18 Burst results for "Ten Eleven Twelve Years"

"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Live day before thanksgiving I always love the day before thanksgiving I love the night before thanksgiving I remember first becoming consciously aware when I was ten eleven twelve years old the night before thanksgiving is kind of cool there's a lot of smells in the house mostly good there's a lot of anticipation of the fees that is the com there's some stuff that it's made that you're allowed to actually eat a little bit of the night before when my mom would make pumpkin pie she would take the extra pumpkin stuff and bake it in these little glass bowls like she would with putting so you had this will treat the night before thanksgiving instead of pumpkin pie you had this little dish of the pumpkin stuff that goes into the pumpkin pie that was baked into the little dash and that was kind of cool and I just remember it's got to be at least forty forty five years ago somewhere in that range thank you the night before thanksgiving is not bad because I don't have to do anything I still don't do anything but the house smells really good check out like that speaking of thanksgiving there will be a live show tomorrow they try to make me not work on holidays all but I do first of all it's not work I like the idea that people actually think that I'm laboring I'm not the show on thanksgiving consists of rolling out of bed walking down the hall sitting down it is not my head said clicking a button and talking to you and I know that there are people out there on thanksgiving who have to work who are driving whether it's six AM eastern three AM Pacific and I don't want you down in part because they're willing to do anything that you do something I'd say well you know it's a holiday sorry I'll be back Friday we will have a live radio and TV show on Friday in past years we were off TV on Friday and I gently raised the notion that kind of a big day three games on Thursday twelve games on Sunday one game on Monday plenty to discuss going into the weekend from what happened what will happen so maybe we should be on TV so this year they decide yeah maybe you're right maybe not crap two years ago the day after thanksgiving I had.

ten eleven twelve years forty forty five years two years
"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on Closure Optional

Closure Optional

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on Closure Optional

"Can you can <hes> cause you to break and <hes> <unk> everything you wanna hold together shadows in yeah. It's it's <hes> such a scary moment like a do you make that decision is is <hes> <hes> e- i think you start to reason with these off and and and i think that's when you really really there's a battle like no one ever really wants to get through on think <hes> but the the part of you that wants to has more control all of you at the time and tends to tells the other pottery <unk> has made it switches disorder committed to it and it's gonna to do it like do you remember that feeling of like loading that shit up and being like this is the last time yeah i think we consciously fumble through it as quick as i could do wanna wanna. I was trying to just make it happen. Just just just hurry up and get through this. We don't have to sit here and contemplate it too much. Because the more time you give it the more the more reasoning comes into play in the mall. You start questioning what you're actually doing say hold on a second line there for all the options like there is a way there's a why or why forward i think at that time and young age yeah just given up i just felt exhausted every option that was available to me but i wasn't mature enough to nari more about law thin and and more about options or just i was just running away from it all and it was hard year the pressure emotions law was ivory too who i was overwhelming to a point of the you know and there was joy. I wasn't enjoying life. I was <hes>. It was just a tough tough place. That was after a diagnosis that was i think it was a true so once that that didn't work out and in order to wash it happened to us off on tunein. It's not that come around again light on and that was probably more gladys bottom autumn but <hes> yeah. I realize that well this. This hasn't worked there this you you're forced to leave on <hes> and because of that little kid fawning me i felt responsible for he's scenario like he had a farm in that scenario. Ayaan keedy would have maybe ten eleven twelve years old or something when they went to hospital and they told me the story just four responsible and lodge a two just because made to extremely <unk> able to use that.

Ayaan keedy ten eleven twelve years
"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

13:19 min | 2 years ago

"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"John will give its is a military historian who is written a book about a subject which is you know super important to me as I have spent a couple years it in hospital chaplaincy but I'll get back to that just a moment I wanted to take the second if I could jog dimension dog fight over Tokyo the final air battle of the Pacific in the last four men to die in World War two I can help me clarify for me when is that book coming out yes well first of all thanks for having me on the show I I certainly appreciate this chance to chat about the different things that I've done and especially the chaplain book the dog fight over Tokyo will be out August twenty seventh okay that's cool only made it more than a month it'll hit the bookstores Amazon whatever I don't put any pressure on you John but depending on how well you do here tonight we might have to have you back for that I would love to an unbelievable story the I came across a maybe ten eleven twelve years ago when I was doing work on a biography of admiral Halsey right one of the top commanders World War two and hall he ordered these guys out on this mission and Mandy calm at the you know they should never be forgotten because they ended up being the final for men to die in a combat mission and maps sure shared with me through the years and I decided well I'm gonna look into this and there are turned out so we got a couple of four families around a lot of material on it it's quite a store well it's not surprising so but to have a couple years ago I had a similar question in my head about who is the who was the the last to die we know some of the first to die in World War two and there's a a monument to one of them at o'hare airport and in Chicago but I was kind of curious to and I was like well you know because I think that would be the end you may make a really interesting point on the difference between in combat and still in service and technically being the last because the last person to die with some he was like a I mean barring the people who later died from their wounds the last person to die before the end of the war some in some sort of transport mishap or something like that but this dog fight over Tokyo is fascinating and I know that's going to be great I can't wait to find out more about it so let's not tell anybody about about it now will will hang on to that thank you for next Monday are you I'd love to come back and talk about it it always warms my heart to hear good upper midwestern accent on the air we are never did anyone tell me access yeah Jordan thinking about that well I I lived in the Midwest my whole life in the yeah I guess this kind of our talk it doesn't strike your our next that kind of thing well I spend it I taught for a year at Ohio northern university and it so I have sent a hip a little bit to the hot this is the sort of the Ohio sound but also I'm from the Chicago area and yeah there's definitely a yeah and I was born in Ohio Akron yeah Tom you your mail that role so but let's talk you sold it then congratulations on the movie option for hello your health from the heavens and and for the can can Titans book and it's all very exciting very cool but this didn't this book soldiers of a different cloth which was published through university of Notre Dame and and with their cooperation in their archives I think would really get it catches my interest on that is when you're writing about the chaplains in the service of Chaplin's of any denomination you it is you have to take a different approach to it then you would be writing about any other soldier or any other battle it would seem to me it was that your experience you have some water because the nature of their job is the opposite of what they are in no way right they're not fighting and I think that's one of the big things that drew me to this book was affected these men are going on so the battle field without weapons and other they're trying to help people not hurt people and so there there's a different viewpoint from from a chapel entry point yes that that intrigue me quite a bit so I I guess in that way are you are you viewed it somewhat differently when I was writing the book you're not so March it was just trying to get the story out I was actually it when I researched all of this I kept coming across great material on a wild all those what these men and two women and I'm sure we'll get to the nuns in a little bit yeah what they did and I keep reminding myself John just don't get in the way of this and measured up I mean it's it's right or not fans of heroes so yes yeah yeah and it's of the reader and that is the work of a good writer every time so the reason I bring that up is because I so I went to seminary and I I'm were detained in the Episcopal Church the I chose to be ordained in the D. Achen it alternately but I I worked with I spent years in hospital chaplaincy in an inter faith in IT environment and working with the we had a Muslim chaplain we had obviously we had access to a rabbi the rabbi didn't come around is often only as needed couple of priests and then some Lutherans and some Baptists in a in a Methodist and and we all took turns working together and so I was sort of resonating with this material right away because I think you make a point early on in the book through your archive research were some of these we're talking about this is one of the some of their first interfaith experiences that any of these chaplains had ever had when when they got it when they got inducted or when they were in rolled into this service for the military they the for them it was the first conversations they may have had in any depth or even rooming with a pastor from another denomination it sure was and that was one of the things that jumped out at me in doing the research I never thought of that angle and and yet for these men who had been working with the Catholic they are trying to gauge shins and living with their Catholic fellow priests and brothers and set your this is the first time that they have their eyes opened a little bit too in depth examination will produce the race or Baptist or jury shore you name it yeah and it will be a lot of your became quite valuable to them after the war as well because they realized you know we're not the only ones in this business and then they always knew that obviously but some but this is going on here yeah these guys are going to have something special yeah I think that's the difference between knowing it and experiencing it you know the the what let's take a minute for people who don't understand explain what chaplaincy is why why is it different than any other sort of typical understanding of your local in OKC clergy well the chaplain's job is to be right there with his unit and and and take care of all their needs turned out not to be simply religious needs but social and personal and family girlfriend boyfriend kind of things being became the ultimate counselor in many ways and those sold their job was to become as familiar as possible with all the men in their units because when they left chaplaincy school they would be assigned to a particular regiments or will the Taliban or whatever the case may be then they stayed with them where they went into battle with them they're trained with the unit say they are did every single soldier would do except fight yeah they're very job was simply Hey I'm here for you to help ease you do through the most difficult time of your life and to be there when you most need me you know you know the history of a of the first Chaplin well Martin stores as in our server for into the towers yes are and how the word chaplain came about yeah I want to explain that because it's kind of cool yeah the nor chaplain if you comes from the French a French word and the shop we all right may not be pronouncing that does it up but it sounded good anyway these will be Martin to chores was a Saint in the Catholic faith and then like the fourth century or something he so the story the legend he gave up his cloak to a bigger part of that cloak and was used by the French military to as something to take them into battle good luck well charmed kind of a town so the care it would take you Martin's cloak with them and the person taking the idea and the shopping all the other guys you became the word chap one in English there are there are thrown all American history as far back as American revolution George Washington was we spared no words increasing the the benefits of Chaplin's brought to the man that he commanded of the three it was almost like having an extra unit of men on his side because of the morale that they could bring to the unit allow me to fill in a couple of blanks and so what's really interesting to me and and why I have that I think what's so cool about about that particular scene is that he he actually tore his Cape in half and so he gave half of his Cape to a backer of those on the side of that had nothing and he kept his half and that's the half that lead Iran becomes so important he was he was a Roman soldier they were in France but he was he was a Roman soldier and and this is where the was one of the first times were people it was sort of a time when Christianity was really getting traction was it only been legal in the in service to be a Christian and to be a Roman soldier then that would go back and forth for awhile there would be a lot of times when they would be illegal again but the injury that pretty time it it was legal and and that's how he ended up you know that was just such a the act the people's Saddam do that then they'd never seen that kind of giving before and I think that's part that is the impact that it had was like wow that's what this guy does that's he's different he's following this new religion thing but look what he did is it not kind of cool and that's part of how you know I think I think that that idea of the of that the Cape in the chaplaincy how that carries forward that idea of self sacrifice while you're still in service in it he still fought like a soldier so he didn't give up fighting he was still you know but it was awhile later and then you know that Chaplin's become in the honor of the that sort of service of the Cape in that in that sense but that's where so the the the Catholic Church in particular has a very strong history of chaplaincy coming up in a World War two how many Catholic chaplains were there that were had been trained and sent into service you know well I can't give you an exact number because I was so focused on other thirty five that were really sure of it again and so I would just have to give you an estimated gas and then you may not it may even though I don't know I don't know the answer no houses yeah it's it's it's it's got to be a couple thousand years over the course of four plus years the with the in the way of certain requirements which would keep a lot of the men out or at least delay their entry into community chaplaincy the you know the age requirements you could be any older at the start of the.

John Tokyo Pacific ten eleven twelve years thousand years
"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

13:25 min | 2 years ago

"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Look at it is a military historian is written a book about a subject which is you know super important to me as I have spent a couple years in hospital chaplaincy but I'll get back to that just a moment I wanted to take the second if I could jog dimension dog fight over Tokyo the final battle of the Pacific in the last four men to die in World War two help me clarify for me when is that book coming out yes first of all thanks for having me on the show I I certainly appreciate this chance to run a chat about the different things that I've done and the social chapter book the dog fight over Tokyo will be out August twenty seventh okay that's cool only made it more than a month it'll hit bookstores Amazon whatever I don't put any pressure on you John but depending on how well you do here tonight we might have to have you back for that thought I'd love to an unbelievable story the I came across a maybe ten eleven twelve years ago when I was doing work on a biography of admiral Halsey right one of the top commanders of World War two and Halsey ordered these guys out on this mission and made the comment the you know they should never be forgotten because they ended up being the final for men to die in a combat mission and that's sure shared with me through the years and I decided well I'm gonna look into this and turned out so we got a couple of four families around a lot of material on it it's quite a store well it's not surprising so but to have a couple years ago I had a similar question in my head about who is the who was the the last to die we know some of the first to die in World War two and there's a a monument to one of them at o'hare airport and in Chicago but I was kind of curious to and I was like well you know because I think that would be the that you met could make a really interesting point on the difference between in combat and still in service and technically being the last because the last person to die with some he was like a I'll be barring the people who later died from their wounds the last person to die before the end of the war some in some sort of transport mishap or something like that but this dog fight over Tokyo is fascinating and I know that's going to be great I can't wait to find out more about it so let's not tell anybody about about it now will will hang on to that thank you for next Monday back to talk about it it always warms my heart to hear good upper midwestern accent on the air never did anyone tell me yeah I don't have access to your thinking about that well I my whole life in the yeah I guess this kind of our talk it doesn't strike your that kind of thing well I spent it I taught for a year at Ohio northern university and it so I have sent a hip a little bit to the Ohio this is the sort of the Ohio sound but also I'm from the Chicago area and yeah there's definitely a you know and I was born in Ohio Akron yeah Tom your email Beverly so but let's talk you so good then congratulations on the movie option for hello health from the heavens and and for the can can Titans book and it's all very exciting and very cool but this didn't this book soldiers of a different cloth which was published through university of Notre Dame and and with their cooperation in their archives I think would really get it catches my interest on that is when you're writing about the chaplains in the service of Chaplin's of any denomination it is you have to take a different approach to it then you would be writing about any other soldier or any other battle it would seem to me it was that your experience you have some more because the nature of their job is the opposite of what they're doing no they're not fighting and I think that's one of the big things that drew me to this book was affected these men are going on so the battle field without weapons and other they're trying to help people not hurt people and so there there's a different viewpoint from from a chapel as you point yes that that intrigue me quite a bit so I I guess in that way are you are you viewed it somewhat differently when I was writing the book you're not so March it was just trying to get the story out I was actually it when I researched all of this I kept coming across very material on a while others what these men and two women who I'm sure we'll get to the nuns in a little bit yeah what they did and I keep reminding myself John just don't get in the way of this and measured up I mean it's right or not fans of hills so then it's of the reader that is the work of a good writer every time so the reason I bring that up is because I so I went to seminary and I I'm were detained in the Episcopal Church the I chose to be ordained in the tea act in it alternately but I I worked with I spent years in hospital chaplaincy in an inter faith in IT environment and working with the we had a Muslim chaplain we had obviously we had access to a rabbi the rabbi didn't come around is often only as needed couple of priests and then some Lutherans and some Baptists in a in a Methodist and and we all took turns working together and and so I was sort of resonating with this material right away because I think you make a point early on in the book through your archive research were some of these we're talking about this was one of the some of their first interfaith experiences that any of these chaplain said ever had when when they got it when they got inducted or when they were in rolled into this service for the military and they they for them it was the first conversations they may have had in any depth or even rooming with a pastor from another denomination it sure was that was one of the things that jumped out at me in doing the research I never thought of that angle and and yet for these men who had been working with the Catholic they are under the age and then living with her Catholic fellow priests and brothers and set your this is the first time that they have their eyes opened a little bit true in the depths the germination of Protestant race or Baptist or jury shore you name it yeah and it will be a lot of I can't quite valuable to them after the war as well because they realized you know we're not the only ones in this business and then they always knew that obviously some knowing these guys are going to have something special yeah I think that's the difference between knowing it and experiencing it you know the what let's take a minute for people who don't understand explain what chaplaincy is why why is it different than any other sort of typical understanding of your local in OKC clergy well the chaplain's job is to be right there with his unit and and and take care of all their needs turned out not to be simply religious needs but the social and personal and family girlfriend boyfriend kind of things being became the ultimate counselor in many ways and those sold their job was to become as familiar as possible with all the men in their units because when they left chaplaincy school they would be assigned to a particular regiments were with the Taliban or whatever the case may be and he stayed with them where they wanted to battle with them they're trained with the unit say they are did every single soldier would do except fight yeah they're very job was simply Hey I'm here for you to help ease the new through the most difficult time of your life and to be there when you most need me you know you know the history of the of the first Chaplin well Lou Martin stores as in our server for into the towers yes are and how the word chaplain came about yeah I want to explain that because it's kind of cool yeah the you learn Japanese you comes from the French French word and in the shop we all right may not be pronouncing that close close enough good anyways Martin to tourism was the saints and Catholic faith and then once the fourth century or something he and so the story the legend he gave up his cloak to a bigger part of that cloak and was used by the French military to as something to take them into battle good luck term kind of a concept it would take to Martin's cloak with them and the person taking the idea and the shopping all that eventually became the word chap one in English but there are there throughout all American history as far back as American revolution more George Washington was no words increasing the the benefits of Chaplin's brought to the man that he commanded of the three it was almost like having an extra unit of mass on his side because of the morale that they could bring to the unit allow me to fill in a couple of blanks on that so what's really interesting to me and and why I have that I think what's so cool about about that particular scene is that he he actually tore his Cape in half and so he gave half of his Cape to a backer of those on the side of that had nothing and he kept his half and that's the half that later on becomes so important he was he was a Roman soldier they were in France but he was he was a Roman soldier and and this is where the is one of the first times were people it was sort of a time when Christianity was really getting traction was it only been legal in the in service to be a Christian and to be a Roman soldier then that would go back and forth for awhile there would be a lot of times when that would be illegal again but the injury that the time that it was legal and and that's how he ended up you know that was just such a the act the people saw him do that then they'd never seen that kind of giving before that I think that's part that is the impact that it had was like wow that's what this guy does that's he's different he's following this new religion thing but look what he did is it not kind of cool and that's part of how you know I think I think that that idea of the of that the Cape in the chaplaincy how that carries forward that idea of self sacrifice while you're still in service in it he still fought like a soldier so he didn't give up fighting he was still you know but it was a while later and then you know that Chaplin's become in the honor of the that's sort of service of the Cape in that in that sense but that's where so the the the Catholic Church in particular has a very strong history of chaplaincy coming up in a World War two how many Catholic chaplains war there that were had been trained and sent into service you know well I can't give you an exact number because I was so focused on the other thirty five that were sure of it again and so I would just have to give you an estimated gas and good you may not it may even though I don't know I don't know the answer no I was just curious it's got to be a couple thousand years over the course of four plus years the with a link we have certain requirements which would keep a lot of the men adults or at least delay their entry into community chaplaincy the you know the age requirements you could be any older at the start of the war anyway any older than forty three you had to have a couple of years service says a priest you know before you.

Tokyo Pacific ten eleven twelve years thousand years
"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

13:27 min | 2 years ago

"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"John will give its is sub a military historian who is written a book about a subject which is you know super important to me as I had spent a couple years buy it in hospital chaplaincy but I'll get back to that just a moment I wanted to take a second if I could jog dimension dog fight over Tokyo the final air battle of the Pacific in the last four men to die in World War two help me clarify for me when is that book coming out yes first of all thanks for having me on the show I I certainly appreciate this chance to chat about the different things that I've done and special chapel book the dog fight over Tokyo will be out August twenty seventh okay let's chalybeate more than a month it'll hit the bookstores Amazon whatever I don't I put the pressure on you John but depending on how well you do here tonight we might have to have you back for that I would love to an unbelievable story we I came across a maybe ten eleven twelve years ago when I was doing work on a biography of admiral Halsey right one of the top commanders of World War two and hall he ordered these guys out on this mission and may be calm at the you know they should never be forgotten because they ended up being the final for men to die in a combat mission and I met sure stayed with me through the years and I decided well I'm gonna look into this and there are turned out so we got a couple of four families around a lot of material on it it's quite a story well it's not surprising so but to have a couple years ago I had a similar question in my head about who is the who was the the last to die we know some of the first to die in World War two and there's a a monument to one of them at o'hare airport and in Chicago but I was kind of curious to when I was like well you know because I think that would be the and you met they make a really interesting point on the difference between in combat and still in service and technically being the last because the last person to die with some he was like a I mean barring the people who later died from their wounds the last person to die before the end of the war some in some sort of transport sap or something like that but this dog fight over Tokyo is fascinating and I know that's going to be great I can't wait to find out more about it so let's not tell anybody about about it now will will hang on to that thank you for next Monday are you I'd love to come back and talk about it it always warms my heart to hear a good upper midwestern accent on the air all up there and we are never again anyone tell me access yeah Jordan thinking about that well I I live in the Midwest my whole life and I I guess this kind of our talk it doesn't strike your well you should be flown in excess that kind of thing well I spend it I taught I taught for a year at Ohio northern university and it so I I've sent a hip a little bit to the hot this is the sort of the Ohio sound but also I'm from the Chicago area and yeah there's definitely a yeah and I was born in Ohio Akron yeah Tom you you nailed that role so but let's talk you so good then congratulations on the movie option for hello your health from the heavens and and for the can can Titans book and it's all very exciting and very cool but this didn't this book soldiers of a different cloth which was published through the university of Notre Dame and and with their cooperation in their archives I think would really get it catches my interest on that is when you're writing about the chaplains in the service of Chaplin's of any denomination it is you have to take a different approach to it then you would be writing about any other soldier or any other battle it would seem to me it was that your experience you have some water because the nature of their job is the opposite of what they're in the home right they're not fighting and I think that's one of the big things that drew me to this book was affected these men are going on so the battle field without weapons and other there to try and help people not hurt people and so there there's a different viewpoint from from a chapel as you point yes that that intrigue me quite a bit so I I guess in that way are you are you viewed it somewhat differently when I was writing the book you're not so March it was just trying to get the story out I was actually it when I researched all of this I kept coming across great material on a wild all those what these men and two women are I'm sure we'll get to the nuns in a little bit yeah what they did and I can remind myself John just don't get in the way of this and measured up I mean it's it's right or not fans of heroes so then it's of the reader and that is the work of a good writer every time so the reason I bring that up is because I so I went to seminary and I I'm were detained in the Episcopal Church the I chose to be ordained in the tea act in it alternately but I I worked with I spent years in hospital chaplaincy in an inter faith in IT environment and working with the we had a Muslim chaplain we had obviously we had access to a rabbi the rabbi didn't come around is often only as needed couple of priests and then some Lutherans and some Baptists in a in a Methodist and and we all took turns working together and so I was sort of resonating with this material right away because I think you make a point early on in the book three your archive research were some of these we're talking about this is one of the some of their first interfaith experiences that any of these chaplains had ever had when when they got it when they got inducted or when they were in rolled into this service for the military and they the for them it was the first conversations they may have had in any depth or even rooming with a pastor from another denomination it sure was that was one of the things that jumped out at me in doing the research I never thought of that angle and and yet for these men who had been working with the Catholic they are trying to gain shins and living with their Catholic fellow priests and brothers and set your the first time that they have their eyes opened a little bit too in depth examination of a Protestant race or Baptist or jury shore are you name it yeah and it will be a lot of came quite valuable to them after the war as well because they realized you know we're not the only ones in this business and then they always knew that obviously but but this is different going up closer yeah these guys are going to have something special yeah I think that's the difference between knowing it and experiencing it you know the the what let's take a minute for people who don't understand explain what chaplaincy is why why is it different than any other sort of typical understanding of your local in OKC clergy well the chaplain's job is to be right there with his unit and and and take care of all their needs turned out not to be simply religious needs but social and personal and family girlfriend boyfriend kind of things being became the ultimate counselor and anyways and those sold their job was to become as familiar as possible with all the men in their units because when they left chaplaincy school they would be assigned to a particular regiments were with the Taliban or whatever the case may be and he stayed with them where they went into battle with them they're trained with the unit say they are did everything the soldier would do except fight yeah they're very job was simply Hey I'm here for you to help ease the new through the most difficult time of your life and to be there when you most need me you know but you know the history of a of the first Chaplin well Lou Martin the sewers a single server for into the towers yes are and how the word chaplain came about yeah I want to explain that because it's kind of cool yeah the nor chaplain it comes from the French French word and we shop you all right may not be pronouncing that close enough but it sounded good anyway so with the Martin to tourism as a Saint in the Catholic faith and then like the fourth century or something he each of these story the legend he gave up his cloak to a bigger part of that cloak and was used by the French military to as something to take them into battle good luck well term kind of the time so they care it would take to Martin's cloak with them and the person taking the idea and the shopping all that eventually became the word chap one in English there are there throughout all American history as far back as American revolution more George Washington was he spared no words increasing the the benefits of Chaplin's brought to the man that he commanded of the three you know it's almost like having an extra unit of men on his side because of the morale that they could bring to the unit allow me to fill in a couple of blanks on that so what's really interesting to me and and why I have that I think what's so cool about about that particular scene is that he he actually tore his Cape in half and so he gave half of his Cape to a beggar on those on the side that had nothing and he kept his half and that's the half that lead Iran becomes so important he was he was a Roman soldier they were in France but he was he was a Roman soldier and and this is where the was one of the first times where people it was sort of a time when Christianity was really getting traction was it only been legal in the in service to be a Christian and to be a Roman soldier that would go back and forth for awhile there would be a lot of times when that would be illegal again but in during that period of time that it was legal and and that's how he ended up you know that was just such a the act the people's Saddam do that then they'd never seen that kind of giving before and I think that's part that is the impact that it had was like wow that's what this guy does that's he's different he's following this new religion thing but look what he did is it not kind of cool and that's part of how you know I think I think that that idea of the of that the Cape in the chaplaincy how that carries forward that idea of self sacrifice while you're still in service in it he still fought like a soldier so he didn't give up fighting he was still you know but it was awhile later and then you know chaplains become in the honor of the that sort of service of the Cape in that in that sense but that's where it shows the the the Catholic Church in particular has a very strong history of chaplaincy and coming up in a World War two how many Catholic chaplains were there that were had been trained and sent into service you know well I can't give you an exact number because I was so focused on other thirty five that were really sure of it again and so I would just have to give you an estimated gas and then you may not it may even though I don't know I don't know the answer no I was it's it's it's got to be a couple thousand years over the course of four plus years the but they they they have certain requirements which would keep a lot of the men ouch or at least delay their entry is gonna chaplaincy the you know the age requirements you could be any older at the start of the war anyway any older than forty three you had to have a couple of years service says a priest you know.

John Tokyo Pacific ten eleven twelve years thousand years
"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

13:27 min | 2 years ago

"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"John will give its is a military historian who is written a book about a subject which is you know super important to me as I have spent a couple years it in hospital chaplaincy but I'll get back to that just a moment I wanted to take the second if I could jog dimension dog fight over Tokyo the final air battle of the Pacific in the last four men to die in World War two help me clarify for me when is that book coming out well first of all thanks for having me on the show I certainly appreciate this chance to chat about the different things that I've done and special chapel book the dog fight over Tokyo will be out August twenty seventh okay that's cool limit more than a month it'll hit the bookstores Amazon whatever I don't put any pressure on you John but depending on how well you do here tonight we might have to have you back for that one I'd love to an unbelievable story the I came across a maybe ten eleven twelve years ago when I was doing work on a biography of ad moral falsely right one of the top commanders of World War two and hall he ordered these guys out on this mission and made the comment that you know they should never be forgotten because they ended up being the final for men to die in a combat mission and that's sure me through the years and I decided well I'm gonna look into this and there are turned out so we got a couple of four families around a lot of material on it it's quite a store well it's not surprising so but to have a couple years ago I have a similar question in my head about who is the who was the the last to die we know some of the first to die in World War two and there's a a monument to one of them at o'hare airport and in Chicago but I was kind of curious to and I was like well you know because I think that would be a new method to make a really interesting point on the difference between in combat and still in service and technically being the last because the last person to die with some he was like a I'll be barring the people who later died from their wounds the last person to die before the end of the war some in some sort of transport mishap or something like that but this dog fight over Tokyo is fascinating and I know that's going to be great I can't wait to find out more about it so let's not tell anybody about about it now will will hang on to that thank you for next Monday are you I'd love to come back and talk about it so it always warms my heart to hear good upper midwestern accent on the air I've never had anyone tell me access yeah Jordan thinking about that well I I live in the Midwest my whole life in the yeah I guess this kind of our talk it doesn't strike your what are you waiting for their next that kind of thing a well I spend it thanks I taught for a year at Ohio northern university and it so I have sent a hip a little bit to the hi this is the sort of the Ohio sound but also I'm from the Chicago area and yeah there's definitely a yeah and I was born in Ohio Akron yeah Tom you you can mail that role so but let's talking so good then congratulations on the movie option for hello your health from the heavens and and for the can can Titans book and it's all very exciting and very cool but this didn't this book soldiers of a different cloth which was published through university of Notre Dame and and with their cooperation in their archives I think would really get it catches my interest on that is when you're writing about the chaplains in the service of Chaplin's of any denomination it is you have to take a different approach to it then you would be writing about any other soldier or any other battle it would seem to me it was that your experience you have some water because the nature of their job is the opposite of what they are in no way right they're not fighting and I think that's one of the big things that drew me to this book was affected these men are going on so the battle field without weapons and other they're trying to help people not hurt people and so there there's a different viewpoint from from the chapel as you point yes that that intrigue me quite a bit so I I guess in that way are you are you viewed it somewhat differently when I was writing the book you're not so March it was just trying to get the story out I was actually when I researched all of this I kept coming across great material on a wild all those what these men and two women who I'm sure we'll get to the nuns in a little bit yeah what they did and I can remind myself John just don't get in the way of this and measured up I mean it's right or not fans of hills so yeah yeah and it's of the reader and that is the work of a good writer every time so the reason I bring that up is because I so I went to seminary and I I'm were detained in the Episcopal Church the I chose to be ordained in the the acting it automatically but I I worked with I spent years in hospital chaplaincy in an inter faith environment and working with the we had a Muslim chaplain we had obviously we had access to a rabbi the rabbi didn't come around is often only as needed couple of priests and then some Lutherans and some Baptists in a in a Methodist and and we all took turns working together and so I was sort of resonating with this material right away because I think you make a point early on in the book through your archive research were some of these priests were talking about this is one of the some of their first interfaith experiences that any of these chaplains it ever had when when they got it when they got inducted or when they were in rolled into the service for the military they for them it was the first conversations they may have had in any depth or even rooming with a pastor from another denomination it sure was that was one of the things that jumped out at me in doing the research I never thought of that angle and and yet for these men who had been working with the Catholic they are trying to gain shins and living with their Catholic fellow priests and brothers and set your the first time that they have their eyes opened a little bit too in depth examination of a Protestant race or Baptist or jury shore are you name it yeah and it will be a lot of them became quite valuable to them after the war as well because they realized you know we're not the only ones in this business and then they always knew that obviously but was going on there calls yeah these guys are going to special yeah I think that's the difference between knowing it and experiencing it you know the what let's take a minute for people who don't understand explain what chaplaincy is why why is it different than any other sort of typical understanding of your local in OKC clergy well the chaplain's job is to be right there with his unit and and and take care of all their needs turned out not to be simply religious needs but social and personal and family girlfriend boyfriend kind of things being became the ultimate counselor in many ways and those sold their job was to become as familiar as possible with all the men and their units because when they left chaplaincy school they would be assigned to a particular regiments or will the Taliban or whatever the case may be and they stayed with them where they went into battle with them they're trained with the unit say they are did everything the soldier would do except fight yeah they're very job was simply Hey I'm here for you to help ease the new through the most difficult time of your life and to be there when you most need me you know you know the history of a of the first Chaplin well we will Martin of chores as in our server for into the towers yes are and how the word chaplain came about yeah I want to explain that because it's kind of cool yeah the nor chaplain it comes from the French French word and the shop we all right may not be pronouncing that close enough only good anyway with the Martin disorders was a Saint in the Catholic faith and then wife before surgery or something he and so the story the legend he gave up his cloak to a bigger under that cloak and was used by the French military to as something to take them into battle good luck well charmed kind of the concept it would take to Martin's cloak with them and the person taking the idea and the shopping all that eventually became the word chap one in English Lehrer throughout all American history as far back as American revolution George Washington was he spared no words increasing the the benefits of Chaplin's brought to the man that he commanded of the three you know was almost like having an extra unit of men on his side because of the morale that they could bring to the unit allow me to fill in a couple of blanks on that so what's really interesting to me and and why I have that I think what's so cool about about that particular scene is that he he actually tore his Cape in half and so he gave half of his Cape to a backer of those on the side of that had nothing and he kept his half and that's the half that later on becomes so important he was he was a Roman soldier they were in France but he was he was a Roman soldier and and this is where that was one of the first times were people it was sort of in a time when Christianity was really getting traction was it only been legal in the in service to be a Christian and to be a Roman soldier then that would go back and forth for awhile there would be a lot of times when that would be illegal again but the injury that time it was legal and and that's how he ended up you know that was just such an act of the people Saudi do that then they'd never seen that kind of giving before and I think that's part of it the impact that it had was like wow that's what this guy does that's he's different he's following this new religion thing but look what he did is it not kind of cool and that's part of how you know I think I think that that idea of the of that the Cape in the chaplaincy how that carries forward that idea of self sacrifice while you're still in service in it he still fought like a soldier so he didn't give up fighting he was still you know but it was a while later and then you know chaplains become in the honor of the that sort of service of the Cape in that in that sense but that's where so the the the Catholic Church in particular has a very strong history of chaplaincy coming up in a World War two how many Catholic chaplains were there that were had been trained and sent into service you know well I can't give you an exact number because I was so focused on the other thirty five that were really sure of it again and so I would just have to give you an estimated gas and did you mean I mean even though I don't know I don't know the answer no I was it's got to be a couple thousand years over the course of four plus years the what they they they have certain requirements which would keep a lot of the men out or at least delay their entry into community chaplaincy the you know the age requirements you could be any older at the start of the war anyway any older than forty three you have to have a couple of years service sales a priest you know.

John Tokyo ten eleven twelve years thousand years
"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on 600 WREC

"But like ten eleven twelve years ago and it's out it's hard to outspend the government but that that's a guy with a with a ton of money now though the license plate thing at fast food I'm not warming up to that number I'd have to take a pass on that I'll just I'll just walk in and pick up my chicken McNuggets I think that's what I would do I hope your hope you're doing well this morning we have seventy seven degrees a heat advisory in effect later today we'll talk about that coming up in just a few minutes the number minute or so six seven years at the art good morning right now we still rack on southbound two forty right there at the shady Grove road over pass it off to the right hand side of the roadway that is causing a rubbernecking issue we've traffic lights not working on popular at Exeter treat that intersection as a four way stop and we're waiting for records on one of her routing interstate forty that accident should be out of the way shortly which I have faith your this report is sponsored by express pros dot com express employment professionals is thinking workers in a big way this August expresses awarding one thousand dollars cash prizes weekly and a chance to win a ten thousand dollar vacation register on the express jobs that were expressed pro stock express nose jobs get to know what's right forty days we've got some sunshine I think pop up thundershowers might be possible police during the day will have a high near ninety heat index close to one hundred five heat advisory in effect this afternoon and then for tonight mostly cloudy skies turning partly cloudy a low in the upper seventy sunny and low nineties Thursday through Sunday for heights currently seventy seven degrees met this morning news time is seven twenty three you wanted more kids convenience stores you got it check out the new sheets at twenty one thrill for wind mill park drive in sterling they're fully equipped to satisfy your every craving grab a bite on the go with hot and cold made to order food choose your favorite specialty coffee or frozen drink and go nuts at the ice cream and frozen yogurt wake up with sheets at twenty one three oh four windmill park drive in sterling it's open twenty four seven three sixty five she wrote it down current or expiring public service public safety and emergency professionals thinking about your career some do American public university is a public service career fair in Woodbridge on Saturday July twentieth from tended to the recruiters from police fire and sheriff's department federal agencies and private enterprises at the for a lot of the building fifty nine forty one Donald Curtis drive in Woodbridge Saturday July twenty it's free no registration required right you buy American public university part of American public university system certified to operate by ship for all your vehicle care.

seventy seven degrees ten eleven twelve years one thousand dollars ten thousand dollar six seven years forty days mill
"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Of talk transactions information information speaking of information voting machines this country are being called into question not the old ones the new ones talk a little bit about that our is our election system secure or do we just have to go back to paper price spend more money buying the paper than when buying more cruddy computers also some people some young people are saying and even not even that young people but the child bearing age saying there don't have kids because the in ten eleven twelve years the earth will be gone because of global warming global warming yes the earth will be gone so there's no reason to have a four oh one K. there's no reason to have kids there's no reason to send them to school because the earth will be gone yeah I'm not making this stuff up it's true anyway you want to reach out to us here we've got some other stuff I'm gonna update before I get to those other things got to talk a little bit about this immigration thing there some things are coming out today that we need to touch upon updating you also on a controversy around camel Harris because we talked about last week and I need to add something else to that as well as something else he said this week that was really weird so if you want eight is set aside the phone number and be ready to get into the action tonight please do so I'm rob are to go your host as I said at rob or to go on Twitter at rob or to go on Twitter I will post things as the show continues as I get stuff and I need to post it so if you're one of the twenty percent of the population who has Twitter get on there and I'll tweet like crazy.

Twitter ten eleven twelve years twenty percent one K
"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

13:16 min | 2 years ago

"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"That'd be moncrieff eleven seasons and they can be eight ten seasons with the box and when i think one of the find players ever put on and then be a uniform one of the things i like about sydney is that what he did out there on the basketball floor was not only offensive defensive because if there was anybody that could get inside side you're jersey and shut you down sydney moncrieff sending good evening how are you tonight ron how're you doing good what is it about defense really caught your attention why is it that you want it to be a defensive type of player known for that capability right oh it's going to be one of lowest paid players so i figure the quick way to get defensive player is no seriously i've had a lot of good coaching start in high school from high school coach and and then in college at university of arkansas with eddie said we spent three and a half hours practicing three hours would be own defense and fundamentally the correct way they play defense when i got to the milwaukee bucks don nelson we drill probably half are practice home defense i think more coaching and just developing the good habit of becoming a good defensive player through good coaching then it was my desire to be a good is there a particular attitude that it takes to be a good defensive player i mean do you have to disdain warning to be off pensively you have to say look these are what my limitations are what is the attitude you have to take about that no i think that you can be a great defensive player and be a phenomenal officer player also there are very few cases that that happens michael jordan is a good example of someone that's a good defender and a great offensive player but usually you have to just make up your mind that from a technical standpoint you're gonna work and you're gonna make sure that your opponent has to expend energy for every point here she gets and that's attitude i have i just don't wanna give it up give up anything easy and also if you could still have some decent player city i've always had the belief that all things being equal in nb hey if you're a player with a say average skills maybe above average because obviously the players at that level are outstanding athletes in their own right but if you could develop that skill that defensive player skill that you can always find a job somewhere in nb i am i correct in that thinking yeah she won't get paid what you think it will always find a job i think i you could just point throughout history of players that have played ten eleven twelve years just being great defensive players because there are so very few people they're willing to sacrifice their office of game because of the glory in the pay those involved in office a player to sacrifice that to be a good defensive player.

ten eleven twelve years three hours
3 Things To Know Around Detroit

Daily Detroit

04:29 min | 2 years ago

3 Things To Know Around Detroit

"The city of Detroit is one of ten American cities to join a new. National program meant to figure out how to help residents make more money and improve their economic status. The initiative is funded by the Bloomberg philanthropies the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the bomber group, which is led by former Microsoft CEO and Detroit area. Native Steve bomber the program goes for eighteen months. The plan is to test ideas, that connect low income residents and affordable housing to opportunities for more income and provide services that help them become more financially stable, the goal is to make affordable housing throughout the city and access point to city services. This is a big deal across the United States as the likelihood that the current generation, earns more than their parents is declining, especially among the middle class and poor. The program came out of a recent survey of American mayors, who said economic issues are their biggest local challenge the results of the twelve million dollar program will then be shared across the country. Other cities in the program include Lansing, right here in Michigan. New. Orleans, Louisiana Newark, New Jersey and others separately. The bomber group last fall issued sixteen million dollars in grants to eighteen Detroit area. Nonprofits to help children and families in poverty. You've heard of hell Michigan, right? It's an unincorporated town near paint ni in Livingston county. It's famous for its road signs a tavern and stores selling, souvenirs branded with the community's name now a California youtuber has purchased the whole five acre commercial property, and officially renamed it gay hill in protest of the Trump administration. Elijah Daniel says the move is in protest of the Trump administration's decision to not allow US embassies to fly the gay pride rainbow flag during June for pride month. He also says the only flags it will be allowed to be flown. Our pride flags, though. That's apparently just joke. And no ban is actually in place on other flags. Daniel is a comedian and musician, who has around five hundred and eighty thousand subscribers on YouTube. He's also the owner of an LGBTQ cannabis business in Los Angeles in two thousand seventeen he participated in hell's program to become mayor for a day, but was promptly. Impeached. He has a video, documenting the experience, titled I became mayor and banned street people from my town, all in lower case letters, Daniel tells NBC news. He is trying to engage his young audience in politics. We picked an interesting place to do it gera-, because hell Michigan in Livingston county. That's deep red country there man. Let me tell you. So I gotta ask, like, how does one by town. I didn't know you could do that because it's on Inc. There is no it's not really a town. There's no village council or or or township board of trustees or anything. It's, it's I think it's sort of unofficially called a hamlet. I mean it's really it's, it's have you ever been there? No. It's so it's like five acres. It's kind of it almost feels like a theme park at this point. There's like I think there's a mini golf course. If I remember correctly, there's a tavern. There's souvenir store. There's technically ally berry. It's right near the banks of the Huron river and everything it's really pretty there. I mean it's beautiful surroundings. It's out near the Pinkney state recreation area. So it's. It's heavily wooded everything. But it's it's not really a town. Do you think we should do the show at hell? Hamlet. We'll keep that one into consideration. The conservatory in bells reopening nearly a month ahead of schedule. The one hundred and fifteen year old Anna scripts, Whitcomb, conservatory reopens Wednesday after a number of structural repairs water head severely compromised. The twenty one foot steel trusses that are original to the building the new trusses used galvanized steel, and they'll be more resistant to the weather the project cost two and a half million dollars. It was paid for by the Michigan DNR and the Ralph c Wilson junior foundation. You know, I'm really glad to see this project happen. I have some so many memories of this place because my grandmother was a member of the o botanical society, and she would drag me around, like ten eleven twelve years old, hauling pots, and plants and all kinds of stuff around that place. It's such a such a cool, little facility, not just the, the public property. They've got all those greenhouses as well. It's a true, gem, one of the best staycationing, especially like in midwinter like you know, if you've got, like a dismal February day, no better like mood. Up than to pay visit to the belau

Elijah Daniel Michigan Detroit United States Livingston County Trump Administration Steve Bomber Bloomberg Michigan Dnr Melinda Gates Foundation Microsoft Lansing Huron River CEO Orleans NBC Golf California Pinkney State Recreation Bill
"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:12 min | 2 years ago

"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Have connected them with another into assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the laws of nature and of nature's God entitled them a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation. We hold these truths to be self evident that all men are created equal that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights, that among. These are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness that to secure these rights governments are instituted among men deriving, their just powers from the consent of the governed that whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends. It is the right of the people to alter or to abolish it and to institute, new government lane. It's foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form as to them shall seem most likely to affect their safety and happiness understand how damn revolutionary those words were back then you're all endowed by your creator with certain unalienable rights, and whenever you believe that a government is you surfing, those rights. The people Jefferson said have the right to overthrow that government. But he owned slaves back when it was legal to do so, so he's a bad man. He's bad man. Very, very bad. Man. Let me go to Quincy. Hey quincy. While. Be reading some of the. Made of America to play when was. It was. Stavish now and try to that. Will no big thing. One. All. Hey quincy. Did our did our did our founding fathers do some bad things? Yes or no? Exterminate. I asked you really simple question did our founding fathers do some bad things? Okay. So do we judge them only on those bad things they did did they do some good things, too? Land belong to 'em slaves. They gave us this country. I'll start their flaw flaws in all Quincy flaws in all they gave us a free country. Is that a good thing? Quincy let me ask you because I respect your opinion man. Should we be thankful for what guys like George Washington? And Thomas Jefferson did. Yes or no? Sparkle extermination of native people. I'm gonna take that as a no, Josh. So I I hear you Quincy. Thank you. They didn't do anything about slavery. And so many years later, we had to have a war to deal with slavery. And you can complain about whatever they did the native Americans. But what I asked you Quincy was with all of that. And I've acknowledged that our founding fathers were flawed. Thomas Jefferson was a flawed man. George Washington, even even Washington was flawed man. Did they not do some good? And there's a guy Quincy right there. I don't know. But he called into this radio show in the year twenty nineteen June something or other twenty nineteen it's hard to tell what month is, is because it's cold, this crap outside, but there's Quincy an American citizen. I'm going to assume who can't acknowledge that George Washington and Thomas Jefferson did anything. Good. There's an American who is not thankful for what guys like Washington and Jefferson did. And I would argue who sees not alone. There are a lot more Quincy's out there. Let me go to Ken. Hey, ken? Hey Joe, Joe again, always a great show just wanted to comment. The revolution has started. It is another revolution. Seventeen seventy six in the first inning. We only got one out but we're fighting we're not giving and we're not negotiating. I just wanted to pass that on because that's what made America and that's what's gonna keep America great. Again. You're Ken, I agree. I've been saying that now for a long, long time. Nine ten eleven twelve years. I do believe that this country that we all even though we disagree on a lot of these issues and we disagree on our founding principles you put Quincy in the studio together this probably not a lot that Quincy and I agree on. I'm going to assume that Quincy loves this country. Just like I love this country. But I would say that Quincy, I probably have two very distinct ideas of what America is. And I agree the country right now is going through what I've called the third American revolution. And it is early. Can I agree with that? We're only we're only ten eleven twelve years into it. It's really early. But you know what all I want, and we're going to have to another topic. The state of Florida did something really good today in the state of Illinois did with the state of Illinois. Always does something that's so good. And we'll get all of that after the top of the hour. I just wish more people in this country knew their history, new American history. That's.

Quincy Thomas Jefferson George Washington America Ken Illinois Josh Florida Joe Nine ten eleven twelve years ten eleven twelve years
"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"I noticed that I was on the year this year up about three percent. You know, it's not one of those things back to be up and the yield on it. Now, it's two point nine percent. So it's getting pretty it's gotten a pretty decent yield two. So, you know, there are some things you can do from a conservative perspective. If you don't want to deal with all the ups and downs, and maybe do a little bit better than you might own CD. So that's what I would say to. To some people. But look if you've been out if you're young it's your relevant because if you're young you've got such a long time horizon that all you should be carrying about is. Humilating shares of stuff not really caring about whether it's upper down. Now, you still have to develop that mindset. That's the mindset you ought to have if you're young. So it's almost any time. It's good to go in because the start that process of accumulating shares. If you are nearing retirement. And you managed to preserve some of your principal by getting out. I don't know that I'd want you to jump in here because we're still at a or still at the high that we were in the for at the end of the first quarter. So we're still at a pretty decent high. And I don't know if this is a good time to get it on the short term. So. Try to you know, I tried to explain my my my set and what I was trying to get across to people. And I know that that's hard to do sometimes on a conference call even on the program. But look if you are if you are like a young person in the sense that I'm getting into the market baby for the first time or been afra- while I'm getting back in I'm getting in the market. And I I've got ten eleven twelve years before I'm likely to use this money in any way, shape or form. Then I would say. You.

Humilating principal ten eleven twelve years three percent nine percent
"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on In Black America

"In those local communities is just connecting them with the resources to have them be able to achieve their goals, any particular positives that you were apart of when you HHS that you proud of you know, I think we were. Worked to make sure that in every state or attempted to work to make sure every state whoever was in charge. It'd be rebel Republican or democrat that they had a minority health agenda, meaning that there was somebody within that state some infrastructure, some leadership within the health department or in other places that particularly was going to have tackling the needs of minority communities the priority. And we're able to expand that during my time there where the vast majority of states had some infrastructure that equated to tackling issues that are pertinent to minority communities. So I think that's the kind of thing that made us feel the most rewarding because what happens in DC only matters. If it affects the lives of people outside of these e so we were really more interested in how how we kind of spread the that that that infrastructure and change to two states across the board. Violence affected, the health and wellbeing of some of these communities, so you know, gun violence is it a real interesting challenge as as you probably know in most of our major cities gun violence is on the rise. And the people forget that it's not just about the actual victim from either homicide or a suicide or something related. You know, there is people who are injured their family members that are impacted there are people who just witnessed this, and then have PTSD because of that, and it was a huge undergrowth epidemic of PTSD and a lot of urban communities from people who have witnessed extreme levels of violent, but have never been provided with either the the clinical psychiatric or any other kind of support mechanism to deal with the witness. So they're the epidemic of gun violence. Not just limited to the people who live or die in an actual conflict. But the people who are impacted. Sometimes for generations to come especially when you have young people who are, you know, ten eleven twelve years old, sometimes even younger who witnessed horrific things that adults would be forever changed, and they see and then they see little children. And so, you know, we have to forget we often forget about the impact that gun violence has survivor as well. Doctors about the Kansas City youth and family violence prevention plan. Yeah. So, you know, there's there's a lot of different local strategies that will see that. We think have shown hope and Kansas City they have implemented. Something called aim fame for peace program, which is the centers for disease control program, what they try to do there as treat gun violence as any disease like hypertension, diabetes and try to identify the risk factors and treat them in a preventative way. So you might look at what are the kinds of things that lead to a hostile sich. Situation then lead an actual violent act. And then before you even get to that what are the kinds of coping mechanism and things that you can teach young people older people anybody involved to try to be escalate these things before they ride gun violence or homicides. Again, are things that actual act is often the result of multiple things leading up to that. So just like any disease process, you have multiple potential intervention points where you can intervene to make either that incident not happen are me people healthier. So we often say that, you know, violence, the public health issue, and we should treat it many times. Like how we treat health issues. Found the Boston man's cardiovascular health project. Yes. Yes..

PTSD Kansas City Boston ten eleven twelve years
"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"It's like the introverted types, the ones who felt silence women people of color, poor people, the disabled queer, you know, all these people who had long been silenced in the mainstream. Finally felt like, wow, I have a waste that people are listening, and I think that's what began to shift it, and it's been still be funny. Right. You know, we we have things that we need to say yet is a higher wire act of money now like probably like it, which I which I don't mind, I think the front of your smarter people will do fine. You know what? But is higher wire. 'cause I just remember when it was like people saying like we say something like a funny at night, and it's on some of the completely offensive. And like, I think about things that missed the Twitter wave that kind of like passed by grandfather law like this Japan Chapelle show and docks like like it was right on the burgeoning of of that right on the social media now, my ooh, we would've toward it. They in the peace. About the MLK episode from the wound docks that would have never flown on Twitter day talk about the king like that. Ever had that happen ever been here? We are. You know, I still remember when you started using you owe cases and started this this big movement. And it really brought a lot of stuff to the forefront with street harassment, and you know, and then like the the black experience within it to because I think a lot of the street harassment conversation have been like white feminism white women talk. I still remember that really. It was like a poignant video where this one was walking out of three and people were three harassing. But then like everyone in the video was like a black, dude. So. It was like it was like two fold. It was live one. We know that it's like white women who are talking about being harassed and was mostly men of color. And so as women colored particularly black women were like, wait a minute. You're not gonna paint our brothers as the only ones that are doing this. You know, like we had an issue with that. But also, we're experiencing this too in your forgetting that and we wanted to shift the narrative, and so you okay, this became like super important for, you know, especially like black and Latino women who are like, listen, we've been dealing with this stuff since we were ten eleven twelve years old and nobody's telling our story, and it's not just about. Hey, baby. Or hey sexy. It's about I'm grab you throw something at you. I'm Bali you for ten blocks. You know, we were at kill you. Right. We had you know, you'll cases helped shift the way the media was covering street harassment, and they were picking up on the stories of women who having your throat sliced and being killed for not giving their phone numbers. So I thought that that was..

harassment Twitter Japan Chapelle ten eleven twelve years
"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on Download

Download

03:52 min | 3 years ago

"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on Download

"This seems like seems like one of those things sometimes you see this info manufacturers where they they. They think they know where things are going to go. And so they wanna be I right. So that people talked about button list Port Louis phones. And so these folks made one it's another I right? So now the question is do people follow are you the first to someplace that? No one else is going to go, which is less. Impressive. Also, this is where you end up with those things like that. There was that phone that was the first one to drop the headphone, Jack. And it's almost like you're just putting it in there. So that. When apple inevitably does later, somebody can go actually, they weren't the first. There was this obscure phone that did it that nobody cared about. And they were I like great. Okay. Great. That's right. So now if anybody else does this people are going to be like the mazes zero was first nobody bought it. But it was I. So I think that's really what it's about. It is interesting. They're using e som. Which of course, apple and others are doing I think I think that very well like actually could be more the future than this. But you know, they go why why have buttons? So the other weird phone is from show me, and it is a folding smartphones that we see Samsung has talked about it, and that they're going to do a folding galaxy this year this from show me is a thing. They posted on social media. It looks like a phone or well, what's the video? It looks like a little tablet, and then the guy like folds one side over and the other side over and now it's like a phone, which is interesting folding, this folding screen tech is definitely coming the part that really bothered me about it. I know this is weird. But is that they showed the back and not only doesn't not look great on the back because it's got you know, these big thing down the middle of. That's like a. I don't know. You can you can you know, what it looks like it kind of looks like a, but anyway, that's what I'm saying. Also, the screen was on like in the demo. So like, you're holding your phone and looking at the front, and they're still like background colors and stuff playing on the back. And I thought no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no. I don't want that. At all. Also that if waltz down in thirds, so you have to do the two gestures to get it to be small instead of just like folding it in half. I don't know I feel like we're definitely wire. And did a piece about this this week to Lauren good at wired about how we are. We seem to be exiting an era of stability and entering an era of spectacularly weird smartphones trying out late just trying to do something new. We're we're ten eleven twelve years into this. Now, if you count the iphone sort of being day one. So maybe this time if people experiment with the form factor, I've got problems with this particular thing, I think you touched on really well, but. But I can't help. But think that, you know, the next ten years, maybe there is some sort of new form factor that we haven't considered or has it been possible yet? So I'm excited like the nerd in me is excited to see what these companies wanna do. And you know, the same time, I think will be more easily to take seriously after we see what Samsung has done, you know, these other companies they are big in China and other places, but Samsung will bring a level of fit and finish this that we haven't seen yet. And so I think I think that may be sort of the the starting point for me to take them more seriously. Well, we'll we'll see where it goes next. I think the big question is what will people actually like to use? Right. Because most of this stuff is going to be bad. That's like, and I don't mean that I'm specifically calling out any new technology here. I'm just saying that has what history shown us is that this is the flinging spaghetti against the wall phase and a lot of it's just not gonna stick. Where people are going to be like..

Samsung apple Port Louis Jack Lauren China ten eleven twelve years ten years
"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on The Skylines Podcast

The Skylines Podcast

07:30 min | 3 years ago

"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on The Skylines Podcast

"Asia than you do like you're in China. However over the past ten eleven twelve years, I would say there's been so much of an effort by the Chinese government to to balance out, the the wealth and economic growth that that large. Difference that you would have seen ten fifteen years ago between the the large east coast cities in inland cities is rapidly disappearing again, there's so much effort to bring wealth inland, but of course, bringing wealth inland means that they're just they want to make sure that the city has a proper Monir face on it. They wanna make sure that they that that large companies usually their state owned companies in state owned developments putting up buildings there that are just as impressive as as what have what we've seen going up in places like Shanghai Guangzhou in Beijing for the past twenty years, but I guess I'm asking slightly different question. Which is if I think about the United States, I kind of have an idea that New York is like skyscrapers, a major finance. Los Angeles is is an detainment and DC as politics and Detroit used to because now a wreck I kind of have to I'm kind of curious if you can maybe talk through we'll do we'll do some of the biggest Chinese if he's represent in that way. Do they have those kind of individual identities within China? I would say, so if we talk, for example, about Beijing Shanghai, there are differences there because Shanghai has always been just purely. It's always been a port city. So it's been surely about commerce into finance. So the pace feels a little bit faster when you're in Sean, high the way that the the city was constructed is it's a little bit the streets are bit. Now are narrower it certainly feels more height as you're trying to get through whether you're in a bicycle whether cab whether you're walking around at it feels more crowded pace seems that faster. Whereas Beijing, you've got you know, that's the seat of government. And we all know governments. Don't. At work as quickly as commerce. So the feeling is more that way. And also the way that the way the city is laid out very different the the avenues are incredibly broad in Beijing, they so they have to put up like, for example, these sprawling pedestrian bridges over these giant intersections, you know, really to get from one corner via intersection in some cases to the opposite corner. Is it might take you about five minutes to get sort of to get across the street, whereas Shanghai, you're zipping back and forth. Yes. So I would say that Shanghai. The flavor of it is does feel like it's more of a commercial city. Beijing does feel more like an official city a mold about some of the over those the tube will about some of the next terrorist cities. I mean, what can you tell us about any of those short? Why I would say once you get to the next year of cities it kinda feels the same. It's. Always hotels office buildings residential developments that all kind of feel the same. I mean, I would say when I was traveling around in between my periods of study I would travel around in by around the twenty years ago. I felt more of a difference. Like, for example in the southwest. You've got Quinn main. And there was something about you could see the there was a there was a regional style architecture there. And I think it had a lot to do with just the the weather conveying its it southwest. So it's warmer. It's it's it's it's wetter. So they're certain building techniques in you would see you kinda felt a little more rustic than say a second tier city in the northeast where you would have just be kind of more concrete, and it would feel it would feel more sort of like what you imagined from like a post communist than to like a post-communist city. So there. That kind of difference. But again that was twenty years ago when I would notice that. Whereas now, it's again, you've got these very large property development companies in fate. Do they're they're putting up developments in every big city, and they all kind of look the same. So I you don't feel the once you get to that second tier city. You don't might off survey shin. Listen, it didn't seem as different as it used to be something I've been told which may be room, so maybe to make an incredibly ignorant comment, but something they have this the within China. There is going to less interest in protecting heritage than new Gemini get in Europe, for example. And so a lot of older buildings have have been kind of demolished in this kind of rush towards modernization does that fit with your experienced true? Yeah. Absolutely. And in Beijing just as an example in Beijing for hundreds of years there were traditional neighborhoods. They were called the who tomes and. Who tones were sort of like a maids almost like a Warren. If you will of neighborhood, it's just a a network of alleys. They don't make a lot of sense. You kind of just have to know where you are from having grown up there and the homes were were core guard homes, so you would have rooms connected in square courtyard in the center and most of Beijing was composed of this kind of neighborhood say no up too early the century. And then really over the past twenty years they've been just knocking most of them down. However, the thirties do recognize that the who tone neighborhoods are actually a huge tourist draw. So there are there are still sections in Beijing futon housing that they realized that they need to preserve. So there's there's a real effort to keep all that intact. But it's sort of becoming the area. Now feels more like a tourist attraction. Than in authentic neighborhood. Which is the problem with without approach say, it sounds quite utilitarian flight, you know, this architecture serving specific purpose, this kind of no sentimentality about preserving something just because he's old is purely like what is it for in today's world. Yeah. Exactly. And I think that really dredges up debate too because in the old Huta neighborhoods. There was you didn't have plumbing. I mean, you had the they're basically communal bathrooms that all of the residents us, and they weren't built for you. Couldn't just things like a basic, plumbing, electrical assistance, robbery difficult to install. So there are quite a lot. It's not like the government wants to knock him down because they think it's bad and all the people are angry about it. Actually, I would say most of the people in those neighborhoods were quite happy to move into a new modern building that had air conditioning and heat and. And modern plumbing and and Monir bathrooms. So it's a complex issue. Historical preservation, preservation of neighborhoods in China is difficult issue because the lot of the historic neighborhoods, very difficult to bring them into to to kind of conduct modern living in them. So

Beijing China Beijing Shanghai Shanghai Shanghai Guangzhou Chinese government Asia Los Angeles United States New York Detroit DC robbery Sean Europe Monir Quinn official Huta twenty years
"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on No Jumper

No Jumper

05:16 min | 3 years ago

"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on No Jumper

"I'm like it's like it's like telling me keep playing his game, you strong key planning. Is key planning is li- airtime. I feel like. I got like I'm not doing the next thing. Next naked doing. That's why our generation fucked up. You feel me killer only killer these next thing killing and they only sell drugs next drug Robert go get from robber. Is like. Do it. The fuck you wanna do it on your fucking with? Nobody else think about it. 'cause the people who really support you people really low you feeling so weird thing wrapping because it's like a lot of people get into when they're like ten eleven twelve years old. They start wrapping. And then what the average person is like completely done with it by sixteen seventeen eighteen rare. When I was six I used is right though. 'cause like I don't like talking I mixed. I've caught antisocial feeling right? Because like I was the kid that was like, I don't know it just like my mind thought other than what I am. I watch cartoons. When I was a kid. I watch sports when I was a kid you feel like in school. I hated being in school childish fuck like. But it was like I was never like, no, no second film, lousy always meal. I don't care about nobody. Like think about nothing feel me. I was fed as little kid were you fat has little kid with glasses and braces, I don't expect expect you say you that. say that. Opened up. My question lists of fall back. So I'll forget anything him your fat. You don't look like affect you. Gotta me. I was a fat fucking night thirteen year old even high school like. I hated high school. I was always smarter light arguing Maryvale. I'm like, I I'm gonna be honest, which added God as my whole high school except for social studies in law class had a f- in Jim. You are bringing shorts will now a fuck about that shit. Just like I was like the debate of here doing school like there's more argued to drinking out of class. Oh, yeah. Me too. I got since the principal's office almost every day for like six grade. I was reading the old journal our entry. I wrote back in the day. And I was like, oh, yeah. I I get sent to the office. Like all these new I really wanted to do. Right. But I was keeping that school ship because it made my momma happy. To do made me happy. How might that school shit stressing me to fuck out? I can't deal with smoking cigarettes, my Lazarus school every day smoking, a pack of cigarettes high for my momma, she just found this out a year ago smoke any more cigarettes. Let me on rounds. Would you like I hit a cigarette when I'm drunk as hell but saying what is that when you're drunk? You want a cigarette. I don't know what it is the same way never smoked cigarettes with any seriousness in my life. I think it's just close enough to weed that when I'm drunk. It's like shit. All right. I'll take those. Will you ever big on credit card fraud? Anybody speak on. While I'm not surprised because man, some of them bang gang signs are talking about credit card more than credit card fraud more than any one. I've ever heard rapping as it has. Like. That's a new hustle. Like real cricket the eighties. I had two thousand. Two thousand three I was sweeping like where when I think about it. Now, I didn't know anyone else who is into back then and I wanna tell anybody because I wanna start doing great. It was crazy. Yeah. And it was like, I know by I don't even know what I was doing for. Yeah. When I look back on it. We were pretty messy liked now. It's time that you feel me so much legal money out here for. So when you think about rap is a feeling good right now you like more confident than ever in terms of your spot. What you've been doing them like extra mo- confident in ever. I didn't like I didn't fought on my demons in laws, all my egos in knowhow to suck up my pride filming. Understand what's important for. So lie like even music. I've been making light everything like heart music. Live flight really can't ban ban. Man. That's what makes recall. Like even one dad's just thought one day. I'm like..

fraud Robert Maryvale principal ten eleven twelve years thirteen year one day
"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

This Movie Changed Me

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"ten eleven twelve years" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

"Harsh an exciting over and over announcing your place in the family of things. Well, it's a subject I knew well a lot about. You know? So it it was there, and you it was there. I was there. This Yes. coincided heard those geese, and you know, says lied about anguish and where that came from. I don't know. I'd say that's one of the poems. It it just came. Yeah. Wasn't dictated. But that's what like us to say. Yeah. Takes wants to rally took dictation. And that's just the way of saying you don't do it comes from. Yeah. But if you if you done a lot and Lord knows when I started writing poetry. It was rotten. The poetry was sure I missed that was ten eleven twelve years old. But I kept at it kept. At it kept at it. I I used to say I I with my pencil. I've traveled to the moon and back probably a few times. I kept at it every day and. Finally, you learn things are you still here in this, very different landscape. Are you still standing with your notebook every morning? Not as much not as much, and I I've had I've had some periods of time of rather bad health. So so and in the north with which I was very familiar. I'd go out in the woods. And I'd always see something, and it's very different down. Here is very seasonal. I thought all the birds were down here in the winter. Unfortunately there farther south and you'd see them. Passing by and some the birds are very a lot of them are large and exotic right? There is very different world you've written. You know, another thing you've said is that as you've gotten older you've become something you never were before? Which is funny. Become I can be and you're in the blue horses book, which is a two thousand fourteen book is has it has a lot of Wednesay to it, including about this place this new landscape, right? When you said that you made the Mark about the mangroves in Utah. You have this really wonderful language about how the trees are. So leggy. Yeah. What did I say something affinity takes longer defections easy? But it takes a while. Well, it's true. What I walk from here. Just out of the intercoastal mangroves mangoes mangoes once in awhile and otter which is very nice to see and a Herron, but maybe the porpoises in the water. Couple of times I've seen the mad at t's. But it's not the same. And it's really shocking difference. And I've chosen it. And, but, but there is a kind of emotional element in the fact that things have disappeared. My Tyler my house at the time was very different by left. It's you mean, the the town province town had already province town was changing very rapidly kind of little Hampton, the the the wealthier successful people were coming in. It wasn't the hardworking artists and writers anymore. So that was different. But nevertheless, the woods were there. And I do miss. And I wish there fifty years. That's a long time. Yeah. And the weather was there. Well, I filled out a couple of times in the winter broke broke bones. So yeah, it was time not to do that..

Wednesay Lord Herron Utah ten eleven twelve years fifty years