35 Burst results for "Teles"

Michael Cohen releases excerpt, cover from Trump tell-all book

The Breakfast Club

01:09 min | 23 hrs ago

Michael Cohen releases excerpt, cover from Trump tell-all book

"All right, and just f Y I. Michael Cohen has released his excerpt and cover on his tele book about Donald Trump. I know where All the skeletons are buried, is what he said. That's Donald Trump's former personal attorney. And so the book is called Disloyal. A memoir was coming up. A lot of people got fat off Donald Trump. Let's be clear lot. It's a lot and it's gonna be. It's gonna be stories for decades to come by the way, and that's probably why the hashtag urine I don't know if you saw this is trending urine trouble, Trump, but you're in like He urine So you're in trouble. Trump is trending right now I got to do with me, then you're in is usually golden yellow. Donald Trump is arms Wouldn't urine and Trump got to, You know the Russian collusion and how they said that the women urinated on Donald Trump, and they had videotapes of that, and that's why they haven't backed in the corner that you didn't hit it always union people. Excuse me. Say what? If you go, you hear? Yeah, That's been the longstanding rumor that there's tapes of Donald Trump getting urinated on. So now you're in trouble.

Donald Trump Michael Cohen Attorney
In MegaMerger, Teladoc Buys Diabetes Coaching Company for $18 Billion

Business Wars Daily

04:01 min | 3 d ago

In MegaMerger, Teladoc Buys Diabetes Coaching Company for $18 Billion

"Yesterday we told you about one industry that appears to be forever changed by the pandemic, the oil and gas business. Well, here's another healthcare. These days make a doctor's appointment and it says likely to occur on your screen as in an office maybe even more likely virtual appointments were on the rise before covid nineteen but the pandemic put this trend on steroids telehealth use tripled as the virus spread around the globe according to a healthcare research firm called. Robo Global. Half of adults age twenty five and older have virtually visited a healthcare provider over the last few painful months. The firm says music to the ears of anyone who runs a telehealth company more than half of those patients were brand new to telemedicine can handle one more statistic well, nine out of ten of those patients told Robo. that. They'd be happy to see Dr Virtual again most likely that include you. So why am I telling you all this or because at least two companies are making big hey from this socially distanced phenomenon last week telemedicine leader Tele Doc announced it's buying Digital Health, coaching? Company. Forget this eighteen and a half billion dollars. It's rare to see those kinds of numbers. Even in Silicon Valley acquisitions, although there are many privately owned telemedicine companies, Tele Doc which was founded in two thousand and two is the only publicly traded one because of the pandemic business is booming in early March, the company was conducting about ten thousand remote medical appointments a day just a month. Later, that number had doubled. The company told The Wall Street Journal. Tele Doc is purchasing a company called the von. Go using Technology Levin go remotely monitors and coaches patients with chronic illnesses. CEO Glenn Tolman founded the company after his young son was diagnosed with type one diabetes. The Condition Levin go is best known for the publicly traded company later expanded to help care for people suffering from chronic problems like high blood, pressure, anxiety, and depression. According to CNBC Tele Doc had long planned to add services for remotely managing chronic conditions and La. bongos leaders had been thinking about moving into telehealth. The two companies quote were either on a path of convergence or collision Tele Doc CEO Jason Gora Vic told. CNBC. Industry publication healthcare dive calls the do the country's first digital health megamerger and by far the largest consider this Google is working on an acquisition a fitbit for what now looks like a meager two billion dollars the trade publication points out. The TALLADEGA deal is set to close by the end of the year proved it'll create an entity worth thirty, seven, billion dollars expected revenues in its first year with top a billion dollars or almost double the two companies sales this year sound promising well, not so fast Wall Street dinged both company's stock prices saying the price was inflated and that telehealth might be an covert bubble. which wants the pandemic finally, Wayne's could pop furthermore there are plenty of challenges on both sides. Tell dot faces a host of telemedicine rivals such as privately held doctor on demand but perhaps the bigger issue is that the eye-popping size of the deal could create copycats other big healthcare companies both virtual and traditional have probably already started shopping for their own remote chronic care management acquisitions. The stock price of Levine go rival Barrio health, which also manages chronic illnesses spiked almost thirty percent following the news. But let's get real. What could all this mean for most of us? One Stop Virtual healthcare management that's at least part of the answer, your blood pressure spikes you'll see it on your digital sensor and maybe through that same device, your virtual doctor will be contacted automatically if it gets bad enough, it's a future that could be more convenient, less personal, not very private and very lucrative for digital health entrepreneurs. Watch this space.

Tele Doc Cnbc Ceo Glenn Tolman Robo Global Digital Health Technology Levin CEO Levin Google Jason Gora Vic Robo. The Wall Street Journal DOT LA. Levine Wayne
‘Ellen DeGeneres Show’ Workplace Is Under Investigation By Warner Media

Sunday Morning with Elizabeth Espinosa

05:20 min | Last week

‘Ellen DeGeneres Show’ Workplace Is Under Investigation By Warner Media

"Reports of a toxic work, culture and crew furious over poor communication during the Corona virus shut down. Despite the bad reports, there have not been any direct allegations made about Ellen herself. For more on all the bad news that the Ellen Show will speak to Matt Donnelly Sr. Film writer at Variety, so essentially human resources representative for both the production company that makes Ellen just called Tele Pictures and Morning brother. It's which obviously, areas the program or distributes it have both come together and sort of pursuit of information about sort of the day to day experience for Ellen's employees, a member, we have changed the sort of reference the stories said that their goal is to ultimately create a work environment where ever wanted sort of protected. And also can sort of advance and flourish and safety, So I think it's you know, a pretty responsible move on their part, But at this point, what we know is that they're reaching out to current and former employees to discuss their experiences, where presumably will conduct as sort of a larger report about what if anything, needs to change their Now, let's talk about these two reports just to kind of see what we're working with here. Back in April, Variety reported on the treatment of crew members during the Corona virus locked down so very loosely when things initially shut down, there was crew members who were saying that we weren't really being told what was going to be the fate of our ours or our pay. And then when Ellen's resumed some sort of filming at her home, they were kind of left out of the lurch on that, too. And I guess they hired Nonunion workers to do that work instead of them. Yeah, A lot of the sources we spoke with who are familiar with the production basically say that her long term crew people have been with her sums of the entire 17 year run of the show. Just expected a better level of treatment in terms of if and when they would come back, You know, up until the moment we published a report that Legacy crew was told to sort of expect dramatically reduced compensation, even though the show of going on filming at the normal rate, so I think a lot of people thought sort of betrayed in away by mixed messages, especially for someone who's banner. Heather staying for her jealous to be kind, and some say this is very difficult situations, obviously, in the confusion and chaos of the Corona virus pandemic that hidden in some ways, it makes sense. Maybe hire those non union workers because they have to do something, maybe things that the union might not have agreed for their workers, depending on safety, and all that, So sometimes those things make sense. But they were just saying that They weren't even afforded that choice or whatnot. Of course. Yeah, I think it was a lack of transparency that really got people. And yes, you know, Krone viruses cause such a dramatic ripple effect how we do or more specifically how we don't do production at the moment. So, yeah, the union might have to look the other way occasionally on getting some people back to work instead of, you know, sort of a massive sun town. But again, I think it was that sort of lack of care. That really got to some long term employees. Yeah, and the pay was also an issue. I know. They told them you're gonna get reduced hours or reduced Pay that way. But shortly after you guys posted your story, then it started coming out. Well, well, they're going to get paid their full amount. They're full pay all that stuff. I think that the production sort of realised, But the right thing to do was especially because if you follow the logic through if they were taking the same amount of episodes, that means that this is going into syndicated viewership and selling the same amount of advertising No one's really losing money on the end. It's just obviously out of an abundance of caution here to figure out how to actually make the show. But you know again, and I think Hollywood is a town that when your staff looks the way that l Inez and you've got no. Ah, working family or some people put it in the over 17 years, they expect you to cover them The way they've covered. You end up with a large part of the frustration and you know another thing. That was in that same report was that you know, no one had even stepped in and said, How are you? How are your family? How is your mental house? Which I think a lot of companies, you know, including the publisher Variety. Ah, lot of people didn't do that. You know that They were here for you. If you knew Greece sources that child care if you need meditation class you any number of things to sort of band together in a really unprecedented in highly stressful time. A lot of people thought that that wasn't done and we're quite surprised. The other part of this. In mid July, Buzzfeed published a report alleging a toxic work culture there. There was an employee who said that there was some racist behavior going around and a few other things that just really made working there on the show, not really tolerable. The budget reports have sort of a spectrum of accused behavior that is troubling from to start a sort of ID on that atmosphere of intimidation and fear. You know, there was some accounts of verbal abuse their accounts of sort of, you know, an idea that overall senior leadership it Alan felt, but no, it was a privilege to work there. And anyone who might complain about sort of the emotional atmosphere. Even working conditions could just move on because they couldn't find anyone else who had died of work, Carella It's a much more serious stuff like sensitive people of color on the head from jokes about two African American females being taken for each other because they have the same hairstyle to another employee being sort of shouted down an angry and resentful because she suggested that the entire staff received diversity and inclusion training. You know all this is supported by historians. That's quite serious, especially, I would say in the world we live in, which is a post me to world and if you even look at what's been happening in this country in the past two months There is it's incredibly justifiable demand for a lack of this toxicity and for transparent, clear on how we're all treating each other at work. Not one thing that I found interesting is that there is no specific

Ellen Variety Nonunion Matt Donnelly Sr Writer Krone Representative Heather Alan Hollywood Greece Publisher L Inez
Debra Messing & Paul F. Tompkins: Show Yourself Some Grace

Ask Me Another

06:16 min | 2 weeks ago

Debra Messing & Paul F. Tompkins: Show Yourself Some Grace

"It guess what we have a guest. We were supposed to have her at the Bell House in Brooklyn, but she is here with us today the Emmy Award. winning. Star of will and Grace Debra. Messing is GonNa, join US tastic. All right. Let's call some friends play some games. Have a good talk. Thankfully. This couple is available at they're not only a couple. They host a podcast called couples therapy where they talk about relationships with comedians themselves. It's both life-affirming and funny, which is a nice combination not like my therapy. We have. Andy. Beckerman and Naomi Eck Paragon Hey. Hey so at you're obviously your house. Yes. Yes. Self Quarantine Day eighteen dating. You're in Los Angeles yes we are. Already a city of self. Quarantine. Works out really well, I was telling these guys that I had a stranger talked me from six feet away and it was just something nice. They were like Oh look over by that tree. There's a eagle's nest and I was like Oh. This is so heartwarming a conversation with a stranger. Missing this and then he was is it an amazing Hell Mother Nature Continually rejuvenates the earth and provides I was like Oh not this guy. We just don't get along normally so it's not going to start now. Like a stack of books with. That he was tossing out. Anyone who would take him. So. Funny. The little conversations you're having now being bored because I'm really, I'll tell Andy any thought in my head. Yes. So a couple couple in captivity how's it going? It could be worse like actually not bad. We've had an eighteen days to arguments I think that's about it. We had two arguments. It was like a real uncomfortable though because we got an argument and then I went in the bedroom you know what I mean like I just like sat there and was like well I guess it's Cool out where I think normally I would have left the house or I would have like gone like met a friend. Do you know what I mean like I'm getting a drink and then cool out This time it was like. The bedroom till you forgive me. S. Oh Yeah. I'm going to the other side of the couch while the exact. I like actually hanging out with people via zoom now because you can like I'm at home we're talking but I could just get up and go get something from Fridge I love that we should all be at home but hanging out with people but they're not in our house. Yeah. Don't clean up they leave. Don't have to get there. Yeah. Is Acceptable. Right, the only problem I have is you can't leave. Here to Leo do though you can always just fake an internet outage. It's very easy. You just. Just leave the meeting, and then you you take something like, sorry, my incident. You Guys WanNa, play a game. Do you WanNa just a little escapist quiz I would love to. Competition. We need healthy competition right now. Okay. So your podcast is called couples therapy. We have audio quiz for you called Tele Therapy. So basically, we're GONNA play a clip of a TV therapist and you're just going to identify the show. Okay we'll start with an easy one. This is for you andy. Hello, Claire. I'm listening. Oh Frazier. Frazier. That's right. Raising grade were you a fan of that show? Did you ever watch that show in its I watched it for many years and then Niles and Daphne got together. Yeah. I was like it's Okay I will say, actually one of our fights guys was. Its own Andy He's a niles. I'm not wrong. He said I was Eddie the dog. Oh. Yes. That's that's pretty harsh. In fairness it was a cute dog does he could you talk a lot of tricks? No. Okay. Because I am anyone I am Marty. Crane okay. I'm sitting in a chair and I am saying. Either me? And so ed he was he's a police detective and that's what you want to be through. I wanted to the the woman that he did the radio show with Ross Ross Ross. Thanks thank you. I ever a buzzfeed quiz now. All right now is your chance Naomi. Here we go. The comic plays that therapist in this clip when a best guest actress Emmy for the role I committed adultery I betrayed a friend I'm an awful person alley. Every patient that comes into this office thinks that he or she is the world's biggest loser for the first time I. Agree. There's a hint in the clue the name I know alley. Oh God I don't know two and a hand. Yeah. Dancing Baby. Oh, fudge. Okay. Ally mcbeal ally mcbeal is correct but what I remember loving do you Elliott Bill took a black lover. You know she was with Jesse l Martin who played collins in the original cast of red. went onto become such a star. Yes remember thinking. That little bony. Lover. I'm very into it. All right Andy, this comedy central show was animated in.

Andy He United States Naomi Eck Paragon Bell House Ross Ross Ross Grace Debra Emmy Award. Los Angeles Crane Ally Mcbeal Frazier Emmy Brooklyn Buzzfeed Jesse L Martin Beckerman Niles LEO Claire
Accenture’s aerospace team reveals strategies for aerospace CEOs looking to the future

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

05:09 min | 2 weeks ago

Accenture’s aerospace team reveals strategies for aerospace CEOs looking to the future

"What is the state of aerospace and defense today, and what's your outlook for twenty twenty one and has that changed at all in the in the recent past Recent past go back into a January February odd things have changed dramatically. If you say recent past in terms of how feeling today for. So spilling back in in. June. Not Not nearly as much. I think know by sum it up I think I look at the industry and so almost tell two cities. If you remember that Dickens novel where on the commercial side, we have all kinds of things going on and you know the impact of airlines and the reduction in capacity, and now reduced number of aircraft being taken and all that kind of stuff going on dampening down you know the business and Yoga Cyber Defence and defence. Largely continuing to perform you know well There are some some issues. There are some blips in supply chain certainly related to things like covid. But it's really is tell to city and we look at Boeing and Airbus both announcing production rates and rate cuts, and of course, we have the existing 737 challenge facing history as well. No I think there's a different side of the coin when we start looking at what's happening on the defense side. And what is that different side of the coin much more positive right? Well, it's much more positive and you know this morning are. Reported there the results in in even just in our she concede example of the Tele two cities playing out. Right now and you know. I think. What I'd like to say is that looking at what's what we're hearing and if we were going to go into farmer air, show the share, which, of course, unfortunately, we did not every year accenture steps back and looks at kind of what we're seeing across the numerous research elements that we have our tech vision, our commercial index and supply chain research, and we look at the work we're doing for clients we look at what we're talking to our. Clients about in terms of where their priorities are. We look at what's going on in industry at large, and from that, we try to distill out what we think are really going to be the you know quote unquote stories to watch and weird do that this year Joe I think there's four things that I think would come out in their four things that I hear consistently I think pat would echo this well when we talked to sea level executives Across our clients defense and commercial, those four things are related to cash management number one number two supply chains smart manufacturing number three workforce in workforce impact in a before's is really rounding technology in systems in resiliency of those systems. into look thinking about where we are today in covert and and what companies need be thinking about as they look forward, their calendar twenty-one. Those four things are really top of mind. Pat, what's what are your thoughts had? We gone to Farnborough what were you prepared to be talking about I? Think the themes that John mentioned are spot on one concept that intertwined through cash management supply chain workforce and systems resiliency is really a need to continue the digital transformation the the level of of change that aerospace and defense companies are dealing with today is is really unprecedented and I think it's changed Focus of of trying to accelerate the agility of decision-making workforces is been fascinating topic. How has a house the debate on that changed in this? I mean, we had a lot of ish. A lot of the talk was about workforce shortages and now companies are laying off tens of thousands of people said, Short Term Blip, John, I mean what are you telling companies to do to be prepared for the workforce of the future? You know. It's interesting. If you think back a couple years, we're worried about the grace. ooh Nami and everybody retiring he let me go back back to January timeframe worried about shortages whether it's pilots are or people in the maintenance shops in of course, we see companies laying off and furloughing on the commercial side, but we also see companies on the defense side hiring, right? So I think Lockheed announced five thousand new hires northbound eight thousand new. Hires right. So it's almost again that tell see what's happening but I think you know the three things that were talking to clients lot about now in this code world where we have more people remark in remotely than we ever did before Amsterdam you have more you're gonNA WANNA add onto this but it's really about you know the people experience how how each individual worker is being interacted with with their company and that comes down to. How they were who they work with and how they get their work done. The second thing is around or Culture. The culture particularly, I think in our industry and maybe I'm biased because I'm in this of this industry but you know you walk into the building and you see the sign, you see the flag, you walk through the hallways almost any aerospace defense office or even in factory assembly floor, and you see the product you see pictures of the product you see people, pictures of people using the products I mean that helps build culture. Now, I, see the four walls of my Home Office or maybe it's my kitchen table or wherever I happen to be working remotely. It's it's a big topic these days how you manage in we'd and maintain culture in the third is really about the work itself and how the workforce works at work in Delhi deals with things like remote collectively high-performance compute environments. Can I get to those from homes cure environment

John PAT Twenty Twenty Home Office Boeing Dickens Lockheed Airbus Delhi JOE Amsterdam
Orca who carried her dead calf for 1,000 miles is pregnant

Seattle Now

08:31 min | 2 weeks ago

Orca who carried her dead calf for 1,000 miles is pregnant

"Pregnancies are good news for the southern resident killer whales and right now, it looks like there are three whales including j thirty five who could give birth. But there's a long way to go today. We're GONNA talk about the lives of these orcas and our complicated relationship with them here to do that with us is Linda makes she's the environment reporter at the Seattle Times Linda. Thanks for joining us. Thank you, Trish. So give us a quick recap on J. Thirty five for people who weren't here maybe when her calf died. So J thirty five or Takuma really is the ORCA whale who changed the conversation about this very small population of whales and very sadly trish as I talked to today that population is even smaller than it was two years ago when she gave birth to a female calf and it live for only one half hour, and then she did something that scientists know these animals do as well as other, very, highly intelligent. Socially, bonded animals they grieve and she just refused to let that baby go. Now, this calf is probably six feet. Long weighs about three hundred pounds, and for seventeen days, she just refused to let it go and she had to decide to retire. She went down for breath to pick it up once again and carry it some more, and it really did touch the hearts. People around the world and even though these southern resident orcas have been listed as dangerous since two thousand and five. Suddenly people really did understand for the first time, just how fragile they are, and the fact that these aren't just random black and white wildlife. These are families with very, very close bonds. And why do you think that we feel so attached to these orca because I grew up in the Eighties and Wales were such a big deal. You know every girl had little whale necklace and why do we feel so attached I'm gonNA, make a sound for you inherit comes. That is sound of a whale breathing. They are mammals like us, and that's sound when you hear it, it's like a sound from the beginning of the world. It's It's a magnificent presence to be with these whales and you and you understand as you observe their family bond says, you see the way they take care of one another. You know they're so superior to people they. They have brilliant diplomacy. They share space in the ocean without ever warring or committing any acts of aggression against one another. They've families together for life. It's really quite remarkable and they've been around don't forget this for six million years as a species. So these are in every way our elders and mentors for how to run a successful society and don't forget this. They were doing just fine until we showed up. How do we raise up the cause of the ORCA of the environment here without doing the thing that we tend to do a lot of as humans, which is just the help that hurts, how do we walk that line? Actually, this is easier than ever I mean, let's remember how we got to know these southern resident whales. Well, it was the capture era which by the way was not that long ago. Free, willy. Oh. Yeah. Anybody could go out and catch themselves a killer whale for an aquarium or for that matter, sell it for profit anouar in the world until as recently as are you ready Nineteen, seventy six. So wow, that's really recent. Recent and the only while who've had survived that time is still alive and she's still at the Miami Seaquarium and the fiftieth anniversary of her capture and Penn cove is on August seventh. Wow. This is recent time and ironically it was through seeing these so-called killer whales up close in captivity and realizing their incredible intelligence and they're gentle personalities that people went through a whole change in their understanding about these animals and today they're not only revered but protected and I said it's easier than ever to love these animals without loving them to death God look at what you can watch the documentary footage that's out there to enjoy these animals is so much. Better than anything that has ever been available. The amount of knowledge we have about them is superb growing by the day and you know you can watch them from shore. The idea that you need to spend the money by the way and get on a boat. Go after them. You know that's not the only way to enjoy these whales and I think that it's important to. Show some restraint and also some respect for their space. So. J thirty five is pregnant. Again, this is a good sign but two thirds of pregnancies in this population are lost. I learned this lesson with birds in my backyard last year in a nest so. This is not the time for a baby shower. We have a long way to go here. That's so well said. I would think about it. This way this time to hold space for these oils to hold them in your mind and think about what you can do to help whether it's something that might feel small but adds up such as be involved in local land use decisions in your community. That's where all this getting decided about how much of the puget sound lowlands we retain and how much we pay of over. You know these tedious things that we don't think matter like Oh, the king, county flood control district. Well, you know what they're up to. They're thinking about the future of the Green. River. which is upstream from the Duwamish, the green flows into the duwamish Seattle's only river. It's very important Salmon River for the whales and so things like paying attention to what's the local flood district doing what is going on in my local community? By Way of development? All of these things make a difference especially if all of us do. and. Read learn about these animals become informed. Educate Yourself. You know there are lots of ways to get involved and stay involved and play heart in whether. Tele. Calf actually. Does get born and does survive. To me, that's our work song as a region. May Her next calf with? So J thirty five. How will scientists track her pregnancy? Will very remotely fortunately. The scientists who do this work are John, Durbin? And Holly Fehrenbach, and they're they're a team of scientists who came up with a new method. using drones to photograph these Wales from at least one hundred, few of them and remote Louis activated. So they're far from the whales. So nowhere near them, the whales don't seem to show any notice of these drums when they're flying. And they take suspect hack your pictures, and there's something about the angle from above That's very different from a boat. You can see not only the shape of the whales. You can watch their behavior, their families. I. Make It takes your breath away and it is an entirely new view of the lives of these Wales and when it comes to keep track of j thirty five and the other pregnant whales. They're going to do is take another peek in September. DID THEY FATTEN UP? Did they pump up or are they going into winter in good shape? Are they look stressed or are they looking skinny? Most importantly with regard to her? Is She nice fat around? They'd like to see her a lot rounder in September than she is now for early in her pregnancy, these whales carry their babies, believe it or not for eighteen eighteen months Linda I read that and I thought. Oh. My Gosh Holy. Mackerel A. And actually then the real work starts because they've got to feed not only themselves, but they've got a lactate and that's a very, very high fat milk. So she's got her work cut out for her so they'll immature September and we will all cross our fingers that she's even bigger. And then you know she's either. Going to be carrying another kappa which time. I, don't know what I'll do. Or, we'll see her romping with a baby. You know We'll see what happens next I. do think that we ought to kind of hold our breath. A little bit chances are are high that things won't go well, but it doesn't mean that she couldn't surprise us and we might have some more good news. Let's remember there have been two berths to southern residents and let's remember Linda are bar for hope, is pretty low. Sleep. Vote through. Isn't it for the? Thought, I'd get a good peach these days and I'm just thrilled. Good Peach. Tomato. I'm good.

Linda Orca Wales Trish Seattle Times Takuma Puget Sound Reporter Miami Duwamish Salmon River Seattle Penn Cove Holly Fehrenbach John Louis Durbin
Creating TV shows on an iPhone

Talking Tech

05:36 min | 3 weeks ago

Creating TV shows on an iPhone

"This pandemic, we're seeing so many TV people recording from home and you're probably wondering how doing this. How are they recording on an iphone in reaching the broadcasting? Facility, we've got rich to mirrow here. He is tech reporter for Channel Five. Ktla in Los Angeles and he remotes first TV stations all over the country and he's. GonNa fill us in rich. How you doing I'm doing fantastic. Let me just first say a I think it was like my little personal dream to go live from my home for all of my stand in one place, and do five hours of live shots every morning for all these TV stations, and I thought. Wow, wouldn't it be more efficient for me to just have a home studio and do it from there? Well now I've been forced to do that, so my little dream has become. Become a reality, but I'll tell you it's been kind of a nightmare because it's not very easy, and if you've been watching me on TV folks that have been seeing, it have seen kind of an evolution of me going live from home. Because KTLA's been fantastic, they said hey do what you need to go live from home. Whatever and get the equipment you need thankfully as tech person. I have a lot of the equipment that I need to do this, but the bottom line is at this point. You only need a smartphone, which is the IPHONE and some software and a microphone, and so we've used to piece of software at KTLA. One is called. And the other is call TV. You and both of these things work in the same way. They take a signal from your phone, and they broadcast it back to home base, so it's kind of like using skype, but it's managed by the TV station, so they can manage in the quality way better than what you would get on an off the shelf product. Does that make sense does? The, let's let's go through. Let's go through the process, so you're doing the morning show it's seven. Oh five and they cut to. They say okay. We got rich with his tech segment. Now now you're sitting in Los Angeles at home and you've got the IPHONE. It's ready to go. Take me through the process. Yes, so when I get up in the morning, it's. It's Kinda like it's. It's like lighting up a little studio so in my spare bedroom which I've used to be the kids playroom I cleared it all out, which actually has been very bad, because the echo has been the biggest issue with the studio, and the problem is normally, and this is the other issue that I've run into normally when you're setting up a home. Home Studio. What do you do you figure out what you need what you have and what you have and you order the rest on Amazon. It's there the next day. Well. Guess what during Kovic Times? You can't just get next day delivery from Amazon so it has been a challenge to set up a home studio because I can't order the products that I need so. So, what I have here is a ring. Light that I used to use for live shots when I used to do like a podcast from home like facebook. Live so I i. Put that up and the ring. Light is kind of a big circular light that goes around my phone. My iphone sits in there and then underneath the iphone i. have another Tripod with A. An ipad on it and actually went to best buy and bought the Tripod Mount for that jobe amount, and then for that I've been using that as kind of a to watch KTLA and to also use as a teleprompter and so I. Did experiment with the Tele prompting APP as well? I didn't think it looked good on TV. I thought my eyes were a little shifty. So for me. It's easier to actually just kind of memorize some of my lines and read them off the script when we go to video which you called voiceover. But the microphone has been tricky. I've tried a lot of different microphones. A lot of the reporters at home are using. either. The apple included ear buds, and those work, really well Otherwise you have to kind of put a microphone into your phone, which is not very easy because professional microphones don't connect to the iphone unless you have a conduit, so I've been using a board I used for my podcast to connect the microphone into the phone, so it's gone very complicated Jefferson. A? What microphone you connecting theoretically into the phone? While so right now I'm using Oh my gosh. I have to look at my my headphones. Hang on. Audio Technica, and so this is an audio technica. It looks like one of the microphones that sports caster would use. It has the microphone that sticks out, but also the nice big headphones so with that I can hear what's called IFP so the other tricky part of this whole situation is that it's not like a video call where you can not worried you have. What's the return from? TV In my ear, so I have to be able to hear what the anchors are saying to me in my ear and. It gets really complicated. That's usually what we call be. We have this little cable that runs to a box that we listen to the programming of the station on, and when you're there live. Obviously you can hear the anchor talking to you, but when you're out in the field, you have to connect to an I've be box, and that's also another challenge, but these programs like I mentioned the. And the TV you, they allow you to pipe in the programming. Cheer IFP. I'm getting a little in the weeds year for the consumer audience. It's okay, do you? Do you pick up those programs in the APP store or are they Do you get up some other way we'll see? These programs are something that the TV stations pay a lot of money for it because they come associated with receiver so when I actually am broadcasting I'm broadcasting. Allied receiver we have at Ktla

Ktla Home Studio Los Angeles IFP Tech Reporter Audio Technica Amazon Facebook Kovic Times Jobe Apple Jefferson
Trump campaign backs off in-person events as coronavirus cases pick up

WBZ Morning News

00:29 sec | 3 weeks ago

Trump campaign backs off in-person events as coronavirus cases pick up

"It is normal presidential campaign politics are more or less at a standstill. President Trump scrapped the scheduled rally a week ago and now goes virtual until the covet is gone. It's a little bit tough, and frankly, some of the Democrat governors make it impossible to do a rally anyway. They're saying you can't do political rallies, and that's nice, but frankly, it's it's fine. So we're doing the tele town halls or Tele rallies. He did two of them on Saturday streamed on Facebook. Tom Foti. CBS NEWS

Tom Foti Donald Trump Facebook President Trump CBS
Hollywood's Black List

Planet Money

11:33 min | Last month

Hollywood's Black List

"Every year, fifty thousand movie scripts Tele plays other pieces of writer Lee stuff get registered with the Writers Guild of America fifty thousand most of which sucks, but a handful of which will become the movies that change our lives today on the show how a math! Loving movie nerd used a spreadsheet and an anonymous hotmail address to solve one of Hollywood's most fundamental problems, picking winners from a sea of garbage, and he may just have reinvented the power structure of Hollywood along the way. Support for this podcast and the following message come from OCTA A leader in identity driven security as the world shifts to a more remote work approach. Your employees need to securely access all your company data as well as connected thousands of applications, OCTA does just that empowering your employees to work remotely while also working smart, keeping their data, APPS and identity secure from anywhere learn more at O., K., T. A. dot com slash NPR. We're only months away from election day and every week or even every few hours. There's a new twist that could affect who will win the White House to keep up with the latest tune into the NPR. Politics podcast every to find out what happened and what it means for the election. It's two thousand and five Franklin Leonard a junior executive at Leonardo. DiCaprio's production company which sounds glamorous, but arguably he is a glorified script reader. WHO's boss's boss? Is Leonardo DiCaprio. Franklin's job is to help that boss. Find The next great movie for Leo, which means he is constantly reading movie scripts. Every junior executive lives in constant fear of the trade story that breaks about some exciting new script that they didn't know about that. Their bosses like. Like why didn't you know about this? Franklin is supposed to know about everything which is tough because there's this famous old saying in Hollywood. Nobody knows anything as in. It's really hard to know what movies are going to work. So if you do find something any piece of information that can help you gauge. What might work that information? Franklin is learning. That is Hollywood gold one of the things that drilled into your head. Is that information? Information is the most valuable thing. Yeah, and that information is to be protected and kept in house and exploitation of that information is how we in power and leverage like what little information you can manage, and then if it's kind of good, put up a wall as quickly as possible. That's exactly right. Movie scripts are a kind of information like the fundamental piece of information for a movie, and so Franklin's job is go out into the world. World and find undiscovered scripts before anybody else finding those scripts, though amongst the thousands and thousands being written every year it's a bit like walking into like the largest bookstore in the world, and every book has the exact same color. There's no cover art. There's no like publishers weekly. There's no reviews available to you, but your job is to walk into that sort of hyper anonymous bookstore and come out with the best books available That seems impossible. And Franklin says you can see how a problem emerges quickly in Hollywood people deal with this overwhelming amount of information by assuming they should reach for the same shelves of that anonymous bookstores they always do. They assume they should make the same kinds of movies written by the same kinds of people starring the same kinds of people. Yes, we are generally talking about white men people you soon because this has been the case for you thus far that are white writer who went to Dartmouth is better than a black writer who went to? To Clark Atlanta or Spelman, the conventional wisdom that you assume as wisdom is more often than not convention, and that is especially true in Hollywood where the convention has been created by people who are in no way, shape or form representative of the audience and consumer that they are trying to sell to Franklin. decided it was going to be part of his job. Try and find scripts outside of the conventions, well of course, also keeping an eye open for the next conventional blockbuster, which yeah was gonNA mean lots more reading the normal. Look. I've always been bit of a grind. My Competitive Advantage was my capacity to work, and so every weekend I would take home a banker's box full of scripts, but literally twenty five thirty screenplays, and try to read them all every Saturday afternoon. There is Franklin sitting on his couch. It is black sweatpants flipping through page after page after page hoping he's about to read a life changing story imagine if Christmas was every Saturday, but every Saturday. You ran downstairs and opened the box that you're most excited about, and it was socks. Because there is the possibility of getting everything that you ever wanted yeah. But there is the probability that it's. Socks most Saturdays and Sundays go like this Franklin tears into his Christmas scripts seven hours later. Frankland sitting in a pile of socks and the worst thing is when he goes into the office on Monday. His boss says you read anything good. And Franklin has to say no. It was as if he didn't do any work that weekend. Because most scripts are so bad, the Franklin would be in trouble for recommending them, and even if he is lucky enough to find a scripted, he loves he's really got to think about whether. Whether it is the right kind of thing for Leo's company like there was a script going around that year about a guy dealing with his interpersonal trauma by buying and dating a sex doll. It's easy to imagine reading that in saying Oh this is a really well observed human story, but imagine going into your boss's office and saying you should read this and when they ask you what it's about saying. This is what it's about Leonardo DiCaprio. I think you should play this role where you date of a doll like that's. That's a tough sell for the most confident among us. Franklin's breaking point came late one night. Do you remember his? He was in the office. It was dark outside, and he was supposed to go on vacation, and he just kept thinking about how he was inevitably going to end up drowning in bad scripts on vacation, and all of that work would generate nothing of actual value for his job and I remember, looking up and thinking. I. Don't know that this is sustainable and I need to come up with a solution. How is there not a better system for finding good screenplays? If you do the Friends of friends method, you end up with the Friends of friends scripts, and if you try this brute force thing, you're going to ruin your weekends, Andrew Vacation, plus you would need fifty more Franklin's to see all of the script anyway. And that's when it dawns on Franklin. There are more than fifty Franklin's in Hollywood got on. My desktop fired up my calendar and went through and looked at every single person who had a job similar to mine. Who I had had breakfast lunch, dinner or drinks with. If you had eavesdropped on those breakfasts and drinks, Franklin says you would have heard the junior executives ask each other this same question. Have you read anything good lately? Yes, these junior. Our competitors and yes, information is power and companies would probably not be jazzed about them sharing that information, but you know these are low level producers. They're doing each other favors, and it's all off the record anyway. Who is going to know about this and so Franklin figures? Let's see if anyone's read anything good lately. He opens up an email and he BBC's about seventy. Five of his fellow junior exacts, and so know hey. Similar of your ten favorite scripts in exchange I will send you the combined. Responses back. Did you say who you were like? I am a I am a mysterious junior executive. Say anything else, I do not believe that I did. I created an anonymous hotmail address. I believe it was blacklist. Two thousand five at Hotmail DOT com, he called it the blacklist partly to honor the blacklisted writers during the McCarthy era, and partly because he always hated the idea that the word black gets used to mean bad, so this blacklist was going to mean great screenplays. People would respond, but surprisingly responses started coming back. Maybe these other junior executives felt as stuck as Franklin. Maybe it was just this information bargain was was a good deal. I sure transcripts I get a whole list back there around ninety responses and every time somebody mentioned the same script Franklin treated that like a vote for that script, and he starts logging all of this into spreadsheet. Twenty five people voted for things. We lost in the fire by Allan Loeb Twenty. Four people mentioned Juno by cody. Fifteen votes Larson the real girl by Nancy Oliver Fourteen votes, Lars and the real girl that is the script about the guy and the sex. If, you were a junior executive. Thinking this is good, but is this good? I'm not important enough to risk bringing this to my boss. The blacklist was a way of saying you were right. It was good and here is a number. Instead of just your instincts fourteen votes, only living boy in New, York, by Allan, Loeb Charlie Wilson's war by earned Sorkin, Fan Burke and by the way a big deal in two thousand five. This wasn't just about finding undiscovered writers. It was any script that was great and not made. In a script called peacock by riders named Michael Lender and Ryan Roy the top ten of the very first blacklist thubten of the very first blacklist. Point the blacklist was just a spreadsheet that only Franklin could see, and he's about to send it back to all those other junior executives who contributed and he looks at it for a moment all of this normally off the record insider Hollywood Intel now written in a single place. He takes a deep breath. And he hit send. And then he packs up and heads off for vacation in Mexico and about a weekend vacation I went to the hotel of business center to check my email on like the public computer. And this lists have been forwarded back to me several dozen times. and everyone's like Oh my word of this team. Come from a lot of descriptions of sister. Good. Where where did this come from? What's your? What's your thought? It was terrifying. My thought is is that my career in Hollywood has a clock on it and the doomsday clock has just sped up. This anonymous list of the best unmade screenplays was blowing up. It had gone way beyond the small circle. It was initially sent to it even ended up covered the industry press, and so Franklin kept his down. He stayed anonymous and one day. He gets this call from an agent. Saying that his client has written this amazing script. It's perfect for Leo. It's like the usual call, except then the agent says hey. Don't tell anybody, but I have it on good authority that this ripped is going to be the number one script on next year's blacklist. I immediately thought to myself. That's interesting because I made the blacklist and I'm not making another one because I. DON'T WANNA get run out of town on rails. But I'm fascinated that you think that the speculative notion of your client scripting on the list is a sales tool for you. That must mean that this list that I created has

Franklin Hollywood Executive Franklin Leonard Leonardo Dicaprio LEO Writer Octa White House Writers Guild Of America Allan Loeb Leonardo NPR LEE BBC Andrew Vacation
Is Telemedicine the Future of Medicine?

Better Life Lab

08:33 min | Last month

Is Telemedicine the Future of Medicine?

"I have to be perfectly honest. When I was first talking with Lucy and she said we really should do something on telemedicine and the future of medicine I just thought well. We look at work and care issues. We look at family as shoes gender equality equity across racing classes well. What does telemedicine have to deal with any of this? So let me turn it over to you Amanda and make the case. Why is this so critical for equity and work in? In Care Systems, this is a subject that is berry near, and dear to my heart. Both someone is committed to racial justice, and in particular with in the area of medicine and shrinking health disparities. It's my body of work, so what I'm doing is trying to redesign prenatal care for as a permanent in northern California where we deliver forty five thousand babies a year, so it's exciting we try to have. What are they? Cow Path moments in private and I'd like to think of this as one of them. Because we have to do more virtual care, prenatal care particular in women's health in general is a time when people come into the office a lot, so we have to ask ourselves what can be done remotely? What can't be done? And what are the factors that are impacting women's ability to have those appointments do they have broadband high speed Internet at their house. Do they have smartphones? do they have any place private to talk about? Their issues were very concerned about family violence, child abuse Yeah, in this era, also so there could be the risk associated with tele-medicine. Flip side there can be huge benefits. People don't have to take time off of work. They don't have to come in and commute and park. They don't have to find child care for their children. Even though China work and care of your children, your doctor of the same kind of tough, but we don't know which way this is point because we have to be really conscious every step of the way we're designing our care delivery in the telehealth space. What is the impact to be on a marginalized patients and the race and ethnic divide you staying with you Amanda? What do we know I? Mean it's it's. It's it's still a fairly new kind of thing right. So what do we know about how it impacts equity or patient, care or working family systems? Do we know much about it, or is it still so new? We don't know a whole lot yet. What we don't know a whole lot yet and in particular we don't know much about the race ethnicity side inside of Kaiser Permanente because we're closed system what we will know a lot because we do have that demographic data about our patients, and then in the maternal house based. We have no babies being born yet because this is all very new. So we don't know about our longer term. Outcomes with the key is as we're doing this design because Kobe is not going away tomorrow, we're going to really have to think about these systems. We have to keep that consciousness around. What is this point? Do in terms of Eray. So, let me turn to you, Lucy. This is something that we've had really some very interesting discussions about, and you've also had some incredibly intense experiences around telehealth and telemedicine during the pandemic, and not just around physical health, but also mental health. Can you talk a little bit more about that? Yes, as you know and many of your listeners now this is a mental health crisis as As, much as it is a physical health, prices Americans are suffering collectively with grief and loss and trauma to varying degrees, and so because our mental health effects, not only how he'll day today, but it directly affects medical outcomes. There's no shortage of data the show that are motion health, and our behavioral health, and of course, layered on top of that a social determinants of health. Effects are medical albums in very real ways. It's essential that primary care. Doctors and doctors in general understand that intersection. And for many people in the pandemic for my musicians. telehealth lifeline. Has as Dr, Williams said, it's not a panacea, not everyone has access to a smartphone or Internet access, but for people who need support physically and mentally is offered a new avenue. I think it's going to be here to stay. I don't think it's ever going to replace individual. One on one faced base care, and actually as Dr. Williams and I know the foundation of my work rotations the relationship, the relationship between patient is crucial, and so that is not going be replaced by virtual care hover. augments existing care for example I have a patient who lost her husband to Kobe during the pandemic. have been able to have the end of conversation. I did with that family from their home. Pre pandemic, because now we have these virtual platforms address. How are loosening regulations allowed visits to be paid for similar to what they would be in person, and then this patient of mine who is going through natural wraith and trauma, losing her husband on top of the pandemic, if able to for the first one axles agreed counselor remotely, and that is something that is not only important for her to. Feeling, but it's it's going to directly affect your medical outcomes, and that is what gives me hope for our future, we. What was that conversation like? You know a pre covert? How would that have gone? And how did that change? Or how was that? I was at different having to having to have such a such an intimate conversation over a kind of a technology platform. Well, it is interesting I mean first of all the patient who is at the end of his life could not have made it physically into my office. But I was able to have an hour long conversation with him on a virtual platform, and his family surrounded by his bedside and talk about very important decision making that pre pandemic. Wouldn't have been covered by insurance now. I probably would have had that conversation anyway, but you know doctors to get paid for their services and mental health providers need to get paid for their service and free. Corona virus insurance wouldn't reimburse for care wasn't face to face and for new incremental health issues. You had to have little morbidity so in other words. If you had an addiction I, Can Apple Addiction? Your therapists would only get paid if you also had diabetes. Those things need to change this change here on out. So I want to get to you in a minute, but Amanda if I can go back to you. Let's stay with that systems question. We've had this technology. You know we've had kind of the ability to connect virtually for some time, so has it really been an insurance issue that this hasn't really taken off before now well I will take a step back and say that I. Do work inside of Kaiser Permanent Day and so our. Models are different than in most of the fee for service. World but. Yes, part of the story is reimbursement, and then it's also familiarity and comfort both on a addition signed, and also on the issue as McBride knives off the about with existing patients people who you know, people, you have a relationship. The transition to virtual visits has been very smooth but for new patients. It's a little harder to make that connection nipping. That's why video is critically important because you'd get to see people's faces, you get to see their is. is their expressions actually highly suspected clamps? Yes, beer location of end of pregnancy on a video visit because I saw other, the pieces face was very swollen Oh. Wow, and it made me wonder you know. What is your blood pressure? What is going on about this fluid retention and so I brought her into the hospital for assessment when I was just doing a video visit at home. Wow, no Medicare has recently just said that they will start now, reimbursing or video. And so that's a big pair for us and for much of the country, and so I think that will helped shift the perspective, and then people are using it for their work. So as folks are more comfortable using distance work in general, they can then apply that with their health is now

Amanda Lucy Care Systems Kobe Dr. Williams Kaiser Permanente California Eray Diabetes China Medicare Mcbride
Technology For Better Caregiving

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

04:36 min | 2 months ago

Technology For Better Caregiving

"Me today is Nina and is a new one for me. Because Nina is from the UK and regular listeners know that I am from California, so it's late for her and early for me, so thanks for joining me today Nina. From the United Kingdom To Be Hey, thanks for having me so Nina has been taking care of her dad, Roger for how long now probably a I mean for me taking care of him for roundabout We say but I have been extremely lucky. Because I looked very much into technology. So I have had a lot of help from cameras and trackers, etc.. So. That's why would. I was I. initially drawn to you because I wanted to learn more about that, and you'd think being very close to Silicon Valley. I would be way more aware of these cameras and technology, and maybe I'm not just because my mom is in late stage Alzheimer's and she lived with dad until he passed away three years ago and then we had to put her in a memory care residents because. I'm still working my sister's working in high school, aged children, and to be perfectly honest. Her living with me was not ever GonNa work, so no, and I think as well when that happens. You kind of dilute your relationship, don't you? He's not so much do trading more. It's more care and that's not really healthy. No it is even in the care residents. There's a lot that I still have to deal with Brian and she thinks I'm her best friend and unfortunately lately. She gets very violently combative when you help her. When she leaned assistance with something she scratches and swears calls people names. To drop dead and having docked. Dad I'm a bit. Like entree to do is make sure you don't fall on your face, the really good learning for major because you know, all data's just gone into now stages. Really if you like so so this really good to hear from you. What? To expect. What's interesting with my mom is? We've been dealing with this for about twenty years I. Think it's to remember when I wasn't aware of. Memory issues. She was diagnosed September of twenty eleven, but by that it was like yet DA. Way a blind person would notice that she has a problem so You know. A lot of that was due to her, just resisting denying. But the thing I went to a workshop yesterday. Part of the workshop was on communication and. My Mom's got it, you know. Struggling eating like she tried to eat a sandwich with a spoon. A couple of weeks ago was fascinating. But our language skills are still her language skills. Don't fit into late stage. She talks a lot. She's still has a lot of words. She uses a lot of the wrong words. And she'll string words together that sound like a sentence, but make no sense whatsoever, so it's like Roy. A Guy, technically not late stage, but everything else is late stage, so it's very interesting, somewhat frustrating. Because it! Oh, people say we'll do this with her. Try this in none of it works which is why started the podcast because I was researching in researching trying to find? Ways of connecting with her, so that I could give her times of joy, and you know happy. Can't say. But. You know just happy Tele. Happy Times and I think that's important because somebody wants to mate was. Someone that worked for the dementia trust in the UK fight, said you know if you go on this journey and if you think. About the person that has dementia. Do you think about the feelings so leave feeling? Happy this whole experience. Will be so much easier for you and for them, and actually that's always stayed with me and that that conversation was probably about six years ago and so that is always today.

Nina UK United Kingdom Alzheimer California Silicon Valley Roger Brian
Michael Dippolito

Casefile True Crime

05:09 min | 2 months ago

Michael Dippolito

"Michael Dip Aleida was born in Philadelphia Pennsylvania on December eighteen, nineteen seventy. But the parents struggled with drug addiction, which led to mock obeying raised by his grandparents. MARKLE developed his own substance abuse problems during early adolescence, and at the age of fifteen, he was admitted to a Rehab facility. Following his release, he maintained sobriety for five and a half years, and worked as not cancel at the same treatment sent out where he drew saved hell. He relapsed in his early twenties and spent the next few years in and dad of Rahab and began dealing crack cocaine. Michael eventually relocated to Florida and began working as a telemarketer for several different companies. His job involved cold, calling potential investors to sell gold coins and foreign currency. And Natural Sows Ben Michael thrived in this line of work at one point earning around two hundred thousand dollars in an eighteen month period. However the siles worse game in which the telemarketing companies would keeping clients investment money. When this games inevitably fell apart, Michael set up a cold cooling scheme of his own. Into thousand two, he was arrested and delighted, convicted of unlicensed tele-marketing communications, fraud and grand theft, and was sentenced to two years prison. He was released in two thousand five with an extended probationary period of twenty years, and ordered to pay a total of two hundred and nineteen thousand dollars in restitution to his victims. A payment schedule was set up in which Michael would contribute monthly installments over the course of his twenty eight year probation. He was also required to report to his parole officer once a month to provide details regarding where he was living who he was living with what car he was driving and how much income he made. His home and vehicle could be searched without prior warning at any time, and he was forbidden from leaving. Palm Beach County in southeast, Florida with the AD obtaining prior approval from the parole office. Upon, his release from prison, markle moved in with these. Go Friend Maria. He immediately started using drugs again, which prompted Maria to end their relationship? Determined to get so about once, and for all markle stopped using and begin attending support meetings and canceling. He secured a job at an online marketing company and reconciled with Maria, and the two were married in July of two thousand seven. Afraid of ever returning to prison Michael cooperated with these parole conditions and maintained his sobriety. He developed a stable retain starting h morning with the Noli Session at the gym before heading off to work. In late, two, thousand seven, he started his own online marketing company. Mad Media, which solved I'd bananas and search engine optimization services to help clients direct more traffic to their websites. The company's initial success was hindered by the global financial crisis of Thursday night, not mad media to end a decent profit regardless and avoided markle comfortable lifestyle that catered to his expensive tastes. By October of two thousand eight, he's marriage had started crumbling. Maria was out of town when Kobe introduced him to Eros Dot Com a website that advertised sex work services. As detailed in the book poison candy by Elizabeth. Parker! Michael contact a sex work I need Dali, Muhammad and to the to organized to meet that evening. Markle was immediately attracted to up. Who was the daughter of Peruvian and digestion parents? She was born in New York, but raised in Boynton beach along with her younger brother and sister. The parents had divorced when she was seventeen. The which she lost contact with her father, but maintained a close relationship with her mother, two siblings and her mother's extended family. At the age of nineteen, Dali started sex work and spent several years running message policy in south Florida and California. She was also a law since Thrilla Stygian and worked part time as a real taw. Markle and Dahlia had a common and instantly hit it off.

Markle Ben Michael Maria Michael Dip Aleida Florida Philadelphia Pennsylvania Crack Cocaine Dali Palm Beach County Mad Media South Florida Boynton Beach New York Officer Parker Elizabeth Eros Dot Com
Pregnancy & Postpartum Body Image

Nutrition Matters

05:39 min | 2 months ago

Pregnancy & Postpartum Body Image

"Matters. Podcast thanks so much for joining me. I am so excited to be here. Really appreciate getting asked to join you. Yeah well we've connected online and you talk about some really important things just from from the perspective of being a therapist and also a human and I thought okay. Let's let's get together and talk about body image and the postpartum period because that is very much on your mind right now is that right. Yes definitely yeah. I am ten weeks outright now with my new baby and also have a two year old so I still kind of feel like I'm in the postpartum period with her to even though some people might disagree with that But I still feel very much like a new mother to both of them. Yeah Yeah Okay so talk about who you are in your background what you do professionally and then we'll dive in topic. Sounds good so I am a licensed clinical social worker and used to say I was a licensed scalzo worker in Louisiana but I just moved Tennessee But for the last almost ten years I've been in New Orleans Louisiana and that's where I got my graduate degree and just moved to Chattanooga Tennessee to be closer to my family. Meanwhile I raised these. Two girls My husband moved. We're altogether but My family lives here and so right now. I'm not working a whole lot. I'm seeing a few clients like in Tele therapy capacity from home So that's what's happening right now. But what like led me to this? Work in journey I around the age. Fourteen fifteen started struggling with OCD related issues and started going to therapy and loved therapy. Knew that it was probably going to be calling passion for me and it has been and so I went to college studied technology. Ocd got better for the most part And then when I went to Grad school I started becoming really interested in addictions and still anxiety and depression and related issues and once I started you know once I graduated Grad School and started my first jobs. I started really obsessively restricting and wants. Take yes food and once. I started that that lasted for about three years. And I mean after that I started to run a started to get help for it and once I went into. I didn't do a an impatient program but I did. Iop stuff and that led me like recovery myself has led me to be really really interested in eating disorder recovery and body image recovery for everybody and then out in a broader topic just disordered eating end health in general Because I think somebody that everybody faces even if they're not clinically struggling with the eating disorder of some kind And also my eating disorder weld in with OCD A lot. So that's what led me to place And still passionate about working in that area especially with having maybe girls. Yeah Okay so you have your own history and and then you've had years of studying in school and then working as a therapist and then Becoming a new mom Taco anything relevant in your story as far as like. What's it been like to be in recovery or recovered? I'm not sure what wording you like to use it From an eating disorder and then kind of going into new phases of life like like motherhood and the end postpartum. So heart of my story has been that I knew that I wanted to be a mom but I also knew I couldn't be a mom unless I was recovered from my eating disorder. And so that is what led me to seeking out. How because they knew at some point I wanted to have children in so basically after I got married I decided to. I realize that it wasn't just an. I want to be thin for my wedding issue. It was a bigger issue for me and decided than our would've been twenty sixteen so three and a half years. I decided that I wanted to make this better for myself that I don't pass on like really toxic ways of thinking to children and so that is what led me to kind of kind of the catalyst that threw me into recovery and so I got really lucky. I do identify as recovered struggle. Sometimes but I don't utilize behaviours in the slightest any longer and most of my thoughts able to Kinda Zap pretty quickly when they come up once. I did get help. I got pregnant pretty quickly after that so abou A year it wasn't very long about a year after I started feeling much more normal and better pregnant and obviously you know. Weight gain is a huge component of getting pregnant in the postpartum period. And while that was hard for me it also felt

OCD Grad School Tennessee New Orleans Louisiana Chattanooga Louisiana Taco
"teles" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

12:39 min | 3 months ago

"teles" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Of investigations that involve the Clintons and also just at the level of what she represents substantively. There is a lot more fear of her individually than for example there might be with Joe Biden like figure. Yeah I mean I do think that well. I wonder about that. I mean I do think for at least for some of these people write me and some of the people on the legal side had literally been involved in the Whitewater investigation had been hunting the Clintons for years that kind of stuff but I think that the larger fact that there was a the Scalia open seat matter a lot in that really sensitize people to the idea that this was a pivotal election over which irreversible change in the judiciary thus the legal system was at stake. I think that's very important. I do think to some degree they. They saw Hillary is more likely to play hard ball with them where law was concerned. But I think more they were likely to say look. We've got two teams. We got a team a conservative lawyers and a team a liberal lawyers and both of these teams really want to entrench to use their political power to entrench themselves in the judiciary and the larger structures of the law. And IF WE LOSE WE LOSE THIS NEXT FOUR YEARS. Were never going to get back. And that's where there's a big discussion of this Michael Anton Flight Ninety three article. The idea that this was a you know we literally were about to be. The plane was like that taken over by the equivalent of terrorists. And unless you rush the cockpit that you were GonNa you're going to go down and so lawyers were much more likely to see the world that way right on deceit. As deeply zero-sum and irreversible election way that national security conservatives didn't and you know the difference between Biden and Clinton would have been somewhat relevant there but I do think only thought that whoever was a Democratic president would bring this other team in and that other team really wanted to to you know make these people subordinate right really wanted to To rule them in a way. The national security conserves more likely to see the person on the other side is really their counterpart between the forty yard lines and so in addition to that or counter. The countervailing factor. Is that for a lot of conservatives who have a legal conservatives who have you know stressed for many years process regularity rule of law issues trunk is a is as jarring figure as he is to non conservatives who are interested in in things like procedural regularity and rule of law. And so. I'm I'm interested in how those fights how that tension played out. The result is a kind of split in the conservative legal movement. That is not there in the for example the Republican foreign policy establishment. Yeah I mean. I didn't think it is interesting that there is an actual organization held checks and balances that came out of legal conservatives WHO OPPOSED TRUMP. But even within the thing. That's interesting when you interview the people who were involved in that even George Conway on who is about is Over the top an opponent trump is as possible to get even. He is likely to say that he loves the judicial appointments. So the first thing to say about lawyers as compared to national security is there is a kind of ambivalence there right. Lots of people really don't like on his relationship to judicial norms. The norms of the execution of the office a lot of them also just disliked the generally shambolic performance of the administration where Legal Matters are concerned and yet on the other hand right they They would be really worried about other people being appointed to the on judiciary from the other side and generally like they know the people who are actually getting appointed to these judicial positions and they they like it so you know I think that is really the the division they're in part of it is when you look at the people who are most likely to have signed. There was an originalist against trump letter. That was very heavily weighted toward academic conservative lawyers. And I think that's not an accident that those people on an operate inside of generally liberal institutions like law schools and. They take seriously the idea that they're on a long term battle to actually persuade people of the rightness legitimacy of principles like originalism. And I think the idea that trump would cause lasting damage to those ideas and those ideas would get tarred with trump brush and therefore never be able to get that set of steak off them. Really weighed heavily. Steve Sax at Duke Law School and will about it at Chicago. Both said things. They were the ones who put together the originalists against trump letter. They both really emphasized that one thing they were trying to do with the letter was to inoculate originalism against the on the state of trumpism and to what extent do you think has been persuasive in a world in which originalism is both associated with a set of ideas right but it's also associated with the appointments that the president has made and the political valence of those appointments even for people who are sympathetic to it and And you know I have my my areas of sympathy with it though. That's complicated but we have now associated originalism with the political right which is now the trump right and so to. What extent do you think that is a talking at windmills? On the part of Stupid Saxon will bow the and others and to what extent do you think there has been a a remotely? Aren't even marginally successful efforts to insulate the ideas from the people? I mean my instinct. Is that probably not right? Probably hasn't been very very effective. No again part of this. Is that the General Force of political. Polarization is so powerful That it sorta sweeps everything you know in its wake in so I do think you know the the project of arguing that originalism was somehow above. Not just being a partisan project Which really is the project of people like will end Steve and others like them. That's a really important idea for them that they're not just partisans and in certainly in wells case where I will really doesn't think of himself as a partisan even though you know he clerked for McConnell and and Roberts But that's an increasingly hard position to maintain. And do think if you look in the economy that that project of legitimating conservatism and creating a home for it fewer. I think there are fewer and fewer liberals in the time of trump who were willing to go along with that. And you know again I would have to. I haven't asked will About this but I do wonder whether the project of trying to persuade liberals of the merits of their ideas which was a very important part. It was very important. Part of the original federal a society designed to go back to the rise of the conservative legal movement. That on the people created that really thought there was an opportunity to engage in persuasion that they many of them have been liberals before steed calibrating had been a Lebron. He had been persuaded and he thought that the design the federal society would really be able to bring people over to their side and I do wonder whether that project is more or less edits end and that's a really dangerous fact for our larger political system. I think the idea that parties previously thought about raiding the other party that you know we didn't just have completely fixed battle lines but you could actually do raids around the though you know the flank of the other party and take takeaway part of their coalition was actually a very important democratic stabilizing mechanism. Because it meant that you didn't just think that it was trench warfare but increasingly. Neither party really thinks that they can actually steal components away from the other parties coalition. And that's where politics really does start looking more like civil war so and yet I wanna make an argument that your your book. Here is a reflection of the fact that parties are stealing at least intellectually from each other. So you know when you take the checks and balances group that you describe. Many of whose founders are associated with law fair. One of the things that I think is is interesting about a group like that is that is a chunk of the intellectual elite of the Republican legal establishment. I mean when you when you take away the the or incurs and the John Adler and the Keyter Heisler and the George Conway's and you either and I don't know what the future holds. Make them the the conservative wing of the Democratic Party. Or whether you make them kind of politically homeless or whether you one thing you are doing is you're depriving the conservative movement of of that and you are disrupting the the idea that you have these two parties. Each with their own intellectual bench that is substantial and deep and intellectually compelling and. That's even more dramatic on the national security side. There simply is no prominent group of national security intellectuals who in a in a sustained serious way will make an art will make the arguments for what this president has done in his representing. And so I'm I'm actually wondering whether the turning of the Federalist Society from a body that persuades which it really did for many many years and a body that that engaged in serious argument to essentially a Republican Interest Group and Networking Organization that actually stands for very little except for.

originalism trump president Joe Biden Steve Sax George Conway Hillary Democratic Party Whitewater Scalia Federalist Society John Adler Duke Law School Michael Anton Keyter Heisler steed Networking Organization
"teles" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

03:11 min | 3 months ago

"teles" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"The lawyers are a much more divided crew and so first of all describe the divisions on then described the explanation for the divisions so I mean again with lawyers. The most important thing to recognize again. That's compared to national security conservatives. An economic conservatives is that trump had accepted both their ideas and their jurisdiction now part of that has to do with the fact. That trump really does have a kind of almost reptilian six cents for power. Trump doesn't have a really coherent ideology Why I think he's better understood as a demagogue. Ben Some kind of fascist like a lot of people wanNA think of him as but he does have a sense of who has power and who he can push and demean and who he has to cut deals with and social conservatives and by extension judicial and legal conservatives are group that he clearly looked and said these people have real power. These people really can hurt me and I have to cut a deal with them and his propose. Ideological reconstruction urged to philosophical reconstruction conservatism. Didn't actually involve a break from pre existing legal beliefs although certainly his his performance at the office in some ways has so the first thing they say is he didn't poke the lawyers in the I. The second thing is he clearly if anything. He expanded their jurisdiction. And that's why I think that the the parts where he you know he put out these. These a list of potential Supreme Court justices that he had gotten directly through heritage the Federal Society Networks. That kind of stuff. That was a recognition of those people's jurisdiction right that was in a way of him bending the knee to them. And that's one important part. The important part to recognize is a lot of these lawyers were genuinely afraid of what a democratic administration would look like on their issues on they genuinely were closer to the flight. Ninety three belief that a democratic administration would create permanent and irreversible damage to their fundamental existential interests on again very much not like national security conservatives right lots of nationals curry conservatives. Were more likely to say that you know our battle with the other side is between the forty yard lines whereas these people really are in a deeply adversarial relationship with the other side. Deeply Zeroed Song and that point is accentuated with when the candidate is Hillary Clinton because to national security conservatives..

Trump Hillary Clinton Supreme Court Federal Society Networks
India and Bangladesh: Health and environmental risks grow, following deadly cyclone

UN News

06:42 min | 3 months ago

India and Bangladesh: Health and environmental risks grow, following deadly cyclone

"A buffalo cyclone has hit eastern India in Bangladesh. Officials have said that it was one of the most ferocious cyclones ever seen what was the intensity of the cyclone arm. This song which cost to feed on one fifty five one five kilometer gusting up to one eighty five kilometers up as we want to Phoenix wreak havoc in the state of West Bengal and extensive damages uploading seven to stick of a single imputing cutout. The Joy I to and also accompanied by dogs need went up to four or five macos high We do not have much information on the how much land area had been inundated. You home box is the expected dot. There has been heavy damages under streets due to the inundation is actually was passed been ravaged by just be less That is expensive damage to the SPA. What communication and have enough waterlogging has several places and the Distrigas ministrations working in. Awadh putting manner the situation. So what is the current situation in these areas Do you have any estimates of the scale of destruction yet how that people people have lost lives in takeovers has been Luckily the damage has been Much less In this state of forty thousand every compared was being gone. The housing our tele-communications water sanitation agriculture will be badly impact with do not have ago some districts. Your husband is going on and More information will be available in a day or two to vote measures taken for disaster resilience. And what's being done for? Response now landfall both of men. That only got dominant overthink gone. Have undertaken massive evacuation more than one point five. Let people were always south and neo five. Let deeper in England so because of this the last that question probably the number of deaths has been quite slow as of now but the possibility that the figure might increase because the government has not yet competed plans and come up with just decided not to actively go there could be an increase in the number of as well in this state over being on the administration is working on a what manner in the affected. Districts are National Disaster Management Sports Day. Disaster-management state police provinces because on steam golf book on some Municipal Corporation Fire Brigade and the entire speed machine heavy stopping the state level are working to focus in this affected in. This is a diamond countries. Also combating covid nineteen infection in such a scenario at Govan prevention measures also being followed in the Shelter Home San Response Investigation procedures high speed challenges for on around. I would say that the government could vote for have made lots of two incommensurable people with prevention measures Shelter homes the have been A gift with the Walker insanity walk facilities hand washing facilities. Mark have been distributed Ready go for distancing have been maintained but as I said that I use on ground and district administration state government along with this Organizations are trying their best to handle the situation after causing scale destruction in eastern India. The cyclone moved towards Bangladesh. So what's the situation Dave? After the line in Bengal cyclone has now been fishing and presently dish. It is very likely to continue to move not not as North eastwards and we can all In Bangladeshi past not brought much damage can it has caused that There has been have Beata or information available from the media on damage to houses and Bleaching of embankments but the fact has not been ready coveting in Bangladesh so these are cyclone prone areas and we witness landscape destruction in the past as well. How have things changed in the last few years has the scenario improved so that these natural disasters caused minimal damage to life and property been going on made significant took five hundred management and this state of its international team last year on significantly reducing the loss of life Joining on funny. If you compare these supersized on which already signed the one thousand nine hundred nine I'm seeing people. I'm be compared compared with Ron tiny rich afford into China India. Two Thousand Nineteen it. Only sixty four people probably Golfman for the response and the professionals custody of the government has significantly improved and under. That is no doubt about it. I mean in the state over there has been locking media off the bad news particularly community preparedness and also Preparedness Assay Institution. Eleven Minister Levers Big The government has to save on sports have constituted did after the team at different Shi'as level so when it comes to on new centers post. I have some significant of that odd room for more improvement but there has been significant progress in the State Park. Shock is funny. Is Thinking Seasons External Miquelon? It'd be loop economic flaws. And we've we've been Steve Constant increase in the economic law particularly off off the economic loss to livelihood and and also in the infrastructure funding. You're increasing habet. Even need Obama's need to strengthen the of disasters governments in the country. I defensive resilience with every in your laughing planning. It'd be one to reduce economic losses due to the Faisal's.

Bangladesh India West Bengal Phoenix State Park DOT Govan Barack Obama Municipal Corporation Fire Bri Preparedness Assay Institution Distrigas Bengal Steve Constant Seasons External Miquelon England Walker Beata Ron Tiny Dave
Fighting COVID-19 From the Frontlines of NYC's Immigrant Neighborhoods

Latino Rebels Radio

06:02 min | 3 months ago

Fighting COVID-19 From the Frontlines of NYC's Immigrant Neighborhoods

"You know? He's being Donna. Ready we are the most people who die now. The the picture is different now but this sunny taty crash. We're going you gotta crises but did you. Let's talk for the beginning soon by a team. We've talked testing people with eating. My ourself and quiz area would find seventy percent of the people were positive which has been alarming. Sensing happened two days after when we went to the Bronx Sixty five to seventy percent positive. And they have to come back. Those buildings apartments small crowded woody international and resources. What we've seen today but dot day so many people seek now. We got different faces knowing that through so much pain now leaving now in the position that people had no money to like food doing pro. Two thousand meals a day in different areas to seeking the congestion with Were sent to teaching Our company nightstalkers because we know now fifty percent our people how the only there are less in their pocket derived. That's gone long ago now. We're GONNA do help we all today now. Jobs people lost fifty percent does agents. Yano joins US your job to Gatien. You're gone plus you act to other people without insurance and without papers circumstance. Afraid they had a lot of the with speeding difficult to find their family member. Who die because freight something could happen today. Where was the disconnect in terms of the testing? Why did the did the city miss? I mean how when you say a month ago you were. Testing would not be expecting this given the conditions. And giving the fact that if you were in a multigenerational house if you were an essential worker if you might have more health conditions of pre existing conditions it just seems that everything that was aimed at. Latino community was happening with this so where was the disconnect they nick was already disconnection that we have to stop paying attention on the socially health or their people live in crowded buildings with Russia. You Sam by the person was sick to the building worse than that those you know within minority note and then nobody was prepared for these. Because who has bundy we said life. Nobody deporting arouse went after we know because we knew people were were crying for giving us good. We bets. You May and building anywhere with Alone Hotel Room because we knew we were sending by millions invisible killer buyers. Plus building knows why this happened. So what did you do besides testing? What what did people you. What we're we're some of the people who are getting tested where we're told me some of the stories of the last month that you heard or your fellow doctors have heard or people in your organization of her for so many ways. But let's start with my pommie. How might keep who say's Saudi got Arresting and when when he got sick he was alone leaving apartment. He was long. He bustled hole. Fifteen days buddy They went back to work do market later. Now that's privilege. Let's go in different direction. Somebody call you. We put tele-medicine from the beginning. That medicine by the end of variety was pulling in Muslims. We plus three three songs and Y to educate our people dialing low. We doctors taking ghetto. Anybody who called even. Where did you. Summer's on the Summer Spacey Betty Portent. That's we knew what was going on right now. You has started like a lady who can out after liberty combat home to hold on is dead John No way whereas it wasn't that she even how the way to have a very often favor baber commission if you find your body and you have to make a seventeen donate. He changed now. He's getting better. But at some point with seventy twenty days cremation you. How the money? So it has the city I mean so where we talk about where we are now. What how is this improved? I mean besides the situation of people with the economic situation has this. Has the health situation improved it in in the community or are there still challenges Geno? I called allergy matching POCAR. What we're sending people city to the billing. Does Ron Koch it. Because what they do every day to work beginning in today the subway on they wouldn't papa. Papa Auditing Kidding that he sees inside those building her but up still coming out just two days ago. What am I secretary? Sister DIE evolving into aided by. Nali what he knows now. Ninety percent of the people going to endorse you die. I mean there is a very difficult thing game. Nobody knew well. Now we know now. We know what happened there? Now we're not to find solutions together. Find a way to test. That's what I've been saying is nine sixteen. That would best. Everybody does we do our you know. We went ahead of the game. Also when we decide to why are they meet a March Test immunological tests for whatever in the world? You these are the time this is

United States Bundy Ron Koch Donna Betty Portent Nightstalkers Alone Hotel Room Yano Russia Gatien SAM Nick Baber Commission Secretary Geno John
The myth of balance, moderation, and how to ditch the all-or-nothing mentality around food with Kris Dovbniak (Part 2)

Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

06:54 min | 3 months ago

The myth of balance, moderation, and how to ditch the all-or-nothing mentality around food with Kris Dovbniak (Part 2)

"WanNa go on and talk a little bit more about the certified intuitive eating counselor so you talked about like why you wanted to pursue that. Can you talk a little bit more about like? What is that process like? Take us like a little bit behind the scenes and then like when you're working with clients as intuitive eating counselor. What are some of the things that you do with them to help bring them through their own journeys towards the other side? Yeah Oh my gosh with so many different so much nutrition training and different certifications in my back pocket bar none. The intuitive eating certification was the not only the most interesting but absolutely the most educational transformational as a coach Simply because you know it is all incredibly research faced Evelyn. Tripoli is just an incredible human so the book and she would have eating was written by Evelyn Tripoli and at least rush and the program is based on their framework of the ten principles of intuitive eating. They actually have their fourth edition coming out very soon. I WANNA say it's mayor June. They have coming out The last version was created in two thousand and three. And that's the one. I'm kind of the basis for the training. She takes the ten principles of intuitive eating. And she takes you through a twelve week seminar series just like you would go to college classroom and goes through the research behind it and ultimately you know why like dieting stretching and Nantou food role. Don't serve and how they aren't our clients. The people that are working and so being able to see that and then taking that and then applying it to our clients so from after doing the whole Tele Seminar training. There's also a I wanna say it's six our audio training that you go through and do and you you learn of the ten principles in depth and how they apply to you as a practitioner. Not just somebody who has gone through at. You're also required to go through and read the book and listen to the Audio version and go through the workbook yourself which I think is so powerful am and then you're required to go through one on one trading with either Evelyn or a lease and I worked with Evelyn through the on one training as well as the telephone. I believe she's the one who does the Tele Seminar series but she is so incredibly smart and so passionate about what she does and being able to ask her direct questions and being able to bring anonymous client story to her and have give her a bluer us through how we would work through that. With a client with an intuitive. Eating lines was more powerful than anything I could have done on my own because it surely taught me. How shoe have compassion for each person that I work with. Meet them where they're at in utilize the intuitive eating Lens Shoe. Help them find freedom with food and find Quote unquote ballots in their in their bodies and in their eating So so it is. It's you know for me. It took me just about nine months to go through everything every every practitioner who works with his different. You're required to have certifications or an educational background in nutrition or psychology or personal training. You have to be professional in order that you were allowed to become into a certified intuitive eating counselor. She does have a or they have a program for. I WANNA see for. Lay people where you can take people through an intuitive eating kind of group course but it's a little bit different. It's not as indepth And practitioner focused as this one is. I'm just because I am working with one on one clients and she is training. Tichenor is and so. It's very interesting that she's training practitioners in different areas too. So she's training psychologists and psychiatrists who work with their clients and obviously the way they're going to work with their clients is different than the way. I'm going to work with my clients. As a health coach in a holistic nutritionist. And what I do Just because of my scope of practice oftentimes my clients are also working with a counselor Which I highly recommend for for many of my clients work with them to you. I certainly do not have the have all the answers but the eating Lens Comes into play with many many different practitioners. So she so. It's you know this whole this whole long program where you dig into the research and you learn practically how to work through this with clients. It was so incredibly helpful to my my on. My knowledge am as a coach and really way that I not just work with clients but the way that I look at clients backgrounds and the way that I am able to help them work through their struggles. So you know my clients work. I do work at this point. It's one hundred percent with women I used to say like ninety percent with women and I'm like it's been three years since I've worked with a guy I definitely work with women. Nothing against man. I'm married to one. And he's great. But I am called to work with women and I work Oftentimes with MOMS to With busy MOMS who are. Like I WANNA eat intuitively but I feel like I don't have time so what I do when I was clients is I need them. Where they're at. I listen to their stories. I adjust like I shared my own story. I listened to where they've been in their relationship with food. We talk about where they want to be in their relationship with food and their vision for having a relationship with food and utilizing the shooting eating principles and you know and my my skills just as a holistic health coach work together to meet their goals for finding freedom with food and eating in a way. That feels good to them but isn't restricted and doesn't contain any rules and so it looks different with every single client. We meet on the phone or meet on skype and it really starts from their story and exactly like we are doing. Today it starts with really Picking apart those pieces and picking positive way taking apart those pieces and and putting them back together so that the relationship with food is no longer broken but their relationship with food is is healed and they feel like a happy healthy whole person again without feeling bogged down by rules and restrictions. And all of this is done from the lens of intuitive eating.

Evelyn Tripoli Tripoli Tichenor
The coronavirus lockdown opens the door to VR theater

The 3:59

12:38 min | 3 months ago

The coronavirus lockdown opens the door to VR theater

"So you've got an interesting piece on VR. As immersive theatre now. I know you're a big fan of of theater. What what is this experience like? What what is this experience about? Short so for a couple months now There's been a game or an experience in VR Called the under presents that was created by tender clause along with a theater company called Pie Hole And with OCULUS and it is a game but it also has actors performing in it so they created this as a way to look at immersive theatre. Vr that was back in November and it was supposed to stop with the live performances in March. Then Corona virus happen and decided to extend the performances for these actors. This is now their their main job. And there's also been an opportunity to look at how this experience can grow what what theater really is in Vr. It's taken on a different so I thought it'd be great to revisit and talk to these actors about what they've been learning. What what is that experience like? Obviously you've tried it You been in the immersive world. What is the like s? So it's not like theater the way you'd expect it and it's also not like zoomed theater and I want to say that because all of a sudden now we are surrounded by zoom as a theater experience and now this you know you look at Saturday night. Live you look at Hamilton I had a friend who acted in something. That's where everybody's in a great talking. You get the opposite here. You don't get faces and you don't get is you get cartoon because that's what. Vr Can do right now. Graphically and we can't scanner faces. And you're moving through that space. What you do get is a lot of movement. A hands. FIT body movement. The actors can talk. But you can't so if you ever have been to a Immersive theater experience usually in big cities. Famous one asleep. No more. You wear mask and you're not allowed to speak that's kind of what it's like you're an observer moving through the space able to move your hands and do a few things but not much more than that so you with a lot theater Cinema right idea the point. Is you sort of connect with the performance? Right sort of see there is you could sort of see their facial recognition the facial expressions. What the story about what what this whole experiences about. But you can't do that with this experience. So how is that likely? How did you connect with the performance? If you couldn't really connect with the performers what's really wild subtlety of it and when you go in you think houses can work then you not in. There aren't always actors. It's like a you know or were other people. Sometimes they'll pop up sometimes. You're alone there other things like a game to do when you find someone they will acknowledge you and if you're another perform if you're another audience member could Nikola tip of the head or movement of the hands there's also some magic gestures and things you can do. You could take off your mask and conjure weird things. That's another part of the game but the performers have different dashboard. They can see. Who's coming and going may even know who individuals are not who they are but they can find individual you know anonymous identities so they have regulars and in a sense they can craft the performances to Kinda see they want to kind of get a feel for that so they said as they go they start to develop this relationship even with actor even with audience members who can't speak to them which sounds weird. But it's it's wild now this fascinating look at. How many times have you done experience every time you gone in? I've got in like like somewhere. Like the the over a dozen less than fifty. You know like I would say in some sort of round like that. Far Less than what What what regulars would be doing right. But I mean that's still a decent number of visits right so I'm just curious how the experience has evolved over time especially as you've gone back in consuming. They know it's not you say but they know that you're like a regular Has performances like how have they evolved over time? So I didn't get a chance this weekend unfortunately to do. What is a new thing where they're expanding into a variety larger variety performance or they're trying to build up theatricality but when you find someone it? I found them to be very simple very direct. Like little almost like mine performances. Where you kind of go with them do something for a bit And You wonder. What am I supposed to be doing right now and you think ok well stop do something else. And you kind of almost like Improv. You of just started doing this thing and it seems kind of silly but you're all doing it together and there's something comforting in that that's how I found it is is it's not like A. It's not Shakespeare but it is These little moments and what I think about that is like it's the beginning of something so if that answers at like if feels like like little little dives and I think they're also knowledge that like unlike theater where you're GONNA be there for two hours. I could take up this headset in five minutes or could keep it on for an hour and they have to address both sides of that Because you're not gonna want to necessarily spend a finite long amount of time in VR right. Now there's an interesting point story when one actor talks about people you know getting more the virtual world a lot of questions about that but the idea was like this is sort of a reaction to lock down. Potentially Mathis station were frustration. But like how did that work? Like do people when he says getting violent like what does that actually mean people like attempting to attack the performance virtual lure or what did that actually mean as a question and the thing that? I talked with them for about an hour and a half so I was like trying to put this in a one story that made sense to clarify on that. They're only so many actions in the game. It was interesting. I think what the actors were doing was observing more micro motions like so. They were saying that they felt. The people seem more bound that they were getting into people's spaces more but also and not to speak on their behalf. But there are there are some things you can do like their certain items like could be like a knife or like. You can't shoot people but like you know like their their props in the world and I think if you bring them close to somebody you kind of do that make it look like you were. You're bludgeoning somebody but like you know I think that that's about it and the person does not die. It's just like but the play acting of it in a way it's like a play acting out and I think there's also like the idea of like a respectful spaces standing back versus getting in people's faces And so it sounded like in the beginning. It was like a a pushy intense Another actor in the show so there's a more intense needy sort of feel but then it became more about emotional like reception. It kind of became kinder over. Time will people. I thought that was amazing. The here also those interesting how they observed how we perform. How like like that Like that laughter seems like choking you know that if you see someone laugh and then people would start to enhance those gestures like a like Emoji. They start to do these things that represent certain emotions and it's like they're becoming these like mine performers. There's also by the way there's also a whole discord group for the under presents that they work basically like a like a very active chat where people are also sharing secrets. Kind of like an animal crossing secrets. You have the unders- present secrets and they had different. Totems they carry around in ways to represent themselves so like a whole new sub languages emerging which is a little crazy intimidating. If you're a first timer but I think that's a really interesting thing that happens in a lot of like really invested world's well so this is interesting because it seemed like there is obviously a to entry with this. You obviously need to have the hardware. What is the minimum threshold? Like what what type of gear that you need to actually take part in this experience yet so you need you need Vr headset and you need. You need certain types of your headsets It started out on oculus question rift and In then it has moved onto steam VR. But what you need versus the old phone. Vr cardboard headsets or even oculus go just before the real limit. There's you can't move your hands around so like things that have with six degree of freedom or the ability to do not hand tracking it but in the future it might be that too. It's the controllers that can make your hands move. I think that's really important because without that you are just kind of like doing this. So your hands kind of become the way you act. So could you like if you had not goes go? Could you experienced this or would work at all? Yeah you need a quest you need a or now with a PC VR headset. That can get into steam but still that's a limited group of people. Vr headsets that is that also ecstasy. -Vivor yes so anything. That can use team so so that you could use a you could use. I think Microsoft the are a lot of heads now can hook into steam in in different ways and but yeah but he's still need the gaming PC It's definitely limited and I think that's the big point. Vr Is that right now. The are has its own set of APPS versus the world of APPs that we live in. Which are the phone? Google Apple Your pc your Mac. I think in the future. Those are obviously going to dovetail. But we haven't seen that yet really so it. I think that's the hard part. Is you think. Well what do I need to buy extra versus? What can I use that? I already have so look. Vr Has Been Vr has been on the rise. Because like you can't buy those things are pretty much sold out Even facebook has talked about. You know the the success of Tad with that gear. Obviously we've we've got a captive audience. The are right now. People are literally stuck at home And is a I deal forward escape but do you think. Vr Theater has experience appeal to people even after lockdown ends. And we all go back out to the real world yet totally. Do I think that what we're looking at now is like the Beta test. That was already in the works but is now reached a different level of intensity because you have a captive a global captive audience that that is trying to figure these things out work tools ways to connect but companies are trying to figure this out you know had tele presence. We'd seen this at Mobile Congress and other places you looked at stuff. Were in a ways to protect yourself other places now. It's just taking on a different level of intensity that I think it's interesting because like immersive theatre for instance or even theater is a really hard thing to experience for a Lotta people you. We live in New York where you take that for granted that you can go see your show. Even the tickets are expensive and hard to come by and immersive theatre is like a rare flower. Thing that POPs up disappears really. It's a privilege to go to those things I hope it doesn't cannibalize those worlds. But I think it can definitely expand the reach of that to do things that you could can't get to or want to build. Maybe it's like a directing tool is asking them about Tender clause about who who created this about active audience members performing more bill building in his a creative tool. It sounds like they're not ready to do that yet. Not that they're not interested but it's a different thought process and I think that right now. It's working well for what they've got. They're GONNA keep expanding. But I think about like you know what if you got a bunch of actors or a bunch of people building inexperienced together Or do Improv. Or whatever you know and we could use it like that So yeah I think there's a lot of possibilities

VR Vr Theater Congress Nikola New York Facebook Microsoft Google Mathis Station
Krista Drobac Discusses Sweeping Changes in Federal Telehealth Policy In Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

08:25 min | 3 months ago

Krista Drobac Discusses Sweeping Changes in Federal Telehealth Policy In Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic

"Let me just for background asked why had the Congress or what's your understanding of why the congressman CMS head up into recent strictly limited Medicare telehealth. And I'll throw in of course we'll get to more patient monitoring or these benefits. The long term challenge has always been the congressional budget. Office really does not look favorably on telemedicine. They believed that. It increases costs overall rather than replacing in person visit their underlying. Thinking is that people use telemedicine and then also on top of that also go in person so Our challenge up until now has always been The cost and the perceived worries about fraud. The we find it very interesting that people at the Office of Inspector General or CMS Program Integrity Office. Think that it easier to commit fraud by telemedicine because really the fraud that takes place in Medicare's often making up fake patients and it's a lot harder to track that down than it is in telemedicine to see a trend quickly And also you have an actual. It addressed the IP address. And tell them so. It seems to us that. Be Easier to detect and root out fraud in the online environment than it would be in the In the in person environment. So we think we've got Good arguments on the fraud piece. And we're collecting data now on the Kospi's okay. The I heard it explained in part by the view. It's duplicative and not substitutive. That's one variation of ood acclimation. Yes thank you. So let's go to Let's go to were at so obviously The Congress house past four so called Kobe. Nineteen related Bills or sometimes referred to as supplemental bills The first The first supplemental and of course the third the Care Act had telehealth provisions in them and then of course in late March early April. Cms published in interim final rule and Proxima. I forty pages of that discussed Regulatory Waivers SMS would grant In relation to their health policy. Can you provide some more top of line? Where the Moore's substantive congressional legislative and regulatory changes to the policy yes. Congress started with authority in the first couple mental hugh allow for the waiver of the originating site in rural restrictions in Medicare and to see us followed through with that and lifted those restrictions The subsequent bills actually gave the authority to cms to lift the entirety of eighteen. Thirty four in any part of eighteen. Thirty four M so that they went ahead and also lifted the restrictions on Speech therapists physical therapists occupational therapists. So now pretty much All of the Practitioners who bill Medicare can practice telemedicine and the patient can be anywhere and the provider can be anywhere they clarified the use of technology. So you can use a art hall And when advocates asked for audio only cms did add some em codes. That are audio. Only there are some codes that you can use for Phone only telemedicine they also Added a a lot of new codes so Most of the primary care codes are now cover. Behavioral Health is covered They sort of assessed what you might need to do. During a a cove emergency and added those codes. So there's a lot more that he'd be reimbursed The Office of Civil Rights at HHS way the Hesse requirements in terms of what kind of platform? You can use the. You don't have to have a hippo compliant platform you can use facetime or skype The waved the Co pays on Telemedicine So that You know for both remote monitoring and telehealth which is really advantageous especially for by train because remote Copays has been a barrier or remote monitoring up They actually most Medicare advantage. Plans have now waved. The Co pays for both tele-medicine and remote monitoring On the state side there have been significant. Changes about forty nine states have weighed some part of their state. Licensure rules Medicaid has started covering things that weren't covered previously State medical boards have allowed for the waiver of existing relationship. Requirements face requirements There's been some scope of practice changes so that For example supervision of nurses can be done virtually Some some states that didn't specifically allow nurses and physical therapists and physicians assistant to practice telemedicine. are now allowing it so there have been changes at both the federal and the state level so quite a lot To say the Least Napoli let me ask as as follow up. There has been some Sweetie question realized relative to tell health as relates to a stark or Physician self referral a law What's what's the intersection there. You know the kinds that hit it has come up. The stark laws from me has been between the vendor and the providers so we weighed the telemedicine restrictions and medicare but most of the capacity in the marketplace telemedicine is through vendors because in the past medical offices haven't been reimbursed for them so they didn't invest in televised. So when you want it to go and get a visit visit your employer or insurer had generally Then did that out in order to make that happen. So you've got a lot of doctors in their homes Doing telemedicine visits all day long. But they're the they're the employee of an American well or an empty live. There are not a physician office. Therefore they're not an enrolled in Medicare so that means that those vendors can't actually provide telemedicine services directly to patient. 'cause they're not medicare enrolled providers so the way that it's happening in the marketplace. Now is that a lot of telemedicine. It'd being done through. Hospitals and other Medicare enrolled providers but they have vendors helping them under a white label. So one of the questions that we've had about dark kickback. Is Can a vendor Provide a referral to a hospital. So that if they get a patient that set you know obviously needs being. Can they refer that patient to the hospital? Who is there a quiet and right and the answer? Yes they can because it's not a self referral Those are the types of scenarios where this is coming up Just because of the strange way That telemedicine his grown up over time and mainly as a response to the regulatory challenges Medicare so in some sense to follow up. It's it it. Turns out to be convenient. That the vendor is not under the Medicare program thereby being able and that's an accident history. Meaning the Medicare provider wasn't doing the service themselves they farmed it out and as a result of that. This referral is now allowed. Is that correct correct? Okay sort of accident of history. I

Medicare Fraud Office Of Inspector General Or Congress Patient Monitoring Congressman Facetime Moore Office Of Civil Rights Sweetie Hugh HHS Hesse
"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

"Especially in patent law uh uh the the main function of the law is just to create a legal minefield a for innovators who can be shaken down bicycle patten trolls who buy up portfolios of patents just a wet weaponized them and litigated them on a litigated on them so what uh what should have been a pro innovation policy is perversely turned into pro lawyer policy steve land yeah i mean the other a attract on this first of all is it uh plays into concentration on through that is the more you have uncertainty as to whether or not your eyes your innovation or the way you're using an innovation is i'm going to be litigated on large firms have the ability to handle batted in a way that small firms don't small firms can be very worried that they're on their innovation or the product they have is simply going to be destroyed by a patent troll in that encourages them to simply sell out to a larger firms on or to never be created in the first place on the other thing about this is it also plays into the inequality story that we're telling on not a lot especially in the entertainment side which is where on the copyright side on the uh the beneficiaries are not usually little plucky um uh add music sharon's right they're very large consolidated media companies like disney or their large recording firms who want to protect on the benefits that they have from a few superstars and apply that globally in so by extending copyright odd terms on that mainly ends up increasing the amount of profit they can get from that very small number of superstar on nar recorders without or i entertainers without actually effecting the amount of people who are going in in the front end which is the thing that really produces innovation that produces new forms of bob of creative odd productivity.

media companies disney patten steve land nar
"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

"Luckily concentrates its smaller number them they're much more geographically concentrated they're not in a city south carolina right there in new york in just a few other places and so you have them much more concentrated said of gains from one regime rather than the other the other side of this is when you think about the asset management side on thirty years ago a lot of that asset management was in on employer pension funds that the case where the on the employer ears of various sorts had a lot more leverage over the asset managers on in setting what their returns were going to be there were large institutions that have that kind of bargaining power as we moved two four one kasen iras and now you have all this proliferation of acted management an asset management the if you look at the um the amount that they charge in terms of fees is a lot larger than the amount that was being charged two on uh syria lawyers through pension funds so both of those explain why you have concentration in an increase in our returns in that effects the uh the resources of firms can distribute internally to their own employees so let's move on i still want to qatar trail lease touch on sale but more at the other as you talked about so finance at bigs session the book he then turned to intellectual property and the patent system copyright et cetera and most people would argue in the abstract well that's good for growth and innovation that uh and and and that's innovations good food lots of people not just the innovators but because those two products often benefit large swath so the population so the sand are we need patents and copyright to protect intellectual property because without that will have less incentive for innovation people's work will be stolen copy the returns will be lower we won't get as much as we otherwise without what's your agreement on intellectual property yes definitely counter intuitive to classify a intellectual property is an as an anti growth measure since its whole justification is diperdana is to sweeten incentives for innovation um by giving innovators temporary monopolies and thereby raising their returns the idea is to increase their incentives to innovate um and that works right there are benefits to intraparty prediction certain innovators are incentivized uh however.

new york south carolina syria qatar thirty years
"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

"That difficult not that transformative they're not inventing the next uh autonomous vehicle or whatever it is uh why is it that those put that there was pay levels attract those are are set at those levels at you'd think they wouldn't have to is this something else going on there i think that those don't get competed away let's let me think about this on in one way right to win the questions is going back to brings tweet about why are um are is pay in this sector so much higher than it used to d m one way think of this is institutionally on that the way we organize finance is just a lot different than it used to be one where but this is in the mortgage business which is a huge high volume business etiquette it it looms very large in the whole area that we're talking about did you go back thirty or so years um the basic way that we organized mortgage finance with through savings and loans on we had thousands upon thousands of them it some of them were extremely small all might the little town my mom grew up in south carolina uh had its own lake city savings in load on debt made uh that made mortgage loans mainly just in the town in the outlying areas and that regulatory regime which was also to connect to the glasssteagall had the distributive effect of producing a lot of middle and upper middleclass bankers who could afford to pay their country club trees phnom win that blew up but they hand that we could no like they couldn't afford to buy their own islands that's that was good if i threats are that wellblocked by living let me get to the people who can afford debate bob eight odds are by their own islands so wind the savings and loan regime blew up on we essentially substituted the mortgage securitisation regime on where now greg were still making lots of mortgages but we guide mortgage originators and then we have on people were trading mortgage securities at a much smaller group of people than in the previous regime on but much more concentrated them more on economic.

mortgage finance south carolina greg
"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

"A uh but the game is running excessive risks which gives you in good times very high returns those high returns then get channeled into into the pay of all those people were talking about uh when times are bad though excessive risk turned into unnecessary losses those losses however socialized so basically uh the uh the financial sector's running oneway bets with with pay uh they get uh they privatize the gains and they socialize losses and and financial and nobody else gets to do that uh so uh so fayatte skits paid better because of these oneway bets it doesn't explain why a bright which are about this flow of human cap which i think again is another really actually the more disturbing or or destructive part of this uh i mentioned the allocation misallocation capital it's him his allegation human capital that i think uh steve you referred to earlier where some of the for a long time now in america some of the brightest uh young men and women coming out of mba programs and out of even science programs have gone into uh financial the financial sector because the peso generous which you could argue uh you know that will be a that would be uh okay if they were actually making the world a better place as you we've all admit it they sometimes do the existence of initial sectors crucial uh but size of it in the weight structured is not crucial mrs through it to her for you may be negative in its impact on our economy so the question is why they have to attract the best and the brightest to do things in the trenches that really now.

america
"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

"Yeah the other dimension of this that i would want to emphasize aung i is that um we often talk about the problem and finances um the recurrent crises in the bailouts but government is also had a a role in propping up the financial industry in a much broader sense on uh one which i bring didn't sizes the tax code i gives a very strong bias uh toward dodge toward borrowing in that's very important for highly leveraged firms like likened finance uh the second is the way we organized a retirement savings we have huge huge subsidies in the four when kasen iras on uh that encourage the very large active management um the industry in high in asset management they have very large fees that for which there is no economic justification on those are not the very highest parts of the on the financial industry those are not the tippy top of the one percent of the lie of the bottom of the one percent are made up of others asset managers whose jobs are purely a function of on the way we work and eyes retirement savings on an so there there's actually a very broad set of subsidies and om and regulations at a prompt up the financial had caused it to be much larger than it would be and other uh other cases and again there's very substantial evidence on from it i offer from economics that on while a certain level of financials asian is a good thing you can definitely be under financial lines with the united states is very far on the other end where financialisation is actually associated with uh declining invasion on financial is asian also ends up setting up a lot of uh highend talent in human capital the causes a very big distortion of of what the most skilled than most highly trained on mines end up doing and that has.

united states one percent
"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

"Five percent of assets is is commonplace how to such a precarious and and and uh uh a vulnerable funding structure uh persist uh in which only slight uh decreases in asset values then make financial firms insolvent uh because they're so highly leveraged uh it persists because of both an explicit a safety net uh uh four financial institutions in terms of the discount window in a lender of last resort function for the fed and also deposit insurance for depositors uh and then as you alluded to russ uh this large implicit guarantee to bail out a larger systemic glee important institutions uh that we've seen again and again and again for decades starting with the continental illinois bailout in the 80s moving through uh the uh the third world debt crisis of the 80s moving then to the mexican debt crisis in the 90s and the asian debt crisis uh they long term capital management a bailout there's been intervention after intervention were a bank scott in over their heads and a go his stepped in to ease their pain and has introduced whopping amounts of moral hazard into the system uh the the moral hazard operates primarily though russ not on the on the decisionmakers within the institutions uh and and and a date they may think that are uh uh managing risks correctly and they may think they may have skin in the game and and and not be trying to make a bet with our taxpayers money uh but the fact is it's the is the effect of moral hazard on the creditors keeping credit costs so low at such dizzying high levels of leverage uh that's that sustains this whole model if we hadn't had this uh this kind of persistent government propping up of high leverage we wouldn't still have it so it's persistent is an artifact a government policy in it produces a financial system that is recurrently crisisprone steve.

fed russ financial system continental illinois third world Five percent
"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

"Yeah we uh we do not claim to do any kind of comprehensive survey of financial regulation our goal simply is to identify a couple of major areas where we think uh government policy is uh through a regulatory capture uh uh having bad effects on efficiency growth and simultaneously a regressive distribution effects uh and um uh and here uh in finance uh the the the case that this is sort of active government intervention in the economy uh is harder to make a because there is uh uh other than in scotland for a few decades in the late seventeen hundreds there's just no laissezfaire back base line in finance to judge interventions against the modern state and modern finance co evolved code dependent lay uh they've been inextricably connected since the getgo uh and so uh it's difficult to find any kind of pristine uh laissezfaire uh financial markets that than when woods said is a baseline for against which he would look at intervention so what we're looking at really as comparing different regulatory models in different regulatory systems and seeing what those different alternative regulatory models uh uh by how they might work uh the regulatory model that we've been uh sustaining for a long time uh is one that aware financial firms are highly dependent on debt for their financing uh in almost all other industries debt loads of higher than fifty percent of assets are considered to be problematic and get your creditors worried and get your stock price nosing down uh many companies have much lower debt loads than that apple famously didn't borrowed all uh until quite recently um but in the financial sector uh uh uh leverage of uh ninety.

scotland woods apple financial markets fifty percent
"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

"And they're gonna be unpredictable and therefore you should do something more modest or you should do a whole lot at small things this is one of the arguments i have for what traduces on kleptocracy which we talked about before on end so in again it win government itself doesn't have a lot of internal capacity or it doesn't have countervailing organizations on the other side that can produce information saying actually this measure you're talking about getting rid of a licensing are dentists or putting capital requirement on finance on isn't actually going to have ball those terrible negative consequences when that doesn't exist that gives a very strong advantages to the existing incumbent interests as when i had a couple things and then we'll segue into the four areas that you look at in in the book for where you think that the the government action has worsened inequality in in her growth the first is that uh the role of economists and talked with um uh luigi is in gali about this in episode at the good some incredibly important point which is that economists often reassure policymakers that they have no choice but to say bailout the creditors have failed financial institution that without it there will be a disaster and it's it'll be terrible and of course all those incentives you talked about steve come into play uh the regulator does not want a great depression on his watch his being saved ben burtt enke's uh so he's going to be very aggressive to make sure that things don't go badly right now which means he can be setting the stage for something to go very badly in the future that he will not be necessarily blamed for economists like to encourage that kind of change because to me it makes them powerful that makes him important it it creates demand for for economists to be steering economic stability macroeconomic stability financial stability so i just think there is a terrible um implicit collusion there that it's not it's not explicitly retirement something sinister about it but just the self and natural self in.

great depression ben burtt enke government steve macroeconomic stability
"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

"I'd like to address is the point that rod that russ made on one way think what this is what our our assumptions about policymakers on the people who are actually making decisions one is on yes there is that there is this a symmetrical information problem that russ's describing that the regulated no more dan the regulator about their industry now that i think that's a variable rather than a constant right you can imagine different ways of organizing government in which there be less asymmetrical information one of the things we emphasize is one of the problems of day revolving door is not just that the peop belong the one side go over to the other side but the people on the government side are often not around long enough to had heard all of the be asked that the that the regulated said you know have argued in saudia we it you know you guys always say that right on and the never turns out to be true well if you're not their around long enough to afford all those stories then you're not going to be able to see through through that on so i think that's an important part of the story the other thing is that policymakers especially those in congress tend to be risk averse i'm doug arnold going back to his great book the logic of congressional action argue that on that policy makers a another more likely to lose their seat than the failed to win it ride there are more likely to lose the seat because uh they do something that creates negative effects that than can be traced back to them and therefore there highly worried that they're going to do so on things are gonna make an action and then something bad going to happen and then people are gonna say oh you caused that aung in that gives a lot of advantage to incumbent interests because in many cases all they're trying to do is defend the existing policy regime in so when somebody saying hey we should have a big capital requirement on financial for on all the finance people out to do as i o this is going to have terrible awful consequences ride on and they're going to be large.

russ saudia doug arnold aung congress
"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

"So when you think what information it's got these two different levels one is on information matters on a affecting whether or not na alternatives are on the agenda or not and uh embedded interests are able to put a lot of resources into keeping ideas off the agenda on and it also affects in on the other side that those who might challenge it generally have less resources to invest in challenging on those uh what people and left recall had demonic ideas and then secondarily information matters even if you get an idea on the agenda that affects the uh the scope of what policymakers thank uh they can actually do what in specially what they can do without taking on substantial risk to themselves i saw match as an aside that you talk to people in industry which i have done in my life not not as often as i wish i had but it's useful for i think for an economist actually talked to people in the trenches at they'll speak with disdain of their regulators that they don't know anything and they don't sit around and rub their hands together and twirled their ends of their mustache thinking i can take advantage of this what they do is they they they see the regulator is very uninformed about their business relative to themselves of course they then have control over the a much of the information that the regulator receives this particularly true in in finance which will talk about the minute and as a result is a natural tendency i don't think it's always sinister i'm sure sometimes it's sinister plot of times is just um they end up showing the regulators information that happens to be conducive to less regulation or regulation that benefits incumbents or regulation that that helps them out in some way and so that's the process that i think you're pointing out that's very very valuable to be aware of i think is easy to miss which is the world's very complex it's always going to be the case.

"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

"To there to there will and i think the evidence of that is on is a little thin in political science phnom and therefore there an overemphasis on campaign finance on on the other hand however there is a under emphasis on the ability of organiz interest to influence the informational environment that policy makers face when they actually make decisions and that's on two levels right drink emphasize the level where policymakers are odds some things on the agenda and then they're trying to decide what to do and then on baid the scope of what they do with influenced by the information that they are able to get from either outsiders are insiders in that's important but there's another which dardenne says yala gis who referred to as the second face a power which is the on whether or not a particular areas even consider a particular ideas even considered to be what jack balkan has called a on the wall or whether it's off the wall on so occupational licensing is a perfect example of this occupational licensing protects enormous number of incumbent interest on debt has all kinds of distorting effects it has all kinds of distributive effects on but the thing that protects it most durably is the fact that any other alternative to occupational licensing is viewed as simply nuts on and the people who have a interest it meant on the shovelled very strong odd interest in making not in preserving that can not that idea right not even to defend this the substance of the arguments for in uh for occupational licensing but two so marginalize any other alternative that they don't even have to defend the merits of their policy and you see that in a number of other areas that we have a critique of zoning zoning is often on been viewed as a as something that only those on the very far libertarian fringe aung have any problem with on inside.

dardenne yala gis jack balkan
"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

"Roar inequality and therefore if you wanna reduce inequality the only way you can do that is to some how throw sand in the gears had machine on and iso regulation it is generally causes the in this new because it reduces the scope for markets to turn everything solid into air and produced the potential for a worldwide on i inequality noxious within the nation state and i think our argument is that markets actually have sung countervailing effects right now where there are supernormal profits of various sorts where you've got the potential for market entry that creates the opportunity to do at least compete away some of those suit by supernormal profits on as a result of that oputa people who have advantages are gonna try to lock the men through sayed action they're not just going to try to create entirely free market in which um they're able to score above all the gains they're going to try and keep out those who would challenge their various forms of supernormal profits and i think that's the area where in general we think the left has a on has a blind spot they don't grisly seed lee some of those countervailing forces that markets properly organized have in the way that on uh that advantage interest on actively try to gain markets on not just to keep regulation out but the eu's regulation as a as a weapon against their competitors in against outsiders if you look at the scholar most associated with the inequality issue on the left thomas pickety uh here he presents this uh this view of capitalism's natural tendency towards concentration equality very starkly for him it's just in the dna of capitalism that because our is greater than g there is this in a tendency and only wars and revolutions contemporary really a interrupt that tendency.

free market eu sayed
"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

"Power because they have these large economic organizations that allegedly exploit customers are take advantage of of some kind of uh of pricing monopoly ability to to raise pricing keep keep uh revenues flowing and profits flowing so there's there's economic power large corporations wielded economic power they would argue and particularly on wall street and then they would also argue that it's the party you mentioned that they also wield political power uh so they did i don't think they see them as now that is quite right they they of course the the the left is quite clear that the rich wields political power but they they tend to see what the how the left uses that power in very incomplete terms that is they see though even the rithy that she's made the rich the rich use their power to keep taxes and regulations low basically to get government out of the way so that they can accumulate wealth would they miss is that if you've got all that power you don't just use it to push government out of the way you use it to recruit government to be an active agent of of your own enrichment wealth adds that that's the part they miss steve you aren't comment on them yeah and i think another way to think about this is that the long the argument you know going it away all the way back to mark's is that on capitalism has an inherently concentrating affect on the more that you get rid of informal a worktorule constraints on markets the broader the scope for aung.

steve mark
"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

"Very strongly screwed up the last 30 to 40 years upward on that's affecting the distribution of income as well as slowing down innovation and uh therefore the distribution of income is something that people on the rape should feel that they can um addressed as a independent issue of uh of inequality without thinking that that somehow on uh a violate someone they're lying set of odd normative principles at a hole and before we go go on i think it'd be useful to listeners to preach you to give a a 30second or ten second thumbnail sketch of your own ideology to the extent you have one you can say i might lg free most of us aren't of course but uh i i think one of the things that make sure in your book interesting in and your work interesting is that you'd you don't see the world exactly the same way so uh brink wedding you uh start the i come from deliver terry in the world uh and uh i'm just a a kind of quirky soft libertarian a sometimes call myself a libertarian uh but uh even though on it than a scan and center now i rate this book uh as a vicepresident at the cato institute which is a deep prettier libertarian thinktank in dc and steve yes yeah and i consider myself on like uh like brakes as users saw assertive soft libertarian in i consider myself i guess a soft on liberal on i have always had a more redistributive i view of on of fairness but have also always been on skeptical of the uh the ability of governments always been dicate are normative principles in that tension which you addressed in our conversation about kleptocracy that tension between um died normative belief in on a fair distribution of income in a political or institutional believed the government's not always very good at doing that is the basic tension in my liberalism in that the being what both a break an eye toward something like what we call liberal terry's into i buy cars on the table listeners are probably pretty familiar with where i stand on these issues that we're gonna be talking about but i want to.

rape terry cato institute steve 30second lg ten second 40 years
"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"teles" Discussed on EconTalk

"Welcome the econ talk part of the library of economics and liberty i'm your host rush roberts stanford university hoover institution our website is econ talked out a world where you could subscribe to comment on this podcast and find links and other information related to today's conversation bill also find her archives where you can listen to every episode we've ever done going back to two thousand and six or email addresses mail it econ talked dot org we'd love to hear forget today is a member thirty is 2017 i'm i guess our brink lindsay of than a scanner center where he directs the open society project in steven tell us of johns hopkins and in the skin and centre steve appeared on he can talk in april of 2014 discussing clue jockocracy his term for overly complex political governance today brecon steve will be discussing their book the captured economy how the powerful enriched themselves slow down growth in increase inequality brink welcomed econ talk and steve welcome back russ thanks for having us big you're having is russ now in the beginning of the book you right is a quote the rise of inequality is to a significant extent a function of state action rather than the invisible hand in this state action by suppressing and mr reckoning entrepreneurship in competition has rendered our economy less innovative and dynamic as well as less fair i want you to expand on his central idea of the book and give us a short sketch of the of the argument brink why did you start asaf here in the twentyfirst century the us economy is suffering a kind of double whammy malays uh inequality rising inequality particularly uh with uh increasing shares of total income going to a favoured few at the very top and also slow growth uh the average growth rate so far in the twentieth century has been about one percent in terms of gross annual growth in real gdp per capita that's half the growth rate of the that was the average rate during the 20th century so we've had a precipitous go.

johns hopkins steve steven russ us per capita one percent