for civilization as media reports begins to reveal the scale of the unfolding tragedy. The UN says nine hundred thousand people are still unaccounted for. About some became clear as government soldiers emerging from the forest in central Bosnia, told of horrific massacres at the hands of the Serbs one young. People executing them on spot, but this didn't come out of the blue. By the time this massacre took place the civil war that tore the former Yugoslavia. Repot was heading into its fourth year. More than a million people have been displaced, and the world became familiar with a new term ethnic cleansing. So? Who is to blame for these well? Let's start with the United. Nations from ninety two to ninety, five shrivel Nitsa was the world's first union declared civilian syphon. It was supposed to to her aggression. It was supposed to aggression and set the scene for political negotiations to end hostilities between the Bosnian Serbs, and Muslims, but the UN soldiers in the SIPHONS. They were bedeviled by problems. If you declare an area safe haven in the name of the United Nations. Nations if you tell the people if they are safe in the name of the United Nations you have got to put the troops on the ground, and it's no good for politicians say yes, we go for safe havens, but we're not gonNA put the troops meanwhile the Europeans vacillated and equivocated failing miserably to cope with across at its own back door. America was also reluctant to get involved as then President George Bush senior explained in Nani Nani to. I? Something because I learned something from Vietnam. I am not going to commit US forces until I know what the mission is to the military. Tell me that it can be completed until I know how they can come out. You have ancient rivalries that have cropped up as as Yugoslavia's dissolved or getting dissolved, and it isn't going to be solved by sending in the eighty second airborne, and although on the campaign trail that Ye Bill Clinton pledged to reverse the appeasement of that bushes of Belgrade as President Clinton allowed the Balkans to bleed for three more years. French President Jacques Chirac was moved to declare quote, the position of the leader of the free world vacant. Trinite Sur changed all that having done nothing the before during the mass killings in Rwanda Clinton was galvanized into action, and crucially he cut the United Nations out of the Decision Chine on August thirty Washington led a night bombing campaign against the Serbs the NATO action began early this morning. The harsh light of fires and explosions coloring the night sky. Some people watched the bombardment from their houses, but after more than ten thousand deaths here in the last three years, most Sarajevans had given up any hope of outside intervention. Last night it came on a scale which could yet change the course of this war by the end of not ninety five sixty thousand nine hundred troops, including twenty thousand Americans were on the ground in Bosnia. Pace was declared. The BOEKEN's wars ended only because the US finally acted. He's President Clinton in November ninety five my fellow Americans in this new era there are still times when America and America alone can and should make the difference for peace. The terrible war in Bosnia is such a case nowhere. Today is the need for American leadership. More stark are more immediate than in. In Bosnia in the years since the Mexica Europe inaction was heavily criticised, and the US was held up for its global leadership in particular for its unilateral humanitarian intervention. This is when the US secretary. Of State. Madeleine Albright said America was the indispensable nation, and that idea would fade into the justification of the Iraq invasion in two thousand and three as a war of liberation, but he's a question with the US intervene. If the shrivel Nitsa massacre happened today from the standpoint of twenty twenty, we might ask if the era of US unilateral humanitarian intervention is well and truly over. Well, that's it for this week. Show remember if you'd like to hear the episode again or download segments since two thousand fourteen. Just go to ABC. Dot Net dot US slash aren and follow the prompts to between the lines, or you can listen via the ABC. Listen APP, or wherever you get your podcast. You can even subscribe, so you never miss an episode. I'm Tom Switzer continue next week.

Australia China United States Melissa Peter Jennings Pacific Tom Switzer Washington TOM Bosnia UN United Nations Prime Minister Europe Melissa Conley Professor Of Asia Pacific Secu Indonesia Asia Institute
"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Also got a hundred Todd dot com enter into dot com if you're going to buy a house right now they're the people to do it for you there with Sierra Pacific mortgage and crucially to refinance their still leading into refinances even with these rates so low ten fifteen twenty year refinance is amazing rates go to entered Todd dot com their Sierra Pacific mortgage fill out a few questions online they'll be right back to you and and Todd dot com a lot of mortgage companies that were out we're done they're pushing back on new home application not into anti dot com triple a triple eight eleven seventy two triple a triple eleven seventy two if you want to buy a house because you know right now is the time with these rates especially at ten fifteen or twenty year mortgage triple eight triple eight eleven seventy to come right back I'll be joined up with the rest of my Anthony Fauci interview how's that the portions of the U. your children brought to buy food for the poor a lot of the news after forty here the truth right here as soon as him he would return this is the Hugh Hewitt show you know it's shocking that your home could be stolen this easily that's the brutal lesson Debra learned when thieves found her home's title online forged it and literally took ownership of her home in an instant feast legally owned Deborah's home she got evicted and spent a fortune in legal fees trying to get it back you know the FBI calls home title fraud one of the fastest growing crimes can you do not want to be next that's why I urge you to protect the online title to your home with home title lock you know the legal documents to our homes are kept online with you some of them.

Hope for Alzheimers and Dementia

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

09:42 min | 2 years ago

Hope for Alzheimers and Dementia

"And today we're going to discuss with you a very sensitive subject. Many of you have a family loved ones out there. That have had this experience. And you're hoping to avoid it as well because of watching them it is called for Alzheimer's and dementia and Doctor this is going to discuss with us today. Many ways that we can start recognizing if we're headed towards one of these terrible diseases down the road Natural products that we can do in supplementation. That could help. Slow it down and I don't know about reversing it. He's GonNa talk to us about that also and we have lots and lots of questions to get to. The you guys have been kind enough to send to us and we're going to make sure we try to answer as many of those as we can as long as we can remember right. I with that being said Dr Lewis. Can You Tell US exactly what you want to tell people today about Alzheimer's and dementia and give them some hope. Y- you know. I always write about two or three hours worth of notes in bullet points for this thirty minute show so please forgive me for not getting around everything First of all. It's a very devastating disease and mark my words what you're going to see in the very near future like ten fifteen twenty years is we're going to lose a great amount of America's workforce because You know how wonderful insurance companies are. They're going to say well. You know we're going to quit covering this and this and this and this and so you're gonNA have to take one of the two workers from your house. The male female to stay at home take care of mom or dad with dementia Alzheimer's So that's GonNa really hurt. America's workforce the the town to treat something. You know. I'm a contractor. We can't treat anything with with supplements but where did we lose our faith in God to realize that our if you put in something really really good your body's going to work within do good so the time to deal with it is before you get it now. I saw dementia slash Alzheimer's and you need to go to a neurologist. If you suspect you have this I love medical profession and you should be doing our program also in addition to I all coming in my mother when she was entered. I guess mid Sixty S and my brother Dr James Lewis who's incredibly brilliant contractor so we started giving my mother lots and lots of stuff and she was a willing participant and we put off dementia slash Alzheimer until. It didn't really kick her but she got around eighty eight to ninety to ninety two. It really got her but That's better than letting it progress in her mid sixties and have ever in in tiger down that terrible road when she seventy so we put it off about twenty five years Here's the problem and again. I'm not a medical. I go to medical doctors I love. Medical doctors had the greatest respect for their knowledge and their commitment to helping people get well but there was an article in the paper the other day. This is drugs. Fail to slow decline inherited. Alzheimer's disease now inherited would imply that. It's genetic but as you know if you've listened to me there's so many of our genes that will not express bad things if you get rid of environmental toxins and increase nutrients and you know to a thinking man or woman you say well. If you increase no chance you're gonNA automatically Detox Bango. You just won the prize. That's true so it. That article talked about the fatal drugs. Fail TO PREVENT OR SLOW. The mental decline They were trying to remove harmful protein. That builds up into Brian to these people leading to you know. Bad dementia The problem with that is and I'm not anti-drug but it's like you've got eighty holes in your roof and it's about to come a thunderstorm and you're trying to patch one. That's what you're doing with the drug. You're not getting to the underlying. Cause will you talked about your mother going into that at a later stage I remember her being much younger. And we thought she was going into dementia and Alzheimer's and they had just put her on an an acid reducer. So that right. I hadn't even forgot that story. Which is one of the signs of dementia Alzheimer's but sometimes it's just dress Yeah My sister called me and says you know Steven my mom. You Know Mamas making coffee with no water into pie. She's turned it trying to turn on the gas stove can't get it going. And she's looking in the mirror and talking to herself thinking she's talking to someone else and she's urinating freely and cannot have a bowel movement. I said Oh good. Lord I'm booked up and I said I'd never mind. I'll cancel everybody on the books and I went to see your well. They just put on a new acid reducer and not that. Those things aren't necessary and appropriate but I said well she's not going to get any B twelve you know out of her mate and we'll get further into that during the questions but I said if you've got to take it for feeling good understand that and I gave her medical doctor the all the research about you know B twelve deficiency and how that can decrease brain function and I said at the very least place. Give her a shot over. Wake well her cute little. Md She. I guess got offended. She wouldn't do it so I had to put Mamo massive doses of B. Twelve. You can't put somebody on the RDA because you're not gonNA absorb it. You gotta put them on massive doses and has got to be the good stuff and she popped out of it in about two three weeks. She has a brand new woman and that was many years before she actually did develop dementia. So sometimes it can be drug induced and you think that they're going down this slippery slope open at something they're taking And and blood pressure medicines and other one that that does that it. It'll make them be like they're somewhere else you know. We had them walk in our office that way. And they don't know what's going on and it turned out to be their blood pressure medication so it could be several. It can be statin drugs. We see that very very often and again. I don't interfere with medical. You know what the what they do. So we'll talk to your md about this. Here's the book. Here's the research. Read that One of the worst insults from a hormonal point of view is one of the worst insults to the Bryant stress. Because then you're adrenals get stressed release. Cortisol we see people with super-duper High Cortisol than it you know eventually gets battalion. Whereas craps out goes down to. Oh we had one in here. Yesterday had five on his cortisol. So we'll no wonder you feel like hack. And you have anxiety on top of that and can't remember and he runs a multimillion dollar business. This has a very bad effect on the hop. Thelma's and they're somewhere in my notes. GotTa hope we get to it. I'll just mention it now. You have to feed the hippocampus. That's not a college for Hippos. That's part of your brain and I did a little research and there's a specific type. You know we always sell the methyl. B twelve the good stuff but there's only one company on no that makes Olympic acid and auto Janet. I said I know I know I keep asking you to buy all these supplements. I started remembering things. I remember the code to our Condo in Branson for months before and went on and on and on it's called T. M. G. which is trauma thylacine. Which is a major methyl donor which means major detoxification? But it has a violin acid which feeds the hippocampus which helps tremendously with short term energy. So for those of you that walk into the next room and have a senior moment because we laugh about it because it's easier to laugh about it and saying Oh crap Mg Are you have to strategically place all of your items? You can see him again when you get in the room Engine twelve flashlights. Hanging around. Because I forgot where I left last seven but I've always got one somewhere except they migrate like wildebeest. I may all be an RV. And I have to bring them back into the house but so stress. You know you've got to deal with that Hypo methylated which lack of be complex. And I've got notes here somewhere. It's be twelve it's B. Six and has to be activated. Be Six it has to be five. M T H F met foul in or Quadraphonic plus that for Lennick. Acid is little bit different than the folic. So you got to be very very careful. Janet can you hand me that the one over there that that bottle is says Omega? Yes you're okay. Here's what I'm GonNa Tell You folks. One of my patients came into the day. She says well I'm taking this. This is from a famous doctor and my Amigas which is very very incredibly important critical for good brain function mine. One Gel caps has several times more. Epa in Dha than this A Megan from a famous doctor. But this name is doctor put in B twelve as Sino Kabbalah mean if it says sign Kabbalah mean. It is junk. Throw it away. I don't care if it comes from a famous doctor and then you know he put in some other cheap stuff It's not good. Just because it comes from a famous doctor. He put info late instead of the five of 'EM T H F.

Alzheimer Dementia Dr James Lewis Cortisol Janet Alzheimer's Disease America Mental Decline Mamo Brian EPA Statin Thelma Bryant Omega Steven
"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"They are going to appear on the shell pencil performance line you know one of the of the big stories always historically Mike in the metroplex in Dallas fort worth is the Dallas Cowboys but it could very close one eight to that is is just think you're gonna fire today is it today tomorrow the next week is that so that's always a story line is cow boy he's worn but one eight Jason Garrett and so you know how this works right I mean in the state of Texas in Dallas you is is it's expected for the Dallas Cowboys to be at the top vying for Super Bowl championship but as you well know you know it's not always automatic and that's definitely the case for the cowboys dot automatic for them to be on top every year well yeah there's no doubt and this is a team Jonathan where I mean the writing's on the wall right they're gonna fire chasing Gary it's just a matter of getting to the end of the season now he's gonna have an opportunity here to win some games got themselves into the playoffs and try to win a playoff game or two but by and large the last two weeks the odd the patriots on Sunday with that disaster we saw on thanksgiving day whenever he's eating Turkey and everything else like this is the end of Jason Garrett barring something completely shocking but here's the thing though about this Mike so geared has been with the ball club for ten years as a head coach was there in twenty ten so at during that time during the administration he has been to the playoffs three times his team's loss of the vision three times in eighteen sixteen and and fourteen and so I think scratcher for some cowboys fans is okay why are you spending so much time with this guy usually Jerry Jones is one that will say okay that's not working I will go to the next guy next guy but for whatever reason news because it is a former cowboy maybe it's because you're it's got pictures something has got the the ire of of Jerry Jones when people bring up here it because you know Jones always defense gear it believes that he should be the head coach but what it is all about wins and losses and the owner cheap is very apparent well it to me I I tell me if you think this is crazy John I've actually not been baffled by how patient Gerry has been with chase and gather from this standpoint I think what Jerry Jones wants is he wants what the patriots have with Bella check doesn't really want that but what the Steelers have had which is basically what three head coaches since Lyndon Johnson was in the White House I think that's what Jerry Jones what ideally one and I think in Jason Garrett I think he saw the potential for that kind of guy like Jason Garrett has been around for nearly ten years and it's only fifty three so this is a guy who as you mention had a history of the cowboys he was the backup quarterback for a long time often serve guy smart guy so I think the big picture is Jerry always saw Jason Garrett as possibly like the guy as crazy as this may sound like the next Tom Landry tie for the cowboys were he can be the coach for ten fifteen twenty years the problem is the reality it's staring us in the face which is Jason Garrett is not that caliber of a head coach simple the simple as that hello Mike Meltzer Java hooded for fourteen Fitzsimmons on ESPN radio and ESPN app some thoughts now from Jerry Jones he gives his thoughts on Jason Garrett's job security hello Jason very well.

Mike Dallas ten years ten fifteen twenty years two weeks
"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

07:55 min | 2 years ago

"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"On the I heart radio app and you just tuning in we're talking about trying to process why we have some of these mass shootings how things might have changed in the past ten fifteen twenty years some of the issues that young people today are growing up with that maybe I didn't grow up with maybe you didn't grow up with what is the world look like to them through the lands in which they view it and of course inevitably and we were talking about this against the backdrop of the Saugus high school shooting of course inevitably we want to find some sort of reason some sort of motive some sort of explanation and we look to social media of course that has its place we talk to neighbors that has its place I will never have all the answers in the sense of what would motivate a person to do this specifically John can if you're listening to KFI earlier today at a fascinating conversation with one of the neighbors I mean I think it's the next door neighbor to the alleged shooter his name is at the neighbor's name is chaired accent and we're just going to play just a few clicks because this is a short segment we went over in the last just a few clicks to give you a sense of we don't and I think that's a memo Kelly show talk about stars and celebrities we don't know these people in the sense of we don't know what they're capable of we don't know what's going on their personal lives many times we don't know our next door neighbors we just because we live next to someone or they're nice and quiet just not exactly give us a window into what's going on in their lives this is Gerry acts of the first clip Jenner describes this family next door and according to him there were no red flags sort of a family and that's really what makes more than neighbors and we've done really well I actually remember the day that they thought makes it home Russian being born salt she seemed also gives the born I remember when the parents moved in when no triggers no red flags and I'm a registered nurse and you start talking to people and looking for nothing they don't share as complex and so they might do nothing I ever picked up from him you know he's a very quiet person just like his parents were very involved with his last year you are if you did actually there to be such that a ball cool using boy scout some non eagles got solution that in common we would talk as we are what a lot of stuff and not like that in our backyard textiles and we'll just talk about things and not just quite himself coming on and how many people do we don't quite into themselves how many how many neighbors do you have without necessarily knowing everything that's going on in someone's house their young children this is scared turn sixteen today how many would fit that description in a general sense how many of those same kids probably we're going through just some emotional ups and downs from an outsider standpoint maybe there is a girl that they're obsessing over you know adolescence puberty we've all been through it maybe we'll school work baby was the pressure to get into college I remember what that's like I remember the emotional up just as the swings that I would go through because you do a purity dealing with all sorts of things that you just don't know how to deal with because you've never gone through before anybody's kid honestly from that description but we learned a little more or at least from the perspective of the neighbor also this is jeered the next door neighbor describing the fire arms around their next door neighbor's home and how the sun grew up around guns so for all I know is on for you usually make your own loads just because one start reaching out about hundred yards there's a lot of TV show for a factor around so I mean nation grew up to do mystery firearms already gone so we will he wasn't somebody who played with fire arms they were loose matter to him so he and I would talk about guns before a new he didn't have any firearms at the time I think it's here come to my house maybe a year before his father died trying to follow up on a situation where they were going to should have been in this position just because what he was going to start top of the article uses from the house you know it's interesting it's the same conversation pretty much the police brought to my door this morning okay Morgan let me go back to my conversation with you you have a next door neighbor knows the kid pretty well in the sense of known the kid his whole life knows the kid has access to guns knows the kid has had some sort of familial difficulties with the father passed Knowles said the kid is going through emotional stress and strife and I'm not blaming the neighbor I'm just saying that could be anybody's kids I don't think about my neighbors their kids one of lost a parent maybe firearms in the home what am I supposed to do with that I'm I supposed to tell the police Hey you need to keep an eye on him or her he may go straight up to the school at some undisclosed harm at some point in the future on some day I don't know what a social media looks like but you know just need to keep tabs on him is what we supposed to do with that well if we did that then we'd have so many reports of all these people that we need to check up on I mean which we need to buy it let's say we did and we checked up on all these kids on a weekly or monthly basis it seems as if when a kid is planning to do something like this they're not exactly telling everyone they're not making it know what they're going to do to a certain degree your careful not to let others know because there is an element of surprise well we're not sure whether that social media message about enjoying school actually came from the alleged shooter not we don't know that but if it was work wasn't there was consciousness of what was going to report or not going to be put on social media and I'm thinking I don't know if we can either legislate our way out of this war I don't know if we can just keep calling the police every time we think something might happen because the child is depressed or lonely or going through something on the other hand we can say well if it stops one mass shooting this worth it yes I agree with that but at the same time I don't know if that tips the balance in the other direction well we start decreasing these over all and here's the last clip with the neighbor recalls the father's struggles with alcohol the father of the shooter yeah market market struggle with alcoholism for several years before he passed on actuated doing on you really on a couple times as the indoor camera you can be customers couch one so unfortunately when you drink a lot for so long and you decide to stop by the guild are your body goes through a whole lot of changes and so he talks in you to make sure that he wasn't freezing and make sure he was choking on his own vomit things like that in years you guys you went through that process unfortunately he wasn't at that particular time he wasn't willing to help or go to a hospital so how can lead to just deal with it right there by trying to man very reserved in this is just something he struggle with very private for a long time you know it was also it's hard is when he eventually died in two thousand seventeen for managed to he was no longer drinking he was on the road to recovery is able to keep Dennis job he was starting to focus on his relationship with his family and so then the man on the national lost with somebody who loved him this is Tim calmly judicial sometimes they're not answers for everything this might be one of those times Kelly in for ten.

ten fifteen twenty years hundred yards
Shaping the Emerging Bioeconomy

The Bio Report

08:52 min | 2 years ago

Shaping the Emerging Bioeconomy

"Trump administration today about technology and how Whoa doesn't understand. Its potential to reshape the economy. Yeah so I can't speak for the White House So I think Alexander Titus was the gentleman who you are referring to spokane Zimbabwe. I Alexander was involved in the bio calm the day and he was also with us during the congressional as well so I can only speak to what we've learned and what we are speaking on and educating legislators and policy-makers around And I will tell you that. This effort has largely been bipartisan. We met with science technology and Space Committee And and the representatives that appeared were equal sides of of of the aisle. Everybody sees this as as a huge focus for For the United States and making sure that we drive this economic development so I can't speak specifically to wear the White House or you know individual congressional leaders stand on the issue. I can say from our experience. We've received very positive feedback including the White House visits but also on the hill as well. I know in two thousand twelve. The Obama Administration had published a national bio comic blueprint. This included a set of strategic investments intended to lay the foundation the nation for a future bio Konami is that roadmap still being used in any way wasn't executed on wasn't successful. Yeah IT'S A. It's a great question and I you know again speaking personally. I was living in Germany at that time so it wasn't. I wasn't too involved in in the creation nations that the documentary that process. I am familiar with it I have reviewed the documents. I will say that it definitely aligns. Too much of the initiatives that that we feel are important important to ensuring that the bio Tommy doesn't forward You know there is current legislation that is under consideration There's a bill. Hr Four three seven. Three which is the Engineering Biology Investment Bill. And so this has been In Committee for an extended period of time and I'm happy to share air that passed out of committee Right before the The recessed now back in session the prior to the recess they pass out of committee and this is one of I legislative priorities. The bottom line is to ensure that. Hr Four three seven three. which is the engineering? Biology Investment Act Get sponsorship and we're looking to really drive have this Into both the House and we've got good one site to support on the house and then finding sponsors in the Senate of driving across the line but again this is a perfect good example of of how we feel. We can be active and really advocating for these types of bills. which really look at? How are we allocating funds and infrastructure picture to support the development of our economy infrastructure being basic science training all the way through to it and computational signs of a shorter required to really orange biology? Maybe you can touch on some of the other policy issues of concern. Are you focused on. Issues of regulation workforce in public investment in our D-. What are the big issues driving the concerns of industry right now? Yeah I mean so many of those things that are important to us so so you know. Regulation is important elements of the industry and you feel that. Proper regulation comes from proper education. So our focus now is really educate h Regulators and policymakers around the opportunity as well as areas where regulation may be required Investment is a huge area that we're looking at and I you know I use similar. We know that. NIH funding has significantly increased over many many years Below we've seen as we've seen a reallocation of funds ends with an age and so on colleges become a huge area funding. And if you look back ten fifteen twenty years ago it was a smaller area. Funding overall financing hasn't changed significantly. We've had ones. We are trying to drive much of that again by autonomy alliance to look at areas where we feel incremental investments or require player and perhaps it can be a real alignment of of internal funds and resources but it's not exclusively through an age you mentioned. Dod Darva Department of Energy Number of entities are actively engaging in creating the Viacom in manufacturing and bringing more through biology but other owners for Russell important as well you know workforce issues is important that we have access to the smartest most driven best trained scientists on the planet. And you want them to you come to the United States and working business established business and want to ensure that those who are here in the United States have a have a line of sites who in education that will enable for them to move into the workforce that is a biological workforce versus perhaps a industrial base workforce. So all of us topics are very important. Join US are there big challenges that need to be addressed through precompetitive issues that need to be solved by public private partners ars. So it's it's it's a great question you know I'll say the have you know we have great examples incredible public private partnerships such as the first genome. Don't project right To sequence I I Hema Jim was was the joints between age and genome sciences and different commercial entities. is in fact when I was on the hill. I kind of preface my comments with me just think about what is the next moonshot project for our vile economy or biological thinkers in the country. You know the the Human Genome Project was one of those moon shots and we've got a lot of others out there that we should think about you. Know from fundamentally a trying to sedate the operating mechanism for biology and understanding what biological components can be put together into organisms to due to drive a new paradigm and manufacturing to really get into understanding Inter Cellular Communication Nation. And how do we look at creating environments of microbes that can communicate with each other respond to stimuli responsive wind. Listen to different response. which may again from a manufacturing process produce a compound or remediate? Something that's happening in the nature So a lot of big challenges could be put on the table and this is one of the kind of I'll say the thought experiments we've done Tommy Lines. What are some of the asset we could go for? And that's what we're working together positioning papers when you think about the biggest barriers to realizing the potential of the opportunities force today what you said they are scientific holocene economic or something else. Yes so so I believe eight largely at scientific at this point and I say that because you know as we've seen scientific innovation and come online we see the economics around that scientific innovation come together quite quickly and we can all that pretty pretty routinely as we look at you know you know go back to the example precision. Helter you know the advent next turner she sequencing sequencing targeted sequencing Really enabled us to lose today. The biology hav driver mutations within tumors which then of course informs which therapies are are prescribed to the individual. I think we're at a similar precedence. Right now and understanding biology from a manufacturing perspective of food due to feed materials perspective. Where you still fundamentally don't understand the rules to biology and I'll say that this is the largest challenge around synthetic biology synthetic biology being a interesting blend in biology and engineering and computational science you know from engineering perspective if you understand hand all the principal components you can build anything and I think when we initially went down the road of synthetic biology thought? Well we'll figure out what the parts are living organism that we can combine those into a new organism and we've learned that biologists complex and we don't really understand those principal components hence we need the new tools to loosening those components. Soon we do. We'll see those economic models fall in line so to your question. I I do believe that way now. The scientific challenge is the largest challenge. which is what we focused on through? The vital COMU- lines and ensuring that funding is flowing to the proper areas of research to enable that elucidation the principal components to enable development of the Diakonie. Jason Ganic Chief Commercial Officer script at a founding member of the bio combines. Is Jason. Thanks so much for your time. Today it was a pleasure. Thank you so much.

United States White House Principal Tommy Lines Alexander Titus Space Committee Jason Ganic Konami Zimbabwe Spokane Germany Obama Administration NIH Inter Cellular Communication N Dod Darva Department Of Energy
Shaping the Emerging Bioeconomy

The Bio Report

15:57 min | 2 years ago

Shaping the Emerging Bioeconomy

"Jason. Thanks for joining us. It's my pleasure to be here. We're GONNA talk about synthetic biology the emerging bio economy the effort to give voice to industry on policy matters related to it. I think what we talk about biotechnology people still. We'll have a furry narrow view around human therapeutics when we talk about the emerging bio-economy. What does that envision? How significant is the Dan? How far is it extending beyond healthier so this is a really great question that we could probably spend the entire time? He's talking on that one on topic so let me let me try to break it up a bit and make it a little more bite size so the way bats that we think about the bio economy today today is is a very different view than what we will be thinking. Five ten fifteen twenty years down the road as we look at how the economy develops but but fundamentally finally the the concept around the Bio Connie is as we know all all things world have cycles and economic cycles exist as well and there are macro economic cycles such as the industrial revolution which really drove development hardening of industrial processes. All the way from you know the concept of assembly line nine and manufacturing of course the economy continues to transition. We've moved from very much of an industrial economy to a knowledge. It and service based economy that we releasing blossoms through Silicon Valley and of course Kendall Square in Cambridge Massachusetts and very identifiable You know areas where we see. Okay that's that. It knowledge say service continental where we fundamentally believe that the next iteration economy is really going to be powered on biology. Had I'll say that some of the concepts that will throw out here today during our conversation might make your head spin of it because you'll think how does biology really get involved in say transportation Or how does biology get involved in computing or how does biology. Of course we think about biology from a healthcare all care perspective but how does that healthcare view of biology change as as a function of time and I always brings back to one thing I think is interesting about the violence is it. It's real and people will see especially consumers were now starting to see translate to true consumer product. So so you know if I would have told you. Ten years ago that you'll have a protein source that tastes like these can be put on a barbecue and put between two vons on Patty. And you think you're eating beef. You'd would probably laugh at me because they're used to those horrible soy solutions that existed ten years ago whereas like cardboard with a little bit of softness. Well now of course we all hear about impossible burgers and beyond meats and and you know truly plant tasting proteins. That's a great example of how this economy is really going to change and it's going to be very visible able to see everybody in the country and not just the folks who may be involved in say the IT industry where we service a knowledge economy of all so Valerie's incredibly powerful and we know that things we manufacturers today will be manufactured by Washington in the future. And I think you know food. Roddick's is a great example of that with kind of novel foods and beyond beats but you'll see a transition to materials. We hear about Adidas Pudding outs tennis issues. Now that are manufactured from synthetic spider silk. And you're starting to see these fruit. Innovations really accelerate into the commercial markets. Advances isn't synthetic biology are enabling the engineering microorganisms to replacement processes that would previously have been conducted through through chemistry. What's it a case for using biology rather than traditional chemical processes? That's a great question I mean so there's obvious Syria around things like sustainability So many chemical processes require hydrocarbons or require organics to to manage those chemical processes disease and hydrocarbons Gannex largely come from trillium products. And we know that there's a limited duration of accessibility to fossil fuels in Detroit. Him and there's obviously a very vigorous debate on the impact of those compounds and chemicals on the environment and we know that biology has existed for billions of years and has continued need to add to the diversity of life and the ability to harness biology to start manufacturing products that previously were manufactured through chemical processes has as I mentioned before huge Say Environmental Sustainable aspects. There's also economic drivers associated with that as well and I'll use a real world example The there is a strong corpus of knowledge that can have annoyed how long or pubic properties and within cannabinoid Avenue. It's you have to largely active compounds you have. THC which is the compound that makes us feel high when people use marijuana and then their CD which is the compound that people people believe how the majority of the therapeutic properties well to truly enable CD DVD used and research purposes and political purposes isn't eventually therapeutic purposes. It doesn't economically make sense and you can't physically grow enough of the material the crop to having reliable reliable sustainable Say Pharmaceutical quality great product in existence. That has huge thing bill. The issues is a lot of water. A lot of land and It's you know. Obviously like all crops is is accessible to drought and infestation. So the focus now is is to take cbd and take the pathways that express the enzymes that manufacturer CD and explosives in say East. You can then transfer that to a for mentor in your now working on an industrial scale from attention where you can ferments either. CBD as a whole or the enzymes is that are used to create CD in a synthetic process. So you just like you said to sustainability issues. There's this huge economic drivers that really we will will push to biology because we found that biology in many cases is very clean very efficient very economical way to drive manufacturing. Where are we in this effort? What's enabling us to do this way now that we haven't been able to do before well that's a that's a great question question And quite honestly that Is What brought me to the company I work for a company called inscription Scripted we fundamentally believe that biology has unlimited potential to truly improve the human condition. And the reason why we haven't seen the advancements through engineer biology or synthetic biology that we he fundamentally believe the tools are not yet developed a truly exploited the richness of violence and for us at At scripted you know working with our partners who started the bio economy alliance around all other similar view that similar to how we Jim Smart develop from the first team genome sequence to now being able to routine musicals even genomic a day or so on the sequencer that chains that seachange which enable precision medicine. Addison and a lot of the standard of healthcare today. We feel the single invention of that next generation multi parallel sequencer has opened up an entire Tiger area of applications which has fueled a huge industry in precision healthcare and other areas associated. That rely on it you know but read out. We believe conscripted on our partners the bio economy alliance. That's that's saying. Level of innovation is happening now that feeling the bio economy and there are various tools unscripted. We utilize a very powerful thing. You find her to Christopher sue precisely engineer and change the genetic makeup of microbes onto ought to create new fina types that or used to move into bioprocessing manufacturing foods nutrients materials and so on so anyway anyway the the key and as you think about other economic kind of changes in cycles you know the industrialization and the development development of of tools you developments of assembly lines. We moved to the. It and service world is development of the Internet the standards associated with the Internet to be able to transfer information back and forth And again we see this same developments happening now within the world with the next generation generation of tools to allow us to truly explore biology as you understand. Biology is incredibly complex. You know we are just starting to scratched the surface of for knowledge and understanding biology and the next generation of tools. Such as what we're bringing forward and swift does is we firmly believe one of those inflection points to enable bowl biology driver commie. Let's talk about the Bio Comedy Alliance. How who makes it up? What is it and what's it aiming to do? Oh yeah that's a question for the economy in Lyons is is a new entity As a matter of fact we're actually going through the work right now to establish five. Oh one three C I to actually set up a a true nonprofit that we can then use to engage policymakers regulators. Legislators and help understood help educate them and understand the power of violence and how the economy is if you transition so you know. This started about a year ago when John Covers. WHO's the CEO? Syn Bio Veda. Syn Bio Veda is a a trade group batches. Moving John over the years is a tremendous job of bringing together. The mobile fought meters and synthetic biology and through discussions. I had with John. I said you know we need to move beyond a conference and move to be an advocacy group and we need to make sure that we educate the people who are making decisions that impact economic developments and decisions around how we're spending spending funding from basic science research perspective. You know what are the infrastructure issues that will intact dullness violent comedy. So through a couple of months of conversation We solidified around the concept of for me the Bio Konami alliance and it's now Has small group of love of initial Organizations joins including RIPTA twist biosciences Gingko by works perfectly lights And we've we've come together really with a common view that education in policy are going to be critically the importance who are industry but also very important to the development of the economy and so As I said the group was formed about a month ago and we're going through the process. Awesome Sabrina Paperwork together. Although in that short month we've had some great engagements including the invites the White House. They're one's a events about two weeks ago at the White House where they're trying understand the power via academy and that was followed the next day by discussions with specific congressional leaders and their staff not educate them on on the bio. Tommy let me and I'll say something for me personally that was so say reassuring and encouraging about this process is you know. The bio comedy is a non partisan issue. You know we spoke to folks who represented the left side of the aisle and we spoke to folks that represented the right side of the aisle and this is a unifying message we understand. I'm from the United States to maintain global competitive advantage. We need to transition technology and we saw again with industrial revolution. Two Services on T.. And now we know that biology is going to the next driver. So how do we do your comedy to succeed in. Biology is the main driver the other elements elements about the bio economy. That is truly a unifying element is that this is an economic opportunity that can benefit the entire country. You know as we saw the industrial revolution. Certainly benefited the entire contract. Factories going up from Boston to Los Angeles but we did see when we had to transition the the economic drivers in the country from knowledge and service based business or economy rather that it didn't necessarily represent the entire United States. Let's we certainly saw centers of excellence pop up on the cups and that economy largely I mean of course. It benefited the United States but in largely benefited certain regions of the United States. And we now see this with large economic disparity between different regions in the country. Biology has the opportunity to be that that say fair equity across the country. Is We think about how biology moves the manufacturing the ability this up large manufacturing Russillo in the midwest where we haven't traditionally seen it and service industries. Pop up too much is a unifying message so when we were in. DC Our message assiduous well received because it is a message that isn't partisan as a message about US economic security about US leadership In what we need you to do to ensure that likely led the world in the last kind of economic term with it knowledge and service. Based how do we lead that charge large from a biology perspective the biotechnology innovation organization as long included industrial and agricultural biotechnology gene. Its purview along with healthcare. Why the need for another entity presence on the policy front with biotechnology agenda hat? Will Your work differ. Yeah it's actually it's a it's a great question and you know it's it's interesting because Sitting on our border directors at inscriptions Roger Weitz Roger also sits on the board of directors. The Bio. And I've actually engaged with Roger quite a bit around the topic of of you know what is the by line's going to drive. That's perhaps that's different than what bio does and so I will say service is a great organization. It's a large organization represents a lot of voices and for us as a nascent recent industry. That's really driving. You know. Synthetic biology or engineer biology. The focus of bio is so large involved that we need a specialty voice. Because we feel that this next iteration in science is going to have significant economic impact. And there's a different investment thesis that's required for that to manifest become reality so actually you bio as a complement to what we are doing We support bios positions uh-huh matter of fact they submitted a paper today and support of An Office of Technology and science Proposal we also support that to the Bio communites. There's many areas where we work together. But there's some very focused areas that we have more more Desire to drive more decisions And Bio as larger entity has other priorities. That may not completely ally but they're complementary to where we WANNA go so we both organizations operating really in common with each other. You mentioned the meeting at the White House. Summit on America's by accommodate. I know the Department of Defense. The Department of Energy have long been engaged in funding working working biotechnology. But I was surprised during symbolic Beta when there was a representative of the Office of Science and Technology Policy addressing addressing the conference who was trying to make the case for biotechnology but basically saying it was not a top priority of

United States White House Engineer John Covers Bio Comedy Alliance Roger Weitz Roger An Office Of Technology And Sc Massachusetts Silicon Valley DAN Jason. Department Of Energy Kendall Square Tennis Office Of Science And Technolo Konami Patty Marijuana
"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on 600 WREC

"It's just a matter of time all this was complete and total science fiction ten fifteen twenty years ago right now it's reality exactly there was a some sit with the very best Sam there was just some sit system we can use to track people wouldn't that be great if there was a some system like maybe a chip but when you put somewhere in the hand or perhaps in the forehead if there was some numeric system that we can be given it would help us keep us pretty much you know to say she'd our behaviors if there was something we can use I don't know what they would call it I don't know maybe would be would you call it just for lack of a better word mark and we could take the bark and would be something that we could put in our hand and have the number in our four had and maybe take a read the retina in our in our eyes retinal scan with the rental scanned and the hand so we have the chip the retinal scan for had and number in hand in head and that number would begin with I don't know maybe the three three three three three our let's double that six six six there's the idea right there and every number after that would be your number is how you appear on your social credit score and those who don't have the mark you don't get anything you know it's really funny I remember back when I first moved to Portland and before I moved to Portland I have a credit score the reason why a credit scores because I did borrow money occasionally to pay for things and you know because I was I have a better paying job and then I moved to Portland because I didn't have a good paying job radio in in Utah for me I felt had run its course I want to take my radio to Portland well I came to Portland broke I had very little money and I didn't borrow money because I couldn't borrow money so I went ten years well borrowing any money just working working working working saving saving working saving working saving and still I wasn't able to make ends meet met my wife and when we got married you know there were things we want to get one get another car we want to get some things to make things work yeah I told my wife this is why I don't know why you wanna look at my credit rating because I think it's going to be crap come to find out I had no credit rating K. zero credit rating I had not borrowed for many years I had not taking out a credit card in many years I was just too broken too poor to do so so I had a fat goose egg you know they told me they said you're too much of a credit risk why because they live in a bad part of town I have very little in my bank account and living in a bad part of town with very little my bank account means that I am red flag for being a risk to being a credit risk they gave me the loan anyway I cosign along with my wife but still I went through humiliation just because I didn't borrow money just because I was broke just because I didn't have any money I did the same thing with insurance companies guys I'm going through this right now would you mean she has to get another surgery it's happening again guys it happens all right they look at you they scrutinize you they say you're gonna have to pre pay for the surgery and I'm saying well what are you talking about were covered we've already met the deductible sorry do you live in a bad part of town your credit risk I just don't I just don't know why we do this to people we want in America to thrive we say this is the land of opportunity but opportunities are taken from his whether be we can't get property we can't live on a property we can't use what we've done over time to better ourselves we want to keep you in that state of panic living from paycheck to paycheck that's what they want in.

Sam ten fifteen twenty years ten years
"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

04:29 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"This is the watch dog on Wall Street welcome back you are listening to a watchdog on Wall Street I am hi I have business meeting I said I had to go to buffalo and meeting with this this group yeah we've been right now helping many many good registered investment advisories around the country we've well I helping them out deal with the future I'm one of the things that kind of separates us from from every ball as many things that separate us from everybody else first and foremost if you're new here yes were C. F. P. firm what we help everyone out we get if you're getting started we're helping you out we're not showing you the door that's not who we are that's not what the mark how's the family is about the other thing that dumb how to separate this is well is that often times people will listen to this radio program and I'll sign up for a consultation and they'll be listen what we what I have to say and I'll take a look at who they're working with and what they have going on and also you know what you guys do a great job yes but there are some really good firms out there they're few and far between and there's another problem as well many of these advisors that is the visors are getting old it is what it is some people some people don't want our tires some people do everybody's different when I was fifty percent fifty percent of advise my talking schlock brokers I'm talking good financial advisors are over sixty five years old so I'm actually there thank you again contacted by various different firms and helping them out with their succession plan where slowly but surely we would be taking over the duties are handling their clients and working with that the firm in helping out their employees and figuring out keeping their employees on it and just having a continuity plan and yeah speaking with this this group Arab off alone nice people really great people are talking about somebody the offers the people that approaching them the offers that they have been getting and it's ugly what I mean by all the is there are outfits out there right now that are looking to churning Burnham for lack of a better phrase yeah we're gonna come in we'll take a look at your clients will keep the ones we want everyone else you're gonna just fire and we'll pay you on those not were firing everybody that's it people I don't like right now what I see I am fearful for the future in this industry what US okay we're never gonna be that why we're looking to help out good firms all over the country there was a a I'm gonna put this into perspective for you there is you know the consulting company McKinsey and company yeah I think Lucifer works for mackenzie quite honestly I wouldn't be surprised the Kinsey and company yes what about optimization yeah yeah you don't think so ten fifteen twenty years down the road what you're doing to that industry or what you might be doing to the customers to turn them off a new strategy paper McKinsey and company uses the number of products sold our relationship manager compare sales productivity between organizations.

fifty percent ten fifteen twenty years sixty five years
"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

06:02 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"There you go it's not about giving people access to be a politician or be a candidate to have access to run it's about just going after trump it may end up in court but I think at this point governor news needs to put a marker down and this is a great one to do there you go so there you go I don't know about you but as far as I can and I could care less about their their taxes and their their past financial dealings are a really good I mean if there is if there's an obvious should if there's anything criminal you know I I would hope it would have already come out by now before they even consider to run for office but I just I I is just not a factor is not it my BOS it by a vote is never based on their financial situation more concerned about the tax returns of those lawmakers that were elected poor and then ten fifteen twenty years later their multi gazillion airs how do you get rich on that taxpayer paycheck yeah yeah that that how did you become a well you know how do you get a hundred million dollars in the bank just being an office right right how how did you I thought your it will first Maxine waters yeah Elijah Cummings just to name a few I mean it's not only the source of the money but the fact that why are you spending enough time or whatever it is you're doing to make that kind of money versus the up the people's business yeah all right five one two eight three six zero five ninety we got we got to the truck to each coming up at eight OO six you don't wanna miss that because of what we get some amazing prices we do other prizes life changing well life changing more life altering I I'm just going to say that you know a lot of things will be the same some things will never be the same after you win today that's all I can check lessen the university of Texas McCombs school of business they are you know they're on top of some amazing research I mean other nationally known internationally known as a great business college right to UT McCombs school of business absolute linking marital infidelity to workplace misconduct to go on researchers have studied the records of more than eleven thousand police financial advisors senior executives and compare the names to a list of names on the website Ashley Madison that were linked in the twenty fifteen to the public and found that those who Cheech are far more likely to engage in misconduct at work Oldboy yeah yeah well that would make sense wouldn't it we have here cada me roughly here at work yeah could even help I can't count I can't either yeah cat either it's just so it's zero that's a man made it I I I I do I would have the focus to be able to do it I I I would be able to ever cheat simply well number one I love my wife but number two I wouldn't be able to focus enough to do it that to me that would take so much concentration just to just to keep things hidden and to balance so I I don't have that I have to which eighty I have to much ADD to be able to she can't do that now can't keep up with the now no I I'm too too scatterbrained to successfully treat not that I've tried every stop talking every office has one though right yes every office has yes yes yes yes yes yes now all I know he talked about seven forty two and this is interesting stories on the U. T. school of business website all this research if it's someone that has an account with Ashley Madison they're probably going to be a bad employee how you do that sure so I I I would have to I'm kind of you know being for attempting to be funny talking about it would have the focus to do it but I am curious how somebody does make that work in their mind that I know they're all kinds of difference different scenarios maybe your gig credibly on happy in your marriage a maybe I don't know maybe maybe some circumstances it's understandable but I don't know I I don't know how somebody Alex it how you how you juggle all that your head and how you go to sleep at night less to get updates on a road project at two will probably affect you which the north end of the one eighty three south project it's about to open up to proud to traffic and if you have a toll tag you can use those toll lanes for free during the whole month of August as between two ninety east and techno center Dr city are amazed deeper still like says this is a major step as our focus now shifts south we're going to be building a new bridge at the very south end of the project in an area called Patton Avenue that's just north of seventy one that'll be a major operation the full project is on track to be opened by late twenty twenty Eric like of newsradio kale BJ all right so there you go we also got some interesting road projects that are being slowed by the save our springs alliance or the sabre springs organization unless it would stop things you know to protect a golden cheeked warbler maybe so you know said to save a frog that's in the K. that kind of thing yeah and the impact they discovered some caves mopac there near lacrosse and and I'll talk to a friend of mine who lives right off of the cross of that project he said man it's they are they are sick and tired of what's going all right now life a easy to federal lawsuits have been filed against textile this week trying to stop the expansion of two ninety and seventy one at the White killed due to concerns over salamander habitats yeah you can thank the save our springs alliance they say run off from construction could hurt multiple species separately a neighborhood group has sued textile and Campbell over excessive construction noise and the threat of water contamination in that same area if if the blind salamander was gone tomorrow Todd how would you approach your day I probably wouldn't even notice it what so ever I have a feeling I wouldn't either but scientists say that they are a Canary in the coal mine yeah I got a water issue yeah in other words contamination you'll start to see a bunch of dead salamander so we need them to be the Canary in the coal mine if you will I guess I'm just curious I mean the.

ten fifteen twenty years hundred million dollars
"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"That thing that thing we're we're when we were growing up Rick we played sports because we wanted to play sports and we just kind of got together all of a sudden you've got this governmental type of bureaucracy around playing sports and without support I'd be in a loony bin right now I'm I'm I'm curious about that and I thought about all sports I'm gravitated toward the Gulf and by the way I do have a city I'm still kind of enhances interview I know we only have a few minutes right now very close to where you are if I have to give you a lesson or two all do that also but we'll have fun well that's the bottom line AJ and and thank you for the call is always you know the fact is it is sort of stems from as AJ mention it stems from the genesis of kids going out and wanted to have fun and the idea of sport and leisure time is to have enjoyment and that's what attracts kids to these games their games they're fun obviously kids a very is very amounts of abilities we know that but you know again it's just sort of unfortunate last ten fifteen twenty years it's sort of gotten out of hand but with a mixture of of the rush to to getting to the either a college scholarship or getting a pro contract whatever the reasons all our it's gotten out of hand and that's why I say cheese the nice instead of always having a a reactive situational where I come on the show and so did you hear about this injure about that whatever they say how about the situation I'm not looking to get big government volunteer but having something we're we're basically we have some sort of commissioner that says okay this is the right way to have kids involved in sports who's the parents need to know this is what works this with doesn't work and so on so forth I let me take a pause when I return also final comments stay with.

Rick commissioner ten fifteen twenty years
"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

09:17 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Into because today every. Okay, should never bring you bagels in the morning. That's all I'm saying. Don't bring cream cheese. This place e one jalapeno that's, that's like crack cocaine almost is almost is so but once every couple of months is fine. Some people like to indulge in drugs. We'll take take. Okay. So what's interesting here, folks is believe it or not. You just lived through one of the best ten year periods for the stock market in US history. And also, one of the absolute worst twenty year periods, and I think there we're going to talk a lot about patients today and patients paying behavioral finance it at this hour, but J P Morgan asset management sent me their little book. Well, they didn't send it to me, but I got it somehow. All right. I think you actually have to be a client to get maybe not. I think it's online, but anyway, I every quarter they come out with these numbers. And this is very, very interesting. So I start with twenty year. Annualized returns by asset class. Yeah. And looking through this. My eyes went right to the standard and Poor's five hundred. What do you suppose the S and P five hundred is done over the past twenty years or already tell you, I'm gonna take a guess, take a guest on five point five percent? Toby already. It's five point six got a bad memory. I wasn't gonna hit me the exactly. Yeah. I know. That, that I was doing a good, well educated, that's seems low to me by. Yeah. It seems low, but it ain't dude because we had a couple of blowups, remember, a couple of them were fifty percent blow ups and it doesn't take much to mess up your overall performance in the twenty years. You're, including nineteen ninety nine to two thousand nine exactly had virtually no growth at all from point to point draws ten thousand nine hundred twenty eighteen twenty year for the first decade. We have a ten year period of virtually nothing and then a ten year period of great. Yeah. And then it proves a couple of really important points is everybody that got freaked out about the dot com. Bubble burst and also the huge financial crisis of fifty-six percent decline. If you got freaked out of the market, then you didn't get anywhere near five point six percent because in order to take you for. From where you were which was probably very near a negative return to where we are today. It's taken fifteen sixteen percent compound returns since. Yep. Yep. Let me go through the whole rundown of these very quickly reits real estate investment trusts, this performing asset class last twenty years since nineteen ninety nine actually, I think if you went back to ninety nine eighty nine seventy nine sixty nine fifty nine four probably every five ten fifteen twenty year period of time, real estate investment trust have been either the top performer or one of the top performers kid why? Well, I can't answer exactly why. But I think it has a little bit to do with the fact that you have leverage and inflation all compounding together. And let's face it real estate is a very very attractive class because most people want to get into the real estate market place, but they don't know how to or they don't want to just go buy one condo out in Las Vegas. Something guy own two or three of you, sir. No, obviously, you can make a lot of money, even if you bought condos in Las Vegas depends on when you bought them, right? Well, of course it's all about timing in that. So, so what a real estate investment trust does. Is it gives individuals? The ability to gain some kind of diversification in an asset class that in many instances have been under served because everybody buys stocks, but not everybody can go out and buy real estate. Well, yeah. You talk about institutional real estate. You can talk about and their dozens dozens if not hundreds of different types of real estate investment trusts. Yes. So we go onto the next one which was also surprising gold seven point seven per cent over twenty years. Yes, per year annualized, total return. Yeah. Because we had that huge runup member big Ribe. Okay. Okay, if you don't. Nothing over the take it up J P Morgan. Could you do that? Okay, call them. So you guys are screwed up. Gold oil was next seven point zero percent. Then the SNP at five point six a sixty forty mix of stocks and bonds. Five point two percent a forty sixty mix five point oh, that's forty percent. Stocks bonds in general four and a half percent. That's twenty year return for bonds, twenty returns ninety nine four and a half percent. And considering that a lot of those years interest rates were on the decline would say many if not most of those years interest rates on the decline that doesn't bode all that fantastic for bonds, either. No. Well, let's see from about ninety nine for sure. Through maybe two thousand nine ten eleven. Yeah. Kind of bottomed out around that right right about that for about twelve of the twenty they until the, the, the craze over the, the, the SNP credit rating crisis. I think it was like August or something of. Twenty was then you've got homes three point four percent. Three point four percent for you. Telling me gold, J, P, Morgan telling me goal was doing better over twenty years in home. Yes. Come on. And inflation was only two point two percent. Here's the scary, part about all this, folks, the average investor over the last twenty years, according to J, P, Morgan asset management, one point nine percent worse than the rate of inflation. And we all know why I'll tell you about the dalbar study in just a moment, but it has a lot to do with the lack of patience. Dear friends lack of patience. Okay. Let's move onto the next one time diversification. Volatility of returns, I love this one because it tells you that if you look at one year, performance, you get really scared if you look at twenty year performance. It's not so bad. The one year numbers for the US domestic stock market is measured by the standard and Poor's five hundred you could experience a minus thirty nine percent return in any given year that how do they, what do you mean you could experience you? Well, you could in the future, if the future could be measured by the past, okay? Pass in the past the worst. One year performance was minus thirty nine. Okay. So that's what it was in the past. It was probably the two thousand. I suspect it was twenty eight I would assume so. Right. And we're talking about the S and P or you could in the future, if the future is measured by past gained forty seven percent in any given year probably two thousand nine so that's a pretty pretty big swing for minus thirty nine to plus forty seven that's over one year. Periods of time now bonds on the other hand minus eight to a plus forty three. For one year for one year. And of course if you went to the fifty fifty mix it's minus fifteen percent to the plus thirty three percent. Then look at that looking at that over a five year period of time, minus three to plus twenty eight minus to plus twenty three and plus one to plus twenty one. So the fifty fifty mix over five year, rolling periods is never hit a negative return least not the last twenty years. Yeah. And then you go the ten year rolling and it's minus one to plus nineteen on which one on the stock one on the bond one it's plus one to plus sixteen. And then the fifty fifty mix, plus two to a plus sixteen. When we come back from the break, I'll tell you what the rolling twenty year periods are so that people that got in late or early might be able to forecast. What they may or may not generate in terms of returns. All about the fixed income sector factor performance correlation. Andy Solomon throughout summer, Fritos, partnering with carry the load to honor the sacrifices made by our nation's heroes as part of that partnership. Fritos producing nearly twenty two million. Specially marked bags to represent the total members who have served in the American military throughout history, including active duty, John watts director of marketing frito, lay North America. There's so many brave men and women who have answered the call.

J P Morgan US Las Vegas crack cocaine SNP Toby J North America Andy Solomon director of marketing John watts Morgan
"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"The next generation also has to take required minimum distributions or their face with that plan, but we can start thinking about things like Roth IRA conversions, because we don't have the income tax from the day. We can think about doing charitable things with the retirement account. Sure what it can be tax consequences. Bottom line, not just five years. But let's go out ten fifteen twenty years when we're talking about this family office plan. Let's think multigenerational. This Bill goes through, it's going to be big and Mike. What about the second part, though, with respect to the small business and attempting to give more tax breaks along the lines of expensing for expensing items, right? With respect to the. Startup cost of those plans and other administrative costs because I think especially our conversations. I think the biggest pushback that we get, or that we've heard over the years when we're talking to those business owners. Right. Just too expensive. Right. Just too expensive, because they are forced to follow new regulations that have been put in place and the regulations are worthy because so many companies were basically asleep at the switch. They weren't looking at their cost structure, which was hurting their employees, and there have been multiple loss of fidelity, one of the largest money managers in the world was sued by their own employees. Not once but twice. So these new regulations were there to have more clarity and transparency for the employees. The problem was if I'm a small business owner, I, I have fifty one hundred two hundred employees, it was costing tens of thousands of dollars to jump through these hoops to get these regulations done. If I can as as that business owner, get some of. That cost off of my plate. And then also maybe I can also be part of a multi employer plan. So if I am a nonprofit, if I'm a school, I can join together with other schools to try to achieve some economies of. So if you are a small business owner, we actually have a book about the 4._0._1._K retirement thunder. That's where I was going with this, and it's again, it's not a Nancy drew mystery this is this is dry. But it tells you the hoops, you have to jump through if you are a small business owner, or if you're the poor person responsible for reporting this information..

business owner Mike ten fifteen twenty years five years
"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

12:26 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Amazing. I did watch trailer for a great what looks like a great Netflix movie coming out in June. I m mother about a post apocalyptic world where there's no humans and a robot takes a little miniature baby embryo out of freezer. Base creates it raises it as its mother, they bond. And then when the little girl grows up to be twenty there is another humans. Hilary swank. She shows up, you said, the robots are evil and the Roma says, no, we're not evil. I don't know. This person is what's going on. Looks amazing Stewart no-interest fifty shades of robot gray stews in post Olympic doesn't mean you think it does do. It'd be your move. We go fifty shades of grey fan. Cool. Go on Twitter. Kobe CBS. I mean welcome to the shows. Denno producer. Loving you this favorites? Do we use that really is between the massage revelation yesterday? Then today everything coming together with why you know he's so into the leather and it turns out that it's a fifty shades thing unfolding this very complex onion. That is still. And it just gets better and better with every layer. Also makes me wanna cry like an onion. And those things. The analogy to who's the because all making sense who's the band that your girlfriend likes. They were leather masks, Hollywood on dead Hollywood. There's just there's a lot to log on. And I dig that about you, man. I specially from three thousand miles away, is nice, but I can enjoy the complexities of Stewart Kovacs from Los Angeles, California earlier in the day earlier in the show, we had, we had Jim Jackson on. And I think Jim's great right now rat twenty five twenty four pretty close game have little frustrated doesn't getting the calls that he wants. I mean there's a lot. It's a it's a it's a hard fought game. They're feeling other out DeMarcus cousins on the floor for the first time since mid April will keep you updated. We talked to Jim Jackson about this series earlier in the day. The former NBA player f s one analyst players only announced broadcaster and I asked him why. Why he thinks he does the warriors inevitably win this NBA finals? Toronto could make it a series. Keep say Durant doesn't play. In the best plays the bulk of his series Durant. Does this think why does this thing. They kind of cancel each other outright. If you look at the second third and fourth best players in both teams who has the Golden State. You got steps. You've got clay mine. And then when you look at from a Toronto perspective, it's Laurie. Baucus siaka. Okay. It even if you take out of the equation and you put stuff in that position. And you look at the next the second and third best player is still skews towards. Golden State, and then other X factors have been Steve Kerr on the bench, kind of been there done that. So that's why tend to lean towards because in the championship series. Your best players got show up and play we have seen with Toronto, the fluctuation of regular season where outstanding but he struggled a bit. Especially in the last, but walkie playing Bach little up down little up, even though they have the experience Danny green wasn't shooting as well consistently. But what you saw Golden State, especially when Kevin Durant went out uptick with the other players, especially grain. And that to me is the difference between a team that has won there before. Team is still trying to figure out how to navigate its way to get to an opportunity to win the championship. I have maintained all along cousins was a net positive for the wars, when it came back, either, they don't play them that they play them, it works, and it's early, he just had a beautiful interior pass to Klay Thompson for an easy easy bucket. Just cool as it's just cool to see buggy out there man. Right. Like Justice to Margaret's cousins out there be vinyls, is of the new behold right now drano up twenty nine twenty six about ten minutes left in the second quarter. Steph curry big part, obviously, of the success, the warriors, but his era the question of where he rings, all time. I find really interesting. And I asked Jim Jackson when he was on the program earlier where he places where he thinks Steph curry is going to be placed when it's all said and done all time why here's here's the thing. And I love I love what he's done. The person is and how he plays. And the championships are one thing in regards. But keep in mind, Steve Nash to MVP. Okay. One year I was playing with at the time. But Steve Nash has to be okay, so a lot of times it's timing not to say the Steph didn't deserve it, but it sometimes from that perspective because Michael Jordan. When he was playing he should have. Got it every year. Okay. But in time, you know with this system. Works can't do it, but in the hierarchy of things here's the difference right now. We're talking about. But the writers, you ten fifteen twenty years from now the young writers that are now growing up that grew up in Steph curry era that top five gonna look totally different because. They didn't see they didn't seek Kareem. You see them sitting in, so it's a sliding scale. The people the writing in the history. It depends on what air you're coming up. It's kind of ugly stretch here in, in the game on the final Samarra balls. Some breakdowns defense easy buckets long long series. It is it is cool to see the raptors. There's all this talk, almost like it's an overdone there in. They made thank God routers fans. Margin the game on mute, obviously, I'm talking to here on the program. CBS sports radio, Bill Ryder. What's up? Thanks for being here and I can feel the energy, just watching it is going to be a really isn't it? Nice. Just a different is not LeBron James versus the warriors. I mean that alone is an amazing even a long time since LeBron James the last time LeBron James not playing in the finals. My son was born which for me is a dad to measure time. It's hard to remember when when things existed before that, but it's been a long run and nothing has lebrons. Glad it's come to an end for a little bit of variety is the spice of life stoop has found other spices. But for me variety, the absolute spice of life. Jim Jackson also, gave us his perspective on who needs to step up for the raptors outside of Leonard in order for them to win. I think I'm not saying play. Lights out but he has to get back to playing during the regular season. He was so active on office so active in transition knocking down shots defensively. He was also say how volley because not just from an alternate perspective. But he, he's gonna have to have some presence, essentially, I thought in the Milwaukee series, a great job audible by getting skill stepping into the passing lane. He's gonna have to have an impact on the game from his leadership perspective, having some kind of defensively when it comes down to knock it down shots some pressure from or he's going to have to be that guy on the perimeter that provide stable support system big on the need to beat Golden State, the other thing that's going to be fascinating about about DeMarcus cousins return is maybe a player in the series and somebody will take a chance but he's not a max player. There's too many concerns about his injury status. It probably makes sense to do what he did. Before you know, maybe do a one plus one if there's the market for it gets a one year deal and then a second year that's his option, but I could see boogied being on this warriors teams next year, but Katie leaves and the wars, find a way to make that work, you know, if to market likes it wins an NBA championship maybe he wants to be there. And I think as soon as the series over there, obviously, going to be a major question, it is the most impactful free zero one of the most impactful for agencies of all time, people have said is the most impactful ever will see it's going to be interesting to be great headlines. I'm not sure that I'm not convinced that quite Leonard and or Kevin Durant, and Kyrie Irving and Chris Middleton, and Kemba Walker are going to be parts of four straight NBA finals and winning two of those. That is what the free agency from two thousand ten led to LeBron, Chris Bosh for my money, and really wait. That was that was the most impactful. Agency ever when that plays out, one of the questions of when the dust settles wherever it settles the warriors without Duran Duran's gone. Are they competitive are they great? I think they will be. I think it'd be a lot more fun. I think they'll be the, you know, one of the two or three best teams in the west, the most likely team to come out of the west pain, how things shake out. But I think it will not be a certainty the way that it is now. And certainly not against whoever emerged in the east. And I asked him Jackson that, that question how good he thinks the warriors can be next year. If Kevin Durant goes elsewhere. Very good team because they have high guys that's you know, we talked about this before a lot of teams wanted to give me late style and pace, which Golden State play, but, but missing particular the key to success of Golden State was that they were able to bring high Q guys off the bench that don't hurt you. That understand how to play. So it may be a drop off from talent somewhat dollars not to say. But these guys, you know. Understand how to play the game. I mean it was one point in the last year against. Houston series or. Series two the first five games bench came in had like ten tunnel. Okay. I mean, having that dynamic with guys come off the bench that don't hurt you is the difference team. You know, Bob. Is that true? Is smart enough to understand how to build out a bench could be a little challenging next year? From the cap perspective, but they have room enough to go out and get some. San antonio. All he looks civic players that can complement the current roster. They Jim Jackson love Jim on the show, Greg. I also David Samson former president of the Miami Marlins. Now MLB analyst for CBS sports, H Q and just give all the cubs game. And just we've seen the last years with Bob balls, injuring fans. I ask David Samson how much of an issue baseball really has with fans safety? Right. Think that it's an issue that faces every team and it's not just in baseball you've got issues with hockey pucks, and it can be dangerous. And it was a nightmare when I watched it last night, it still impacted me this morning. I feel for that little girl, I you'll Mora, and I feel for the president of the Astros, because I know that I talked about it. I'm q- this morning every home game. I worried every single vowel ball everyone eighteen years because I didn't want anyone to ever get hurt and it happens and I don't know how you can eliminate it unless you put nets all the way around the entire field from Florida and the move that they have to do. And then lastly into David Sampson, the rays have a bay where baseball team nobody's going to games. Nobody's going to games. It's an embarrassment of the sport..

Jim Jackson Golden State Kevin Durant CBS LeBron James NBA Steph curry Toronto Stewart Kovacs DeMarcus Hilary swank Netflix Twitter raptors Kobe analyst David Samson Leonard Klay Thompson
Mental Health Month - Raising Mental Health Awareness

Living Healthy Podcast

09:43 min | 3 years ago

Mental Health Month - Raising Mental Health Awareness

"In every five adults in the US experiencing a mental health condition in a given year. We definitely want to talk about some of the ways that we can help de stigmatize mental illness and help people get treatment. But before we do that. We kinda wanna know can you give us a recap of what mental illness what it means to have a mental illness. I mean, I think thinking about it in terms of mental health in general, mental health is just a state of being which takes into account, our cognitive, psychological and emotional health, and there's various forces that work toward that and taking all of those into account or what we think about when we consider mental. Okay. And you know, what we we had that conversation about six months ago for mental illness awareness week. We did a little campaign on social media. And I wanted to share some of the responses that we got from that because we got some really positive interaction with our community. And the question that we kind of pose to people was is working out part of your therapy. And these were some of the responses without a doubt. Yes, it is. I used to be so depressed and take medication. But I started releasing all my stress when I started going to the gym, absolutely true. More people should try it. Yes. The best decompression ever. We also had some other people say, yes, the it's the greatest therapy. I've found outside of the therapist chair. I've also found a few mazing souls over the past few years and have shared who have shared with me some of their darkest moments in an absolute delight to see when I walk in the doors, a simple genuine, high with a smile from the staff members can turn your day around to thank you. Another person said, I just signed up. And if it does what a few people have said here already, I can't wait to begin. When I started working out. I not only gain physical strength. But which also occurred my chronic anxiety. I became more confident and my social anxiety. No longer bothered me. My personal training has been one of the best coping mechanisms Frank Ziobro. Thank you L af. So this just kind of highlighted to us that this is really a big deal to people, and it's kind of a bigger topic. And it's starting to gain notoriety now as well in the media. So can you kind of talk about what you think why you think mental health is becoming so mainstream. I guess to put it that way. Well, I think that we are able to tap into other people more easily now, and that's happening. With social media that's happening with into just the internet in general being able to read newspapers from around the world have different topics at your doorstep that you probably couldn't ten fifteen twenty years ago. So I think we're more knowledgeable of what's going on around us. And then if we just look at domestically here in the United States, what's happened over the last let's say eight to ten years, we have more people insured than ever. And when you have people that are insured. They're going to seek out care, and that care sure, it's going to be some of it physical a lot of it is also going to be emotional and behavioral health care. And when we have that we have more interest driving mental health topics, which I love, and I'm glad to see because I think it's something that, you know, people struggle with reaching out. And I'm glad that you hear all these big names talking about it. Whether it be on, Twitter or various different platforms. Right. I think. Yeah. So in a big component of that is kind of I guess like you said when you're connecting with more people, maybe you develop a little bit more. Empathy for that. But I kinda wanted to talk about that because mental illness. It's so we talked about in our last episode. It's so internalized like you can't really necessarily see if someone is injured mentally so to speak. So it might be hard for everyone. Especially those that don't have a mental illness to kind of empathize with those people that do suffer from it. So how can we of bridge? This empathy gap between those that suffer and those that don't I mean, that's a very important question. I'm glad you brought it up. I think first off is like with most interactions with any human being don't try and fix. We get into a really tough space when we're trying to fix people. No, it's being sad. And being okay are not incompatible. When you when you know that someone you work with or lives in your dorm, whatever it might be is dealing with depression or anxiety. Doesn't mean that they can't have normal conversation with you. So I think that you we should speak as if they belong in the group not met they need to be treated differently or that we have to count for this in some fashion where it would make it very hard for us to be ourselves. I think they want you to be yourself. You wanna be herself? Right. The only way really know how to be. And so that empathy can really come through. If we see it as I don't need to fix the situation. I don't need to change anything. I just need to be who I am. And let this person be who they are are there specific ways, you can engage with someone though that you think suffers from mental illness or like you're saying kind of be yourself. But if if you see some I think. Maybe it's hard for people to see someone struggling with something. And not do something about it. You know what I mean? So how do you kind of judge that or no absolutely so listening? I think listening is the best way hear their story understand seek I understand and you know, reserve judgment. It's really hard for us. Right. We want to judge right from the beginning. Not just people but scenario situations anything going on because it's easier for us as allows us to move forward to do whatever we were thinking of doing anyway. Right. But if we can really reserve judgment at helps to understand and really allow that person to feel like they were heard, which is probably all they really want out of that interaction. Anyways. Right. Yeah. I've I've kind of found that if you can ask the simple question. Why do you feel that way? A lot of times I've seen that kind of had success where it's like you aren't trying to fix them. But you're asking why do you think you feel that way? And then that just opens the door for them to express themselves further, and it sounds like that's what you're saying is kind of the most helpful. Just letting someone express themselves seeking I understand is such a big part of this. And it's something that we don't always naturally do. They may not be our first impulse. Not unlike having a friend who's going through a break up or a friend who's a new parent. Maybe maybe you've had two kids. Maybe you've had four breakup doesn't mean that whatever worked for you is going to work for them. And doesn't mean that in the ninety seconds univac with them at the gym. They want you to fix that issue. It's so true. Why I wonder why we all or maybe it's just the guys I know guys fixers, but why why wonder why we naturally do want to try and do that in that ninety seconds. Because it's so it's so rational with like, no, you're not going to do it. That's not what's necessary. Everyone's situation's different. But yet we still somehow feel compelled and I wonder I wonder if it's just honestly this is gonna go way off. But I wonder if it's just trying to control the chaos of the universe. Maybe to hear from you. Can't is welcome to the show two guys. Well, I actually have a few. Questions for Dr Doshi myself kind of switching topics here a little bit. I wanna talk about the effects of mental illness. Exactly how does mood and emotions. How do they correlate mental health? So right. We were all born with a range of emotions, and we're allowed to have them. I don't think anyone is going to care dry someone based on just emotions at the experience. Now when it becomes an issue is when there's a functional concern. So if you're experiencing everyone has sadness, everyone has excitement everyone has Zayed's, you know, but if it's a predominant force in your life, and it stopping you from doing things that you would normally want to do like going to school going to the gym interacting with family, whatever it might be. That's when we step in and say, hey, maybe there's something that we can do here to alleviate this pain that you experience it is that like would one of the tale signs. This is just an example. But like you just wanna lay in bed all day. You don't even wanna get out to face the world. Is that kind of maybe a sign like, oh, this is something that's impacting the function of your life. Right. And you know, I think some of us, you know, having a day where we lay in bed and don't interact with anything in the environment. Could actually be helpful for us one day, you know? But if you notice that wait a second, it's Wednesday. I was supposed to go to war. Work. I'll supposed to meet my brother for lunch out supposed to go to the gym at six, and I didn't do any of that. And I don't feel good about that. I think that's a whole 'nother level, and that makes sense. How much does your environment affect your mental? You know, can the music you listen to have an affect on your mood. Absolutely. I mean, I think places like here places like the gym where there's, you know, fast music pumping gets your heart rate up that allows you to kind of move to the beat and get going. I think that is it's all designed to certain way. Right. And it makes sense because I think mood can be affected especially in the short term by music. I hesitate to say that it's going to have this long-term effects. You know, the whole we all hear about, you know, play Mozart to a little baby. And he'll grow up to edginess. I don't know how much truth there is to that. Exactly. But you know, if you go to a nice restaurant, you probably going to hear some light classical music from peon on what they're trying to advertise uses, you know, relax Asian. It's all part of the experience. And I do think that our mood is affected by that. And I do think that we can feel calm listening to certain types of music. Now, I, you know, I don't think everyone needs to listen to classical music to feel calm. I think that if you know listening to the Hamilton mix tape gets you going, I think that's great. I think that's wonderful. Totally it's going to be different for everyone. But I think it's more in the moment mood changes rather than super long

United States Twitter Frank Ziobro Mozart Dr Doshi Zayed Ninety Seconds Ten Fifteen Twenty Years Six Months Ten Years One Day
"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Long term stay on your plan as opposed to succumbing to the financial media and all the emotions that come to the short term market moves. Hey rights. Really simple. Right. I mean, something this complex is the financial markets. It's simply getting to your comfort level, right? Everyone has a level where they're comfortable. Because at volatility it's inherent in the market. It's going to drive those emotions so how do you get to your comfort level? I mean, the first thing you need to do is. And we talk about this in our industry, you take that risk tolerance test. That's not the best way to do it because you take risk tolerance tests. And the problem is that the marks going up, you might be more risk tolerance on the flip side of the marks go down you may be more risk adverse. So we found Bob is it's better to figure out what your goals are your, you know, what you need to live on what you need in retirement and work back from there to figure out what returned you actually need on your portfolio. Right. I think most of you out there have that problem. Your portfolio strategy was based on how you answered six questions on risk tolerance questionnaire, you know, ten fifteen twenty years ago, and you advisor never ask those questions again. So that's not the way to set your strategy. The best way to set strategies the follow. What we call the process could be more simple than that could. No, no. It'd be we like to keep it. Simple. Pop. Hit any process. Here's really mad ride. We keep it simple. Right. It's kind of like your financial GPS you plug in the coordinates of where you want to go. And then it reverse engineers the best route to get there based on where you are now. Same thing with your planning we reverse engineer look at where trying to get to. And then we work back and look at where you are now. And then we figure out the best route to do that and the best route to do that as a diversified portfolio based on those goals, and that's the only way we found that we can keep you invested long-term if not you're gonna fail. There's no better process. Right. I mean, let's face it. The the big question that you get all the time and Mike taking more risks than necessary or might not taking enough risk. If you have your own financial GPS, you know, exactly where you are no matter which way, the market goes. And you know, exactly what action you need to take. And sometimes and in most cases, you know, what that action is doing nothing. Nothing when doing nothing is absolute most appropriate thing for you to do to achieve that, financial independence. We also desire. About that. When it's goal driven. It's not emotion driven. So all the decisions, we make are pragmatic, and they're not reactionary because of price fluctuations every day. It's kind of like we've talked about this a lot. But imagine if your home was on the market every day, and you can see the price every second of the day. It would drive you crazy, right? That everybody would rent who had own a home. If you saw the volatility inherent in real estate market. Right. Right. But the concepts the same you own that home you bought it figures could be worth more in the future. In the meantime, you don't really care what the value is unless you're ready to sell. Well, the same thing with your investment portfolio. A lot of your investments, you're not.

Bob advisor engineer Mike ten fifteen twenty years
"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:15 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Her team manages dedicated healthcare assets of sixty two billion dollars in strategies, including the Wellington global healthcare long short fund and the actively managed vanguard health care fund and Bloomberg's Erik Schatzer spoke with Hines about active versus passive management at the Milken institute conference. We are really song believers in active management, and we believe has a role as well. But we believe across every asset class that you can generate alpha for our clients, and that will help their money grow over the long term. So when we think about active management the question is going to generate alpha for your and for Wellington that is all based on generating differentiated insights our research as well. As tools that help us put together Foley is in a way that helps generate alpha over the long term. Why does it seem as though is so much harder? Degenerate now than it used to be say ten fifteen twenty years ago. The market structures change dramatically in part because of that. Yes. The market sectors change, there's a much larger amount of both Quan as well. Dr much incremental trading. So that has dramatically changed the market structure. Eliminated opportunities. Short term opportunities. What hasn't done is really changed companies are worth. So as an investor companies the value of companies over a long period of time are going. Those what the company's values are. That's what determines our ability to generate returns over the long term. And that hasn't changed do active managers need to become more activists using their proxy tower to catalyze change and help the market recognize that intrinsic value at Wellington. We have always been very strong partner with corporations that we invest in. We have very strong relationships. Increasingly. So we are we are interacting with awards over the last couple of years over my twenty three year career, we've done it with corporate management, and increasingly as I just said with boards. So there's a partnership about strategy about corporate, governance and. We are we are investing in that on that equity criticize while on the on the ESE side partner with our corporations even more. But what about companies what about the boards that that that you don't agree? Do you feel the need to become more aggressive in the way that you hold them accountable? I would say there are a number of things I is governance, and there are a whole number of corporate governance in terms of executive the boards and in how how they operate as a board. So we have we have opinions at Wellington what good corporate governance looks like interacting boards, very regularly on those topics. You talked earlier about the impact quantitative investing has had on investment opportunities for active managers like you. But you're working data science. I'm sheen learning into what you do as well. Is that in the Enserch of a hybrid? So we're spending a very big investment Wellington right now is our investment in our investment science, and we are combining and they're trying to number of things to elevate. All of us. So very fundamental investors artists we call them of. Have Quan investors to use science all the time? We're trying to make it better for all of us. So I'm an artist so myself the fundamental investing. But I'm very excited about using more science, tools and terms of both porfolios construction. How? Check. My portfolio is better. Get better as an investor to coaching. What are my what am I blind? So we're spending a lot of time on coaching one of the areas where we're going to be really differentiated then from the research side. Big data and data science to help us generate research ideas. We're in a really exciting ideas that Wellington using natural language processing to do things that used to be done in our brains to help us and really leverage data and away. The helps us generates our insights one quick one is unique into the future. What do you think is the biggest challenge ahead for active managers? Towns ahead is talents. So ten we'd generate kicking me attract talent around the globe. Because increasingly also many of the opportunities are going to China and emerging markets. So to be a really strong manager of our clients assets. Over the next ten or twenty years, we are going to have to develop retain talent. And all parts of the world. We're going to need to make them collaborate help them. Learn to collaborate with people in Boston London as we have the model to do that. We have the culture to.

Wellington partner Milken institute Foley Quan Bloomberg Erik Schatzer China Boston London Hines executive sixty two billion dollars ten fifteen twenty years twenty three year twenty years
'I'm fighting through it': Alex Trebek discusses cancer battle

News, Traffic and Weather

00:58 sec | 3 years ago

'I'm fighting through it': Alex Trebek discusses cancer battle

"For what it's worth, I'm Sherry Preston. It's been a month since we've heard from jeopardy host Alex trebek's about his battle with pancreatic cancer. But he's opened up GM host Robin Roberts telling her. He's heard from fans who survived ten fifteen twenty years with it for him. It's not been that long. I am now a thirty day cancer survivor says he's encouraged by the strides made in pancreatic cancer research, and he's becoming us to the regimen of chemo somewhat. I'm used to dealing with pain. But what I'm not used to dealing with is the surges that come on suddenly of Jeep gave sadness, and it brings tears to my trebek's says he feels week after his treatments, but he's positive about the future my platelets. My blood counts are steady my weight of steady. The numbers that indicate the cancer the cancer indicators those are coming down taping for jeopardy's now on a break for the summer for jeopardy. Finol James halts sour travek. Says he has no weaknesses for what

Pancreatic Cancer Cancer Sherry Preston Alex Trebek Robin Roberts GM Finol James Chemo Ten Fifteen Twenty Years Thirty Day
Alex Trebek Discusses Cancer and Depression in ABC Interview

WBZ Afternoon News

00:41 sec | 3 years ago

Alex Trebek Discusses Cancer and Depression in ABC Interview

"Jeopardy. Host Alex trebek's says he was prepared for the cancer treatments. But not what came with it the depression. Jeopardy house. Alex trebek's says he has heard from fans who survived ten fifteen twenty years with cancer for him. It's not been that long. I am now a thirty day cancer survivor says is encouraged by the strides made in pancreatic cancer research, and he's becoming used to the regimen of chemo somewhat used to dealing with pain. But what I'm not used to dealing with is the surges that come on suddenly of deep deep sadness, and it brings tears to my he tells good Morning America. He feels positive. But week after treatment taping for jeopardy is now on a break for the

Alex Trebek Cancer Ten Fifteen Twenty Years Thirty Day
How Facebook is Eating Our Seniors Alive

The Big Story

08:19 min | 3 years ago

How Facebook is Eating Our Seniors Alive

"Enough time technology blows past everyone every day. We're basically just trying to keep up. Where online foreign meddling in the fall federal election. That's the warning from Canada, cyber spy agency as the government puts social media companies on notice. Servicemen actors continued to manipulate online information in order to influence voters opinions and gave us. The modern internet is a living breathing ecosystem, really. And if you're not living in it. Then it's rapid evolution is probably incomprehensible. I mean, do you remember the I mean that you just didn't get the first social media platform that you decided was for the kids instead of a place to set up a new account. Now, imagine that every social media platform is for the kids. And there are no longer any kids around the house to teach it to you in the middle of our first real attempt to grapple with digital literacy as a society, we've largely left out an older generation, and that's unforgivable because they use the internet to the use it as a way to socialize. And sometimes as their only way to socialize and the people out there, we're using the internet to prey on the misinformed either through digital scams or fake news or malware or hacking, they know that and they know we've done a half ass job, preparing our seniors to cope with today's digital landscape. We've brought them online. We've sign. Signed them up, and we friend them on Facebook. And we've sent them our baby picks, and we taught them how to taxed, and in many cases, we then left them to fend for themselves. And now, we're paying the price. Jordan, heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. Craig Silverman is the media editor at BuzzFeed news. Here's an expert on the internet. But also on how we use it as good. Thank you. You've spent time recently examining how seniors use the internet. Yes. In one word. How do they use the internet? I don't want to generalize. But can I give a preamble? The data tells us the one word might be poorly. Yes. It's not my opinion. This is this is the direction we're going in fractionally. Yeah. How did that happen? I think there's a lot of people who are reaching for easy answers in this. And I would encourage an element of embracing complexity on this. So so one piece of it is the natural process of aging. You know, we are not as connected to the things we might have been when we've roar, for example in the workforce. And we're. Living longer. So you have more people at a more advanced age who are more disconnected from, you know, maybe from what was going on in their workplace in that kind of threat and the everyday interactions. Yeah. And that's not to say that older people are engaged in life around the many of them are. But, but you know, the there are more older people than ever before. And there will soon be more older people than we've ever had in Canada, and in the United States, another piece of this is we have a very rapidly advancing information technology environment. So even somebody who ten fifteen twenty years ago was using the internet was up-to-date had all that that doesn't mean that they're necessarily able to stay with it. And this is something that I think even people in their forties and fifties start to feel. I mean, how many people out there are looking at tick tock, one of the most popular apps right now that everybody's talking about how many people feel connected to that. Not a lot in the time. It happened to me was Snapchat. Yeah. I was like, oh, I'm not a savvy internet user anymore. It's it's Snapchat. Do the thing. I like Sabo Snapchat is if you open it, and you don't understand it. -gratulations your old and. And and I've felt that in other people feel it. So we have the changing environment we have the aging population. And then also in our in our family life. We don't have as many multigenerational households. Whereas before right grandparents lived with the parents and the grandkids often for for a long time. But now everyone's living longer and a lot of older people end up living on their own and the data around isolation and around loneliness shows that older people are feeling those things, and if you put all these things together, and for people to be able to stay up to date with what's going on is a genuine challenge. It is not about inherit intelligence is not a, you know, about accusing people of, you know, being left, you know, left and and completely out of touch. There's a bunch of factors that some people can control and some things that we actually can't control that I think have put us in a position where the data's showing that older people particularly those over sixty five or having a lot of trouble with fake news with scams with other elements on the internet are they more prone to. Falling four fake news and falling for scams or are the people who create this kind of content and these kind of scams going after them specifically this to me is one of the interesting things to think about so I think it's a little bit of both. So the first thing is we have four studies that have come relatively recently that have all looked at the sharing of fake news like completely false stuff on the internet. And one of them looked at Facebook two of them looked at Twitter some looked at web browsing and every case even when they controlled for all the elements, and did, you know, good social science. They found that age was actually a significant factor people over sixty five and we're talking about in the United States where the data was were more inclined to consume and share real actual fake news. So there is something that that is suggesting that age is a factor. And so then when that happens because of our digital media environment when you start to realize who is susceptible to something. Right. Who is vulnerable? Well, you can target them. You can hammer them with stuff nonstop. And so it's true. If somebody shows a little bit of owner Bill. Suddenly, they can be identified and say we need to, you know, hit this group more and over time their defenses that they had might actually start to fall down. And they're not really sure which is which for your examination of this. You weren't just looking at studies you were talking to people, and I found some of the people you chatted to or about just fascinating. So to take an example of what you just described sort of somebody falling down the rabbit hole of being targeted. Tell me about Betty Mandla, Betty, man, love is woman or eighties. She lives in the United States. I know her grandson grandson is a journalist who used to work with PBS. He actually specializes in investigating misinformation in some ways has been based at Harvard for a few months, and when he was looking into a story about kind of false, but also misleading what he called junk news. He started looking at the Facebook pages, really, hyper partisan political pages and sort of seeing who liked them. And he realized that his grandmother had liked so many of them and he. Realized that she had in fact, like more than fourteen hundred pages on her Facebook profile, and she didn't realize that she also didn't realize that she was being fed ads where people would say, hey, if you if you think Obama should be imprisoned like this. She didn't realize that that wasn't just her kind of voting she it was actually her subscribing and liking a page on Facebook. So she ended up with this profile with just tons and tons of extremely like getting to the extreme edge of stuff that tended to be a little more far. Right. And then the other group has stuff where we're just, you know, religious pages it was like hardcore, hyper partisan in sometimes far, right stuff. And you know pages about Jesus do we have any sense of? I mean, that's an extreme example. I guess, but do we have any sense of the scale of this problem in North America? Well, I think when we look at the US and Canada, we all know that we have aging populations there, and it is aging at a at a rate that we've never experienced before. And so we can also look, for example, we know. That since twenty eleven if you take the data for the United States more people in that kind of fifty five plus sixty five plus age group have joined Facebook than in any other group. So we naturally, of course, have older people who are still engaged in the world around them who are still online who are flocking to Facebook who are who are buying smartphones who are buying ipads. And so we have a huge amount of online seniors, and what we don't have when I started looking into this is as many programs that are really focused on supporting them in the digital life that they're going to leave longer into their livelihoods,

Facebook United States Canada Snapchat North America Sabo Snapchat Harvard Buzzfeed Craig Silverman Editor Twitter Betty Mandla Jordan Barack Obama Heath Rawlings Ten Fifteen Twenty Years
"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

03:27 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Very. Oh, yes. Things math not one. Do the math for you. Yeah. People were joking it there's a lot of listening. Okay. Also, people listening that do well with math and like to follow economic news and things like that. What about those people if they wanted to do it themselves? Sure. So again, I'm a huge advocate of individuals, certainly doing it themselves, and I do believe that if you want to do your own financial planning and be your own financial advisor. I it's entirely possible. And it's even easier today than it was, you know, five ten fifteen twenty years ago because of technology technology. I mean, we've we've got a lot of first of all you can learn an awful lot just online. But then you can also access technologies can be very, very helpful. The reality though, Kristen is a lot of people just aren't interested in doing that. You know, they didn't envision their retirement or that transition to retirement being a situation where okay song I'm going to stop working on my career. And then basically, you know every day I'm gonna work on my financial plan. It kind of goes back to the we're all familiar if we're old enough the idea of being able to retire and get a pension and social security and the checks just show up on a monthly basis, and we never had to worry about anything. Then that changed and they gave us 4._0._1._K's, and then we had this sort of build our own pension or own retirement. And that mentality says, well, I want to be able to retire. And I want to show up every month. I don't have to put a lot of thought into the process of how that check gets into my checking account every month. I I just I want it to get there. I want it to never stop for as long as I'm retired. But also now that I built up these assets and had in my 4._0._1._K or IRA or TSP or whatever your retirement account is or other investments, I wanna make sure that if I can sort of have the best of both roles and get income off of that port folio, but also protect the principle. What I found that's really pretty ideal for most of our clients. So the conversation that we're having with individuals who come sit down with us at one of our offices. And again, if you're listening to us on the radio right now, we have an office very close to you. We've we've done that very intentionally. So if you were to call we could schedule an appointment, but the bottom line is, you know, having a financial plan. Connecting all of those dots and being able to determine whether or not you have enough money to retire is a part of that financial plan having enough money to retire and having the money invested in the right way or two different things. Chris I don't meet people in retirement that are super excited about just having a hang their philosophy on their portfolio. They're familiar with fall tillage either familiar with if you're looking at retirement now or you're currently retired. You went through two thousand and eight. All right. That was in very uncomfortable. When are the losses going to stop and a lot of people who are working with financial advisers at the time just getting told to hang in there to me hang in. There is not an approaching retirement. You can't afford to lose, you know, twenty thirty forty fifty percent of your portfolio because you're not putting any money back in there. So, unfortunately, this idea of being able to work with a financial advisor that's a fiduciary that has a vested interest in you doing. Well. I mean, we do well for our clients do. Well, that's also not using in their portfolios. We use very actively managed per folios. This should not be a unique thing, but unfortunately, it is and most of the financial world. And so we're inviting people to come in and sit down and learn more about everything that we do..

advisor Chris Kristen fiduciary twenty thirty forty fifty perc five ten fifteen twenty years
"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"Of it. The hands on carpenters and plumbers electricians. So that economy in the future is just going to be strong for the next who knows how many years ten fifteen twenty years. Well, the good part about it too. Is that there is a lot of support from our local unions as well, as can you comment on the partnerships with our organized labor unions that also have apprentice apprenticeship programs, of course, it cetera. Yes. So we we have Brenston programs at HCC for the trade schools. This is separate from the trade schools. Okay. But we. So the construction management is actually a new. Kind of a new curriculum. That's been curriculum. But it's so the congestion management manager is used to be engineers and architects, right? So we are kind of lightning their load taking on the management portion of it. Excellent. My son is pursuing mechanical engineering, and he's more automotive, but he's looking into the automotive technology program. And so I bring that up only to say HCC as an education destination for graduating high school students can be an ideal location because let's face it. Those of us if you went to college, how many actually stuck to their first declared major, you know, it's it's it's rare almost as rare as finding someone to support Donald Trump in this town. But anyhow unexciting, okay? Let's get political just on the side. No. So before we go ask how about that invitation for folks to come and see you here, we are booth is located and also how we can reach out. All right. So we I right. In the front behind h case construction in Cranston really is there. Another instructs homework is the only construction..

HCC Donald Trump Cranston ten fifteen twenty years
"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Don't worry about what it costs because FHA Knicks. It very affordable for you with financing options. Discounts and rebates, and you can also pay for these windows. If your Palm Beach county resident over a period of five ten fifteen twenty years in increments, if you like something called the pace program. So don't wait any longer. Call this number five six one three three zero Fifty-seven hundred give you and your family, the your home, of course, the gift of security and safety with high impact windows and doors from FHA eight five six one three three zero Fifty-seven hundred call now. Six dirty words. And boy, I'll bet you. Everybody's hurt him. I can get it for you, the International Diamond Center owner Keith LeClair with a warning. If you're looking for a certain diamond in the jeweler tells you he doesn't have it in stock, but he can get it for you watch out. If a jeweler says, I can get it for you. That means they don't have the confidence put their own money in it. And so they're going to go borrow it from somebody else Arlene from a wholesaler or broker always comes with added markups. Because they pay your pay. I d see we don't have to borrow from wholesalers because we own one of the largest selection of certified diamonds in America. You wanna thirty care? I got it. You wanna ten carat I got you wanna three Karen, I got lots of half. Karen? I gotta push you come in. Here. You see hundreds of diamond International Diamond Center. A true diamond powerhouse is not a side. Business is our business don't risk overpaying and don't pay broker markups. Get the selection you want at International Diamond Center at US one and PS L boulevard. Kombi chocolates this Friday through Sunday. Okay. This RV so has a huge savings on new and pre-owned days. Through Sunday from. Getting back out into the workforce can be difficult. Unless of course, you contact careers or Palm Beach county. Julia Daytona right now with the BP up business services. Tell me exactly what does careers polish county jail curse Palm Beach county is.

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"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

03:18 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"The hell did he just say? I don't know. I did that what did that highly educated educators say all I heard where a bunch of questions really invigorating because you feel the energy, and whatever doubt or confusion there was before it melts away because of this rain and people are just giving each other life. Thank you. I had to sit in a classroom and listen to him all day long. I would scratch my own eyes out, and maybe somebody else's is to man, we're all very resourceful. We're willing to fight the fight. We are not going to buckle easily. This is very important. They're not in it for the kids are in it for the money. I had the resources if I had smaller class size. If I had time to interact with my students on a one on one basis, if we didn't have to do all this high risk test taking we couldn't so much. There you go. That's just some Los Angeles. Teachers, and they actually have some of the same arguments that local teachers well, and I did hear that many of them are having to teach class sizes as big as like. Forty which dominates man as far as a teacher student ratio. That is that's tough. Right. There is it. I I would assume. So I mean, no, I mean, I mean may I mean in in college, we have classes of one hundred two hundred people true good point. That's a. Mobile. I mean, I would think in the middle school and high school, you probably want more one on one reaction, which you can't do in college. But you want to do in high school. I you know in elementary school. For example, you've got you're going to have forty kids that you've got to try to keep their attention in college. You know, it's kind of everybody on their own. And if you want to pay attention. Different scenario at the elementary level. You've got forty kids in the class. There's going to be ten of them that are outstanding pay attention in one and learn and want to be there. There's going to be ten that just don't want to be there at all and kind of struggle to get by. And then there's going to be ten more still pooped their pants true or sounds like one of our sales meetings, actually. Where's what I still don't understand? Here's what I don't understand. And I've I've asked this question many times. But I don't understand how teachers get into this profession and end up complaining about the money. I feel like this is a profession that they're not. Absolutely. They're not prepared for. They're not whatever it is that they learn in college to be a teacher is not enough. They are not preparing the reality of it. I would say that I would agree with that for the young people. Now that are just now starting to get into the profession. Yeah. I would say that you know, what you're getting into. But how about those teachers had been on the job ten fifteen twenty years? And the system has totally changed while they've been on the job. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Things have gotten tougher for teachers red tape more and more legislative input control more and more politics and politicians that are getting in the way that I get I get but the younger ones who. I don't know. I think a lot of them just really romanticize the idea of becoming a teacher and making a difference in the kids lives making a difference to me, it's the most important job in the world other than being a parent being a teacher would be the most important job. And I think a lot of people romanticize that and then they get into it in realize this is the hardest job in the world. And I don't make enough money hanging on the second. You.

Los Angeles ten fifteen twenty years
"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"ten fifteen twenty years" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Settling. Yup. Soundlink for number. Chief among them because I love Kevin Spacey's acting. Usual suspects. Can that still be my favorite movie? House of cards was transformed in first season of house of cards. Was unlike anything we've seen on television up to that point. Okay. Maybe I'm overselling it a little bit. But really truly he his ability to just nail that character question. In that. I know I know, and that's why that's why you're particularly. And also because I mean, let's just be real. Are we being real at six thirteen? Yeah. We're always real here. What are you talking about because he's the gay? And it's like, oh, you know, you didn't come out for years and years and years, that's true. Another added element that makes you really mad as a gay, man. You know, we. I understand why people don't come out as soon as perhaps it would be nice. If they did or why they didn't maybe ten fifteen twenty years ago. Whatever I'm not here to judge somebody's particular choices. But to know what he's done, and then to put it in the context of or to to sort of add to that like the fact that he was keeping that in sort of. And he joked about the fact that he wouldn't be honest about sexuality at a time when it was perfectly. Okay. An acceptable for people to be open about their sexuality. There's still like a lingering bitterness about that. So then to see this, which you know, like, I don't have to tell you that gay people have suffered for years at the hands of you know. Of stereotypes about things that we do. Yes. Especially with you know, people who are maybe not willing. Quitting. Ten years of Jason and Alexis show. This is Jason and Alexis flashback promo Jason and Alexis have the inside scoop on everything comes on three. And this is what keeps you in the middle. Forty three. Which brings the party to a screeching halt. And then we all of course, looked at Alexis first, and then lifted the screen, and yes, in fact least on had cinnabon on Jason and Alexis weekday afternoons from one to three on mytalk one.

Kevin Spacey Alexis Jason ten fifteen twenty years Ten years
Hear Yodeling Kid Mason Ramsey's Moving Debut Song 'Famous'

Colleen and Bradley

03:00 min | 4 years ago

Hear Yodeling Kid Mason Ramsey's Moving Debut Song 'Famous'

"The show with the three things we think you need to hear to be in the know it's called the three at twelve oh three get this the three three things at twelve oh three talk about three things the magic yodeling hid mason ramsey this kid is on fire he is on fire the walmart yodeling kid has now released i don't see that can i just say this really quick my kids yesterday were talking about the walmart yodeling kid and i was like oh yeah he's big news you guys he's dropping a single they looked at me and they're like you know the walmart moat yodeling kid and i was like yeah da and now everybody's gonna know the walmart yodeling kid mason ramsey because he already is a major label album deal album deal and this is his first single from it it's called famous perspective famers it's kind of cute i mean he's an adorable eleven year old who's very talented and i hope the world does not ruin him like they've ruined everything else in the world you should rued the day that the internet takes a look at your child because it will not be good happy monday everybody you know i don't disagree with you he is let's just put everything into perspective can we just talk about this he's eleven years old that that video basically was posted and went viral twenty nine days ago we're not even a month in for the reign of yodeling kid okay he has sung at coachella he has been on ellen degeneres show he's into huge album deal and he's recorded in now dropped the single in twenty nine days can i say something can i say something no we are a horrible people in a wonderful way i'm all ears in a wonderful way but this just this sought occurred to me so i feel like i should share it in the moment like it used to be that you eleven year old mason ramsey really wanted to perform and had a desire to sing into share his thing and he worked really hard and maybe just maybe somebody would recognize him at a certain point ten fifteen twenty years later and he would be rewarded for all the.

Walmart Mason Ramsey Ellen Degeneres Twenty Nine Days Eleven Year Ten Fifteen Twenty Years Eleven Years