17 Burst results for "Temple Mount Shelly"

"temple mount shelly" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

12:49 min | 2 years ago

"temple mount shelly" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Shelley niece is the vice president of the Jerusalem connection international and nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand to two thousand and four where she learned conversational Hebrew and received her EMMY and Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the gap. The high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending the two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications or articles have appeared in the Jerusalem Post. A route Sheba front page magazine. And more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at coumarin in two thousand and nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national fund's speakers bureau, she is addressed various Jewish student groups and. On debate panels, and she is the author of the copper, scroll project an ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Richard. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take us back to the early nineteen fifties, the Kumaon caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, the copper schools, of course, part of that. But but just sort of paint that picture force if you will. Right. Well, so that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls. It's part of the Dead Sea scrolls collection, but you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on the miracle. That is the Dead Sea scrolls and to really put yourself in that time and point in history. When that she's schools are flooding the black market. I'm sure the, you know, the story of how the first that sea scrolls were found made at this point. It's kind of part of our of our cultural fabric. But. But it had it not been somehow the Dead Sea scrolls were hidden for two thousand years, and and it was in the nineteen fifties. Probably nineteen forty seven. Whenever no one knows quite for. Sure. Nineteen forty seven. Nineteen Forty-six that bedouin just letting their sheep run across sparse vegetation and the day in desert that one of the bedouin through Iraq in a cave, and here's a shattering of something and. Goes home and thinks he's too scared to go in the cave that day that goes back the next day with his cousins thinking that they'll find some sort of very treasure and really were quite disappointed when I was just broken pottery. And what their purposes they were literate in Arabic, much less. Hebrew, or ancient Hebrew. So he really had no idea what they had. But they brought it back to their cap. Put it in a bag and hung up from temple and debated. Sort of what to do about it? How to repurpose it? There's one part of the story is that there was a debate about repurposing the leather for something else. And and you imagine, oh, my Lord what a loss, but it was one on goal who suggested, hey, let's go to Bethlehem on a market day that that when already going to Bethlehem, and and we'll shop around and he knew somebody who knew somebody that was connected to that the black market. And that's that's where this story. But that's us pros began. So really to me even just right up front in front of the getting it's a it's a story of just providence. Absolutely. And why are they significant? These scrolls have Hebrew inscriptions on them. What is their significance? Right. Well, so before the Dead Sea scrolls, really the Dead Sea scrolls are pre dating our oldest known Hebrew manuscripts by a thousand years. So in terms of what that did for scholarship. What it did for our understanding? This is pre canonization of the bible. So really what it did for understanding of that process and really in first century to respond what books where Jewish sects reading what books were the most popular. It gives us a shines like a light into this window of time. That's so critical for the rest of the two thousand years for our bible, and the even just books the book. Really turning biblical scholarship on its head in terms of what did I say, it looked like two thousand years ago, would it Samuel chronicles, and what they were the psalms in the same order then as now and what we found scholars for scholars small differences. You know, they make their living off of what did they say the narcissism of small differences? And so for them, they look at Samuel, and they see differences and study those, but for our purposes for the purposes as any believer. I mean, it is astonishing that the bible was able to maintain its it's authentic fabric for for all of this time. And they then looks like Isaiah now, and certainly Genesis through. Deuteronomy? Look the same now. As it did then. Right. So for people who argue that the bible has been mistranslated or the meanings have been changed. The the discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, really a confirms and buttresses the the consistency of the biblical narrative. It hasn't changed. Correct. Absolutely. That's exactly right. And and so amongst the the these scrolls of papyrus are two different types of scrolls. Copper what do they look like? So the copper scroll. There's we've always thought before that. There are eleven caves that house Dead Sea scrolls last year, twelve cable was found not with close. But we know that it wasn't pad scroll. So there was twelve caves, the copper, scroll was found in every one of the few caves, it was found by legitimate archaeological team, I said the other squirrel caves were found by bad ones. I mean, really in the fifties. It was just a race against time. In terms of who could find the next said, she's close cave. I would it be the bedouin are the archaeologists than the bedouin usually won that war in the case of Cape three it was a French. Archaeologist. And so you can imagine what they're expecting defined as it scrolls written on papyrus or leather and every one of those is, you know, a treasurer in its own right? But it was it was case three that they excavated for ten days, and they were pretty disappointed because they could tell that it wants house. At least forty scrolls. But that that. Roof of the cave had collapsed in antiquity. So once it clap once it broke, the jars than the girls were exposed to rodents and time, and and so most of this growth, where we're really not salvageable, and they were closing out the big and really it was in the last hours of of that last day of the day that they see that almost there's this false wall at the back of the cave. Sorry, I guess another. The actual appearance of the conference. Call back feel like I have to pay this picture. Thank you. So so it was it was like this false wall, the secret chamber, and I mean, that's just the only way I can describe it. Do they chips through it live stone? And and they see I'm like every other scroll that's been found really in the Dead Sea scrolls is it was resting on a man-made shelf behind this wall, which probably had collapsed in antiquity. And so there's really just like nature had created the perfect hiding spot for this super unusual that she throws. So the way looked was two roles. So really, the copper scroll is ones grow. But and integrity when they were rolling it up. It had snapped in two those two roles living next to each other. And they were green the color of the statue of liberty because copper copper does. And and it got that. Nice. Patina on it. Right. It oxidises. Yeah. Exactly. And that would prove to to really be protected for the copper school for two thousand years. And and so once they got it, and where he would have clean it off and use mirrors. And and and and they could only see the words that were on the outside of the copper scroll. And so it took three years for them to be able to open it. Now, we know that the copper scroll originally measured about seven feet long was cut wide. It has rivets on the four corners, which means at some point. It was probably hung on a wall. And and that the copper scroll was was what it must have been incredibly precarious unscrew rolling something that had been scrolled up for twenty four hundred years something that's made of I don't know how brittle it is. But copper I mean the decision. To try an unscripted without destroying it. That must have been nerve wracking. Absolutely. I think it was a combination. You know, now, I don't think that we would have tried to cut it open, our unfurl it. Now, I think we would have the ability to probably been able to scan it and see see what was there without even making such a risky move. But then they they sat on it for three years, and partly for this reason, it was it was it was shattered. You know, it was so vulnerable even to just the slightest touch. So they really they they talked to a Metallurgist at Johns Hopkins. They really shocked it out kind of internationally just is there any expert out there that could help us in this process to unroll it and pretty much universally no-one said that it was worth the risk of of unrolling it, but they could see words on the outside. Three words that kept repeating themselves were dig and gold. And so I mean, they knew what they had on their hands. It was something unlike every other Dead Sea scroll, but I think too. There was a, you know, Israel's not sovereign over to respond at this time that the Dead Sea scrolls are in the hands of the Jordanian antiquities thirty. And so no Jewish scholars are allowed to work on the Dead Sea scrolls at this point, which really reduced their expertise level as well. I think the Dead Sea scroll aditorial team that was there which is worth of book in its own. Right. Just to those guys were they were overwhelmed. They were you know, being flooded with all of these cease both every day. So I just don't think that the copper scroll was very high on their priority list. They had a publishing schedule that they would be thirty years off on in terms of once they were able to to get the Dead Sea scrolls published and to the public so they were going to spend the rest of their lives being really far behind on their workload. But one guy. His name was John allegro. He he's not at the back of the Dead Sea school editorial team, he just he works fast. He wasn't as careful methodical as the rest of them that really we have him to sort of thank for getting getting his the Dead Sea scrolls, just inviting the public into that process. From the very beginning. And he was the one that champion the copper scroll, and he brought it to his alma mater, which was Manchester university and an England, and and he found he went to different different antiquities experts. But he ended up. Finding a guy. Henry right Baker. Who is just a professor an engineering professor at the college of engineering at Manchester university. So really, no no business really being being the guy that would open the copper scroll, but he had guts, and he had faith, and and he thought he could do it..

Dead Sea bedouin Dead Sea school Bethlehem Shelley Samuel Israel Temple Mount Shelly Manchester university EMMY page magazine Henry right Baker Ben Gurion university Jerusalem Richard Shelly Washington Jerusalem Post Isaiah
"temple mount shelly" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

12:49 min | 2 years ago

"temple mount shelly" Discussed on KNSS

"Shelley niece is the vice president of the Jerusalem connection international and nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand two thousand and four where she learned conversational Hebrew and received her EMMY and Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the Negev the high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending the two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications or articles have appeared in the Jerusalem Post. A route Sheba front page magazine. And more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at Kumaon in two thousand and nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national fund's speakers bureau, she is addressed various Jewish student groups and participate. On debate panels, and she is the author of the copper, scroll project an ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Great, richard. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take us back to the early nineteen fifties, the coumarin caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, the copper schools, of course, part of that. But but just sort of paint that picture for us if you will. Right. Well, so that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls. It's part of the Dead Sea scrolls collection, but you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on the miracle. That is the Dead Sea scrolls and to really put yourself in that time and point in history. When that she schools are flooding the black market. I'm sure, you know, the story of how the first Dead Sea scrolls were found me at this point. It's kind of part of our of our cultural fabric. But. But it had it not been somehow the Dead Sea scrolls were hidden for two thousand years, and and it was in the nineteen fifties. Probably nineteen forty seven. Whenever no one knows quite for. Sure. Nineteen forty seven nineteen Forty-six that bedouin just letting their sheep run across sparse vegetation, and the Judean desert that one of the bedouin through Iraq and a cave, and here's a shattering of something and goes home and thinks he's too scared to go in the cave that day that goes back the next day with his cousins thinking that they'll find some sort of very treasure and really were quite disappointed when I was just broken pottery. And what their purposes they were illiterate and era bec- much less. Hebrew, or ancient Hebrew. So he really had no idea what they had. But they brought it back to the recap put it in a in a bag and hung it from. Poll and debated. Sort of what to do about it? How to repurpose it? There's one part of the story is that there was a debate about repurposing the leather for something else. And can you imagine? Oh, my Lord what a loss, but it was one on goal who suggested. Hey, let's go to Bethlehem on a market day that that win are already going to Bethlehem, and and we'll shop around and he knew somebody who knew somebody that was connected to that the black market. And that's that's where the story the Dead Sea scrolls began so really to me even just right up front in front of the getting is it's a it's a story of providence. Absolutely. And why are they significant? These scrolls have Hebrew inscriptions on them. What is their significance? Right. Well, so the four the Dead Sea scrolls, really the Dead Sea scrolls are pre dating our oldest known Hebrew manuscripts by a thousand years. So in terms of what that did for scholarship. What it did for our understanding? This is pre canonization of the bible. So really what it did for our understanding of that process and really in first century to respond what books where Jewish sects reading what books were the most popular. It gives us a shines like a light into this window of time. That's so critical for the rest of the two thousand years for our bible and the even book the book. Really trading biblical scholarship on its head in terms of what did I say it look like two thousand years ago, would it Samuel chronicles and what they were the psalms in the same order. Then is now and what we found. I mean scholars for scholars small differences. You know, they make their living off of what did they say the narcissism of small differences? And so for them, they look at Samuel, and they see differences and study those, but for our purposes for the purposes of any believer. I mean, it is astonishing that the bible was able to maintain its its authentic fabric for for all of this time. And I then looks like Isaiah now and certainly Genesis through. Deuteronomy? Look the same now. As it did then. Right. So for people who argue that the bible has been mistranslated or the meanings have been changed. The the discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, really confirms and buttresses the the the consistency of the biblical narrative. It hasn't changed. Correct. Absolutely. That's exactly right. And and so amongst the the these scrolls of preposterous are two different types of scrolls. Copper what do they look like? So the copper scroll. There's we've always thought before that eleven caves that house Dead Sea scrolls last year, right twelve cable was found. Not what's close, but we know that at one touch scroll. So there was twelve caves the copper, scroll was found in cave. Every one of the few caves, it was found by legitimate archaeological team, most of the other squirrel as were found by bad ones. I mean, really in the fifties. It was just a race against time. In terms of who could find the next said, he's close case. I would it be the bedouin are the archaeologists and the bedouin usually one that or in the case of three it was a French archaeologist. And so you can imagine what they're expecting defined as a school was written on papyrus or leather. And every one of those is, you know, a treasure in its own, right? But it was it was case three that they excavated for ten days, and they were pretty disappointed because they could tell that it wants house at least forty scrolls. But that that. Roof at the cave had collapsed and integrity. So once it clap once it broke the jars than this girls were exposed to wrote in some time. And so most of this girl's where we're really not salvageable, and they were closing out the big and really it was in the last hours of of that last day of the dig that they see that almost there's this false wall at the back of the cave. Sorry, I. The actual appearance of the conference call, but I feel like I have to pay this picture. Thank you. So so it was it was like this false wall, the secret chamber, and I mean, that's just the only way I can describe it. And so they chips through it live stone. And and they see I'm like every other scroll that's been found really in the Dead Sea scrolls, as it was resting on a man-made shelf behind this wall, which probably had collapsed in antiquity. And so there's really just nature had created a perfect hiding spot for this. Super unusual that he's throws. So the way looked with two roles. So really, the copper close ones grow. But antiquity when they were rolling it up. It's not been too. So two rolls laying next to each other. And they were green the color of the statue of liberty because copper copper does. And and I got that. Nice. Patina on it. Right. Yeah. Exactly. And that would prove to really be a protect that for the copper school for two thousand years. And and so once they got it and where he will clean it off and use mirrors. And and and and they could only see the words that were on the outside of the copper scroll. And so it took three years for them to be able to open it. Now, we know that the copper scroll originally measured about seven feet long with a foot wide. It has rivets on the four corners, which means at some point. It was probably hung on a wall. And and the the copper scroll was was one. It must have been incredibly precarious unscrew rolling something that had been scrolled up for twenty four hundred years something that's made of I don't know how brittle it is. But copper I mean, the decision to try an unscripted without destroying it. That must have been nerve wracking. Absolutely. I think it was a combination. You know, now, I don't think that we would have tried to cut it open, our unfurl it. Now, I think we would have the ability to probably been able to scan it and and see see what was there without even making such a risky move. But then they they sat on it for three years, and partly for this reason, it was it was it was shatter. You know, it was so vulnerable even to just the slightest touch. So they really they they talked to a Metallurgist. And at Johns Hopkins, they really shocked it out kind of. Internationally, just is there any expert out there that can help us in this process to unroll it and pretty much universally no-one said that it was worth the risk of of unrolling it, but they could see words on the outside. In three words that capture feeding themselves were dig and gold in Cuba. So I mean, they knew what they had on their hands. It was something unlike every other Dead Sea scroll, but I think too. There was a, you know, Israel's not sovereign overtures son at this time that the Dead Sea scrolls are in the hands of the Jordanian antiquities thirty. And so no Jewish scholars are allowed to work on the Dead Sea scrolls at this point, which really reduced their expertise level as well. I think the Dead Sea scroll aditorial team that was there which is worth a book in its own. Right. Just to those guys were they were overwhelmed. They were you know, being flooded with all of these that cease both every day. So I just don't think that the copper scroll was very high on their priority list. They had a publishing schedule that they would be thirty years off on in terms of once they were able to to get the Dead Sea scrolls published and to the public so they were going to spend the rest of their lives being really far behind on their workload. But one guy. His name was John allegro. He he's not at the fabric of the Dead Sea scrolls editorial team, he just he works fast. He wasn't as careful methodical as the rest of them. But really we have him to sort of thing for getting getting his the Dead Sea scrolls, just inviting the public into that process. From the very beginning. And he was the one that champion the copper scroll, and he brought it to his alma mater, which was Manchester university in England, and and he found he went to different different antiquities experts. But he ended up finding a guy. Henry right Baker. Who is just a professor an engineering professor at the college of engineering at Manchester university. So really, no no business really being being the guy that would open the copper scroll, but he had guts, and he had faith, and and he thought he could do it..

Dead Sea bedouin Bethlehem Shelley Israel Samuel Temple Mount Shelly Henry right Baker EMMY page magazine Manchester university Ben Gurion university Jerusalem richard Washington Shelly Jerusalem Post Kumaon Isaiah
"temple mount shelly" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"temple mount shelly" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Shelley niece is the vice president of the Jerusalem connection international and nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand two thousand and four where she learned conversational Hebrew and received her EMMY and Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the Negev the high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending the two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications or articles of appeared in the Jerusalem Post a route Sheba front page magazine and more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at coumarin in two thousand and nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national fund's speakers bureau, she is a dressed various Jewish student groups and partic-. On debate panels, and she is the author of the copper, scroll project an ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Great, richard. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take us back to the early nineteen fifties, the coumarin caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, the copper schools, of course, part of that. But but just sort of paint that picture for us if you will. Right. Well, so that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls. It's part of the Dead Sea scrolls collection by you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on the miracle. That is the Dead Sea scrolls.

Shelly Shelley Dead Sea Ben Gurion university Temple Mount Shelly Jerusalem Post Jerusalem vice president EMMY richard Israel Bethlehem Washington page magazine
"temple mount shelly" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

13:18 min | 2 years ago

"temple mount shelly" Discussed on KTRH

"Shelley niece is the vice president of the Jerusalem connection international and nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand to two thousand and four where she learned conversational Hebrew and received her EMMY in Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the negate the high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending the two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications are articles have appeared in the Jerusalem Post Sheba front page magazine and more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at Kumaon in two thousand nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national fund's speakers bureau, she is addressed various Jewish student groups and participate. Did on debate panels. And she is the author of the copper scroll project an ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Great, richard. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take us back to the early nineteen fifties the Coomer on caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, the copper schools, of course, part of that. But but just sort of paint that picture for us if you will. Right. Well, so that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls. It's part of the Dead Sea scrolls collection, but you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on that the miracle that is the Dead Sea scrolls and to really put yourself in that time and point in history. When that she schools are flooding the black market. I'm sure the, you know, the story of how the first Dead Sea scrolls were found I mean at this point it's kind of part of our of our cultural fabric, but. But it had it not been somehow the Dead Sea scrolls were hidden for two thousand years, and and it was in the nineteen fifties highly nineteen forty seven whenever no one knows quite for. Sure. Nineteen forty seven. Nineteen Forty-six that that one's just letting their sheep run across starts vegetation, and the Judean desert that one of the bedouin through rock and cave, and here's a shattering of of something and goes home and thinks he's too scared to go in the cave that day that goes back the next day with his cousins thinking that they'll find some sort of very treasure and really were quite disappointed when I was just broken pottery. And what for their purposes, they were literate in Arabic, much less. Hebrew, or ancient Hebrew. So he really had no idea what they had. But they brought it back to their cap. Put it in a in a bag and hung it from attempt temple and debated. Sort of what to do about it? How to repurpose it? There's one part of the stories that there was a debate about repurposing the leather for something else. And and you imagine. Oh, my Lord. Oh, it a lot. But it was one on goal who suggested. Hey, let's go to Bethlehem on a market day that that when are already going to Bethlehem, and and we'll shop around and he knew somebody who knew somebody that was connected to that the black market. And that's that's where the story, but that's use gross began. So really to me even just right up front in front of the getting it's a it's a story of just providence. Absolutely. And why are they significant? These scrolls have Hebrew inscriptions on them. What is their significance? Right. Well, so before the Dead Sea scrolls, really the Dead Sea scrolls are pre dating our oldest known Hebrew manuscripts by thousand years. So in terms of what that did for scholarship. What it did for our understanding? Yeah. This is pre canonization of the bible. So really what it did for iron or standing of that process and really in first century to respond what books where Jewish sects reading what books were the most popular. It gives us a shines like lie. Into this window of time. That's so critical for the rest of the two thousand years for our bible, and the even just books book really turning biblical scholarship on its head in terms of what did I say, it looked like two thousand years ago, would it Samuel chronicles, and what they were the bombs in the same order. Then as now what we found. I mean scholars for scholars small differences. You know, they make their living off of what did they say the narcissism small differences? And so for them, they look at Samuel, and they see differences and and study those, but for our purposes for the purposes of of any believer. I mean, it is astonishing that the bible was able to maintain its it's authentic fabric for for all of this time. And I they then looks like Isaiah now and certainly Genesis through. Deuteronomy? Look the same now. As as it did then. Right. So for people who argue that the bible has been mistranslated or the meanings have been changed. The the discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, really a confirms and buttresses the the the consistency of the biblical narrative. It hasn't changed. Correct. Absolutely. That's exactly right. And and so amongst the the these scrolls of papyrus are two different types of scrolls. Copper what do they look like? So the copper scroll. There's we've always thought before that. There are eleven caves that house Dead Sea scrolls last year, twelve cable was found not what's close. But we know that at one time. So there was twelve cave. The copper scroll was found in caves every one of the few caves that was found by legitimate archeologocial team. Most of the other squirrel caves were found by bad ones. I mean, really in the fifties. It was just a race against time. In terms of who could find the next said, she's close k I would it be the bedouin or the archaeologists and the bedouin usually won that war in the case of three. It was a French archaeologist. And so you can imagine what they're expecting to find is it's close written on papyrus or leather. And every one of those is, you know, a treasurer in its own, right? But it was it was case three that they excavated for ten days, and they were pretty disappointed because they could tell that it wants house at least forty scrolls. But that that. Roof at the cave had collapsed and integrity. So once it clap once it broke the jars then this girls were exposed to wrote in some time. And and so most of this growth where we're really not salvageable, and they were closing out the big and really it was in the last hours of of that last a day have the dig that they see that. Almost there's this false wall at the back of the cave. Sorry, I it's the actual appearance of the conference call, but I feel like I have to pay this picture. Thank you. So so it was it was like this false wall of a secret chamber. And I mean, that's just the only way I can describe it. And so they chips through it live stone. And they see I'm like every other scroll that's been found really in the Dead Sea scrolls is it was resting on a man-made shelf behind this wall, which probably hit collapsed in antiquity. And so there's really just like nature had created a perfect hiding spot for this super unusual that he's throws. So the way looked was two roles. So really, the copper scroll is ones grow. But an antiquity when they were rolling it up but had snapped in two so two rolls laying next to each other. And they were green. The color of the statue of liberty because copper copper does. And and I got that. Nice. Patina on it it oxidises. Yeah. Exactly. And that would prove to to really be a protect that for the copper school for two thousand years. And and so once they got it, and where he would have clean it off and use mirrors. And and and and they could only see the words that were on the outside of the copper scroll. And so it took three years for them to be able to open it. Now, we know that the copper scroll originally measured about seven feet long was wide. It has rivets on the four corners, which means at some point. It was probably hung on a wall. And the copper scroll was was one. It must have been incredibly precarious unscrew rolling something that had been scrolled up for twenty four hundred years something that's made of I don't know how brittle it is. But copper. I mean, the decision to try an unscripted without destroying it. That must have been nerve wracking. Absolutely. I think it was a combination. You know, now, I don't think that we would have tried to cut it open, our unfurl it. Now, I think we would have the ability to probably been able to scan it and see see what was there without even making such a risky move. But then they. They sat on it for three years, and partly for this reason, it was it was it was shattered. You know, it was so vulnerable even to just the slightest touch. So they really they they talked to a Metallurgist. And at Johns Hopkins, they really shocked it out kind of internationally just is there any expert out there that can help us in this process that unroll it and pretty much universally no-one said that it was worth the risk of of unrolling it, but they could see words on the outside. And three words that capture repeating themselves were dig and gold in Cuba. So I mean, they knew what they had on their hands. It was something unlike every other Dead Sea scroll, but I think too. There was a, you know, Israel's not sovereign over Jerusalem. At this time that the Dead Sea scrolls are in the hands of the Jordanian antiquities thirty. And so no Jewish scholars are allowed to work on the Dead Sea scrolls at this point, which really reduced their expertise level as well. I think the Dead Sea scroll aditorial team that was there which is worth a book in its own. Right. Just to those guys where they were overwhelmed. They were you know, being flooded with all of these cease both every day. So I just don't think that the copper scroll was very high on their priority list. They had you know, a publishing schedule that they would be thirty years off on in terms of once they were able to get the Dead Sea scrolls published and to the public so they were going to spend the rest of their lives being really far behind on. Their workload. But one guy. His name was John allegro. He he's not as the Mavericks of the Dead Sea scrolls editorial team, he just he works fast. He wasn't as careful methodical as the rest of them. But really we have to sort of thing for getting getting his the Dead Sea scrolls, just inviting the public into that process from the very beginning. And he was the one that champion the copper scroll, and he brought it to his alma mater, which was Manchester university and an England, and and he found he went to different different antiquities experts. But he ended up. Finding a guy. Henry right Baker. Who is just a professor an engineering professor at the college of engineering at Manchester university. So really, no no business really being being the guy that would open the coppers girl, but he had guts, and he had faith, and and he thought he could do it. And so he engineered a contraption of old World War Two materials or retired war to materials and things from the school of dentistry. And if you look at them and see, and you can see pictures of it online. There's pictures in the book, and it is the crudest thing. I mean. Yeah, it makes me queasy just even look at it. And think that that was about a touch, touch that's an exit document, but but he did it and he opened a into two twenty three pieces..

Dead Sea Bethlehem Shelley Jerusalem Israel Samuel Temple Mount Shelly Manchester university Ben Gurion university Henry right Baker richard Washington Jerusalem Post Sheba John allegro Isaiah Shelly page magazine Kumaon vice president
"temple mount shelly" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

16:45 min | 2 years ago

"temple mount shelly" Discussed on WLAC

"WNYC. Shelley niece is the vice president of the Jerusalem connection international and nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand two thousand and four where she learned conversational Hebrew and received her m a in Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the Negev the high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending the two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications are articles have appeared in the Jerusalem Post. A route Sheba front page magazine. And more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at Kumaon in two thousand and nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national fund's speakers bureau, she is addressed various Jewish student groups and participated on debate panels. And she is the author of the copper scroll project and ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Richard. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take us back to the early nineteen fifties the on caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, the copper schools, of course, part of that. But but just sort of paint that picture force if you will. Right. Well, so that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls. It's part of the Dead Sea scrolls collection by you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on the miracle. That is the Dead Sea scrolls and to really put yourself in that time and point in history. When that she schools are flooding the black market. I'm sure the, you know, the story of how the first Dead Sea scrolls were found made at this point. It's kind of part of our of our cultural fabric. But. But it had it not been somehow the Dead Sea scrolls were hidden for two thousand years, and and it was. In the nineteen fifties probably nineteen forty seven. Whenever no one knows quite for. Sure. Nineteen forty seven. Nineteen Forty-six that beduins just letting their sheep run across starts vegetation, and the Judean desert that one of the bedouin through rock and cave, and here's a shattering of of something and goes home and thinks he's too scared to go in the cave that day that goes back the next day with his cousins thinking that they'll find some sort of very treasure and really were quite disappointed when I was just broken pottery. And what their purposes they were literate in Arabic, much less. She brewer ancient Hebrew. So he really had no idea what they had. But they brought it back to their camp. Put it in a in a bag and hung it from Paul and debated. Sort of what to do about it? How to repurpose it? There's one part of the stories that there was a debate about repurposing the leather for something else. And can you imagine? Oh, my Lord what a loss, but it was one on goal who suggested. Hey, let's go to Bethlehem on a market day that that when are already going to Bethlehem, and and we'll shop around and he knew somebody who knew somebody that was connected to that the black market. And that's that's where this story the Dead Sea scrolls began so really to me even just right up private funding. Getting it's a it's a story of just provident. Absolutely. But wh why are they significant? These scrolls have Hebrew inscriptions on them. What is their significance? Right. Well, so before the Dead Sea scrolls, really the Dead Sea scrolls are pre dating our oldest known Hebrew manuscripts by thousand years. So in terms of what that did for scholarship what it did for our understanding. This is pre canonization of the bible. So really what it did for our understanding of that process and really in first century to respond. What books were Jewish sects reading what books were the most popular? It gives us a shines like a light into this window of time. That's so critical for the rest of the two thousand years for our bible, and the even just books the book. Really turning biblical scholarship on its head in terms of what did I say it look like two thousand years ago, would it Samuel and chronicles and what they were the psalms in the same order. Then is now and what we found scholars for scholars small differences. You know, they make their living off of what did they say the narcissism of small differences? And so for them, they look at Samuel, and they differences and and study those, but for our purposes for the purposes of any believer. I mean, it is astonishing that the bible was able to maintain its it's authentic fabric for for all of this time. And then books like Isaiah now, and certainly Genesis through. Me look the same now. As as it did then. Right. So for people who argue that the the bible has been translated or the meanings have been changed. The the discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, really confirms and buttresses the the the consistency of the biblical narrative. It hasn't changed. Correct. Absolutely. That's exactly right. And so amongst the the these scrolls of preposterous are two different types of scrolls. Copper what do they look like? So the copper scroll. There's we've always thought before that. There are eleven caves that house Dead Sea scrolls last year, twelve cable was found not what's close, but we know that at one touch scroll. So there was twelve caves, the copper, scroll was found and cave. Every one of the few caves, it was found by legitimate archaeological team the other. Squirrel. Caves were found by bad ones. I mean, really in the fifties. It was just a race against time. In terms of who could find the next said, she's close k I would it be the bedouin. Are they are gala just in the bedouin usually one that or in the case of three it was a French archaeologist. And so you can imagine what they're expecting defined as at school was written on papyrus or leather. And every one of those is a treasure in its own, right? But it was it was case three that they excavated for ten days, and they were pretty disappointed because they could tell that it wants house at least forty scrolls. But that that. Roof of the cave had collapsed and integrity. So once it clap once it broke the jars then this grows were exposed to wrote in some time. And so most of this growth where we're really not salvageable, and they were closing out the big and really it was in the last hours of of that last day of the day that they see that almost there's this false wall at the back of the cave. Sorry, I'm I guess the actual appearance of the conference. Call back feel like I have to pay this picture. Thank you. So so it was it was like this false wall, the secret chamber, and I think that's just the only way I can describe it. And so they chips through it live stone. And they see I'm like every other scroll that's been found really in the Dead Sea scrolls is it was resting on a man-made shelf behind this wall, which probably had collapsed in antiquity. And so. There's really dislike nature had created the perfect hiding spot for this super unusual that he's froze. So the way looked was two roles. So really, the copper scroll is ones. Grow and integrity when they were rolling it. But it's not been too. So those two rolls laying next to each other. And they were green the color of the statue of liberty because copper copper does. And and I got that. Nice. Patina on it. Right. It oxidises. Yeah. Exactly. And that would prove to really be a protect that for the copper school for two thousand years. And and so once they got it and where he would a clean it off and use mirrors. And and and and they could only see the words that were on the outside of the copper scroll. And so it took three years for them to be able to open it. Now, we know that the copper scroll originally measured about seven feet long with a foot wide. It has rivets on the four corners, which means at some point. It was probably hung on a wall. And and the the copper scroll. What was what? It must have been incredibly precarious unscrew rolling something that had been scrolled up for twenty four hundred years something that's made of I don't know how brittle it is. But copper I mean, the decision to try and unscrew it without destroying it. That must have been nerve wracking. Absolutely. I think it was a combination. Now, I don't think that we would have tried to cut it open, our unfurl it. Now, I think we would have the ability to probably been able to scan it and see see what was there without even making such a risky move. But then they they sat on it for three years. Partly for this reason, it was it was it was shattered. You know, it was so vulnerable even to just the slightest touch. So they really they they talked to a Metallurgist. And at Johns Hopkins, they really shocked it out kind of. Internationally, just is there any expert out there that can help us in this process to unroll it and pretty much universally no-one said that it was worth the risk of of unrolling it, but they could see words on the outside. And three words that kept repeating themselves were dig and gold and Cuba. So I mean, they knew what they had on their hands. It was something unlike every other Dead Sea scroll, but I think too. There was a, you know, Israel's not sovereign over Jerusalem. At this time that the Dead Sea scrolls are in the hands of the Jordanian antiquities thirty. And so no Jewish scholars are allowed to work on the Dead Sea scrolls at this point, which really reduced their expertise level as well. I think the Dead Sea scroll aditorial team that was there which you know, is worth of book in its own, right? Just to those guys were they were overwhelmed. They were being flooded with all of these both every day. So I just don't think that the copper scroll was very high on their priority list. They had a publishing schedule that they would be thirty years off on in terms of once they were able to to get the Dead Sea scrolls published and to the public so they were going to spend the rest of their lives being really far behind on. Their workload. But one guy. His name was John allegro. He he's not at the fabric of the editorial team. He just he worked. He. Wasn't as careful methodical the rest of them. But really we have him to sort of thank for getting getting his the Dead Sea scrolls, just inviting the public into that process from the very beginning. And he was the one that champion the copper scroll, and he brought it to his alma mater, which was Manchester university and an England, and and he found he went to different different entities experts. But he ended up. Finding a guy. Henry right Baker. Who is just a professor an engineering professor at college of engineering at Manchester university. So really, no no business really being being the guy that would open the copper scroll, but he had guts, and he had faith, and and he thought he could do it. And so he enjoy neared a conception of old World War Two materials or retired World War Two materials and things from the school of dentistry. And if you look at them and see, and you can see pictures of it online. There's pictures in the book, and it is the crudest thing. I mean, I yeah. It makes me queasy just even look at it. And think that that was about to touch touch such an age that person, but but he did it and he opened the into two twenty three pieces. And so as soon as he was able to he rotated, the copper, scroll spindle and would make. And he was able to open it up into twenty three strips which would allow them to be read. How was it that Allegra was able to spirit the copper scroll out of disputed territory, and and take it back to England and cut it open. I mean was he given permission to do that? Did he take that upon himself? How did that happen? Right. Well, that's a good question. So he. He did he took it upon himself. Although the Jordanian department of antiquities had to approve it. And so I they just gave him one role. And now, it's kind of a compromise that they made here's one of the the two rows if you destroy this one at least, we still have the other half and. Thankfully, when the when the first cut was made Henry right Baker, and John allegro had agreed wants to contraption has made to to meet back the next day because it was going to be that I cut that would prove whether or not, you know, that idea works, and and so. It was actually that they made the first cut the night before. And in his diary. He says that if he had shattered into a million pieces he wanted to be alone in his misery. So how clearly he would still you know, worried enough that that it wouldn't work. But Lancaster Harding was the director of the Jordanian department of antiquities. So you know, these are all internationals that are reading this that she's protein for four Jordan. Been in Israel's possession at the time. Her not sure that they would want to, you know, workshop out this kind of process, but but for for hurting he was already facing a lot of internal drama had itself. And so I think because of everything that was going on at the time and just all of the human drama involved whenever you have this international team that's over work working for foreign government. And and with really the eyes of the world watching you interpreted at people were just waiting for mostly they cared about the biblical manuscripts. In the beginning. You know, just waiting for the information to be released people didn't know, they didn't know whether or not the Dead Sea scrolls would prove the whole bible, Ron whether or not they would say something about Jesus, you know, nobody. People were just waiting with baited breath to find out what these scrolls would prove or disprove. And so I think a lot to be done, but behind the scenes and processes, especially for the copper scroll, which was technically not a manuscript. And seems like it was a bit of an after thought it was kind of an afterthought only. So I had a little bit of a free reign, but you can imagine. Once he got the first roll open. He fired off a letter to to Baker and said you've got to get the second role to me. But you scrolls are red hot he turned out to be a bit naive and a process because he and his letter he wrote, you know, we can't wait to start digging..

Dead Sea Henry right Baker Israel Bethlehem Jerusalem John allegro Manchester university Shelley Jordanian department of antiqu England Temple Mount Shelly page magazine Ben Gurion university Richard Washington Samuel Jerusalem Post Isaiah vice president
"temple mount shelly" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

14:39 min | 2 years ago

"temple mount shelly" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"One FM. Shelley niece is the vice president of the Jerusalem connection international and nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand to two thousand and four where she learned conversational Hebrew and received her MA in Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the Negev the high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending the two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications or articles of appeared in the Jerusalem Post. A route Sheba front page magazine and more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at Kumaon in two thousand nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national fund's speakers bureau. She is addressed various Jewish. Student groups and participated on debate panels, and she is the author of the copper scroll project and ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Richard. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take us back to the early nineteen fifties the on caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, the copper schools, of course, part of that. But just sort of paint that picture force. If you will. Right. Well, so that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls, it's part of the debt collection. But you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on the near coal that is the Dead Sea scrolls. And to really put yourself in that time and point in history when schools are flooding the black market. I'm sure the, you know, the story of how the first Dead Sea scrolls were found made at this point. It's kind of hard as our of our cultural fabric. But. That it had it not been somehow the Dead Sea scrolls were hidden for two thousand years, and and it was in the nineteen fifties. Nineteen forty seven whenever no one knows quite for. Sure. Nineteen forty seven. Nineteen Forty-six that bedouin just letting their sheep run across sparse vegetation, and the today in desert that one of the bedouin through Iraq and a cave, and here's a shattering of of something and goes home and thinks he's too scared to go in the cave that day that goes back the next day with his cousins thinking that they'll find some sort of very treasure and really were quite disappointed when I was just broken pottery. And what their purposes they were literate in Arabic, much less. She brewer ancient Hebrew. So he really had no idea what they had. But they brought it back to the recap put it in a in a bag and hung up from temple and debated. Sort of what to do about it? How to repurpose it? There's one part of the story is that there was a debate about repurposing the leather for something else. And can you imagine? Oh, my Lord what a lot. But it was one on goal who suggested. Hey, let's go to Bethlehem on a market day that that when are already going to Bethlehem and we'll shop around, and he knew somebody who knew somebody that was connected to that the black market. And that's that's where this story the Dead Sea scrolls began so really to me even just right up front in front of the getting it's a it's a story of just provident. Absolutely. But wh why are they significant these scrolls? Have a Hebrew inscriptions on them. What is their significance? Right. Well, so before the Dead Sea scrolls, really the Dead Sea scrolls are pre dating our oldest known Hebrew manuscripts by thousand years. So in terms of what that did for bevaqua scholarship. What it did for our understanding? This is pre canonization of the bible. So really what it did for our understanding of that process and really in first century to respond what books where Jewish sects reading what books were the most popular. It gives us it's signs like. Into this window of time. That's so critical for the rest of the two thousand years for our bible, and the even just books the book, really turning biblical scholarship on its head in terms of what did I say it look like two thousand years ago, would it Samuel and chronicles and what they were the psalms in the same order. Then as now what we found means scholars for scholars small differences. You know, they make their living off of what did they say the narcissism of small differences? And so for them, they look at Samuel, and they see differences and study those, but for our purposes for the purposes as any believer. I mean, it is astonishing that the bible was able to maintain its it's authentic fabric for for all of this time. And then looks like Isaiah now, and certainly Genesis through. Me look the same now. As it did then. Right. So for people who argue that the bible has been mistranslated or the meanings have been changed. The the discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, really a confirms and buttresses the the the consistency of the biblical narrative. It hasn't changed. Correct. Absolutely. That's exactly right. And and so amongst the the the scrolls of papyrus are two different types of scrolls. Copper what do they look like? The copper scroll. There's we've always thought before that there eleven caves that house Dead Sea scrolls last year. Cable was found that was close. But we know that it wasn't Todd scrawled. So there was twelve cave. The copper scroll was found in cave. Every one of the few caves, it was found by a legitimate archeologocial gold team. Most of the other squirrel caves were found by bad ones. I mean, really in the fifties. It was just a race against time. In terms of who could find the next said sees calls case. I would it be the bedouin are the archaeologists and the bedouin usually won that war in the case of Cape three it was a French archaeologist. And so you can imagine what they're expecting defined as scrolls written on papyrus or leather. And and every one of those is, you know, a treasure in its own, right? But it was it was case three that they excavated for ten days, and they were pretty disappointed because they could tell that it wants house at least forty scrolls. But that that. Roof the cave had collapsed and integrity. So once it clap once it broke the jars then this girls were exposed to wrote in some time. And so most of this growth where we're really not salvageable, and they were closing out the big and really it was in the last hours of of that last day have been big that they see that almost there's this false wall at the back of the cave. Sorry, I got the actual appearance of the conference call, but I feel like I have to pay this picture. Thank you. So so it was it was like this false wall, the secret chamber, and I mean, that's just the only way I can describe it chips through it live down. And and they see I'm like every other scroll that's been found really in the Dead Sea scrolls is it was resting on a man-made shelf behind this wall, which probably had collapsed in antiquity. And so. There's really just like nature had created the perfect hiding spot for this. Super unusual that he's pro. So the way look was two roles really the copper, scroll is ones grow. But antiquity when they were rolling it up had snapped in to those two rolls laying next to each other. And they were green the color of the statue of liberty because copper copper does. And and I got that. Nice. Tina on it it oxidises. Yeah. Exactly. And that would prove to really protect that for the copper school for two thousand years. And and so once they got it, and where he would have clean it off and use mirrors. And and and and they could only see the words that were on the outside of the copper scroll. And so it took three years for them to be able to open it. Now, we know that the copper scroll originally measured about seven feet long was a foot wide. It has rivets on the four corners, which means at some point. It was probably hung on a wall. And and that the copper scroll what was what? It must have been incredibly precarious unscrew rolling something that had been scrolled up for twenty four hundred years something that's made of I don't know how brittle it is. But copper. I mean, the decision to try an an unscrupulous without destroying it. That must have been nerve wracking. Absolutely. I think it was a combination. You know, now, I don't think that we would have tried to cut it open, our unfurl it. Now, I think we would have the ability to probably been able to scan it and see see what was there without even making such a risky move. But then they. They sat on it for three years, and partly for this reason, it was it was it was shattered. You know, it was so vulnerable even to just the slightest touch. So they really they they talked to a Metallurgist at Johns Hopkins. They really shocked it out kind of internationally just is there any expert out there that can help us in this process to unroll it and pretty much universally no-one said that it was worth the risk of of unrolling it, but they could see words on the outside. In three words that capture themselves were dig and gold and Cuba. So I mean, they knew what they had on their hands. It was something unlike every other Dead Sea scroll, but I think too. There was a, you know, Israel's not sovereign over Jerusalem at this time that the Dead Sea scrolls are in the hands of the Jordanian antiquities. It's thirty and so no Jewish scholars are allowed to work on the Dead Sea scrolls. At this point, which really reduced their expertise level as well. I think the Dead Sea scroll aditorial team that was there which is worth a book and its own right? Just to those guys were they were overwhelmed. They were you know, being flooded with all of that cease both every day. So I just don't think that the copper scroll was very high on their priority list. They had you know, a publishing schedule that they would be thirty years off on in terms of what they were able to get the Dead Sea scrolls published and to the public so they were going to spend the rest of their lives being really far behind on their workload. But one guy his name was John allegro. He he's not as the Babar's of the Dead Sea school editorial team. He just he works fast. He wasn't as careful about as their act of them. But really we have to sort of thing for getting getting his. The Dead Sea scrolls just inviting the public into that process from the very beginning. And he was the one that champion the copper scroll, and he brought it to his alma mater, which was Manchester university and in England, and and he found he went to different different antiquities experts. But he ended up. Finding a guy. Henry right Baker. Who is just a professor an engineering professor college of engineering at Manchester university. So really, no, he no business really being being the guy that would open the copper scroll, but he had got and he had faith, and and he thought he could do it. And so he engineered a contraption of old World War Two materials or retired World War Two materials and things from the school of dentistry. And if you look at them and see, and you can see pictures of it online. There's pictures in the book, and it is the crudest thing. I mean, I it. Yeah. It makes me queasy just even look at it. And think that that was about to touch, touch, that's an that document. But but he did it and he opened a into two twenty three pieces. And so as soon as he was able to he rotated the copper scrolling spindle and would make. And he was able to open it up into twenty three strips which would allow it to be read. How was it that Allegra was able to spirit the copper scroll out of disputed territory, and and take it back to England and cut it open. I mean was he given permission to do that to take that upon himself? How did that happen? Right. Well, that's a good question. He so he. He did he took it upon himself. Although the Jordanian department of antiquities had to approve it. And so I they just gave him one role. And now it's kind of a bit of compromise that they made here's one of the two roles if you destroy this one at least we still have the other half. And thankfully, when the when the first cut was made Henry right Baker, and John allegro had agreed wants to contraption was made to meet back the next day because it was going to be that I cut that would prove whether or not, you know, their idea works, and and so. It was actually the Baker made the first cut the night before. And in his diary..

Dead Sea bedouin Henry right Baker Bethlehem Shelley Jerusalem Dead Sea school Israel John allegro Manchester university England Temple Mount Shelly Ben Gurion university Richard page magazine Washington Jerusalem Post Samuel Isaiah
"temple mount shelly" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

12:49 min | 2 years ago

"temple mount shelly" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Shelley niece is the vice president of the Jerusalem connection international and nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand to two thousand and four where she learned conversational Hebrew and received her EMMY and Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the Negev the high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending the two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications or articles of appeared in the Jerusalem Post, a route Sheba page magazine and more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at Kumaon in two thousand and nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national fund's speakers bureau. She is addressed various Jewish state. Groups and participated on debate panels, and she is the author of the copper scroll project an ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Great, richard. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take us back to the early nineteen fifties, the Coomer caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, the copper schools, of course, part of that. But but just sort of paint that picture force if you will. Right. Well, so that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls, it's part of the debt collection. But you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on the miracle. That is the Dead Sea scrolls and to really put yourself in that time and point in history. When that she schools are flooding the black market. I'm sure the, you know, the story of how the first Dead Sea scrolls were found made at this point. It's kind of part of our of our cultural fabric. But. But it had it not been somehow the Dead Sea scrolls were hidden for two thousand years, and it was in the nineteen fifties. Probably nineteen forty seven. Whenever no one knows quite for. Sure. Nineteen forty seven. Nineteen Forty-six that that one's just letting their sheep run across sparse vegetation and the day in desert that one of the bedouin through Iraq and a cave, and here's a shattering of of something and goes home and thinks he's too scared to go in the cave that day, but goes back the next day with his cousins thinking that they'll find some sort of buried treasure and really were quite disappointed when I was just broken pottery. And what for their purposes, they were literate in Arabic, much less. She brewer ancient Hebrew. So he really had no idea what they had. But they brought it back to the cap put it in a in a bag and hung it from attempt temple and debated. Sort of what to do about it? How to repurpose it? There's one part of the story is that there was a debate about repurposing the leather for something else. And can you imagine? Oh, my Lord what a lot. But it was one on goal who suggested. Hey, let's go to Bethlehem on a market day that that when are already going to Bethlehem, and and we'll shop around he knew somebody who knew somebody that was connected to that the black market. And that's that's where this story, but that's use gross began. So really to me even just right up five in front of the getting it's a it's a story of just providence. Absolutely. And why are they significant? These scrolls have Hebrew inscriptions on them. What is their significance? Right. Well, so before the Dead Sea scrolls, really the Dead Sea scrolls are pre dating our oldest known Hebrew manuscripts by thousand years. So in terms of what that did for scholarship. What it did for our understanding? Yeah. This is pre canonization of the bible. So really what it did for our understanding of that process and really in first century to respond what books where Jewish sects reading what books were the most popular. It gives us a shines a light into this window of time. That's so critical for the rest of the two thousand years for our bible, and the even just books the book. Really turning biblical scholarship on its head in terms of what did I say it look like two thousand years ago, what it Samuel and chronicles and what they were the psalms in the same order. Then as now what we found. I mean scholars for scholars small differences. You know, they make their living off of what did they say the narcissism small differences? And so for them, they look at Samuel, and they see differences and study those, but for our purposes for the purposes of any believer. I mean, it is astonishing that the bible was able to maintain its it's authentic fabric for for all of this time. And then looks like Isaiah now, and certainly Genesis through. Deuteronomy? Look the same now. As as it did then. Right. So for people who argue that the the bible has been mistranslated or the meanings have been changed. The discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, really confirms and buttresses the the the consistency of the biblical narrative. It hasn't changed. Correct. Absolutely. That's exactly right. And and so amongst the the the scrolls of preposterous are two different types of scrolls. Copper what do they look like? The copper scroll. There's we've always thought before that eleven caves that house that sees crawls last year twelve cable was found not what's close, but we know that it wasn't touted scrawled. So there was twelve gave the copper scroll was found in cave re. One of the few cases, it was found by legitimate archeologocial team. Most of the other squirrel caves were found by bad ones. I mean, really in the fifties. It was just a race against time. In terms of who could find the next said, she's close cave. I would it be the bedouin are the archaeologists than the bedouin usually won that war in the case of three. It was a French archaeologist. And so you can imagine what they're expecting to find is at school was written on papyrus or leather. And and every one of those is, you know, a treasurer in its own, right? But it was it was case three that they excavated for ten days, and they were pretty disappointed because they could tell that it wants house at least forty scrolls. But that that. Roof at the cave had collapsed and integrity. So once it clap once it broke the jars then this girls were exposed to wrote in some time. And so most of this growth where we're really not salvageable, and they were closing out the big and really it was in the last hours of of that last day have been dig that they see that. Almost there's this false wall at the back of the cave. Sorry, I guess about the actual appearance of the conference call, but I feel like I have to pay this picture. Thank you. So so it was it was like this false wall, the secret chamber, and I mean, that's just the only way I can describe it. So they chips through it lives down. And and they see I'm like every other scroll that's been found really in the Dead Sea scrolls, this it was resting on a man-made shelf behind this wall, which probably had collapsed in antiquity. And so there's really just like nature had created a perfect hiding spot for this. Super unusual that he's throws. So the way look was two roles. So really, the copper scroll ones grow. But antiquity when they were rolling it up. It had snapped in to those two rolls laying next to each other. And they were green the color of the statue of liberty because copper copper does. And got that. Nice. A Tina on it oxidises. Yeah. Exactly. And that would prove to to really be a protect that for the copper school for two thousand years. And and so once they got it, and where he would have clean it off and use mirrors. And and and and they could only see the words that were on the outside of the copper scroll. And so it took three years for them to be able to open it. Now, we know that the copper scroll originally measured about seven feet long with a wide. It has rivets on the four corners, which means at some point. It was probably hung on a wall. And and the copper scroll was was one. It must have been incredibly precarious unscrew rolling something that had been scrolled up for twenty four hundred years something that's made of I don't know how brittle it is. But copper. I mean, the decision to try an unscripted without destroying it. That must have been nerve wracking. Absolutely. I think it was a combination. You know, now, I don't think that we would have tried to cut it open, our unfurl it. Now, I think we would have the ability to probably been able to scan it and see what was there without even making such a risky move. But then they. They sat on it for three years, and partly for this reason, it was it was it was shatter. You know, it was so vulnerable even to just the slightest touch. So they really they they talked to a Metallurgist. And at Johns Hopkins, they really shocked it out kind of internationally just is there any expert out there that can help us in this process to unroll it and pretty much universally no-one said that it was worth the risk of of unrolling it, but they could see words on the outside. In three words that capture repeating themselves were dig and gold in Cuba. So I mean, they knew what they had on their hands or something like every other Dead Sea scroll. But I think too. There was a, you know, Israel's not sovereign over to respond at this time. The girls are in the hands of the Jordanian antiquities. It's thirty and so no Jewish scholars are allowed to work on the Dead Sea scrolls at this point, which really reduced their expertise level as well. I think the Dead Sea scroll aditorial team that was there which is worth of book in its own. Right. Just to those guys were they were overwhelmed. They were you know, being flooded with all of these both every day. So I just don't think that the copper scroll was very high on their priority list. They had a publishing schedule that they would be thirty years off on in terms of once they were able to get the Dead Sea scrolls published and to the public so they were going to spend the rest of their lives being really far behind on. Their workload. But one guy his name was John allegro key. He's not at the Mavericks of the Dead Sea school editorial team. He just he works fast. He wasn't as careful methodical as the rest of them that really we have to sort of thank for getting getting his the Dead Sea scrolls, just inviting the public into that process from the very beginning. And he was the one that champion the copper scroll, and he brought it to his alma mater, which was Manchester university and in England, and and he found he went to different different antiquities experts. But he ended up. Finding a guy. Henry right Baker. Who is just a professor an engineering professor at the college of engineering at Manchester university. So really, no, he no business really being being the guy that would open the copper scroll, but he had guts, and he had faith, and and he thought he could do it..

Dead Sea Bethlehem bedouin Dead Sea school Shelley Israel Temple Mount Shelly Manchester university EMMY Ben Gurion university Jerusalem Henry right Baker richard Washington Jerusalem Post Samuel Isaiah John allegro professor
"temple mount shelly" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

12:48 min | 2 years ago

"temple mount shelly" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"The vice president of the Jerusalem connection international and nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand two thousand and four where he learned conversational Hebrew and received her EMMY and Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the Negev a high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending the two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications or articles of appeared in Jerusalem Post, Sheba front page magazine and more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at on in two thousand and nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national funds. Speakers bureau, she is addressed. Various Jewish student groups and participated on debate panels, and she is the author of the copper scroll project an ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Richard. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take us back to the early nineteen fifties the Coomer on caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, the copper schools, of course, part of that. But but just sort of paint that picture force if you will. Right. Well, so that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls. It's part of the Dead Sea, scroll collection. But you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on. The miracle that is the Dead Sea scrolls and to really put yourself in that time and point in history. When that she schools are flooding the black market. I'm sure, you know, the story of how the first Dead Sea scrolls were found made at this point. It's kind of part as our of our cultural fabric. But but it had it not been somehow the Dead Sea scrolls were hidden for two thousand years, and it was in the nineteen fifties. Nineteen forty seven whenever no one knows quite for. Sure. Nineteen forty seven. Nineteen Forty-six that that one's just letting their sheep run across sparse vegetation, and the today in desert that one of the bedouin through Iraq and a cave, and here's a shattering of of something and goes home and thinks he's too scared to go on the cave that day that goes back the next day with his cousins thinking that they'll find some sort of very treasure and really were quite disappointed when I was just broken pottery. And what their purposes they were literate airbag, much less. Hebrew, or ancient Hebrew. They really had no idea what they had. But they brought it back to their camp. Put it in a bag and hung up from a temple and debated. Sort of what to do about it? How to repurpose it? There's one part of the story is that there was a debate about repurposing the leather for something else. And and you know, my Lord what a lot, but it was one on goal who suggested, hey, let's go to Bethlehem market day that that when all ready going to Bethlehem and we'll shop around, and he knew somebody who knew somebody that was connected to that the black market. And that's that's the story. But that's us pros began so really to me even just right up private funded again. It's a it's a story of just provident. Absolutely. And why are they significant? These scrolls have Hebrew inscriptions on them. What is their significance? Right. Well, so before the Dead Sea scrolls, really the Dead Sea scrolls are pre dating our oldest known Hebrew manuscripts by thousand years. So in terms of what that did typical scholarship what it did for our understanding. This is pre canonization of the bible. So really what it did for our understanding of that process and really in first century to respond what books where Jewish sects reading what books were the most popular. It gives us a shine a light into this window of time. That's so critical for the rest of the two thousand years for our bible, and the even just book the book, really turning biblical scholarship on its head in terms of what did I say it look like two thousand years ago, what did Samuel and chronicles and what we're the psalms in the same order then as now and what we? We found I mean scholars for scholars small differences. You know, they make their living off of what did they they've been narcissism of small differences? And so for them, they look at Samuel, and they see differences and study those, but for our purposes for the purposes of any believer. I mean, it is astonishing that the bible was able to maintain its its authentic fabric for all of this time. And then looks like I am now and certainly Genesis through. Me look the same now. As it did. Then. Right. So for people who argue that the bible has been mistranslated or the meetings have been changed. The the discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, really a confirms and buttresses the the the consistency of the biblical narrative. It hasn't changed correct? That's exactly right. And and so amongst the the the scrolls of papyrus are two different types of scrolls. Copper what do they look like? The copper scroll. There's we've always thought before that eleven caves that house Dead Sea scrolls last year, right twelve cable sound not what's close, but we know that it one touch scroll. So there was twelve gave the copper scroll was found in cave. Every. What of the few cases, it was found by legitimate archaeological team of the other, squirrel. Caves were found my bad ones. I mean, really in the fifty there was just a race against time. In terms of who could find the next said, she's calls cave. I would it be the bedouin are the art gallery in the bed with usually one. Or in the case of caves three it was a French archaeologist. And so you can imagine. What they're expecting defined as it scrolls written on papyrus or leather. And every one of those is, you know, a treasure in its own, right? But it was it was case three that they excavated for ten days, and they were pretty disappointed because they could tell that it wants house. At least forty scrolls. But that that. Roof at the cave had collapsed in antiquity. So once it clap once it broke jars been scrolls were exposed to wrote him some time. And and so most of us girls where we're really not salvageable, and they were closing out the big and really it was in the last hours of of that lasted day have been big that they see that. Almost there's this false wall at the back of the cave. Sorry, I it's the actual appearance of the conference call, but I feel like I have to pay this picture. Thank you. So so it was it was like this false wall, the secret chamber, and I mean, that's just the only way I can describe it. And so they chips through it. Why stone and and they see I'm like every other scroll that's been found really in the duchy solstice. It was resting on a man-made shelf behind this wall, which probably had collapsed in antiquity. And so there's really dislike nature had created a perfect hiding spot for this super unusual that he throws looked was two roles. Really, the copper scroll is ones grow antiquity when they were rolling it up. It's not to cause to rolls laying next to each other. And they were green. The color of the statue of liberty because copper copper does. And and I got that. Nice. Tina on it. Right. It oxidises. Yeah. Exactly. And that would prove to to really be a protect that for the copper school for two thousand years. And and so once they got it and where he will clean it off and use mirrors. And and and and they could only see the words that were on the outside of the copper scroll. And so it took three years for them to be able to open it. Now, we know that the copper scroll originally measured about seven feet long with a foot wide. It has rivets on the four corners, which means at some point. It was probably hung on a wall. And and the the copper scroll was was what? It must have been incredibly precarious unscrew rolling something that had been scrolled up for twenty four hundred years something that's made of I don't know how brittle it is. But copper. I mean, the decision to try and unscrew it without destroying it. That must have been nerve wracking. Absolutely. I think it was a combination. You know, now, I don't think that we would have tried to cut it open, our unfurl it. Now, I think we would have the ability to probably been able to scan it and see see what was there without even making such a a risky move. But then they they sat on it for three years, and partly for this reason, it was it was it was shatter. You know, it was so vulnerable even to just the slightest touch. So they really they they talked to a Metallurgist at Johns Hopkins. They really shocked it out kind of internationally just is there any expert out there that can help us, and that's process that unroll it and pretty much universally no-one said that it was worth the risk of of unrolling it, but. They could see words on the outside. In three words that capture repeating themselves were dig and gold in Cuba. So I mean, they knew what they had on their hands. Something unlike every other Dead Sea scroll, but I think too. There was a, you know, Israel's not sovereign over Jerusalem at this time that the Dead Sea scrolls are in the hands of the Jordanian antiquities. It's thirty and so no Jewish scholars are allowed to work on the Dead Sea scrolls at this point, which really reduced their expertise level as well. I think that that's editorial team that was there which is worth a book. It's own right. Just to those guys were they were overwhelmed. They were you know, being flooded with all of that cease both every day. So I just don't think that the copper scroll was very high on their priority list. They had you know, publishing schedule that they would be thirty years off on in terms of once they were able to to get that cease girls published and to the public so they were going to spend the rest of their lives being really far behind on. Their workload. But one guy. His name was John allegro. He he's not at the Mavericks of the Dead Sea school editorial team. He just he works fast. He wasn't as careful article as the rest of them. But really we have him to sort of thank for getting getting his the Dead Sea scrolls, just inviting the public into that process from the beginning, and he was the one that champion the coppers crawl and he brought it says album mater, which was Manchester university and an England, and and he found he went to different different antiquities experts. But he ended up. Finding a guy. Henry right Baker. Who is just a professor an engineering professor at the college of engineering at Manchester university. So really, no no business really being being the guy that would open the copper scroll, but he had guts, and he had pay and and he thought he could do it..

Dead Sea Dead Sea school Bethlehem Jerusalem Israel bedouin Samuel Shelley Temple Mount Shelly Manchester university Henry right Baker EMMY Ben Gurion university Speakers bureau Jerusalem Post Richard Washington vice president John allegro
"temple mount shelly" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

12:49 min | 2 years ago

"temple mount shelly" Discussed on KTRH

"Shelley niece is the vice president of the Jerusalem connection international nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand to two thousand and four where she learned conversational Hebrew and received her MA in Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the Negev the high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending the two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications or articles of appeared in the Jerusalem Post. A route Sheba front page magazine and more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at coumarin in two thousand and nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national fund's speakers bureau, she is addressed various Jewish student groups and participate. Did on debate panels. And she is the author of the copper scroll project an ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Great, richard. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take us back to the early nineteen fifties the Coomer on caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, the copper scrolls, of course, part of that. But but just sort of paint that picture force if you will. Right. Well, so that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls. It's part of the Dead Sea scrolls collection, but you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on that the miracle that is the Dead Sea scrolls and to really put yourself in that time and point in history. When that she schools are flooding the black market. I'm sure the, you know, the story of how the first Dead Sea scrolls were found made at this point. It's kind of hard as our of our cultural fabric. But. It had it not been somehow the Dead Sea scrolls were hidden for two thousand years, and and it was in the nineteen fifties highly nineteen forty seven whenever no one knows quite for. Sure. Nineteen forty seven. Nineteen Forty-six that bedouin just letting their sheep run across sparse vegetation, and the Judean desert that one of the bedouin through Iraq and a cave, and here's a shattering of of something and goes home and thinks he's too scared to go in the cave that day that goes back the next day with his cousins thinking that they'll find some sort of very treasure and really were quite disappointed when it was just broken pottery. And what their purposes they were literate in Arabic, much less. She brewer ancient Hebrew. So he really had no idea what they had. But they brought it back to the recap put it in a in a bag and hung up from temple and debated. Sort of what to do about it? How to repurpose it? There's one part of the story is that there was a debate about repurposing the leather for something else. And can you imagine? Oh, my Lord what a lot. But it was one on goal who suggested. Hey, let's go to Bethlehem market day that that went going to Bethlehem and we'll shop around and he knew somebody who knew somebody that was connected to that the black market. And that's that's where this story. But that's us pros began. So really to me even just right up five getting it's a it's a story of just provident. Absolutely. And why are they significant these scrolls? Have a Hebrew inscriptions on them. What is their significance? Right. Well, so before the Dead Sea scrolls, really the Dead Sea scrolls are pre dating our oldest known Hebrew manuscripts by thousand years. So in terms of what that did for clock scholarship. What it did for our understanding? This is pre canonization of the bible. So really what it did for understanding of that process and really in first century to respond. What books were Jewish sects reading what books were the most popular? It gives us a shines like a. Light into this window of time. That's so critical for the rest of the two thousand years for our bible, and the even just book the book, really turning biblical scholarship on its head in terms of what did I say look like two thousand years ago, would it Samuel chronicles. And look like we're the psalms in the same order then as now and what we found. I mean scholars for scholars small differences. You know, they make their living off of what did they say the narcissism of small differences? And so for them, they look at Samuel, and they see differences and and study those, but for our purposes for the purposes of any believer. I mean, it is astonishing that the bible was able to maintain its it's authentic fabric for for all of this time. And I they then looks like Isaiah now and certainly Genesis through. Deuteronomy? Look the same now. As it did then. Right. So for people who argue that the the bible has been translated or the meanings have been changed. The the discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, really a confirms and buttresses the the the consistency of the biblical narrative. It hasn't changed. Correct. Absolutely. That's exactly right. And and so amongst the the these scrolls of preposterous are two different types of scrolls. Copper what do they look like? The copper scroll. There's we've always thought before that Lebanon caves that house Dead Sea scrolls last year. Twelve cable was found not what's close, but we know that at one touch scroll. So there was twelve gave the copper scroll was found in cave. Every one of the few caves, it was found by a legitimate archaeological team the other squirrel caves were found by bad ones. I mean, really in the fifties. It was just a race against time. In terms of who could find the next said, she's close k I would it be the bedouin are the archaeologists and the bedouin usually won that war in the case of three. It was a French archaeologist. And so you can imagine what they're expecting to find. Is it scrolls written on papyrus or leather? And every one of those is, you know, a treasure in its own, right? But it was it was case three that they excavated for ten days, and they were pretty disappointed because they could tell that it wants house. At least forty scrolls. But that that. Roof of the cave had collapsed and integrity. So once it clap once it broke the jars then the girls were exposed to wrote in some time. And so most of this growth where we're really not salvageable, and they were closing out the dig and really it was in the last hours of of that last day of the dig that they see that. Almost there's this false wall at the back of the cave. Sorry, I got the actual appearance of the conference call, but I feel like I have to pay this picture. Thank you. So so it was it was like this false wall, the secret chamber, and I mean, that's just the only way I can describe it chips through it live stone. And and they see I'm like every other scroll that's been found really in the Dead Sea salts as it was resting on a man-made shelf behind, you know, this wall, which probably had collapsed in antiquity. And so is really just like nature had created a perfect hiding spot for this super unusual that she throws. So the way looked was two roles. So really, the Cuppers close ones grow. But antiquity when they were rolling it up had snapped in two two rolls laying next to each other. And they were green. The color of the statue of liberty because copper copper does. And and I got that. Nice. Patina on it. Right. Yeah. Exactly. And that would prove to to really be a protect that for the copper school for two thousand years. And and so once they got it and where he would to clean it off and use mirrors. And and and and they could only see the words that were on the outside of the copper scroll. And so took three years for them to be able to open it. Now, we know that the copper scroll originally measured about seven feet long was a foot wide. It has rivets on the four corners, which means at some point. It was probably hung on a wall. And and the the copper scroll was was one. It must have been incredibly precarious unscrew rolling something that had been scrolled up for twenty four hundred years something that's made of I don't know how brittle it is. But copper. The decision to try an unscrew it without destroying it. That must have been nerve wracking. Absolutely. I think it was a combination. You know, now, I don't think that we would have tried to cut it open, our unfurl it. Now, I think we would have the ability to probably been able to scan it and see see what was there without even making such a risky move. But then they they sat on it for three years, and partly for this reason, it was it was it was shattered. You know, it was so vulnerable even to just the slightest touch. So they really they they talked to a Metallurgist. And at Johns Hopkins, they really shocked it out kind of internationally just is there any expert out there that can help us in this process to unroll it and pretty much universally no-one said that it was worth the risk of of unrolling it, but. They could see words on the outside. And three words that kept repeating themselves were dig and gold and Cuba. So I mean, they knew what they had on their hands. It something unlike every other Dead Sea scroll, but I think too. There was a, you know, Israel's not sovereign over Jerusalem. At this time that the Dead Sea scrolls are in the hands of the Jordanian antiquities thirty. And so no Jewish scholars are allowed to work on the Dead Sea scrolls at this point, which really reduced their expertise level as well. I think the Dead Sea scroll aditorial team that was there which is worth a book in its own. Right. Just to those guys were they were overwhelmed. They were you know, being flooded with all of these every day. So I just don't think that the copper scroll was very high on their priority list. They had you know, a publishing schedule that they would be thirty years off on in terms of once they were able to to get the Dead Sea scrolls published and to the public so they were going to spend the rest of their lives being really far behind on. Their workload. But one guy. His name was John allegro. He he's not as the Babar's of the Dead Sea school editorial team. He just he works fast. He wasn't as careful methodical as the rest of them that really we have this sort of thing for getting getting his the Dead Sea scrolls, just inviting the public into that process from the very beginning. And he was the one that champion the copper scroll, and he brought it to his alma mater, which was Manchester university and in England, and and he found he went to different different antiquities experts. But he ended up. Finding a guy. Henry right Baker. Who was just a professor an engineering professor at the college of engineering at Manchester university. So really, no no business really being being the guy that would open the copper girl, but he had guts and he had fake, and and he thought he could do it..

Dead Sea bedouin Dead Sea school Bethlehem Shelley Jerusalem Israel Samuel Temple Mount Shelly Manchester university Ben Gurion university Henry right Baker page magazine richard Washington Jerusalem Post Shelly Isaiah John allegro
"temple mount shelly" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

12:46 min | 2 years ago

"temple mount shelly" Discussed on WTVN

"Shelley niece is the vice president of the Jerusalem connection international nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand two thousand and four where she learned conversational Hebrew and received her MA in Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the Negev the high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending the two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications or articles have appeared in the Jerusalem Post. A route Sheba front page magazine. And more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at coumarin in two thousand and nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national fund's speakers bureau. She is addressed various Jewish studio. Groups and participated on debate panels, and she is the author of the copper scroll project an ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Great, richard. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take us back to the early nineteen fifties, the coumarin caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, the copper schools, of course, part of that. But but just sort of paint that picture for us if you will. Right. Well, so that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls. It's part of the Dead Sea scrolls collection, but you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on that the miracle that is the Dead Sea scrolls and to really put yourself in that time and point in history. When that she's schools are sledding the black market. I'm sure, you know, the story of how the first Dead Sea scrolls were found me at this point. It's kind of part of our of our cultural fabric. But. But it had it not been somehow the Dead Sea scrolls were hidden for two thousand years, and and it was in the nineteen fifties. Howie nineteen forty seven whenever no one knows quite for. Sure. Nineteen forty seven. Nineteen Forty-six that bedouin just letting their sheep run across sparse vegetation, and the Judean desert that one of the bedouin through Iraq and a cave, and here's a shattering of of something and goes home and thinks he's too scared to go in the cave that day that goes back the next day with his cousins thinking that they'll find some sort of very treasure and really were quite disappointed when I was just broken pottery. And what for their purposes, they were literate in Arabic, much less. She brewer ancient Hebrew. So he really had no idea what they had. But they brought it back to the recap put it in a bag and hung up from temple and debated. Sort of what to do about it? How to repurpose it? There's one part of the story is that there was a debate about repurposing the leather for something else. And and you imagine, oh, my Lord what a loss, but it was one on goal who suggested, hey, let's go to Bethlehem on a market day that that when are already going to Bethlehem and we'll shop around, and he knew somebody who knew somebody that was connected to that the black market. And that's that's where this story. But that's us pros began. So really to me even just right up private funding. Getting is it's a it's a story of providence. Absolutely. And why are they significant? These scrolls have Hebrew inscriptions on them. What is their significance? Right. Well, so before the Dead Sea scrolls, really the Dead Sea scrolls are pre dating our oldest known Hebrew manuscripts by thousand years. So in terms of what that did for scholarship what it did for our understanding. This is pre canonization of the bible. So really what it did for understanding of that process and really in first century to respond what books where Jewish sects reading what books were the most popular. It gives us a shines a light into this window of time. That's so critical for the rest of the two thousand years for our bible, and the even just book the book. Really turning biblical scholarship on its head in terms of what did I say look like two thousand years ago, would it Samuel and chronicles and what they were the psalms in the same order. Then as now what we found. I mean scholars for scholars small differences. You know, they make their living off of what did they say the narcissism of small differences? And so for them, they look at Samuel, and they see differences and and study those, but for our purposes for the purposes of any believer. I mean, it is astonishing that the bible was able to maintain its it's authentic fabric for for all of this time. And then looks like Isaiah now, and certainly Genesis through. Deuteronomy? Look the same now. As it did then. Right. So for people who argue that the the bible has been mistranslated or the meanings have been changed. The discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, really confirms and buttresses the the the consistency of the biblical narrative. It hasn't changed. Correct. Absolutely. That's exactly right. And so amongst the the the scrolls of preposterous are two different types of scrolls. Copper what do they look like? So the copper scroll. There's we've always thought before that. There are eleven caves that house that sees crawls last year twelve cable was found not what's close. But we know that it wasn't scroll. So there was twelve caves the copper scroll was found and pays every one of the few caves it was found by legitimate archeologocial team. Most of the other squirrel caves were found by bad ones. I mean, really in the fifties. It was just a race against time. In terms of who could find the next said sees calls cave. I would it be the bedouin are the archaeologists and the bedouin usually won that war in the case of three. It was a French archaeologist. And so you can imagine what they're expecting defined as scrolls written on papyrus or leather. And every one of those is, you know, a treasurer in its own, right? But it was it was case three that they excavated for ten days. They were pretty disappointed because they could tell that it wants house at least forty scrolls. But that that. Roof of the cave had collapsed and integrity. So once it clap once it broke the jars than this girls were exposed to wrote in some time. And and so most of us girls where we're really not salvageable, and they were closing out the big and really it was in the last hours of of that last day of the dig that they see that almost there's this false wall at the back of the cave. Sorry, I. The actual appearance of the conference call, but I feel like I have to pay this picture. Thank you. So so it was it was like this false wall, the secret chamber, and I mean, that's just the only way I can describe it. And so they chips through it live down. And and they see I'm like every other scroll that's been found really in the dead. She's supposed to it was resting on a man-made shelf behind this wall, which probably had collapsed in antiquity. And so there's really dislike nature had created a perfect hiding spot for this. Super unusual that he's froze. So the way looked was two roles. So really, the copper scroll is ones. Grow an integrity. When they were rolling it up. It had snapped any to those two rolls laying next to each other. And they were green the color of the statue of liberty because copper copper does. And and I got that. Nice. Tina on it. Right. It oxidises. Yeah. Exactly. And that would prove to to really be a protect that for the copper school for two thousand years. And and so once they got it and where he would clean it off and use mirrors. And and and and they could only see the words that were on the outside of the copper scroll. And so it took three years for them to be able to open it. Now, we know that the copper scroll originally measured about seven feet long with a foot wide. It has rivets on the four corners, which means at some point. It was probably hung on a wall. And and the copper scroll was was what? It must have been incredibly precarious unscrew rolling something that had been scrolled up for twenty four hundred years something that's made of I don't know how brittle it is. But copper. I mean, the decision to try an unscripted without destroying it. That must have been nerve wracking. Absolutely. I think it was a combination. You know, now, I don't think that we would have tried to cut it open, our unfurl it. Now, I think we would have the ability to probably been able to scan it and see what was there without even making such a risky move. But then they. They sat on it for three years, and partly for this reason, it was it was it was shattered. You know, it was so vulnerable even to just the slightest touch. So they really they they talked to a Metallurgist at John Hopkins. They really shocked it out kind of internationally just is there any expert out there that can help us in this process to unroll it and pretty much universally no-one said that it was worth the risk of of unrolling it. But they could see words on the outside three words that kept repeating themselves were dig and gold. And so I mean, they knew what they had on their hands was something unlike every other that's you scroll. But I think too. There was a, you know, Israel's not sovereign over Jerusalem at this time that the Dead Sea scrolls are in the hands of the Jordanian antiquities. It's thirty and so no Jewish scholars are allowed to work on the Dead Sea scrolls. At this point, which really reduced their expertise level as well. I think the Dead Sea scroll aditorial team that was there which is worth a book, and it's own right. Just to those guys were they were overwhelmed. They were you know, being flooded with all of these pros every day. So I just don't think that the copper scroll was very high on their priority list. They had you know, a publishing schedule that they would be thirty years off in terms of once they were able to get the Dead Sea scrolls published and to the public so they were going to spend the rest of their lives being really far behind on their workload. But one guy his name was John allegro. He he's not as the Mavericks of the Dead Sea school at Atari team. He just he worked. He wasn't as careful methodical as the rest of them. But really we have to sort of thank for getting getting his. The Dead Sea scrolls just inviting the public into that process from the very beginning. And he was the one that champion the copper scroll, and he brought it to his alma mater, which was Manchester university and in England, and and he found he went to different different antiquities experts. But he ended up. Finding a guy. Henry right Baker. Who is just a professor an engineering professor at college of engineering at Manchester university. So really, no he no business really being being the guy that would open the coppers girl, but he had guts, and he had paid..

Dead Sea bedouin Bethlehem Dead Sea school Shelley Jerusalem Israel Temple Mount Shelly Manchester university page magazine Ben Gurion university Henry right Baker richard Shelly Jerusalem Post Washington Samuel John allegro Isaiah
"temple mount shelly" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

12:37 min | 2 years ago

"temple mount shelly" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Shelley niece is the vice president of the Jerusalem connection international nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand to two thousand four where she learned conversational Hebrew and received her EMMY and Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the Negev the high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending the two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications or articles of appeared in the Jerusalem Post, a route Sheva front page magazine and more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at Kumaon in two thousand and nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national fund's speakers bureau. She is addressed various Jewish stewed. Groups and participated on debate panels, and she is the author of the copper scroll project an ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Right, richard. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take us back to the early nineteen fifties the on caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, the copper schools, of course, part of that. But but just sort of paint that picture for us if you will. Right. Well, so that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls. It's part of the Dead Sea scrolls collection, but you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on that the miracle that is the Dead Sea scrolls and to really put yourself in that time and point in history. When that she's schools are flooding the black market. I'm sure the, you know, the story of how the first that sea scrolls were found me at this point. It's kind of part of our of our cultural fabric. But. But it had it not been somehow the Dead Sea scrolls were hidden for two thousand years, and and it was in the nineteen fifties. Probably nineteen forty seven. Whenever no one knows quite for. Sure. Nineteen forty seven. Nineteen Forty-six that that one's just letting their sheep run across sparse vegetation, and the Judean desert that one of the bedouin through rock and cave. And here's a shattering of something and go home and thinks he's too scared to go in the cave that day that goes back the next day with his cousins thinking that they'll find some sort of very treasure and really were quite disappointed when I was just broken pottery. And what their purposes they were literate in Arabic, much less. Hebrew, or ancient Hebrew. So you really had no idea what they had. But they brought it back to their camp. Put it in a in a bag and hug it from temple and debated. Sort of what to do about it? How to repurpose it? There's one part of the story is that there was a debate about repurposing the leather for something else. And and you magin, oh, my Lord what a lot. But it was one on goal who suggested. Hey, let's go to Bethlehem on a market day that that when already going to Bethlehem, and and we'll shop around and he knew somebody who knew somebody that was connected to that the black market. And that's that's where the story, but that's used froz- began. So really to me even just right up in front of the getting it's a it's a story of provident. Absolutely. And why are they significant? These scrolls have Hebrew inscriptions on them. What is their significance? Right. Well, so before the Dead Sea scrolls, really the Dead Sea scrolls are pre dating our oldest known Hebrew manuscripts by thousand years. So in terms of what that did for scholarship what it did for our understanding. This is pre canonization of the bible. So really what it did for understanding of that process and really in first century to respond what books where Jewish sects reading what books were the most popular. It gives us a shines like a light into this window of time. That's so critical for the rest of the two thousand years for our bible, and the even just books the book. Really trading biblical scholarship on its head in terms of what did I say, it looked like two thousand years ago, would it Samuel and chronicles and what they were the psalms in the same order then as now and what we found. I mean scholars for scholars small differences. You know, they make their living off of what did they say the narcissism of small differences? And so for them, they look at Samuel, and they see differences and study those, but for our purposes for the purposes of any believer. I mean, it is astonishing that the bible was able to maintain its its authentic fabric for for all of this time. And I then looks like Isaiah now and certainly Genesis through. Deuteronomy? Look the same now. As it did then. Right. So for people who argue that the the bible has been mistranslated or the meanings have been changed. The discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, really a confirms and buttresses the the the consistency of the biblical narrative. It hasn't changed. Correct. Absolutely. That's exactly right. And and so amongst the the these scrolls of papyrus are two different types of scrolls. Copper what do they look like? So the copper scroll. There's we've always thought before that eleven caves that house Dead Sea scrolls last year, twelve cable sound not what's close, but we know that it one touch scroll. So there was twelve caves, the copper, scroll was found and cave. Every one of the few caves, it was found by legitimate archeologocial team. Most of the other squirrel caves were found by bad ones. I mean, really in the fifties. It was just a race against time. In terms of who could find the next said, she's close case. I would it be the bedouin are the archaeologists than the bedouin usually won that war in the case of case three it was a French archaeologist. And so you can imagine what they're expecting defined is schools written on papyrus or leather. And every one of those is, you know, a treasure in its own, right? But it was it was case three that they excavated for ten days, and they were pretty disappointed because they could tell that it wants house at least forty scrolls. But that that. Roof of the cave had collapsed and integrity. So once it clap once it broke the jars then that's grows were exposed to wrote in some time. And so most of the squirrels where we're really not salvageable, and they were closing out the big and really it was in the last hours of of that last day of the dig that they see that almost there's this false wall at the back of the cave. Sorry, I got the actual appearance of the conference call, but I feel like I have to take this picture. Thank you. So so it was it was like this false wall, the secret chamber, and I mean, that's just the only way I can describe it. And so they chips through it live is down. And and they see I'm like every other scroll that's been found really in the Dead Sea scrolls is it was resting on a man-made shelf behind this wall, which probably had collapsed in antiquity. And so. There's really just like nature had created a perfect hiding spot for this super unusual that he's so the way looked with two roles. So really, the copper scroll is ones grow. But and integrity when they were rolling it up. It had snapped in two. So it's two rolls laying next to each other. And they were green the color of the statue of liberty because copper copper does. And and it got that. Nice. Patina on it. Right. It oxidises. Yeah. Exactly. And that would prove to to really be a protect that for the copper school for two thousand years. And and so once they got it, and where he would have clean it off and use mirrors. And and and and they could only see the words that were on the outside of the copper scroll. And so it took three years for them to be able to open it. Now, we know that the copper scroll originally measured about seven feet long was a foot wide. It has rivets on the four corners, which means at some point. It was probably hung on a wall. And and that the copper, scroll, what was what it must have been incredibly precarious unscrew rolling something that had been scrolled up for twenty four hundred years something that's made of I don't know how brittle it is. But copper the decision. To try an unscripted without destroying it. That must have been nerve wracking. Absolutely. I think it was a combination. You know, now, I don't think that we would have tried to cut it open, our unfurl it. Now, I think we would have the ability to probably been able to scan it and see see what was there without even making such a risky move. But then they they sat on it for three years, and partly for this reason, it was it was it was shattered. You know, it was so vulnerable even to just the slightest touch. So they really they they talked to a Metallurgist. And at Johns Hopkins, they really shocked it out kind of internationally just is there any expert out there that can help us in this process to unroll it and pretty much universally no-one said that it was worth the risk of of unrolling it, but they could see words on the outside. Three words that kept repeating themselves were dig and gold in Cuba. So I mean, they knew what they had on their hands. It was something unlike every other Dead Sea scroll, but I think too. There was a, you know, Israel's not sovereign over to respond at this time that the Dead Sea scrolls are in the hands of the Jordanian antiquities. It's thirty and so no Jewish scholars are allowed to work on the Dead Sea scrolls at this point, which really reduced their expertise level as well. I think the Dead Sea scroll aditorial team that was there which is worth a book in its own. Right. Just to those guys were they were overwhelmed. They were being flooded with all of these cease both every day. So I just don't think that the copper scroll was very high on their priority list. They had a publishing schedule that they would be thirty years off on in terms of once they were able to get the Dead Sea scrolls published and to the public so they were going to spend the rest of their lives being really far behind on their workload. But one guy his name was John allegro. He he's not as the Mavericks of the Dead Sea school editorial team. He just he works fast. He, you know, wasn't as careful methodical as the rest of them. But really we have him to sort of thank for getting getting his the Dead Sea scrolls, just inviting the public into that process. From the very beginning. And he was the one that champion the copper scroll, and he brought it says alma mater, which was Manchester university and in England, and and he found he went to different different antiquities experts. But he ended up finding a guy. Henry right Baker. Who is just a professor an engineering professor at the college of engineering at Manchester university..

Dead Sea Dead Sea school Bethlehem Shelley Israel Temple Mount Shelly Manchester university Henry right Baker EMMY Ben Gurion university Jerusalem richard Washington Jerusalem Post Samuel Isaiah John allegro professor Shelly
"temple mount shelly" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

11:43 min | 2 years ago

"temple mount shelly" Discussed on WRVA

"Shelley niece is the vice president of the Jerusalem connection international and nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand to two thousand and four where she learned conversational Hebrew and received her MA in Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the negative the high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending the two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications or articles have appeared in the Jerusalem Post. A route Sheba front page magazine. And more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at coumarin in two thousand nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national fund's speakers bureau, she is addressed various Jewish student. Groups and participated on debate panels, and she is the author of the copper scroll project an ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Great, richard. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take us back to the early nineteen fifties, the Kumaon caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, the copper scrolls, of course, part of that. But but just sort of paint that picture for us if you will. Right. Well, so that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls. It's part of the Dead Sea scrolls collection, but you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on the miracle. That is the Dead Sea scrolls and to really put yourself in that time and point in history when that schools are flooding the black market. I'm sure the, you know, the story of how the first Dead Sea scrolls found me at this point. It's kind of part of our of our cultural fabric. But. That it had it not been somehow the Dead Sea scrolls were hidden for two thousand years, and and it was in the nineteen fifties. Nineteen forty seven whenever no one knows quite for. Sure. Nineteen forty seven. Nineteen Forty-six that that one's just letting their sheep run across sparse vegetation and the day in desert that one of the bedouin through Iraq and a cave, and here's a shattering of of something and go home and thinks he's too scared to go in the cave that day, but goes back the next day with his cousins thinking that they'll find some sort of very treasure and really were quite disappointed when I was just broken pottery. And what their purposes they were literate in Arabic, much less. Hebrew, or ancient Hebrew. So you really had no idea what they had. But they brought it back to their cap. Put it in a in a bag and hung up from ten and debated. Sort of what to do about it? How to repurpose it? There's one part of the story is that there was a debate about repurposing the leather for something else. And and you imagine, oh, my Lord what a loss, but it was one on goal who suggested, hey, let's go to Bethlehem on a market day that that when are going to Bethlehem, and and we'll shop around and he knew somebody who knew somebody that was connected to that the black market. And that's that's where this story the Dead Sea scrolls began so really to me even just right up five the getting it's a it's a story of just provident. Absolutely. And why are they significant? These scrolls have Hebrew inscriptions on them. What is their significance? Right. Well, so before the Dead Sea scrolls, really the Dead Sea scrolls are pre dating our oldest known Hebrew manuscripts by thousand years. So in terms of what that did for scholarship. What it did for our understanding? Yeah. This is pre canonization of the bible. So really what it did for our understanding of that process and really in first century to respond what books where Jewish sects reading what books were the most popular. It gives us assigns like. Alight into this window of time. That's so critical for the rest of the two thousand years for our bible, and the even just books the book really training, biblical scholarship on its head in terms of what did I say look like two thousand years ago, would it Samuel and chronicles and where the psalms in the same order then is now what we found. I mean scholars for scholars small differences. You know, they make their living off of what did they say the narcissism of small differences? And so for them, they look at Samuel, and they see differences and and study those, but for our purposes for the purposes of any believer. I mean, it is astonishing that the bible was able to just maintain its it's authentic fabric for for all of this time. And then looks like Isaiah now, and certainly Genesis through. Deuteronomy? Look the same now. As it did then. Right. So for people who argue that the the bible has been mistranslated or the meanings have been changed. The the discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, really a confirms and buttresses the the the consistency of the biblical narrative. It hasn't changed correct? That's exactly right. And and so amongst the the these scrolls of preposterous are two different types of scrolls. Copper what do they look like? So the copper scroll. There's we've always thought before that. There are eleven caves that house Dead Sea scrolls last year, twelve cable was found not what's close, but we know that it wasn't Todd scroll. So there was twelve cave. The copper scroll was found in cave. Every what if you caves it was found by legitimate archeologocial team? Most of the other scroll caves were found by bad ones. I mean, really in the fifties. It was just a race against time. In terms of who could find the next said, she's close case. I would it be the bedouin or the archaeologists and the bedouin usually won that war in the case of Cape three it was a French archaeologist. And so you can imagine what they're expecting defined is scrolls written on papyrus or leather. And every one of those is, you know, a treasurer in its own, right? But it was it was case three that they excavated for ten days. They were pretty disappointed because they could tell that it wants house. At least forty scrolls. But that that. Roof at the cave had collapsed, and then take so once it clap once it broke, the jars been this grows were exposed to rodents and time, and so most of this growth where we're really not salvageable, and they were closing out the big and really it was in the last hours of of that last day of the day that they see that. Almost there's this false wall at the back of the cave. Sorry, I guess another the actual appearance of the conference call I feel like I have to pay this picture. Thank you. So so it was it was like this false wall of the secret chamber. And I mean, that's just the only way I can describe it. And so they chips through it live down. And they see I'm like every other scroll that's been found really in the Dead Sea scrolls, as it was resting on a man-made shelf behind this wall, which probably had collapsed in antiquity. And so is really just like nature had created a perfect hiding spot for this super unusual that she throws. So the way looked was two roles. So really, the copper close ones grow. But antiquity when they were rolling it up it had snapped. And to those two rolls laying next to each other. And they were green. The color of the statue of liberty because copper did what copper does. And and I got that. Nice. Patina on it oxidises. Yeah. Exactly. And that would prove to really be a protect that for the copper school for two thousand years. And and so once they got it, and where he would have clean it off and use mirrors. And and and they could only see the words that were on the outside of the copper scroll. And so it took three years for them to be able to open it. Now, we know that the copper scroll originally measured about seven feet long with a foot wide. It has read it on the four corners, which means at some point. It was probably hung on a wall and the copper scroll. What was what? It must have been incredibly precarious unscrew rolling something that had been scrolled up for twenty four hundred years something that's made of I don't know how brittle it is. But copper I mean, the decision to try and unscrew it without destroying it. That must have been nerve wracking. Absolutely. I think it was a combination. You know, now, I don't think that we would have tried to cut it open, our unfurl it. Now, I think we would have the ability to have probably been able to scan it and see see what was there without even making such a risky move. But then they. They sat on it for three years, and partly for this reason, it was it was it was shattered. You know, it was so vulnerable even to just the slightest touch. So they really they they talked to a Metallurgist at Johns Hopkins. They really shocked it out kind of internationally just is there any expert out there that can help us in this process to unroll it and pretty much universally no-one said that it was worth the risk of of unrolling it, but they could see words on the outside. And three words that capture repeating themselves were dig and gold in Cuba. So I mean, they knew what they had on their hands. It was something unlike every other Dead Sea scroll, but I think too. There was a, you know, Israel's not sovereign over Jerusalem. At this time that the Dead Sea scrolls are in the hands of the Jordanian antiquities already. And so no Jewish scholars are allowed to work on the Dead Sea scrolls at this point, which really reduced their expertise level as well. I think the Dead Sea scrolls aditorial team that was there which is worth a book in its own. Right. Just to those guys were they were overwhelmed. They were being flooded with all of these these both every day. So I just don't think the copper scroll was very high on their priority list. They had you know, a publishing schedule that they would be thirty years off on in terms of once they were able to to get the Dead Sea scrolls publicity to the public. So they were going to spend the rest.

Dead Sea Bethlehem bedouin Shelley Jerusalem Israel Temple Mount Shelly page magazine Ben Gurion university Jerusalem Post Shelly richard Washington Samuel Isaiah vice president Iraq Johns Hopkins Deuteronomy
"temple mount shelly" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

12:37 min | 2 years ago

"temple mount shelly" Discussed on KNSS

"Shelley niece is the vice president of the Jerusalem connection international and nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand to two thousand and four where she learned conversational Hebrew and received her m a in Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the Negev the high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending the two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications or articles of appeared in the Jerusalem Post. A route Sheba front page magazine and more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at coumarin in two thousand and nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national fund's speakers bureau, she is addressed various Jewish student groups and participated. On debate panels, and she is the author of the copper, scroll project an ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Great, richard. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take us back to the early nineteen fifties, the coumarin caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, the copper schools, of course, part of that. But but just sort of paint that picture force if you will. Right. Well, so that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls. It's part of the Dead Sea scrolls collection, but you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on that the miracle that is the Dead Sea scrolls and to really put yourself in that time and point in history. When that she's schools are flooding the black market. I'm sure, you know, the story of how the first Dead Sea scrolls were found made at this point. It's kind of part of our of our cultural fabric. But. But it had it not been somehow the Dead Sea scrolls were hidden for two thousand years, and and it was in the nineteen fifties. Probably nineteen forty seven. Whenever no one knows quite for. Sure. Nineteen forty seven nineteen Forty-six that that one's just letting their sheep. Rona cross sparse vegetation, and the Judean desert that one of the bedouin through Iraq and a cave, and here's a shattering of of something and goes home and thinks he's too scared to go in the cave that day that goes back the next day with his cousins thinking that they'll find some sort of very treasure and really were quite disappointed when it was just broken pottery. And what their purposes they were literate and era bec- much less. Hebrew, or ancient Hebrew. So he really had no idea what they had. But they brought it back to their cap. Put it in it in a bag and hung it from attempt temple and debated. Sort of what to do about it? How to repurpose it? There's one part of the stories that there was a debate about repurposing the leather for something else. And can you imagine all my Lord what a loss, but it was one on goal who suggested, hey, let's go to Bethlehem on a market day that that when already going to Bethlehem, and and we'll shop around and he knew somebody who knew somebody that was connected to the the black market. And that's that's where the story, but that's use gross began. So really to me even just right up front in front of the getting it's a it's a story of just providence. Absolutely. And why are they significant? These scrolls have Hebrew inscriptions on them. What is their significance? Right. Well, so before the dads. He's pros really the Dead Sea scrolls are pre dating our oldest known Hebrew manuscripts by thousand years. So in terms of what that did for biblical scholarship. What it did for our understanding? Yeah. This is pre canonization of the bible. So really what it did for understanding of that process and really in first century to respond what books where Jewish sects reading what books were the most popular. It gives us a shines like a light into this a window of time. That's so critical for the rest of the two thousand years for our bible in the even just books the book, really turning biblical scholarship on its head in terms of what did I say it look like two thousand years ago, would it Samuel and chronicles and what they were the psalms in the same order. Then as now what we? You sound. I mean scholars for scholars small differences. You know, they make their living off of what did they say the narcissism of small differences? And so for them, they look at Samuel, and they see differences and study those, but for our purposes for the purposes of any believer. I mean, it is establishing that the bible was able to maintain its it's authentic fabric for for all of this time. And I they then looks like Isaiah now and certainly Genesis through. Deuteronomy? Look the same now. As as it did then. Right. So for people who argue that the bible has been mistranslated or the meanings have been changed. The the discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, really a confirms and buttresses the the the consistency of the biblical narrative. It hasn't changed. Correct. Absolutely. That's exactly right. And and so amongst the the these scrolls of papyrus are two different types of scrolls. Copper what do they look like? So the copper scroll. There's we've always thought before that Lebanon caves that house Dead Sea scrolls last year, right twelve cable sound not what's close, but we know that at one touch scroll. So there was twelve caves the copper scroll was found and every one of the few caves it was found by a legitimate archaeological team. Most of the other squirrel caves were found by bad ones. I mean, really in the fifties. It was just a race against time. In terms of who could find the next said, she's close cave. I would it be the bedouin or the archaeologists and the bedouin usually one that or in the case of Cape three it was a French. Archaeologist. And so you can imagine what they're expecting defined as it scrolls written on papyrus or leather and every one of those is, you know, a treasure in its own right? But it was it was case three that they excavated for ten days, and they were pretty disappointed because they could tell that it wants house at least forty scrolls. But that that. Roof at the cave had collapsed and integrity. So once it clap once it broke, the jars then the girls were exposed to rodents and time, and and so most of this girls were we're really not salvageable, and they were closing out the dig and really it was in the last hours of of that last day of the dig that they see that almost there's this false wall at the back of the cave. Sorry, I got the actual appearance of the conference call, but I feel like I have to pay this picture. Thank you. So so it was it was like this false wall, the secret chamber, and I mean, that's just the only way I can describe it. They chips through it live stone. And they see I'm like every other scroll that's been found really in the Dead Sea scrolls. It was resting on a man-made shelf behind this wall, which probably had collapsed in antiquity. And so. There's really just nature had created a perfect hiding spot for this super unusual that throws. So the way looked with two roles. So really, the copper scroll is ones grow. But antiquity when they were rolling it up snapped in two so two rolls laying next to each other. And they were green the color of the statue of liberty because copper dead what copper does. And and I got that. Nice. Patina on it. Right. It oxidises. Yeah. Exactly. And that would prove to to really be a protect that for the copper school for two thousand years. And and so once they got it and where he would clean it off and use mirrors. And and and and they could only see the words that were on the outside of the copper scroll. And so it took three years for them to be able to open it. Now, we know that the copper scroll originally measured about seven feet long with a foot wide. It has rivets on the four corners, which means at some point. It was probably hung on a wall. And and the the copper scroll was was what? It must have been incredibly precarious unscrew rolling something that had been scrolled up for twenty four hundred years something that's made of I don't know how brittle it is. But copper I mean, the decision to try and unscrew it without destroying it. That must have been nerve wracking. Absolutely. I think it was a combination. You know, now, I don't think that we would have tried to cut it open, our unfurl it. Now, I think we would have the ability to have probably been able to scan it and see see what was there without even making such a risky move. But then they. They sat on it for three years, and partly for this reason, it was it was it was shatter. You know, it was so vulnerable even to just the slightest touch. So they really they they talked to a Metallurgist at Johns Hopkins. They really shocked it out kind of internationally just is there any expert out there that can help us in this process to unroll it pretty much universally no-one said that it was worth the risk of of unrolling it, but they could see words on the outside. And three words that kept repeating themselves were dig and gold and Cuba. So I mean, they knew what they had on their hands it with something unlike every other Dead Sea scroll, but I think too. There was a, you know, Israel's not sovereign overtures son at this time that the Dead Sea scrolls are in the hands of the Jordanian antiquities authority, and so no Jewish scholars are allowed to work on the Dead Sea scrolls. At this point, which really reduced their expertise level as well. I think the Dead Sea scroll aditorial team that was there which is worth a book in its own. Right. Just to those guys were they were overwhelmed. They were being flooded with all of these both every day. So I just don't think that the copper scroll was very high on their priority list. They had you know, a publishing schedule it. They would be thirty years off on in terms of once they were able to to get the Dead Sea scrolls published and to the public so they were going to spend the rest of their lives being really far behind on their workload. But one guy his name was John allegro. He he's not as the Mavericks of the Dead Sea scrolls editorial team, he just he works fast. He wasn't as careful methodical as the rest of them. But really we have to sort of thing for getting getting his. The Dead Sea scrolls just inviting the public into that process from the very beginning. And he was the one that champion the copper scroll, and he brought it to his alma mater, which was Manchester university in England, and and he found he went to different different antiquities experts. But he ended up. Finding a guy. Henry right Baker. Who is just a professor an engineering professor at the college of engineering at Manchester university..

Dead Sea Bethlehem bedouin Shelley Israel Temple Mount Shelly Manchester university Henry right Baker Ben Gurion university Jerusalem page magazine richard Washington Shelly Samuel Jerusalem Post Isaiah John allegro vice president
"temple mount shelly" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

12:49 min | 2 years ago

"temple mount shelly" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Shelley niece is the vice president of the Jerusalem connection international nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand to two thousand and four where she learned conversational Hebrew and received her EMMY in Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the Negev the high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending the two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications are articles of appeared in the Jerusalem Post. A route Sheba front page magazine. And more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at Kumaon in two thousand and nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national fund's speakers bureau. She is addressed various Jewish state. Groups and participated on debate panels, and she is the author of the copper scroll project and ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Great record. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take it back to the early nineteen fifties the on caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, a copper schools, of course, part of that. But but just sort of paint that picture force if you will. Right. Also that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls, it's part of the debt collection. But you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on that the miracle that is the Dead Sea scrolls and to really put yourself in that time and point in history. When that she's schools are flooding the black market. I'm sure, you know, the story of how the first that sea scrolls were found made at this point. It's kind of part of our cultural fabric. But. That it had it not been somehow the Dead Sea scrolls were hidden for two thousand years, and and it was in the nineteen fifties. Probably nineteen forty seven. Whenever no one knows quite for. Sure. Nineteen forty seven. Nineteen Forty-six that bedouin just letting their sheep run across sparse vegetation, and the today in desert that one of the bedouin through rock and cave. And here's a shattering of something and goes home and thinks he's too scared to go on the cave that day that goes back the next day with his cousins thinking that they'll find some sort of very treasure and really were quite disappointed when I was just broken pottery. And what their purposes they were literate in Arabic, much less. She brewer ancient Hebrew. So they really had no idea what they had. But they brought it back to their camp. Put it in a in a bag and hung it from a ten temple and debated. Sort of what to do about it? How to repurpose it? There's one part of the story is that there was a debate about repurposing the leather for something else. And can you imagine all my Lord what a loss, but it was one uncle who suggested? Hey, let's go to Bethlehem on a market day that that win or already going to Bethlehem and we'll shop around and he knew somebody who knew somebody that was connected to the the black Marquette. And that's that's where this story. The Dead Sea scrolls began so really to me even just right up private funding to getting is it's a it's a story of just provident. Absolutely. And why are they significant? These scrolls have Hebrew inscriptions on them. What is their significance? Right. Well, so before the Dead Sea scrolls, really the Dead Sea scrolls are pre dating our oldest known Hebrew manuscripts by thousand years. So in terms of what that did for the scholarship what it did for our understanding. This is pre canonization of the bible. So really what it did for our understanding of that process and really in first century to respond what books where Jewish sects reading what books were the most popular. It gives us a signs like a light into this window of time. That's so critical for the rest of the two thousand years for our bible, and the even just book the book. Really turning biblical scholarship on its head in terms of what did I say look like two thousand years ago, would it Samuel chronicles and look like where the psalms in the same order then as now and what we found. I mean scholars for scholars small differences. You know, they make their living off of what did they say the narcissism of small differences? And so for them, they look at Samuel, and they see differences and and study those, but for our purposes purposes as as any believer. I mean, it is astonishing that the bible was able to just maintain its it's authentic fabric for for all of this time. And I they then looks like I am now and certainly Genesis through. The same now. Just as it did then. Right. So for people who argue that the the bible has been translated or the meanings have been changed. The discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, really a confirms and buttresses the the consistency of the biblical narrative. It hasn't changed. Correct. Absolutely. That's exactly right. And and so amongst the the the scrolls of Paris are two different types of scrolls. Copper what do they look like? So the copper scroll. There's we've always thought before that. There are eleven caves that house Dead Sea scrolls last year, right twelve cable sound that was close, but we know that at one touch scroll. So there was twelve cave. The copper scroll was found and pays every one of the few caves it was found by legitimate archaeological team. Most of the other squirrel keizer found by bad ones. I mean, really in the fifties. It was just a race against time. In terms of who could find the next fed sees calls case. I would it be the bedouin are the archaeologists in the bed with usually one that or in the case of case three it was a French archaeologist. And so you can imagine what they're expecting defined as scrolls written on papyrus or leather. And every one of those is, you know, a treasure in its own, right? But it was it was case three that they excavated for ten days, and they were pretty disappointed because they could tell that it wants house. At least forty scrolls. But that that. Roof had collapsed and integrity. So once it clap once it broke, the jars been scrolls were exposed to wrote in some time. And and so most of the squirrels where we're really not salvageable, and they were closing out the dig and really it was in the last hours of of that last day of the day that they see that. Almost there's this false wall at the back of the cave. Sorry, I the actual appearance of the conference. Call back like I have to pay this picture. Thank you. So so it was it was like this false wall of a secret chamber. And I mean, that's just the only way I can describe it. They chips through it lives down. And and they see I'm like every other scrolled that's been found really in the Dead Sea scrolls, as it was resting on a man-made self behind this wall, which probably had collapsed in antiquity. And so there's really dislike nature had created a perfect hiding spot for this super unusual that he's so the way it was two roles. So really the cops close ones grow. But antiquity when they were rolling it up had snapped any to those two roles living next to each other. And they were green. The color of the statue of liberty because copper copper does. And then it got that. Nice. Patina on it oxidises. Yeah. Exactly. And that would prove to really be a protect that for the copper school for years. And and so once they got it and where he would clean it off and use mirrors. And and and and they could only see the words that were on the outside of the copper scroll. And so it took three years for them to be able to open it. Now, we know that the copper scroll originally measured about seven feet long was cut wide. It has read it on the four corners, which means at some point. It was probably hung on a wall. And the copper scroll was was one. It must have been incredibly precarious unscrew rolling something that had been scrolled up for twenty four hundred years something that's made of I don't know how brittle it is. But copper. The decision to try an unscripted without destroying it. That must have been nerve wracking. Absolutely. I think it was a combination. Now, I don't think that we would have tried to cut it open, our unfurl it. Now, I think we would have the ability to probably been able to scan it and see see what was there without even making such a risky move. But then they. They sat on it for three years, and partly for this reason, it was it was it was shattered. You know, it was so vulnerable even to just the slightest touch. So they really they they talked to a Metallurgist. And at Johns Hopkins, they really shocked it out kind of internationally just is there any expert out there that can help us in this process that unroll it and pretty much universally no-one said that it was worth the risk of of unrolling it, but they could see words on the outside. And three words that kept repeating themselves were dig and gold and Cuba. So I mean, they knew what they had on their hands. It was something unlike every other girl, but I think too. There was a, you know, Israel's not sovereign over to respond at this time that the Dead Sea scrolls are in the hands of the Jordanian antiquities thirty. And so no Jewish scholars are allowed to work on the Dead Sea scrolls. At this point, which really reduced their expertise level as well. I think the Dead Sea scroll aditorial team that was there which is worth of book in its own right? Just to those guys where they were overwhelmed. They were you know, being flooded with all of these cease every day. So I just don't think that the copper scroll was very high on their priority list. They had a publishing schedule that they would be thirty years off on in terms of once they were able to get the Dead Sea scrolls published and to the public so they were going to spend the rest of their lives being really far behind on their workload. But one guy his name was John allegro. He he's not as the fabric of the Dead Sea scrolls editorial team, he just he worked. He wasn't as careful. Methodical as the rest of them that really we have him to sort of thing for getting getting his the Dead Sea scrolls, just inviting the public into that process from the very beginning. And he was the one that champion the copper scroll, and he brought it to his alma mater, which was Manchester university and in England, and and he found he went to different different antiquities experts. But he ended up finding a guy. Henry right Baker. Who is just a professor an engineering professor at college of engineering at Manchester university. So really, no no business really being being the guy that would open the coppers girl, but he had got and he had faith, and and he thought he could do it..

Dead Sea copper school scrolls of Paris Bethlehem Shelley Israel Samuel Manchester university Temple Mount Shelly Henry right Baker page magazine Ben Gurion university Jerusalem Washington Shelly Jerusalem Post Kumaon John allegro professor
"temple mount shelly" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

10:17 min | 2 years ago

"temple mount shelly" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Alarm to play nine seventy WFL a every day at six AM. Shelley niece is the vice president of the Jerusalem connection international and nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand two thousand and four where she learned conversational Hebrew and received her in Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the negative the high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending the two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications or articles have appeared in the Jerusalem Post. A route Sheba front page magazine. And more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at coumarin in two thousand and nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national fund's speakers bureau, she is address. I various Jewish student groups and participated on debate panels, and she is the author of the copper scroll project an ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Great, richard. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take us back to the early nineteen fifties, the coumarin caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, the copper schools, of course, part of that. But but just sort of paint that picture force if you will. Right. Well, so that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls. It's part of the Dead Sea scrolls collection, but you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on the miracle. That is the Dead Sea scrolls and to really put yourself in that time and point in history. When that she's schools are flooding the black market. I'm sure the, you know, the story of how the first that sea scrolls were found made at this point. It's kind of hard as our of our cultural fabric. But. But it had it not been somehow the Dead Sea scrolls were hidden for two thousand years, and and it was in the nineteen fifties. Probably nineteen forty seven. Whenever no one knows quite for. Sure. Nineteen forty seven. Nineteen Forty-six that bedouin just letting their sheep run across sparse vegetation, and the Judean desert that one of the bedouin through Iraq and a cave, and here's a shattering of of something and goes home and thinks he's too scared to go in the cave that day that goes back the next day with his cousins thinking that they'll find some sort of very treasure and really were quite disappointed when I was just broken pottery. And what their purposes they were literate in airbag, much less. Hebrew, or ancient Hebrew. So he really had no idea what they had. But they brought it back to the recap put it in a in a bag and hung up from ten Paul and debated. Sort of what to do about it? How to repurpose it? There's one part of the story is that there was a debate about repurposing the leather for something else. And can you imagine? Oh, my Lord what a lot. But it was one on goal who suggested. Hey, let's go to Bethlehem on a market day that that when are already going to Bethlehem, and and we'll stop around, and he knew somebody who knew somebody that was connected to that the black market. And that's that's where this story, but that's used gross began. So really to me even just right up five hundred again, it's a it's a story of just provident. Absolutely. And why are they significant? These scrolls have Hebrew inscriptions on them. What is their significance? Right. Well, so before the Dead Sea scrolls, really the Dead Sea scrolls are pre dating our oldest known Hebrew manuscripts by thousand years. So in terms of what that did for scholarship what it did for our understanding. This is pre canonization of the bible. So really what it did for our understanding of that process and really in first century to respond what books where Jewish sects reading what books were the most popular. It gives us a like a light into this window of time. That's so critical for the rest of the two thousand years for our bible, and the even just books the book. Really turning biblical scholarship on its head in terms of what did I say, it looked like two thousand years ago, would it Samuel chronicles and what they were the psalms in the same order. Then as now what we found. I mean scholars for scholars small differences. You know, they make their living off of what did they say the narcissism of small differences? And so for them, they look at Samuel, and they see differences and study those, but for our purposes for the purposes of any believer. I mean, it is astonishing that the bible was able to maintain its it's authentic fabric for for all of this time. And I then looks like Isaiah now and certainly Genesis through. With the same now. As it did. Then. Right. So for people who argue that the bible has been mistranslated or the meetings have been changed the discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, really confirms and buttresses the the the consistency of the biblical narrative. It hasn't changed. Correct. Absolutely. That's exactly right. And and so amongst the the these scrolls of papyrus are two different types of scrolls. Copper what do they look like? So the copper scroll. There's we've always thought before that Lebanon caves that house Dead Sea scrolls last year, right twelve cable was found. Not what's close, but we know that at one touch scroll. So there was twelve gave the copper scroll was found in pays every. What of the few caves, it was found by a legitimate archaeological team, most of the other squirrel as were found by bad ones. I mean, really in the fifties. It was just a race against time. In terms of who could find the next said, he's calls cave. I would it be the bedouin are the archaeologists and the bedouin usually won that war in the case of three. It was a French archaeologist. And so you can imagine. What they're expecting defined as it scrolls written on papyrus or leather. And every one of those is, you know, a treasure in its own, right? But it was. It was case three that they excavated for ten days, and they were pretty disappointed because they could tell that it once house. At least forty scrolls. But that that. Roof of the cave had collapsed and integrity. So once it clap once it broke, the jars then the scrolls were exposed to wrote him some time, and so most of this growth, where we're really not salvageable, and they were closing out the big and really it was in the last hours of of that lasted day of the day that they see that almost there's this false wall at the back of the cave. Sorry, I guess about the actual appearance of the conference call, but I feel like I have to pay this picture. Thank you. So so it was it was like this false law the secret chamber, and I mean, that's just the only way I can describe it. Do they chips through it live down? And and they see I'm like every other scroll that's been found really in the Dead Sea scrolls, as it was resting on a man-made shelf behind this wall, which probably had collapsed in antiquity. And so there's really just like nature had created a perfect hiding spot for this. Super unusual that she throws. So the way looked was two roles. So really, the copper scroll is ones grow. But and integrity when they were rolling it up. It had snapped any. So it's two rolls laying next to each other. And they were green the color of the statue of liberty because copper copper does. And got that. Nice patina on it. Right. It oxidises. Yeah. Exactly. And that would prove to really be a protect that for the copper school for two thousand years. And and so once they got it and where he would to clean it off and use mirrors. And and and and they could only see the words that were on the outside of the copper scroll. And so it took three years for them to be able to open it. Now, we know that the copper scroll originally measured about seven feet long was a foot wide. It has rivets on the. Four corners, which means at some point. It was probably hung on a wall. And the copper scroll was was one. It must have been incredibly precarious unscrew rolling something that had been scrolled up for twenty four hundred years something that's made of I don't know how brittle it is. But copper. I mean, the decision to try an unscripted without destroying it. That must have been nerve wracking. Absolutely. I think it was a combination. You know, now, I don't think that we would have tried to cut it open, our unfurl it. Now, I think we would have the ability to probably been able to scan it and see see what was there without even making such a risky move. But then they. They.

Dead Sea bedouin Bethlehem Shelley Samuel Temple Mount Shelly Ben Gurion university page magazine Jerusalem Shelly richard Israel Washington vice president Jerusalem Post Isaiah Iraq Paul Lebanon
"temple mount shelly" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

08:16 min | 2 years ago

"temple mount shelly" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Shelley niece is the vice president of the Jerusalem connection international and nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand two thousand and four where she learned conversational Hebrew and received her m a and Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the Negev the high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending be two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications or articles have appeared in the Jerusalem Post. A route Sheba front page magazine. And more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at Kumaon in two thousand and nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national fund's speakers bureau. She is addressed various Jewish state. Groups and participated on debate panels, and she is the author of the copper scroll project an ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Great, richard. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take us back to the early nineteen fifties, the coumarin caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, the copper schools, of course, part of that. But but just sort of paint that picture for us if you will. Right. Well, so that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls. It's part of the Dead Sea scrolls collection, but you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on that the miracle that is the Dead Sea scrolls and to really put yourself in that time and point in history when that schools are flooding the black market. I'm sure the, you know, the story of how the first that sea scrolls were found made at this point. It's kind of part of our of our cultural fabric. But. But it had it not been somehow the Dead Sea scrolls were hidden for two thousand years, and and it was in the nineteen fifties. Holy nineteen forty seven. Whenever no one knows quite for. Sure. Nineteen forty seven. Nineteen Forty-six that bedouin just letting their sheep Ronin across sparse vegetation and the day in desert that one of the bedouin through rock and cave. And here's a shattering of something and goes home and thinks he's too scared to go in the cave that day that goes back the next day with his cousins thinking that they'll find some sort of very treasure and really were quite disappointed when I was just broken pottery. And what their purposes they were literate in Arabic, much less. She brewer ancient Hebrew. So he really had no idea what they had. But they brought it back to their camp. Put it in a bag and hung it from temple and debated. Sort of what to do about it? How to repurpose it? There's one part of the story is that there was a debate about repurposing the leather for something else. And and you imagine all my Lord what a lot. But it was one on goal who suggested. Hey, what's good about Lehem on a market day that that when are already going to Bethlehem, and and we'll shop around, and he knew somebody who knew somebody that was connected to that the black market. And that's that's where this story. That's us pros began. So really to me even just right up front in front of the getting is it's a it's a story of just provident. Absolutely. And why are they significant? These scrolls have Hebrew inscriptions on them. What is their significance? Right. Well, so before the Dead Sea scrolls, really the Dead Sea scrolls are pre dating our oldest known Hebrew manuscripts by thousand years. So in terms of what that did for biblical scholarship. What it did for our understanding? This is pre canonization of the bible. So really what it did for our understanding of that process and really in first century to respond. What books were Jewish sects reading what books were the most popular? It gives us. It's shines a light into this window of time. That's so critical for the rest of the two thousand years for our bible, and the even just books the book. We'll be turning biblical scholarship on its head in terms of what did I look like two thousand years ago, would it Samuel and chronicles and what they were the psalms in the same order. Then as now what we found. I mean scholars for scholars small differences. You know, they make their living off of what did they say the narcissism of small differences? And so for them, they look at Samuel, and they see differences and study those, but for our purposes for the purposes of any believer. I mean, it is astonishing that the bible was able to maintain its it's authentic fabric for for all of this time. And I they then looks like Isaiah now and certainly Genesis through. Deuteronomy? Look the same now. As it did. Then. Right. So for people who argue that the bible has been mistranslated or the meetings have been changed. The the discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, really a confirms and buttresses the the the consistency of the biblical narrative. It hasn't changed. Correct. Absolutely. That's exactly right. And so amongst the the the scrolls of papyrus are two different types of scrolls. Copper what do they look like? So the copper scroll. There's we've always thought before that. Eleven caves that house Dead Sea scrolls last year, twelve cable was found not what's close. But we know that it wasn't scroll. So there was twelve gave the copper scroll was found in pays every one of the few caves it was found by legitimate archeologocial team. Most of the other scroll caves were found by bad ones. I mean, really in the fifties. It was just a race against time. In terms of who could find the next said sees close cave. I would it be the bedouin are the archaeologists and the bedouin usually won that war and the case of Cape three it was a French. Archaeologist. And so you can imagine what they're expecting to find is it's close written on papyrus or leather. And every one of those is, you know, a treasurer in its own, right? But it was it was case three that they excavated for ten days, and they were pretty disappointed because they could tell that it wants house. At least forty scrolls. But that that. Roof of the cave had collapsed in antiquity. So once it clap once it broke the jars then this girls were exposed to wrote in some time. And and so most of this growth where we're really not salvageable, and they were closing out the big and really it was in the last hours of of that last day of the day that they see that almost there's this false wall at the back of the cave. Sorry, I got the actual appearance of the conference call, but I feel like I have to pay this picture. Thank you. So so it was it was like this false wall, the secret chamber, and I mean, that's just the only way I can describe it. And so they threw it live down. And they see I'm like every other scroll that's been found. Really does it was resting on a man-made shelf behind this wall, which probably had collapsed in antiquity? And so there's really dislike nature had created the perfect.

Dead Sea Shelley Bethlehem Temple Mount Shelly Ben Gurion university Jerusalem Israel page magazine Shelly richard Jerusalem Post Washington Kumaon Samuel vice president Isaiah Lehem Deuteronomy treasurer
"temple mount shelly" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

07:15 min | 2 years ago

"temple mount shelly" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Shelley niece is the vice president of the Jerusalem connection international and nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand to two thousand and four where she learned conversational Hebrew and received her EMMY and Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the Negev the high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending the two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications or articles have appeared in the Jerusalem Post. A route Sheba front page magazine. And more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at coumarin in two thousand and nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national funds. Speakers bureau, she is addressed various Jewish. Student groups and participated on debate panels, and she is the author of the copper scroll project an ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Great, richard. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take us back to the early nineteen fifties, the Coomer caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, the copper schools, of course, part of that. But but just sort of paint that picture for us if you will. Right. Well, so that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls. It's part of the Dead Sea scrolls collection, but you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on that the miracle that is the Dead Sea scrolls and to really put yourself in that time and point in history. When that she schools are flooding the black market. I'm sure the, you know, the story of how the first Dead Sea scrolls were found made at this point. It's kind of part of our of our cultural fabric. But. But it had it not been somehow the Dead Sea scrolls were hidden for two thousand years, and and it was in the nineteen fifties. Probably nineteen forty seven. Whenever no one knows quite for. Sure. Nineteen forty seven. Nineteen Forty-six that bedouin just letting their sheep run across sparse vegetation, and the Judean desert that one of the bedouin through Iraq and a cave, and here's a shattering of of something and goes home and thinks he's too scared to go in the cave that day that goes back the next day with his cousins thinking that they'll find some sort of very treasure and really were quite disappointed when it was just broken pottery. And what for their purposes, they were literate in Arabic, much less. She brewer ancient Hebrew. So he really had no idea what they had. But they brought it back to the recap put it in a bag and hung it from a temple and debated. Sort of what to do about it? How to repurpose it? There's one part of the story is that there was a debate about repurposing the leather for something else. And can you imagine? Oh, my Lord what a loss, but it was one on goal who suggested. Hey, let's go to Bethlehem on a market day that that when are already going to Bethlehem, and and we'll shop around and he knew somebody who knew somebody that was connected to that the black market. And that's that's where this story the Dead Sea scrolls began so really to me even just right up front in front of the getting is it's a it's a story of providence. Absolutely. But wh why are they significant? These scrolls have Hebrew inscriptions on them. What is their significance? Right. Well, so before the Dead Sea scrolls, really the Dead Sea scrolls are pre dating our oldest known Hebrew manuscripts by thousand years. So in terms of what that did for bevaqua scholarship. What it did for our understanding? This is pre canonization of the bible. So really what it did for our understanding of that process and really in first century to respond what books where Jewish sects reading what books were the most popular. It gives us. It's shines a light into this window of time. That's so critical for the rest of the two thousand years for our bible in the even just book the book. Be turning biblical scholarship on its head in terms of what did I say, it looked like two thousand years ago, would it Samuel and chronicles and what they were the psalms in the same order. Then is now what we found. I mean scholars for scholars small differences. They make their living off of what did they say the narcissism of small differences? And so for them, they look at Samuel, and they see differences and and study those, but for our purposes for the purposes of any believer. I mean, it is astonishing that the bible was able to maintain its it's authentic fabric for for all of this time. And then looks like Isaiah now, and certainly Genesis through. Look the same now. As it did then. Right. So for people who argue that the bible has been mistranslated or the meanings have been changed. The the discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, really confirms and buttresses the the the consistency of the biblical narrative. It hasn't changed. Correct. Absolutely. That's exactly right. And so amongst the the these scrolls of Paris are two different types of scrolls. Copper what do they look like? So the copper scroll. There's we've always thought before that eleven caves that house Dead Sea scrolls last year, twelve cable was found not what's close. But we know that it wasn't scroll. So there was twelve caves the copper scroll was found in cave every. One of the few caves, it was found by legitimate archaeolgical team. Most of the other squirrel caves were found by bad ones. I mean, really in the fifties. It was just a race against time. In terms of who could find the next said sees close cave. I would it be the bedouin. Are they are gala just and the bedouin usually won that war and the case of three it was a French archaeologist. And so you can imagine what they're expecting defined as it's written on papyrus or leather. And every one of those is, you know, a treasurer in its own, right? But it was it was case three that they excavated for ten days, and they were pretty disappointed because they could tell that it wants house. At least forty scrolls. But that that. Roof.

Dead Sea bedouin Bethlehem Shelley Temple Mount Shelly EMMY Ben Gurion university Jerusalem page magazine Speakers bureau Shelly Israel Jerusalem Post richard Washington vice president Samuel Isaiah Iraq