35 Burst results for "Tel Aviv"

Roy Sheinfeld on the Maturation of Lightning

Bitcoin Audible

01:58 min | 2 weeks ago

Roy Sheinfeld on the Maturation of Lightning

"The maturation of lightning, growing up by going vertical. By Roy scheinfeld. It's almost tautologically true that specialization within a social system increases with sophistication. In fact, increasing specialization could be one way to define social sophistication. Example one our global society is pretty sophisticated. I know how to create products, ace a trivia contest about the wire and find the best shawarma joints in Tel Aviv. But I have no idea how to knit, design and efficient photovoltaic cell, or where to go rock climbing around Maputo. We're all experts at something, learning more and more about less and less. Compare that with hunter gatherer societies, where everyone can basically duke everything. Everyone can weave a basket, catch a fish, light a fire, sing a song, recite the rules of the tribe, make a shelter, et cetera. Though their worlds are complex, their societies are simple. With very little internal differentiation or specialization. Example two. In the early days of the web, companies like CompuServe and AOL were basically one stop online shops. They were ISPs providing basic connectivity, email, social media, IE chat rooms, content in the form of news, weather, and so on, and search, often in the form of an actual curated directory. As the web became more complex, we now engage with multiple companies for each of those functions, including all the writing, editing, commenting, revising, and so on. Even a simple post like this one will involve the services of a few ISPs, a few email providers, a few cloud storage platforms, a few cloud text editors, a few image repositories, and who knows how many background services. And now, it's happening to lightning.

Roy Scheinfeld Hunter Gatherer Maputo Tel Aviv Compuserve AOL
Once and Future Prime Minister of Israel Shares His Story

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:28 min | Last month

Once and Future Prime Minister of Israel Shares His Story

"Years ago, my next guest stormed an airplane got shot for his efforts, saved a bunch of passengers for Palestinian terrorists killed, but you probably better know him as the once and future prime minister of Israel, Bibi Netanyahu. Mister prime minister, welcome to the U.S. show. Great to have you on. Good to be with you. I have with your audience as well. I have greatly enjoyed BB my story. Jonathan Karp sent it to me on Friday and I've done nothing but read it and listen to it and I enjoyed the fact that you recorded the end of the book, but not the beginning. So I got through your accent pretty good at the end there. Let's start with the beginning though. And an argument among brothers on a tarmac about who is going to rush into an airplane. I've never read that before. That might be familiar to listeners in Israel, but ain't familiar to Americans. That's kind of an extraordinary story. Well, indeed it was. I could tell you that far from being just an extraordinary story was an extraordinary in many ways an unbelievable moment in my life. And it's one where my brother was pitted against me, we had 16 soldiers from our unit just as mechanics about to fix and fix a hijacked plane. That was a ruse arranged by a point by defense minister dayan to overtake these hijacked claims that landed near Tel Aviv,

Bibi Netanyahu Jonathan Karp Israel U.S. Minister Dayan Tel Aviv
Amid COVID worries, fist bumps for Biden — with exceptions

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 5 months ago

Amid COVID worries, fist bumps for Biden — with exceptions

"The White House says President Biden will try to limit physical contact during his Mideast trip due to rising COVID cases While flying to Israel the president spokeswoman said the goal was to minimize contact as much as possible And after landing in Tel Aviv the president did Dole out some fist bumps but then reverted to his old ways with an arm around a back a handshake There was intense speculation about what he'll do in Saudi Arabia and whether he'll shake hands with The Crown prince whom U.S. intelligence says probably sanctioned a critics killing There appeared to be few COVID precautions in place before the president's trip Yesterday he mingled and shook hands with lawmakers at a White House picnic Sagar Meghani Washington

President Biden White House Tel Aviv Dole Israel Saudi Arabia U.S. Sagar Meghani Washington
Biden arrives in Mideast jittery about Iran nuclear program

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 5 months ago

Biden arrives in Mideast jittery about Iran nuclear program

"President Biden has arrived in the Middle East for the first time since taking office Welcome to Israel our brother Joseph The president was greeted in Tel Aviv by among others Israeli counterpart Isaac Herzog before noting what he calls a stronger than ever relationship between the two nations Bone deep The president says he has a full agenda the next few days in a region full of challenges and opportunities Greater pace greater stability greater connection He did not mention one of the trips biggest goals assuring Israeli and Saudi officials that the U.S. remains committed to keeping Iran from becoming a nuclear power His administration though is becoming increasingly pessimistic about resurrecting the deal to stop that from happening Sagar Meghani Washington

President Biden Isaac Herzog Tel Aviv Middle East Joseph Israel Iran U.S. Sagar Meghani Washington
Condemning Anti-Americanism

Dennis Prager Podcasts

00:53 sec | 7 months ago

Condemning Anti-Americanism

"Okay, so let's hear, let's hear Julie and Harvard. If we lose freedom in America, there is no place to escape to. This is the last stand on earth. President Ronald Reagan. Last spring break, I went on a trip with a hundred other Harvard undergraduates to Israel. It was one of the most extraordinary experiences of my life, and I will always be grateful to Harvard for that. I recalled the trip with awe and joy, but a certain moment rattled me. Our group attended a Shabbat dinner at a Tel Aviv synagogue. The rabbi proclaimed, welcome to Israel. You are all here from America, the best country in the world. He paused. But not a single person clapped.

Harvard President Ronald Reagan Julie America Israel Tel Aviv Synagogue
 Palestinians vandalize West Bank shrine as tensions soar

AP News Radio

00:10 sec | 8 months ago

Palestinians vandalize West Bank shrine as tensions soar

"To to to heightened heightened heightened tensions tensions tensions speaking speaking speaking to to to his his his cabinet cabinet cabinet Israeli Israeli Israeli prime prime prime minister minister minister Naftali Naftali Naftali Bennett Bennett Bennett foes foes foes that that that Israel Israel Israel is is is going going going on on on the the the offensive offensive offensive to to to tackle tackle tackle Palestinian Palestinian Palestinian attacks attacks attacks I'm I'm I'm the the the only only only Shannon Shannon Shannon Israeli Israeli Israeli troops troops troops kill kill kill an an an unarmed unarmed unarmed Palestinian Palestinian Palestinian woman woman woman in in in the the the west west west bank bank bank as as as tensions tensions tensions continue continue continue to to to escalate escalate escalate during during during Ramadan Ramadan Ramadan the the the Israeli Israeli Israeli army army army shot shot shot the the the woman woman woman at at at a a a military military military checkpoint checkpoint checkpoint near near near Bethlehem Bethlehem Bethlehem after after after she she she was was was asked asked asked to to to stop stop stop and and and ignored ignored ignored warning warning warning shots shots shots that that that came came came after after after Palestinian Palestinian Palestinian militant militant militant was was was killed killed killed by by by the the the Israeli Israeli Israeli army army army for for for his his his part part part in in in the the the deadly deadly deadly shooting shooting shooting in in in Tel Tel Tel Aviv Aviv Aviv earlier earlier earlier this this this week week week hundreds hundreds hundreds

Cabinet Cabinet Cabinet Naftali Naftali Naftali Bennet Israel Shannon Shannon Shannon Israeli Israeli Israeli Army A West West West Bank Bank Bank Ramadan Ramadan Ramadan Bethlehem Bethlehem Bethlehem Aviv Tel Tel TEL
Israeli forces kill Palestinian attacker after manhunt

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 8 months ago

Israeli forces kill Palestinian attacker after manhunt

"Israeli Israeli Israeli Israeli security security security security forces forces forces forces say say say say they they they they have have have have killed killed killed killed a a a a Palestinian Palestinian Palestinian Palestinian man man man man who who who who opened opened opened opened fall fall fall fall into into into into a a a a crowded crowded crowded crowded bar bar bar bar in in in in central central central central Tel Tel Tel Tel Aviv Aviv Aviv Aviv and and and and killed killed killed killed two two two two people people people people the the the the shooting shooting shooting shooting took took took took place place place place in in in in a a a a bar bar bar bar on on on on a a a a sexual sexual sexual sexual for for for for a a a a fact fact fact fact that that that that has has has has seen seen seen seen other other other other attacks attacks attacks attacks over over over over the the the the years years years years Thursday Thursday Thursday Thursday night night night night is is is is the the the the beginning beginning beginning beginning of of of of the the the the Israeli Israeli Israeli Israeli weekend weekend weekend weekend on on on on the the the the area area area area was was was was packed packed packed packed with with with with people people people people in in in in the the the the various various various various bars bars bars bars and and and and restaurants restaurants restaurants restaurants Israel Israel Israel Israel says says says says the the the the attack attack attack attack was was was was tracked tracked tracked tracked down down down down off off off off to to to to an an an an overnight overnight overnight overnight manhunt manhunt manhunt manhunt and and and and killed killed killed killed in in in in an an an an exchange exchange exchange exchange of of of of fire fire fire fire near near near near a a a a mosque mosque mosque mosque it it it it was was was was the the the the fourth fourth fourth fourth day day day day of of of of the the the the attack attack attack attack in in in in Israel Israel Israel Israel by by by by Palestinians Palestinians Palestinians Palestinians he he he he listened listened listened listened three three three three weeks weeks weeks weeks and and and and came came came came at at at at a a a a time time time time of of of of heightened heightened heightened heightened tensions tensions tensions tensions around around around around the the the the start start start start of of of of the the the the Islamic Islamic Islamic Islamic holy holy holy holy month month month month of of of of Ramadan Ramadan Ramadan Ramadan I'm I'm I'm I'm Charles Charles Charles Charles Taylor Taylor Taylor Taylor this this this this month month month month

Aviv Israeli Israeli Israeli Israel Israel Tel Tel TEL Ramadan Ramadan Ramadan Ramada Charles Charles Charles Charle
Mark Levin: What Makes You Think Russia Would Stop at Ukraine?

Mark Levin

02:00 min | 11 months ago

Mark Levin: What Makes You Think Russia Would Stop at Ukraine?

"You know if our good little talk show host I wouldn't talk this way I get in line with all the others I'd be a good little isolationist Because I risk being called a neocon particularly because I'm Jewish I'm no neocon I am no neocon I am no trigger happy chicken hawk as they say Now I am not I'm an old reaganite Who knows history And what follows From isolationism Just think as a matter of reality If you have these countries and these regimes that are on the hunt that are on the move What makes you think they won't threaten us one day As I would history tells us of course not Of course not Why are the Iranians building intercontinental ballistic missiles Tel Aviv is in 7000 miles away from Tehran We are We are Do you think our federal contractors Our military contractors are a bunch of unpatriotic ex generals and so forth that they want war so they can make more money What's the evidence for this There's no evidence for this None

Tel Aviv Tehran
Israel's Shocking Vaccine Admission

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:01 min | 11 months ago

Israel's Shocking Vaccine Admission

"Israel having a very sophisticated healthcare system having an incredible research team at their disposal has had one of the worst responses and handlings of this pandemic. Now Israel is far from a third world country. They are a first world country. And in fact, if you look up GDP per CAPiTA, Israel is about 35, but if you removed parts of the West Bank and you really only counted the non disputed parts of Israel, I guarantee Israel would move up in the top ten of GDP per CAPiTA. It's one of the wealthiest countries on the planet. Makes you wonder, it should make you wonder, makes me wonder, how is it that a wealthy country with such incredibly talented scientists, they're not dumb? They're not a dumb society at all. How did they get into a situation? Where you look at the handling of the virus, it is an objective failure. Professor Ehud qimron, head of a department of microbiology and immunology at Tel Aviv university, and one of Israel's leading immunologists. Last week denounced what he called the Israeli government's mismanagement of the pandemic. He said quote, two years late, you finally realize that a respiratory virus can not be defeated and that any such attempt is doomed to fail. You do not admit it, because you have admitted almost no mistake in the last two years. But in retrospect, it is clear that you have failed miserably in almost all of your actions, and even the media is already having a hard time covering your shame. This letter is extraordinary. You guys should check it out. He continues by saying that the reported side effects of the useless lockdowns have quote destroyed Israeli and Jewish children and their future.

Israel Professor Ehud Qimron Department Of Microbiology Israeli Government West Bank Tel Aviv University
Mark Meadows Previews His New Book 'The Chief's Chief'

Mark Levin

01:13 min | 1 year ago

Mark Meadows Previews His New Book 'The Chief's Chief'

"Well you've written a fantastic book the chiefs chief And you know what's amazing As soon as it comes out the propagandist in the Democrat party media are looking to create controversy between you and president Trump Did you notice that Yes I noticed that all too well The good thing is is if anybody buys the book and read it it's a tribute to the unbelievable accomplishments that actually you and I got to witness up close and personal on a number of times whether I was chief of staff or as a member of Congress but yeah they try to in even now They're trying to make sure it doesn't sell and it has a bad headline here or there But I can tell you the Patriots out there are encouraging us and certainly I think it tells the story about how president Trump honestly came in and did things that have never been done before in Mark you and I know that but one of the ones that I outlined in the book is moving the embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem and a lot of us are candidates and presidents had promised that but it was only one who

President Trump Democrat Party Chiefs Congress Patriots Mark Tel Aviv Jerusalem
CAIR's Nihad Awad Insists Israel Capital Should Move to Tel Aviv, Return to Palestinians

Mark Levin

01:19 min | 1 year ago

CAIR's Nihad Awad Insists Israel Capital Should Move to Tel Aviv, Return to Palestinians

"Let me ask you this Have you ever heard Talib or Omar Or AOC or the other marxists in the Democrat party ever criticized communist China Mister producer have you ever heard them criticize communist China Have any of you ever heard them criticize how communist China is murdering raping sterilizing and torturing and torturing excuse me 2 million Muslims You ever hear about that This organization care which is led by somebody named Neha awad Sounds about right Nihad awad made a speech not that long ago That he hopes most of you didn't see or hear We insist that the capital of Israel needs to be moved back to Tel Aviv and eventually Tel Aviv needs to move back to the Palestinians as if it ever was He said there recently He's an executive director the national care CAR CAR This administration talks the care the Department of Justice the FBI work with care the Democratic Party embraces

China Talib Neha Awad Democrat Party Nihad Awad Omar Tel Aviv Israel Department Of Justice FBI Democratic Party
Tel Aviv is priciest city, outranking Paris in new report

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Tel Aviv is priciest city, outranking Paris in new report

"Tel Tel Aviv Aviv residents residents have have for for years years complained complained about about how how expensive expensive the the places places with with living living costs costs taking taking a a chunk chunk out out of of their their paychecks paychecks but but now now a a new new study study affirms affirms the the quibbles quibbles according according to to the the economist economist intelligence intelligence unit unit the the seaside seaside metropolis metropolis has has emerged emerged as as the the most most expensive expensive city city to to live live in in Tel Tel Aviv Aviv which which previously previously ranked ranked fifty fifty most most expensive expensive does does not not suppose suppose other other pricey pricey places places like like Paris Paris and and Singapore Singapore economists economists attribute attribute the the jump jump to to a a strong strong appreciation appreciation of of the the shekel shekel against against the the dollar dollar while while also also pointing pointing to to rising rising grocer grocer and and transport transport costs costs the the report report did did not not include include housing housing prices prices another another common common complaint complaint among among young young professionals professionals and and families families trying trying to to live live in in the the bustling bustling city city I'm I'm Charles Charles de de Ledesma Ledesma

Tel Tel Aviv Singapore Singapore Paris Charles Charles De De Ledesma
Stocks sink on new COVID variant; Dow loses 905 points

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Stocks sink on new COVID variant; Dow loses 905 points

"The new coronavirus variant first detected in South Africa has sent financial markets tumbling I'm Ben Thomas with a look at the numbers New York Stock Exchange closed early on the Friday after thanksgiving just as word was coming from the World Health Organization the new variant of covert nineteen Omicron is a highly transmissible virus of concern with cases being discovered in Hong Kong Belgium in Tel Aviv as well as major south African cities like Johannesburg worry spread that it could reverse progress toward getting the pandemic under control travel and energy stocks were among the biggest losers as the S. and P. five hundred fell two point three percent its worst day since February the Dow lost nine hundred and five points to two point five percent and the nasdaq composite had its worst drop in two months meanwhile the price of oil saw its biggest decline since early in the pandemic falling about thirteen percent I'm Ben Thomas

Ben Thomas New York Stock Exchange World Health Organization South Africa Tel Aviv Belgium Johannesburg Hong Kong
Eric Describes the Funniest Story From His New Book 'Is Atheism Dead?'

The Eric Metaxas Show

05:49 min | 1 year ago

Eric Describes the Funniest Story From His New Book 'Is Atheism Dead?'

"There are a lot of funny stories in the book. And usually when I do interviews, I don't get to tell these stories. I've got a glance over the top. But you just asked me about one of my favorites. I mean, I can't tell you how much joy I just laugh every time I think about it. But this was the discovery in 1979 of what's called the silver ketef scrolls. And what that means is these are incredibly tiny silver scrolls that were so tiny they were worn as amulets. And they had the priestly blessing the ironic blessing where the priests would say the lord bless you and keep you the lord make his countenance to shine upon you and give you peace. I mean, this holy thing from the scripture of written in silver in really Proto hebraic because this is from 6 50 BC. Anyway, but how was it found? Yes. I, if you read books and archeology, it'll sort of tell you, oh, this was discovered here here by so and so and so and so I was okay. But somehow, in my research, because I have fun doing the research, I discovered this weird backstory. And the more I dug the funnier it became. Yeah. Okay, here's the story. The guy whose last name, oh gosh, what is it? It's Barack. I can never say his name. It's the book here. But anyway, it's not Jacobs. No, it's a 28 year old. It's a 28 year old guy studying archeology in a Tel Aviv, or Jerusalem. So he's a nobody. He's 6 years from his PhD, but he gets this idea in his head that below Saint Andrew's church outside just right at the outset skirts of Jerusalem. There are some old caves and burial caves, whatever. They've all, they looked like they've been excavated. There's nothing there, but he has a hunch that there's more to be found there. But he doesn't have any credibility or anything to get real archeological students to help him. So he has to be really humble and say, you know, I'll take anybody who can help me. Gabriel barques Gabriel bark, I think it's barkai, barkey. He has to go and this is like a joke. So archeology club, 12 and 13 year olds. They volunteer the kids, the kids can help you. So how'd you like 12 and 13 year olds annoying 12 and 13 year olds to help you on this big dig? So they do the dig, they find nothing. He's disappointed, and he says, well, you know what? At least to we've got a photograph, all these chambers, even though we found nothing, there was one kid that was so annoying to this barkai that barkey was like ripping his hair out and he says, I can't take another minute of this annoying 12 year old named Nathan. So here's what I'm going to do. All of these caves need to be photographed. The most distant one or one of the distant ones and over cave 25, he sends Nathan there, and he's really stern with him, like angry, like, hey, I've had enough out of you. I want you to clean that chamber. It's gonna be photographed. I want it to be so clean that your mother could use it as a kitchen. Like you really threatens the kid because this kid was very annoying. So Nathan trundles off to this distant place. And the joy, of course, is that it's far away, and we're not going to hear from this kid for two or three hours while he's doing what we do. But he takes a hammer with them, which is a weird thing, nobody knows. But the kid is so annoying that to go clean the cave, he just happens to hide a hammer on his person. And when he's bored in this sacred chamber, okay? There's nothing there. It's got a stone floor, whatever. He takes the hammer out. Nobody knows this, okay? He's all alone and starts smashing the floor with the hammer. Now this alone, I find it funny. The only reason he's there is because he was so annoying, they sent him as far away as possible. But if he wasn't annoying enough, he had a hammer with him and decides to use the hammer to smash the floor. The board Nathan smashes the floor with the hammer so hard that it cracks. It wasn't supposed to crack. And he finds a hidden chamber. He sticks his hand in the hidden chamber and is dragged into the bowels of hell itself. Just kidding. He puts his hand into hidden chamber and he pulls out some stuff, some like little ceramics. He now is like, hey, this is what I'm here for. I'm not here to clean. I found treasure. So he runs to barkai and tugs on his shirt. He's like, hey hey, look what I found. You could see bark. I could picture his hair standing on end, like what is going on? The annoying kid is back with some ancient treasure. So they run back to the place, barkai sees that, what do you assumed was an empty place was in fact hiding this stuff and the annoying kid was so annoying that he smashed the floor open or whatever. So he sends the kid home and they spend days now excavating the secret whole and they pull out treasure after treasure and the greatest treasure is what we described. And unbelievably tiny silver scroll so delicate that they couldn't unwrap it for three years. They didn't know how to have the technology without destroying it. But they could read the words inscribed in silver. Now if it's inscribed on anything but silver, it doesn't last. So the Dead Sea scrolls, which are amazingly old, they're not this old. This is even older. So this is the first extant writing from the Hebrew scriptures ever discovered thanks to the annoying 12 year old Nathan. He's probably in his mid 50s right now and he doesn't know. And when he's

Barkai Barkey Nathan Gabriel Barques Jerusalem Saint Andrew Tel Aviv Jacobs Barack
Republicans Blast Democrats for Pulling Iron Dome Funding

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:15 min | 1 year ago

Republicans Blast Democrats for Pulling Iron Dome Funding

"Applaud once leader mccarthy again for taking a stand and doing what not a single other week week. Humiliated democrat did which was to stand up to the filth to the garbage. Anti semitism which is really targeted. Jewish against the jewish state. That was on tuesday. So thank you leader. Mccarthy thank you republicans for saying no place for hate against the jew or israel in in the house of representatives where was chuck schumer. When all that was going on i thought he was a chamara energy style. Gas big mo a guardian of israel. Where was against this. Hey where was jerry. Nee adam schiff schakowsky and all the others who who were calling trump any semite which was garbage i president have orthodox jewish children orthodox jewish grandchildren and such a such a fan of as roma staunch support of israel that he singlehandedly. Move the embassy member from tel aviv. Jerusalem not a single democrat not even the jewish liberal democrats went to jerusalem when they opened the new embassy and moved it to israel's capital. Why because they hated trump more loved or supported or want stand with israel. So thank you. Republicans for standing up against the hate of the democratic

Israel Nee Adam Schiff Schakowsky Mccarthy Chuck Schumer House Of Representatives Jerry Tel Aviv Jerusalem
Biden slips into political quicksand amid Haitian migrant buildup

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:46 min | 1 year ago

Biden slips into political quicksand amid Haitian migrant buildup

"Starting off the show. Tonight we have a discussion about joe biden. Apparently he's doing more deportations than trump specifically deporting more asylum seekers than trump did well. Yeah we don't have the other categories of deportations as the numbers that That we came across. And it's a shocking number. I don't know the entire number. But i have here the us Moved over six thousand. Haitian asylum-seekers from the border at del rio so that's just haitian asylum-seekers just recently with you know the whip's did see that. Oh i saw that very scary stuff. There was ice agents. I guess they're ice. Sported patrol agents. Scroll on horseback whipping people catalyst. Yeah like cadillac. Wrangling them with whips and hitting them with the long whip. It looked incredibly frightening and in and scary to be in that situation with a bunch of armed men on horses attacking people who are just trying to escape the hellish life of living in haiti. And do you think the biden voters expected this to happen because the people on the left like biden love to position themselves as the friend of the immigrants they acted like trump was the worst for immigration and right immigration. I mean right. When joe biden got elected like somebody. I know got a deportation letter. Just and they're telling him oh. It's been a lot worse recently under biden. They told him that his friends sorry like his friends. That like is also a legal immigrant. Types may know some other people like that well according to the same place that you're looking here. It's says twitter account. Aj plus they're citing cnbc saying that biden is using what's called title forty two to expel asylum-seekers without a right to a hearing so you know what asylum is right. Yeah when you leave somewhere that is you're gonna die there or they're gonna put you in prison for the rest of your life or thereafter you for for whatever reason and the numbers here are just shocking. According to cnbc under trump and remember trump had four full years. And we're not even through year number one biden four hundred and forty th over four hundred. Forty thousand people were Were expelled under this title. Forty two during the trump administration and six hundred ninety thousand have been expelled under the biden administration under title forty two so that's a tremendous level of increase because if if biden is able to keep up the same amount over the next three years. Yeah he'd be like twenty four hundred weight. It was six hundred ninety thousand right now so yeah that'd be well over two million people well so you know that is just absolutely horrifying because these people if they are indeed being prosecuted or persecuted. They're going to be sent back to likely their deaths or likely to a prison cell. Yeah it's probably worse for you if you try to leave and then they find out about that absolutely it is. Let's see there's other story here from cnbc biden. Administration appeals judges order. This is from less than a week ago to stop. Expelling migrants under trump era pandemic policies. So there was a judge who said they need to stop using title forty. Two and biden is appealing so this is yet another example of how joe biden is more like trumpy than the trump haters thought. That trump was like people hated trump for all these different reasons and biden has continued trump's policies and crank them up. Yeah my friend. Sent me this weird video of biden today. It was him when he was younger. You know he. He's always been in government office. So i don't know what his title was at the time but he was being interviewed. Probably a senator or something. Yeah and he was saying he was saying. What do people think. I care more about bosnia than haiti because it's white people in bosnia and it's you know black people in haiti and then he just went on and said well if haiti sank into the ocean. I wouldn't care just like that was his answer to that was like what is that supposed to mean. Well i'll tell you clear what it means. It means he has no empathy right to say that about another an entire group of people living somewhere on the planet to say they just if they just all died one day he would have no concern whatsoever for that and you juxtapose that against what he says while he's running for office which is to make himself seem like this all caring. Oh the democrats we care about people that's clearly. Bs tel aviv From penn and teller thought he was going to heal us all with his love. Is that what taylor said. Y- you read that on the show. It was numbered teller's lider new saying let pendulum but tell her was going along with pen from what i could see. So presumably teller didn't disagree otherwise he wouldn't have been in the photo op. Yeah just mixed them up. Sorry according to the story here. Cnbc biden administration appealing. A judge's order to stop using a trump era pandemic policy that allows for the rapid expulsion of migrants without giving them a chance to apply for asylum. So they're using covert as the excuse. The departments for his just cove it. That's why we had to have horseback riders with the because of it. It's just you covered. The department of justice filed an appeal of district. Judge emmet sullivan's ruling thursday bars. The federal government from expelling migrants under the public health law known as title. Forty two sullivan. The ruling to go into effect in fourteen days the appeal is the latest move by the bided administration to address the twenty year high surge of migrants from mexico and central america crossing the border illegally which remains a political flashpoint between republicans and progressive democrats title forty two is first introduced by donald trump in march of twenty twenty over concerns about the corona virus pandemic. It gave the government the power to turn back any migrant caught crossing the border illegally regardless of their country of origin to supposedly stop cove nineteen. So if you had managed to escape from north korea and you made it to the united states which is no easy task. Mind you. it's one thing to get here from haiti or guatemala. Or duress or something. It's a whole other story to get here from north korea. But if he'd managed to and they caught. You did it cover. Nineteen you gotta go back to north korea and you back to north korea where you would certainly either be put into a hellish prison labor camp and then of course all your family members have probably already been put into a prison labor camp. Because that's what they that's how they roll over north korea. If you try to escape or you do something bad. They punish your whole family for it. So you know you're going to prison and it's going to be like the worst possible prison labor camp experience basically on the planet right now if they don't just go right ahead and just summarily execute you but this quote from a man at the border a haitian man with two children. He says the. Us government

Donald Trump Joe Biden Mexico North Korea SIX Taylor Twitter Central America Guatemala Two Children Forty Thousand People Fourteen Days Four Full Years Del Rio Today Bosnia March Of Twenty Twenty Six Hundred Ninety Thousand Over Six Thousand
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Into. Who's who's you in your book. You do together a little bit conservatives and the working class even though you say there is also a liberal working class but anybody. Who's alienated by your by by the liberal media in your critique so first of all you could go to the south and find churches where they are black and white working class people who are praying together and all. The black people voted for joe biden all the way people voted for trump. And it's just not an issue like the idea of d platforming other side is very much an elite liberal phenomenon. You really and it's so funny because it used to be the conservatives who stood for censorship right who are like you can't say this you can't say that and that's treason as a nestle patriotic. That's blasphemy it. And today somehow it's conservatives who are like. I just wanna make an off color joke by. What's the big problem in it liberals who are like to the gulag with you know. No one's allowed to not only make off color jokes. But i mean to say anything that is to say that there's a difference between men and women right that's now considered to be an of heresy. Right it's like this very extreme policing of language so there's been this total shifts the look. I'm not arguing. That every working class person america is the most tolerant person of all. When i am saying is we are the educated people. We are the people who run things. We are the people in positions of power. We're the people making money. We are the people who wanted to be in charge right so there is more of. Yeah there is more of a responsibility at that point when you have a job as an editor at a publication. Let's say like i do right. And when you're somebody who's you know own alignment right like we have more responsibility because we asked for it. Lot of provocative and strong points. This book i. I really appreciate talking to you about this. This is dr bhatia talking with us about her book bad news. How woke media's undermining democracy which will be released on. October twenty six. Thank you for being on the show. Thank you so much for having me. And i will just say one more thing. Is that There's a section in there about how anti zionism fits into all of this which might be of interest your interest to our listeners and thanks to retire. Shola manager of t. v. one studios and to rochelle in for producing this show and to our producer ariel cohen. Now request many. Or most of you listen to us on the apple podcast app and we'd like to ask you to please consider writing a review and we take all kinds of us. You can write us. Critical review to you can support us by going to our website. -til v. one dot fm slash tel aviv review and subscribing on our patriot campaign checkout archive. We have close to seven hundred and fifty interviews like us on facebook. Follow me on twitter or the tel aviv review on twitter. Join us again next week for another edition of the tel aviv.

joe biden dr bhatia ariel cohen america Shola rochelle apple twitter facebook tel aviv
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

08:02 min | 1 year ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"I wasn't sure what that referred to. How could they share their good fortune. So it's very interesting again. It comes back to how you know the weird nature of america out for liberal elites there is this sense of like you know that. They're very willing to pay more in taxes. As long as they can. Keep accumulating. I mean that's that's the thing with the tech oligarchs for example right there you tell them to pay sixty percent tax bracket. They're totally happy to do it. Because they already are making so much more money than they could possibly ever spend and those are voting for democrats right like you know. Wall street gave more money to joe biden than they did to donald trump. And it's not because you know they feel good about redistribution and because they felt they didn't have to worry about it happens to be. They were wrong about joe biden. Who's doing an incredible job. I think but i would say To your point i think that There is a larger their larger forces at stake here. there's a larger point here where we have allowed ourselves to buy into a narrative that gives cover and the way that it does that specifically as christopher lasch made this point about thirty years ago. He said you know. The meritocracy depends on the top tier being racially diverse and diverse from gender point of view. Because it's all white man. It's very clear that it's not meritocratic. Thirty years ago. He said that it's just happening. Really in recent years the diversification of the top. The top must be diversified. It is a huge problem. That elites are so white okay. That is a huge problem. Our newsrooms are incredibly white. It is embarrassing. And that is a real problem. But diversifying the elites. I mean what happens to everybody else. I mean that's sort of my real question here. So yes i wanna see. More elite more diverse elite like. I wanna see black people getting rich. I want to tino people getting rich. I wanna see people. Caller on the board of every corporation like that stuff is important but to me. The way that corporations have latched onto it amazon is not going to do anything. That's not good for amazon. So when amazon puts up a black lives matter sign. You know right that that is totally compatible with. Its you know anti-working class policies right that that is not a threat to them and i would say that yes of course. Journalists see themselves as good people of course they want to help the working class but that is the same thing to me. You know those things really go together very very well like the new york times. It suddenly decide to like start sharing power right if they're on the woke trains because it does not entail sharing power. That's that's sort of what i wish. More journalists would understand and to me. What's so funny is if you see this leftist to yell at you but it's like this is such a lefty point of view right like it's such a with what about everybody else. Yes i want everybody. Einstein in a low income minority community to have the chance to become einstein that is so crucial both for america and for them. But what about everybody else. I don't think it's fair for everybody else to just be left behind. I think that's what i would say is like. Why is that not a left-wing point of view. And what would it look like if it was more incorporated into american media. Today i'll give you example covering crime like every single day that a child is killed in public housing like having swarm of reporters out there demanding to know what happened. How did this happen. Who's responsible for it. You know like like that never happens right. You never see that. Baltimore's school children forty one percent of them have a one point. Oh gpa that is unacceptable. But nobody cares they just do the could not why are they not being swarmed with journalists saying. How are you allowing these children. These children to to just have no future you know. Eighty four percent of juvenile offenders are functionally illiterate. Like why are the liberals. Just okay with that and this isn't liberal schools. You know liberal. School districts are the northeast the most segregated way more than the south. And we sit here calling the south racist and we won't let black kids go to school with our kids. I mean so. He's a end. This is never covered. Never spoken about. And if you bring this up you get totally ratio it on twitter. I mean nobody wants to talk about this will that i have no no disagreement with you there because i grew up in new york city public schools. I experienced that every day and i was very frustrated by the hypocrisy of blaming the south even as a teenager in the nineteen eighties. So i i'm with you on that. It reminds me of jonathan cozumel's Kind of general crusade when you know back. When he was writing books. I guess in the ninety s and that was really his big issue is bringing everyday urban poverty of america to the forefront of consciousness. And so you think maybe more newspaper should look like that. And this is why. I'm trying to clarify this. Your critique of the elite media and there's aesthetic and their language and their you know insider jokes made me wonder if what you're advocating was simply dumbing them down but i was sure that wasn't what you meant but i'm asking you. I mean from our point of view when you watch fox news. A lot of it feels dumbed down and that's because those people are not educated in the way that we are. But i think it's disgusting that we live in these like you know i mean i. I live in working class neighborhood but that like somehow like you know that the liberal elites have allowed themselves to be totally sequestered from people who are less educated than them like. It's like yeah. You don't have to always talk like you're like for every media outlet to be going for the same you know makes over a hundred and fifty thousand dollars. A year has graduate. Degree lives on the upper west side. Like that's all media is now geared towards all media the vast majority of liberal media. Now that is where the digital pressure is pushing them towards right and so like first of all why are you not catering like you've made it impossible for working class people to to consume your media for trump supporters to consumer media. Why would you write about the news. In a way that seventy five million of your country folk would not literally not be able to read it because it's so insulting to them like well. Because after reading your book i looked up some of the stats and found out that forty one percent of america according to the bureau of labor statistics is Is a professional class. And that's like sixty five million people. I mean there is a tension because don't they also deserve to read in a language and conceptual world that they appreciate. I totally think if if liberals were like look it's in our economic interest to have open borders it's in our economic interests to pursue this or that policy it's in our economic interests to have media like the near times. Leave us alone. We want to be in our economic interests. I would be like gives it the. Hey right like oh my god totally be by guest but what they do is they have closed their economic interests as a fight for racial justice. And that is the thing that i absolutely cannot abide is acting as though you're standing up for poor black people in poor latino people for the actually vulnerable like clothing pursuit of your own economic interests as in elite clothing up as social justice. I cannot stand that that i think is the thing that really needs to be called out. Okay well i I have one last question had many last questions trying to limit myself to one. Which is when you you make a very strong case. I think for changing simply how we think about the other side. Whatever you know in this. Very polarized dangerously polarized world in america right now certainly in america of listening more compassionately without judging really trying to hear understand. Open ourselves up not sequestering. I agree with all of that. Do you think the other side of that. Divide the populist group. Do say this is a populist critique. Do you think that they're having the same conversation. And saying listen with more compassion understand why some of the things were saying. Feel so painful. So you know racist or Insulting and offensive to the values that the elite side believing. Oh it's the question is do. Are they having this into. Who's who's you in your book. You do together a little bit conservatives and the working class even though you say there is also a liberal working class but anybody. Who's alienated by your by by the liberal media in your critique so first of all you could go to the south and find churches where they are black and white.

joe biden christopher lasch amazon america donald trump jonathan cozumel tino Einstein new york times bureau of labor statistics Baltimore new york city fox news twitter
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

06:21 min | 1 year ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Hello and welcome to the tel aviv. Review i'm dolly shenlin. Unfortunately delayed halpern is not with us this week but he'll be back next week every week. We bring you conversations with authors about their books and research and other things that we can find fascinating if you like us. Please consider becoming a patriot supporter by going to our homepage. -til v. one dot fm slash tel. Aviv review scroll to the bottom and click the big red button that says patron click and support us. Because we're counting on you. I'm very excited today. To welcome bhatia on sargon. She's the deputy opinion editor of newsweek before that she was the opinion editor of the forward the largest jewish media outlet and america. she's written for many illustrious places including the new york times washington post foreign policy. Newsweek of course and the new york review of books daily and other publications. She's appeared many times on msnbc nbc. The brian lehrer show npr and other media outlets she holds a phd from the university of california. Berkeley and literature full disclosure. She's also commissioned and edited my own work at the forward. And now it newsweek. we'll be discussing. But his new book. bad news. how woke media is undermining democracy published by encounter books which will be released on october. Twenty six. but you're welcome to the show. thank you so much for having me dahlia. It's so thrilling to be here with you. Great to have you. I should say also. You're speaking to us from new york today. Is that right. Yes that is okay. Let's start with the basic premise of the book. It's a media critique. You're arguing that the national media in the us has leverage ratio woke kness to escape The class divides that actually truly polarize american society. And i. i wonder at times. It seems sometimes like your primary argument is in fact with the wo- culture itself which is the more problematic issue for democracy. Whoa culture or the media Wow what a great question. I definitely see the media. As part of a larger trend part of larger sort of pressure structures in america a larger movement on the left and among liberals that has resulted in the abandonment of the working class And so i would say. The primary problem is income inequality in america and the class chasm that has opened up that nobody's willing to talk about and the media is sort of become the handmaiden of that larger problem would say that's a very succinct way of putting it i to be one of the things i think is really interesting about the book is how you trace the historic roots of some of the national print. Media's shift from what was once a more working class outlook to an upper middle class elites. Can you give us a quick rundown of a very rich history. Yeah you know. Journalism used to be a working class. Trade really I still think it's not something you can teach people. I don't think people are learning journalism when they go to journalism school they're establishing networks and contacts which you need to succeed today because it's such a cutthroat environment but the work of being a good journalist is learning how to listen learning how to challenge your priors and that is certainly not something. That's being taught at america's elite institutions these days. And so those sort of the heroes of the book that i start out with a joseph pulitzer benjamin day these two historic figures from the nineteenth century who believed journalism should be four and by the working class that it should be a crusade on behalf of the poor and the way that i think about it as we hear a lot about the partisan divide in america in about how our media is. Partisan the problem with our media is not that it's partisan it's who it's partisan four. You have republican conservative media. That's part is on behalf of the rich who are conservative and then you have liberal media that is now partisan on behalf of an affluent liberal elites as well and you have no one who's partisan for the ninety percent of americans who do not belong in either of those categories and so to me. That's really the problem. Is journalist have undergone the status over the twentieth century. That put them in the elites. And that's who they now speak to. Well it's very interesting. Because given how critical you are of the left some people might think you're conservative yourself. But i read into the book especially the way you just described it almost a marxist critique you're saying really what's at stake here is a class problem and the identity politics aspect of it is being manipulated. Let's say it's become the opium of twenty-first-century. If i understand your perspective is that right. Is that wrong. I am not afraid of being called a conservative I am a socialist. And you're right. That i have a marxist view of what ails america right now. I don't think that purely materialists solutions will solve. What the real source of our problem. Which is the loss of a concept of the common good in the loss of the idea of the body politic in that matters which as jews of course like without the body politic. Were totally lost. That was aren't point So i would say If people wanna call me a conservative socialist amount insulted by that. I don't fear being called conservative. But i would say that my views on economics are pretty radical at my problem with the left is that it has abandoned economic platform in favor of an identity from that i think really Perpetuates inequality because it allows them to act like. It's not happening. Yeah i mean that is certainly something that appears within the book and at times i actually thought that a lot of criticism or the evolution that you described in the media can really be attributed to capitalism itself so is this really a problem of journalists and editors and publishers going astray. I mean even those founding fathers if you will of the Low cost penny press. Let's say in the nineteenth century. They were also trying to make money. They weren't exactly a nonprofit endeavor. Is this really just a problem with american capitalism So my answer to this is not going to be satisfying my own. Critique of capitalism has been moderated by spending time and interviewing talking to working class americans who are big proponents of capitalism. You know the whole sort of tax. The rich that's not how they see things. they think. Rich people are jobs creators. and you know there's evidence on both sides of that. And so i my primary point of view is we should be listening to the most vulnerable. We should be listening to poor and working class middle class disappearing middle class of america and asking them what they want and so to them. You know what goes by. Socialism is not always the most popular although you also see things like florida which really went very strongly for trump voting to raise the minimum wage. Fifteen dollars an hour so things are much more complicated in america..

america dolly shenlin new york times washington post new york review of books daily newsweek brian lehrer halpern sargon bhatia joseph pulitzer benjamin aviv Aviv msnbc npr university of california nbc Berkeley american society new york
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

07:42 min | 1 year ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Is it was wrong for the british to be putting jews behind barbed wire here in the in the land of israel and if you words to make a museum or a heritage site in shall leah. That was historically accurate. It would look so much like the heritage site of athletes. And so many of those remembrances would be the same. And it's so much easier right when saying like the british shouldn't have done this to jews to sort of coming to terms with saying like this is what happened in israel. That's much harder history to confront. So that's my follow up question is should do's be doing this to other people and the reason i ask that is because you're really touches on some very contemporary themes one of which of course is the waves of migrants and asylum seekers who have come in Through africa usually going through horrors as they crossed the sinai desert smuggling themselves in and the israeli authorities have blocked them but part of the claims of those who opposed their presence was always well. They bring horrible. Diseases are there. Ain't girls and have you thought about the insights that we can gain from that. Yeah there are definite parallels. And i think that we need to see to see these parallels and understand how they're playing out now I remember when i was when i was doing my. Hd this sort of a story that that was seared in my memory that Being in a taxi. I was early on in my phd. Thinking that you know in terms of everybody needed to know the story Being in a taxi where the driver was telling me like you know these immigrants who are coming in or they're in. they're not cultured. they're bringing diseases. And i thought that the most vakhidov way to sort of bring this to his attention for him to understand you know i. It was clear to me that he was from a A moroccan origin jewish moroccan. And i said to me you know you need to understand that the things that you're saying now about the people who are coming in where the same things that they people were saying about your mother right that people were saying about your parents and he made it clear to me that i should not speak about his mother that way right like wondering right or or pretty stupid of me right but but the fact that you know what i've seen is being the defense. Then people would then say today like yes but they're not jewish they're not jewish. So it's it's different. And i don't see it as being different right. I saying as being like the way you know because at the time it was saying like yes. But they're they're not shkin azeem or they're you know they're they're holocaust survivors and like is sort of the various ways that we see the people saying others and that need to then keep them out and that that we using disease as an excuse to exclude people in something that is is very very problematic and and i you know what i would hope that i think that you see in. This story is the need to be more. Empathetic is and for and for us to to be more welcoming and and to see to question those barriers that we put in place in the various stages. Isn't it just incredibly curious that your book came out just a few weeks before. Everyone quarantined became a buzzword. And not just a buzzword reality yeah but everyone you know it was probably the most searched word on google Whatever and i ask you whether you think that your work on on quarantining Etcetera gave us some sort of insight into understanding the reality of you know. The current pandemic will struggling with yes. It was very strange. It was very strange for me and it had. I mean it's i think on a personal level i was both very helpful Sort of an in terms of understanding what was going on you know this was just sort of very micro level but it was also very disturbing right under seeing things that you know that could have been prevented and playing out on a public level and right across the world and so many upsetting themes whether it's you know You know the scapegoating of of vulnerable communities You know blaming them for contagion No various Governments using the fear of contagion as a way to further authoritarian. Agendas right and using also the fear of contagion to as a way to justify xenophobic closures. Border border closures again was incredibly disheartening But i think that for me also you know you find comfort where you can. And i think that i saw was teaching my course on the history of disease at the time that the pandemic in a when we went online and the university took comfort in my students sort of learning about these histories and applying them. And seeing them around them. I it's reinforced for me. Which is something. That i've always felt you know but the need for Collaboration between policymakers healthcare workers and humanists right historians of medicine anthropologists have medicine. Who really have something valuable to bring to the table. And i think that when we see this I'm heartened when i see this happening And that's very useful. I think that you know two of them. When i sort of think about the two main points that i think that i would want people to come away with that. I should have also hung to with with the history of quarantine at this time and wine was that when it is implemented carefully quarantine work. This is a global ancient Act of soon very human self preservation. And that when it's done appropriately it can work than the other point that i think is so important. Is that in times of upheaval in uncertain historical times. Very much like the one that we're living through now. We need to watch out to make sure that the most vulnerable members of our communities and marginalized peoples are not being unfairly targeted and excluded. And i think are the two main points that you know that. I just keep coming back to in the midst of this period while you know having this research very central in my mind dr rhona settlement. I think you should be on the government. Advisory committees for corona policy. From now on. Thank you so much for joining us. Today thank you. It's been a pleasure speaking with you. I appreciate it and thanks to tie. Shell i'm the manager of -til v. one studios and to our producer arielle cohen and to show him for helping to produce today's episode. Now request many or most of you. Listen to us on the apple. Podcast app when we'd like to ask you to please consider writing a review. We like to hear all sides of an argument so please write anything you like. You too can support us by going to our website. He'll be one dot. Fm slash tel aviv review and subscribing on our patriot campaign. Check out our archive. We have over seven.

shkin azeem israel sinai desert Through africa google dr rhona arielle cohen apple
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

06:11 min | 1 year ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"You can moderate them. You can weaken them. But you're right. If these minority coaches grew then a new support their schools and so on then at some stage in in in in the future. There's a danger. It might be too late and i'm not sure what to say about that. Just gets back to what you the argument that you just made. Which is that if the state continues to support religious education. That's one thing but they may need to insist. And i was about to prompt you but you said it yourself To insist not only on marketable skills but unskilled train people to understand. The value of the common good democratic values shared society. Also the disservice show showed very weak trust for all democratic institutions the supreme court and so on especially the supreme court. Because there's that's where you have a contradiction of authority. Yeah it seems to me having read the book and also having listened to what you say now that you think that institutionally at least israel has struck a pretty good balance between state and religion in public in public life. Barring several a need addressing. Am i wrong or do you think that the somewhere that should be a more radical changes made. I mean this is one of the. Most visceral controversies in israeli life. The secularist think that everything is about to be destroyed because there's too much intervention and the religious people feel like the jewish people are almost lost. Because there's not enough to some in israel. Where do you stand. Yoga's is interesting. The cigarette perception ziv. The you know the the the religious did the team kind of taking over. you know. we can't breathe here in the country. Everything is is imposed upon us by religion on. This is so far from reality. A guy ben porat with now also. The idea road wrote a book which appeared motion independent hebrew showing how in awe in relevant areas chabad and conversion i wherever things have become much more sacred than they used to be thirty forty years ago. I mean either way. This book was discussed on the tel aviv. Review in the very beginning off. The podcast was years ago but he was here when it came out. Probably two thousand fourteen. Yeah so you may remember. When i was a child or a teenager. Maybe forty years ago. There were demonstrations every chabad because in the place near tel-aviv does one cinema that opened on shabazz's the hud cinema on it was a big scandal. Who who then ever dreamt of shopping malls opening on chabad as you know today shabas become the shopping day for many israelis on the. There's there's no political power thinking israel today but shutdown the shopping malls a and you walk into on about. You wouldn't know each about amino every almost everything is open of course the restaurants and also some more if you go to the tel aviv portland. You know in any case so in the actual dynamics is such that the country is much more secular. At least i'm not now. There are more the religious specially the But relation has grown okay. But that doesn't really affect the think the the the day today life of the secular. Okay so in. That case i think the kind of the panic or the the the anxiety the that the no the country is becoming too religious. Actually the opposite is is what's going on. I should but among the non haredi the rare religious the the the level of secularization is so high. Talking about the thing. I would drink a fifty percent of the kids now. Today who grew up who grew up in religious families become secular. There is very good tracking on this stuff largely from mother who had on the show. And it's not that high but it but there isn't attrition rate for both ultra-orthodox and national religious and it's higher among national religious. But i don't think it's quite as high as you said. But it's there isn't attrition rate. Yes i guessed thirty forty percents that would be my guess but also depends how you define these things in any case so so in that case. There's so in that sense. I think the there's no way there's no room for bunny. Frank for anxiety about dot however i don't think the balance is is to go back to your question get either. Don't think is a good one. I think we need serious reforms regarding khashru regarding family low regarding the redeem. There's a whole whole package of things that need need need to be done. We need to reduce the the the birth rates among among hurry dame we need we need to find ways of really changing their way of life of getting them out of the chevanton in in in the in the world market and so on. So there's a lot to be done. And i don't think we need these additional the the rabbinate the brutal sheet with the team rabbit robert and we we don't we don't need that institution. So there's there's a lot to be done okay. I think we'll hopefully that unfortunately because we could probably talk about this for a longtime professor daniel stedman thank you for being on the show and talking about your recent book co authored with you. Don't superior called state and religion israel. It's been a pleasure to have you thank you very much and thanks also tweet. I show them or station manager. And reo cohen. Our producer end to the israel democracy institute for their generous support. Now a request. Many or most of you. Listen to us on. The apple podcasts app. And we'd like to ask you to please consider writing a review..

israel ben porat supreme court aviv shabas ziv shabazz khashru tel portland daniel stedman Frank reo cohen robert israel democracy institute apple
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Your competitors gets more jewish property than you do none. Your competitors confiscates more property and poland and gets more slave labor than you do become part of capitalist enterprise under nazi dictatorship. What about another relatively new at school of a scholarship on the cost that seeks to perhaps position it in a broader network of genocide and twentieth century and before that as opposed to those who would like to see the holocaust as this unique insular episode in twentieth century history. What's your take on that back. When i was first getting into it Little seventies and eighties. A lot of the concern was on defining. The uniqueness of the holocaust and uniqueness is a word. I don't think many historians light because it is more. It seems to plan a metaphysical category rather than historical category. So we look for what we would call what was unprecedented about. What was singular would differentiate it from other temple atrocities the nazis and so i would say the holocaust got contextualized. Three ways one was to look at the non-jewish victims of the holocaust and how did nazi persecution and mass killing of other groups of people compare to the fate of the jews. And what does how do each of those killing programs illuminated. The other would help us understand more. And for instance. We know that. The army presided over prisoner-of-war camps in which three and a third million saved soviet. pow's parish if there had been shot in the spring of nineteen forty to the death soviet prisoners war would have been his biggest killing. The jews would have not been the number one body count of the nazi regime described that the big plan and barbosa was to starve them all to death right. Yeah the plans. Were for even much more than that and it turns out that they in the end didn't control the country well enough to starve as many people as they had hoped to. There were limits to their power while they were still fighting a war. Yeah they couldn't in fact Because they had to fight a war at the same time. They couldn't in starve as many people to stalin's intentionally so we learned. We learned that the army was not only key in the holocaust but the army presided over millions of captured prisoners noncombatants who perished their hands of the t four program. The killing of physically mentally handicapped. They are the first victims of gassing the first people the nazis gas or germans and it is the people who ran that program that are then sent to run the operation reinhard camps so these people have become mass murder before they ever kill you. They had already killed tens of thousands of germans and then there with their expertise. They are sent to poland where they become key. Staff members of operation reinhard so looking at nazis did to other groups and find you had equal opportunity killers. People that could kill soviet. Pow's and jews could kill many. Ill andrus forced us to realize that the issue of nazi racism is broader. Anti semitism is part of a bigger picture. Well you yeah. I mean clearly. You're touching on one of the big controversies in the field. Although you've identified many controversies. Many polarizing controversies but it seems like one of the biggest ones at least regarding your work. Is this debate of. let's call it. The naturally grown killer like people who can become killers over the course because of these social processes versus what some people criticised as a one dimensional caricature of germans as sort of congenital antisemites. And this is you know. Obviously kind of the debate between you and daniel jonah goldhagen. What would you say is the strongest evidence on your side. An ankle duggan has argued for this unique racist. german mentality. yes basically. It isn't hard to intuit. Come up with a sense of national character. We basically just the way in which human beings managed masses of information we get. Is we try to find the simplest categories that allows us to grasp stuff. So it's very normal. I think i think in terms of national character in a sense. That was what daniel takings approach was that germans were different than any other group in europe. They were all anti semitic to the german. Anti semitism was very different kind. A murderous eliminationist antisemitism that made it for as he put it. Basically ninety five percent of the germans. Killing jews was something that was not only justified and necessary. But something they did with gusto and enthusiasm and enjoyed their torturing their victims and it isn't hard to line up all sorts of survivor testimony that attest to the gratuitous cruelty the horrific human behavior that they confronted the question for me then is are we at the beginning or that the end of the process the and while i have no doubt on survivor. Testimonies of the ashley harvick people. They encountered the issue is. Did they do it because they were already horrible. People or did they become horrible people in the process of the escalating nazi persecution and particularly once. the killing starts do they. I mean we've tried to find him in. Maybe is that ideas can produce action. If you believe something about jews can behave towards jews in a certain way and you can be brought to believe those things but we also know that. That's a two-way street. And what you see and what you do can alter in shape what you believe and for the case of please pretend one on one when you draft these random middle aged working class. People streets german and put them in poland. The first killing has absolutely traumatic. They're distraught traumatized. They don't understand what this is. Start drinking they start drinking heavily but the horror of it is how quickly they got used to it and the battalion i think sort of breaks into roughly three groups. There's a group of evaders the people that take up the commander's offer in kind of withdraw from the very worst aspects which is pulling the trigger. A group of accommodates compliance. They simply do whatever they're told but there is a group that learns to enjoy what they're doing learnt to enjoy for being professional killers. And this i think is the group that of course sticks in the memory of survivors and is the product people who produce the greatest gratuitous cruelty that is then imprinted left in the memories. And it's easy to see the part for the whole But i think we'll take into it. Seems took the part for the whole and that this group which is there for him becomes the image of ninety percent of germans. I think one is a group that one grows and develops becomes what they are. They're not they're star with and they represent a minority whose impact is out of all proportion to their numbers within the unit because of course they have the license and the encouragement and the freedom to do this and they will be the people who pushed the envelope. They're the ones that are going to set the pace and become the go-getters that a- at the cutting edge of what the battalion is doing so based on your understanding of the holocaust for what do you think about drawing pilots between that historical episode and current affairs..

poland army daniel jonah goldhagen barbosa reinhard andrus stalin ashley harvick duggan intuit daniel europe
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

08:55 min | 1 year ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"This is one the tel aviv review. Hello and welcome to the tel aviv. Review hosts john halpern co host establish. Land we're bring you conversations with authors about the books and research and other things that we can find find fascinating now. If you like us please consider becoming a patriot supporter for going to a homepage. That's still v. one daughter. fm's tel aviv review. Scroll down to the bottom and click. The big red button says patriot click and supporters. Because we're counting on you and today we're very pleased to welcome david reef. He's a political analyst journalist cultural critic and the author of nine books he is a member of the new york institute for the humanities collaborated as an editor on the world policy journal. The new republican harper's magazine published in pretty much every important outlet. I would say in the world He's held many other and today we'll be discussing his twenty sixteen book in praise of forgetting historical memory and it's ironies published by yale university. Press speaking to us from dublin. Today david welcome to the tel aviv. Review thank you very much as i read your book. It could have also been titled in praise of forgetting indefens- of history. You argue for why too much historic collective and perhaps selective memory can be a bad thing but it seems like you keep up running defense in a way of historical research and accuracy. Can you try to characterize the difference between memory as you analyze it here in this context and history in the context of your book Sure I think when the history i praise to the extent. I praise any thing in that. Rather morose book is critical history. That is to say tree that is not trying to buttress occurrence political opinion ore tendency or or or politics of any kind and that is not the only definition of history. But it's the one that i- counterpose to historical memories sometimes go collective memory which is basically an attempt to well. It's mobilize the past either in defense of something in the president or of something wishes to happen or as a way of denouncing Something that exists today and you know history to make the value of history is that it makes things more complicated not that simplifies things and collective memory is a is by definition inactive simplification. It's an active political mobilization. It's an act of collective morning. It's it's meant different things but it's not history at least in this fairly narrow sense i've to find it and that's the opposition so it like to ask you about the The overlap between the history and memory. Maybe between fact and memory because on the one hand the great improvement in historiographer in historical research has led ironically to the decline of history as a social force. And i'd like to know whether you think that history or maybe fact and memory sometimes compete or do they serve totally distinctive purposes separately from each other. I first of all. I think that of course they compete in the sense that You know history. As it were for history's sake or to get the past right is different than history for the presence. Sake or posterity's sake i mean. Obviously these are. These are not airtight categories. These are not You know they lead into each other to mix. My metaphors are with The So i mean you know you can't you can't say there's the you know quitting one and critically to as it were but what you can say is that I think is that you know the purposes or somewhat different critically history basically founded on the idea. You know to quote The first line of famous english novel go between L p hartley novel the past is another country. Do things differently there Collective memory is about as it were saying. The past is relevant to the present. The president you know we'd be understood thinking about past The scars will memories whatever of the past much some be dealt with etcetera etcetera. And there you start. I think calling into well ideas about political mobilization about collective morning and but also about just saying that you can pick and choose the past past become the kind of menu if you like you can you can even have the tasting player you can have one dish the car or whatever so i mean again. These things are are not total opposites. But they're certainly used for different purposes and collective memory in particular. I mean in the sense. By which i mean talking about. Collective historical memory is of course in logical terms a complete fiction. There's no such thing as collective memory there's individual memory but what there is is obviously the collectively agreed upon narrative of nations ethnic groups religions. You name it families for that matter And those are very powerful things. But in i would insist that memory is is is something of a misnomer in in dot com context one of the most common prevailing attitudes. It seems to me in the post. War era is senna's of course famous adagio. Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it and it seems so ingrained in our way of thinking it to me seems almost self evident but you of course site the tragic ironic quip that those who remember history are also condemned to repeat it. So what's the danger here in remembering history. Is there any causal link between remembering history and doing terrible things and committing atrocities. No i don't think so. I mean i. There was a man called nicholas. Winton coup two years ago. I think i mentioned them. In the book. He was an english and I'm not quite sure context For his action whether it was through a group or something organized himself anyway. He rescued a lot of jewish children in the nineteen thirties. Bring them to the uk and he very late in his life. This would have only been six or seven years ago. Lived to a hundred and something He did a hard talk Injured view That famous be rhys program And to the stupefaction of the presenter winton said well. I don't think we learn much from the past. Because of course the interviewer want to know well. What are the lessons for today. It's entered center from you know what we should have learned from nazi nazi-era etc. And i'm with winston. I actually think what santiago. Maybe the stupidest thing ever said by smart person that i'm familiar with because i think it's palpably false i. I don't think the memory of this show has stopped. Single genocide No matter how. Widely publicized i think events events take their own course. Histories are not transferable lessons or not transferable. I mean you know. I you know and so you know i once wrote in when i was i worked in bosnia for during the war there and in one of my on my books. Who's actually cheerful but in my book on bosnian wars particularly graham even by my my generous standards and i said i thought.

john halpern david reef new york institute for the hum world policy journal aviv tel aviv yale university harper dublin david hartley senna Winton nicholas winton uk winston santiago bosnia graham
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

07:33 min | 1 year ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"The research project that you present here studying a city through text whether it's like it's becoming a trend or fashion among historians. Because i think you know there could be similar studies on other cities. Tell me if they exist. Because i was thinking and no for the first time that istanbul could be an interesting case. Study as well. I you know often compared to roussel to istanbul In many ways predominantly because it The go back so so long and have such a rich History of their own and also the fact that in their own history they acted as some sort of a meeting point of civilizations and it's really really very palpable and still more than city than you. Walk down the street and sort of feel like they Archaeological layers around you. But i'm i'm digressing like to ask you whether you know they're all should be a similar Studies applying to other cities. So there are a few books not many and it's not an entity. There's one book by david hankins on new york Before the civil war and which is very much you know. It was a great inspiration for my book because he looks also is the series of artifacts signs Or text on money and so forth. It's a very very different context. and You know so so. It's different kinds of changes in different kinds of conclusions There are other. There's a study of a texan. Fatimid egypt in the middle ages by in Bearman There's not quite same. But the state on a study of tetralogy in yemen is twenty thousand nine hundred and twentieth century by brinkley messages. More entrepreneurial as much more about texts on paper bates also very much very to wear that writing changes in meiji meaning of of writing and reading changes. But not too many of these. It was quite a challenging to think of you know to find parallels So yeah hopefully. They'll be more there there. Is i mean among social linguists. There's something calling. I mean they have the concept of linguistic landscape which is about understanding power relations between anguish as and the way language is operating space. So that's kind of similar bates much more focused and contemporary. Then he store and you know they usually come and they see you know street sign and they say why is this language on top and wise's language missing and for me. The question was why. Do we have a street sign you know. Why do we have a street nameplate at one point two people think that there's a need for it and what is and what is the use so not taking it as obvious because these artifacts were introducing certain point it's not like they always existed and in jerusalem. They are introduced mainline under colonial setting so to understand that was important. And stand that. Kind of philosophic. Cle- what does it do when you start naming street and putting science to make the names official is it philosophical or is it institutional part of that modern institution building. That certainly started under under the the mandate period and continued. You know in the form. I'm thinking about mail distribution and tax collection and things like that. So yes i mean a lot of it is about you know Tightening the grid The hold of the authorities on the city and It's very clear with british. The british one to know where individuals live. They do not want to deal with the dow with local delegate or the head of the community they want an address where they can arrest tax not conscripts but they want this kind of level of information but and that kind of idea of the city is formed of streets and houses is very european way. That was not the way that the ottomans all the All the local residents understood. I mean they thought much more spatially in terms of neighborhoods and vicinity is rather than in a kind of a cartesian way of you know we have agreed that Streets street name and number and that allow that you could have different names for the same street without you know without asking which is the real name and without enforcing one imposing one have geography over them. Well seeing similar patterns in post sixty seven jerusalem now under Israeli rule I mean not some. I'd like to use the word colonial but may be an inverted commas. Because it's not so much about you know the What i mean is the way of a regime controlling a perhaps Hostile indigenous population in in in those ways. That you describe your book so it's interesting. I mean if we just focus on on that kind of address thing address aspect Not quite in the same way so I mean we do have instances in which streets are named in a very interventionist way without asking local residents. What they think about it. We sit in suwon places but it many other cases the must polity did not name the streets. The streets are named which provides an excuse why you do not provide services because we can't find you and you know and we can't deliver mail to your house so you have to collect it from the shop or from the post office and And we see it. I mean when when the police comes to arrest people in east jerusalem. They have Coordinates and rather than street name and street number. So you know it's kind of gps style and through that they don't need names of streets anymore so that kind of creates also a form of neglect which of underdevelopment officials them is is partly by by the lack of street names Rather than by imposing street names and we see a local demand for street names in fact because of the lack of services right talk to walk author of the newly published a city and fragments of and text in more than jerusalem. Thank you very much for coming on the show today. Thank you very much and big. Thanks to ariel cohen producer. Entice hallam the manager of tv one studios and now we've got request because many most of you listen to us on the apple podcast app and we would like to ask you to. Please consider writing a review of any kind. You can support us by going to a website and subscribing to patron campaign. Check out. Our archive has way over. Six hundred interviews. Maybe even hundred. Maybe even seven hundred on. Actually if you have a spare week maybe we should sit down and count them. Don't forget to like us on. Facebook page is called the tel aviv. Review custody is from israel. Follow me entirely on twitter and of course join us again next week for another edition of the tel aviv review and until an from data. And for me too..

david hankins istanbul bates roussel brinkley meiji jerusalem yemen egypt suwon new york east jerusalem ariel cohen Entice hallam apple tel aviv Facebook israel twitter
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

09:11 min | 1 year ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Make it to the book like on sewage on this kind of iron things on top of sewage Holes and all these kinds of things and lots of text on names of villas in our guy and these kind of things. I was walking law and thinking What these things mean and you know. How do i understand how the people that put these signs. What do they have in mind. Yup and of course it's it's all about the social and political function of the text in this particular Period of time that you look at the latter half of the nineteenth century in the first half of the twentieth century more or less a century. And i'd like to ask you. How does your study correspond with the latest scholarship of late ottoman palestine around that area. Because on the one hand as you point out yourself this new scholarship or late autumn in palestine. Disputes the age. All dichotomy between the image of ultimate jerusalem's rundown sort of backwaters city and on the other hand is so called modern city. It's become under the british ernest influences so disputes thing and on the other hand The focus on the many aspects of modernisation in the late nineteen th and early twentieth century. That come about through the text could potentially play into that very same dichotomy. How do you reconcile that tension of not looking at modernization and in this very narrow sense so yes. I'm building a rich. Scholarship of the last twenty years starting with salim tamari whose work is really really important and really open up lots of questions and thinking both theoretically and historically but then lots of names like i'm become jacobson matzah. Michelle campos Klein and others so building on this. And kind of what i bring. Kind of I think Emphasizes some trains or allows us to see them through different kind of different kinds of view. I think the first inside is to Understand that the kind of caught me that emerges in twenty century between zionist movement and palestinian nationalism is not You know we can say between colonizer and colonized is not between more than traditional. I think that's a key thing that is important so both jewish society. They shoe in both our society go through processes of modernization. In both cases you have champions of more than is asian working against the very rich traditional background and tradition ways of thinking and doing things and understanding oneself and you're saying those processes happen in a way independent of the emerging sort of colonizing presence of zionism locally. Yes yes definitely. I mean in and we can see this both in our palestinian muslim christians but also in local jewish society that embraces hebrew in modern way towards a ton of the century Zionism there's local zionism which has more cultural in view and more about cultural revival. Outside zionism brings a certain edge. To which is very much about colonization territorialization taking over land conquest and transforming meaning. I think that's the the edge of zionism nuts. So there is a clash between colonizer and colonized the jewish community. The local And in some ways is colonized by zionism. And you can see this kind of clashes. not just between the orthodox and the you know the new rival but also between local modernizing circles within both sephardic in misaki but also can as local in jerusalem and the more kind of secondly i and so forth that is one I think understanding that dynamic and understanding the kind of the champion champions of modality within the local arena is really important. I in the book. I br includes a kinney. Enjoy blame others as examples of over local person act intellectuals that were you know fully excited about this ability to rewrite themselves entirely and their society and that's what more than men went for for them and on the other side i bring local. Jews jews indies shoe and i bring ignored and Others who are much more ambivalent about this transformation. So that's kind of communicates that they caught him. He does not You know it's not just about juices are science versus palestinians. it's also cuts through these societies with differences. That i mentioned other defense of course as cultural differences between different means the way they use takes thing the other way which i think i pushed in the book maybe more than others is the way that the jerusalem is very much took a colonial city the way that a legacy of british colonialism in the way that people do not realize i think so we think of growing cities i dunno mumbai. New delhi and grand canyon architecture that we don't find interest them but the that the meaning of the city was profoundly shaped by By the british in very careful interventions in town planning and architecture bozo in the narrative of the city that really shaped the way we think of it as ancient cities segregated holy city and. That's very very different. From the late ottoman period where it was all about ruthless modernization progress building. Roads breathing tramways. You know not so much. Caring about the store co. fabric so the ultimate city was in a way much more modern than the british city but the pretty city is the one that we live within the way that we think about this mo- most clearly through the stone stone cladding regulation that still that very much shaped the way that city looks but also through the street names which were about imposing sacredness of the city on. Its new parts all these kind of biblical names to communicate that this is a holy city even if the buildings were just ten years twenty years old i wanted a draw a on a draw you out a bit exactly on that transition of understanding of the identity of jerusalem from the late ottoman period. That you start off with in the mid nineteenth century And then the changes that came with mandate palestine under the british. Because you seem to argue that in the late autumn period it the way we think of jerusalem today as segregated city jews against muslims. And you know the these The the mosaic of atomised communities. that don't really overlap. You're saying wasn't quite like that. They they had a sort of somehow more overlap and shared identity and the british came. They imagined it as a city of much. More cultural clash. You explain the difference between those two. I mean the the late autumn in city has it's a multifaith and lots of communities and a much less much less segregated than we imagined particularly in the old within the walls so for example the the four quarters of the city not the way that people understood of all communities day they had local names for the neighborhoods which were not according to Mostly not according to a denomination Towards the end of the century emerges Ultimate class which multifaith which is very much pushing the modernization and the expansion of the city and driven by the local municipality which is again a multifaith and is local conflicts but these conflicts are between the middle class and and the villagers outside the city or the kind of the roof rothwell and so forth Not between josie knobs and not. So much i mean there are. There are examples that we can find the attentive example but the primary The primary You know locomotive for change. Is this kind of middle class. Which very much embraces an ottoman view of all of dante and identity. Did they have a shared..

jerusalem palestine salim tamari jacobson matzah Michelle campos Klein misaki grand canyon New delhi mumbai josie
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Today's doctor your wallet is a senior lecturer in israel studies at so us university of london as well as the head of the center for jewish studies there and an old friend of the tel aviv review. Podcast his new book a sit in fragments. Urban texts in modern jerusalem was published by stanford university press in twenty twenty and we're delighted to welcome him to the studio. Hello and welcome to the show. Thank you very much. I'm a big fan of the purpose. Able to throw away by the way wonderful so about your book. It's not just a historical monograph more than that even it's a sociolinguistic and even a philosophical exploration of text as a political social and cultural artifact and even dare i say an actor so what is your understanding of texts as an ob- object research so that the a starting point is that text is texas history that the way we read and writes Changes profoundly and and and therefore textual artifact. It's meaning the pens on place. It's located in the culture in the specific moment. i think that's that's the key insight and the question for me was how the exchange how does reading writing change. And and what can we learn from it. I think that's the as and and the maybe the second thing is to think of texas kind of technology something that can be deployed. It's not just pure meaning. It has a purpose and function again. Which change over time and to understand the different roles that technology is employed for. I had almost opposite question What is your understanding of the city as something that is best explored through text. Maybe not best but you chose to explore through text. And the reason i ask that is because i guess when i started thinking about it reading your book think of text ever since the printing press. Something that helps us transcend location connects people city and country and everywhere else mass distribution. So why did you choose to look. At a specific city through the prism of text. Then he was to look at the the kind of extra technologies and artifacts that they usually left out of histories of text in reading so most of the histories of reading really focus on the print press and books and other printed material and so the idea was really to focus on the kind of texts that today at least surround us and make a daily experience but are rarely acknowledged narrowly studied and rarely studies at as kind of one corpus. So one context The cities therefore really important location as a as a site as saturated With with text And and it's a place where text is encountered in a very important way. The other reason to focus on a city. First of all in in in the middle of the nineteenth century texas primarily visible in cities the in the in the rural areas in palestine. You could still see texting say on a on coins or in holly tombs. But that was real so in the city. One of the things that distinguishes city was that textual saturation already in the middle of the nineteenth century and the city also is a site of encounter and borders between the communities and that was A chance to explore the especially place like jerusalem where you have different at different communities different languages and different political victories so that kind of condensation allowed me to do a comparative study for example to look at arabic and hebrew in a very very small relatively geographical location but very rich in history battles in in demography and so forth. And when you started you started going about this research how. How did you even approach This i mean it's it's sorta rheumatological question. Okay if you decided you wanted to study text and you want to study in jerusalem. And how did you You know fragmented into the really. Why either a of artifacts pseudo-cause book from Number plates on of buildings to Stone inscriptions have so the the idea. The primary interest was to understand how text Functioned for dozen writers and for that i relied primarily on on contemporary accounts so that was the main methodology and main difficulty at two. It's it was relatively easy to find what was visible. I mean jerusalem is a very well documented in various variety of ways. That wasn't the main challenge. The main challenge was to understand how text was read. How takes was written and to find moments of change where tech starts meaning different things to Local people in jerusalem so that means reading lots of memoirs diaries and press officially codes and so forth. That was the main Main mythology but to understand on which artifacts focus. I looked at a huge amount of telegraphy and paintings and a corp corpus's of inscription and various other And of course walking the streets. I walked in the streets tourism and to try to find a text from before nineteen forty eight. I had this image of you walking around with like a big magnifying glass up to your eyes appearing. It's cornerstones on buildings and such. Did you do that i did. I did walk quite. I st- i think kind of with my head up and trying to look for you know and i did find some things that nobody fun before me You know i so. The only the only mandatory street sign that survived inside the ultimate in jerusalem. Which is David streets which is a bizarre In in arabic and that's kind of blue and whites Armenian ceramic tile In three languages with the hebrew faced. And that's above a shop and all of them otherwise will remove by leaning and run sixty five or six six and replaced with jordanian nameplates. So this is the only one that's five But lots of lots of things also didn't make it to the book like on sewage on this kind of iron things on top of sewage Holes and all these kinds of things and.

us university of london center for jewish studies tel aviv review jerusalem texas stanford university israel palestine David
The Digitizing Process - Natalie Monbiot of Hour One on Virtual Humans Automated Video Production and More - Voicebot Podcast Ep 219 - burst 04

The Voicebot Podcast

02:06 min | 1 year ago

The Digitizing Process - Natalie Monbiot of Hour One on Virtual Humans Automated Video Production and More - Voicebot Podcast Ep 219 - burst 04

"On starting poi- is very much human would not making humans up with starting with real human being and then with digitizing them in order to be able to Create endless amounts of content featuring that pass in with the commission in the case of taryn So a describe what we did say the process was we got her in studio and she had a couple of different looks because she wanted high as she calls at. Ai clone to have some flexibility a couple of different ways of different presenting different types of content. And so we go to rent a studio with the green screens Team production team in tel aviv. A video conference in and direct shape and the goal of that is to capture about three to five minutes worth of quantity footage and with that vintage which essentially becomes the data that we can then use to create a digital character. So that's what we did answer the following the shoot Actually if you go to terrence youtube page You can see the proof of concept video on. They're also making a video of what the process was like actually creating higher character so it's a really simple process that we just use a normal Normal video calmer normal studio. Everything's quite normal. We have a few things like lighting in the have we have you know try and minimize reflections. Just little things like that and What we do is we have like a methodology that we guide passing through such as to bury still talk a little bit more Character and expression various degrees of Expressive essentially so that we can capture that full range of facial expressions so that we have this data she disposal when we want to generate new content.

Taryn Ai Clone Virtual Human Digital Human Avatar Online World Creative Process Video BOT Green Screens Team Tel Aviv Youtube
IDF Paratroopers Head to Europe to Jump for Hannah Szenes's 100th Birthday

The Promised Podcast

02:02 min | 1 year ago

IDF Paratroopers Head to Europe to Jump for Hannah Szenes's 100th Birthday

"We learned this week that next sunday as we recorded on july eighteenth another delegation of one hundred fifty or so idea of soldiers code-named the lightning of the heavens will leave israel on a mission marking. What would have been the hundredth birthday of hannah. Censh- mayor memory for blessing. Hana sanish the budapest born poet and soldier in these secret british special operations executive who on march fourteenth nineteen forty four. When she was just twenty two parachuted with others into yugoslavia where she joined a partisan group and was soon captured by nazi soldiers at the hungarian border and then tortured and murdered by firing squad on monday. To a f- hercules transport. Planes will fly over the forests of eastern slovenia. Where sanish made her last. Jump and one hundred soldiers mostly from the idea but also hungarian. Slovenian and croatian soldiers were reenact sandwiches. Jump the purpose of the reenactment. According to colonel yuval guys the commander of some hueneme the idea paratroopers brigade is to strengthen the ties between the idf and local countries and to try to recreate the heroism of the shoe paratroopers and quote the name of the mission. The lightning of the heavens is taken from his most famous poem. Highly colicky sorry. I walked the case. Aria which goes my god. My god may these never end the sand and the see the rush of the water the lightning of heaven. The prayer of man among the soldiers travelling to slovenia is one who was called up for reserve duty to serve as an educational officer for the mission tel aviv university professor of jewish history. Lieutenant colonel seem Golden husan lieutenant. Haddara golden may refer blessing was killed at twenty three in the two thousand and fourteen gaza war and whose body has been held by hamas for the seven years since and again like mariam said it would take hours months even dissect and elucidate the historical religious and political currents that converge in. This baffling act of symbolism

Hana Sanish Sanish Colonel Yuval Paratroopers Brigade Slovenia Hannah Yugoslavia Hueneme Israel IDF Mission Tel Aviv University Golden Husan Haddara Golden Gaza Mariam Hamas
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"So so you can see that there is a real majority for ethan snorts thus something and the second issue is the override clause so and this is the strongest. Now i think in political discussion in israel so allow the government to override decisions of the court striking down specific laws here again so so say the government bosses law the court strikes down. It says it infringes on some right these protected by The basic rules and so the idea of the override clause is the government. Could the knesset could in reenacts it and say we know that the court said it infringes but nevertheless we wanted enacted that's the idea and there is an example in his basic law freedom of occupation. There is an override clause. It was used once and in the entire history. It's a it has a time limit for four years and it can be reenacted so for four years and and So that's the political idea and it some kind of compromise solution now. The question is what will be the you know. Go on in the details so what will be the safer i. I don't pose the override clause in principle as a political Solution to this discussion. So say we'll have basically deflation saying explicitly. Yes the court has a right strike down laws and then on the other hand. The knesset has the ability to overwrite in what majority. So we'll here we'll sixty one members of conflict would be enough perhaps the timeframe so what about the idea that you have the ability but only after the next election so people could understand what they are voting for. Perhaps you could limit the number of times that the knesset another suggestion has been floated. You could limit the number of times that the knesset can use the override clause in any specific message. So three or four times override. So there are many. I is about and there is room for discussion and compromise here. It's uncharted terrain. And perhaps there will be some kind of solution here. We have to wrap up pretty soon. I want to ask you one. Final question i think unless gala has anymore afterwards. Which is that you know. The israel democracy index survey that comes out annually shows that not only is support for the supreme court or trust in the supreme court declining. But the most striking thing to me is the polarization the left and the centre support at very high rates. The right wing much less and one of the theses of your book. One of your arguments is that there is a way to bridge. The gap between conservative and activist approaches would say conservative and liberal approaches. How do you characterize the way to bridge that the arguments for An active and You know substantial role for the court with the conservative criticism. So two things. I as i said before. Prep stake some issue. Some issues off the table of the court so for example if you authorized municipalities to have more issue's delta municipalities less issues will be brought to the court decisions and for decision. And maybe this will bring down the tension somewhat you know and then bring up the trust and the second point is that i think the court should explicitly say not implicitly as it does now but explicitly say we are about the protection of the democratic system of the separation of powers of the institutional for formation of these ready democracy. We are not about decision of values in in in israel and explain why and perhaps in some issues if you wanna be trusted than sham each in some issues the courts should say listen. Okay so this is a value issue. Perhaps won't deal with it on the other hand issues that the court has avoided because it said well listen. It's not exactly rights. It's more con- arrangement of the country. The coach should deal with them. And and and i think the a move from only human rights speak which was appropriate in the nineteen nineties. Let's burps it's less appropriate now towards a more perhaps procedural but institutional way of framing the decision will contribute right on this rather optimistic note that i have said not quite expect. I'd like to thank you. Professor cohen of israel democracy institute a senior fellow there and presto flow at ono academic college with discussed Things related to your new book published last year called the constitution. Revolution and counter. Revolution came out owning hebrew. Hopefully sometime soon in english as well thank you very much. Thank you very much. And many thanks to retie shalimar station manager and ariel cohen our producer. And of course to the israel democracy institute for the generous support. And now we've got a request because many most of your listen to us on the apple podcast app and we'd like to ask you to please consider writing a review of any kind. You too can support us by going to a website. That's still be one dot have him slash tel aviv. Review subscribe to a patriot compaign. Please check out. Our our covered.

israel ethan supreme court israel democracy institute government Professor cohen ono academic college shalimar station ariel cohen apple tel aviv
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Been close to the political party was part of the game. at least this is common knowledge. One of the ideas that the likud brought with him menachem begging at that time. In nineteen seventy seven was to clean this atmosphere to have a professional spare of the public service. And these were right good ideas that were also you know implemented in law part of the rule of law. That was very much developed. Since then was a not having conflicts of interests was having a this appleaday political very professional a public service and then in the last decade because of these different process a whenever there's there was criticism against these ideas of having political nominations and all that the first two three decades of the government of his was suddenly rose back again. Why not referring to nine hundred seventy seven. Why not referring to. The eighties whites were fighting to nineties. It's very easy to go back to bangui on when it's easy but wanted to so. I closed the brackets of that. I just have to answer your question in the about the erosion and about the erosion. The third idea that i fine was very much influential except for these two already mentioned. Is this approach that we have to have the the markets work freely with competition and we have to help the markets the government is interfering with the markets and this idea was brought in a sense that came at the expense of the other interests of civil society that as far as i understand carte democracy is to take them into account and at least take them into account so too and i expect to a prevent damaging them like environment concerns and and helping the weaker parts of society minorities pluralism and so on and so forth. You know it reminds me of the The the way that it's When you said that they You know the public servants were just reflecting the core values of israel as a democracy It reminded me of what Stephen colbert the american. Satirist us to say that. It's well known that reality has a left wing bias anyway. The hurrell fisher researcher at the idea. Thank you very much for joining us today for this second interview at the tel aviv review. Podcast thank you very much for having me and many things. Retie shalimar station manager and arielle cohen of as well as the israel democracy institute for the generous support. And now we've got a request because many most of you listen to us on the apple podcast app and would like to ask you to please consider writing a review of any kind will be happy to read your thoughts you to support us by going to a website and subscribing onto a patron campaign. Checkout archived has well over six hundred interviews and here like us on facebook and don't forget to follow me and aalyah and tel aviv review. Podcast now on twitter. Join us again next week for another edition of the tel aviv review and until then from dahlia. And for me goodbye..

Stephen colbert arielle cohen today next week twitter eighties two second interview Retie shalimar six hundred interviews aalyah last decade nineteen seventy seven facebook apple nineties first two three decades seventy seven third idea hurrell fisher
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"By the israel democracy institute a longtime partner and an independent center of research and action dedicated to strengthening the foundations of israeli democracy. Today we'll happy to welcome back to the show edna hurrell fisher a research fellow at the israel. Democracy institute's center for religion nation and state and the center for democratic values prior to joining. The idea is she was a public. Seven four twenty five years during which time she filled several positions as legal advisor most recently as the head of regulatory issues for the attorney general now at the idei sha carries out research on several issues of government policy and democratic rights including governance corruption public trust in the government and other topics that we're going to discuss today and the hurrell fisher welcome back to the tel aviv review. And thank you very much. So governance governability and we're going to discuss terminology in the second half. It has become somewhat of a controversial issue in israeli politics and the night to start by trying to understand how and why because you define governance or ability as a quote the government's ability to adopt and carry out policy decisions in accordance with the law and within mechanisms that continuously and simultaneously guaranteed the rule flow and the professionalism independence and integrity of the administrative apparatus and quote. Now it sounds self evident almost but now why on earth would governance governability according to finishing be that controversial. Well yeah as a matter of fact i would love to be in an atmosphere that it's not confer controversial but In the last several years it is very controversial in israel and it has a difficult day effects on our governmental sphere and Even our our civil rights. It's i will explain in a minute. But first of the finishing a governance in israel is a understood to be the power of government. ministers like only elect government officers to rule. That's governance when you say elected ministers you mean specifically the executive branch specifically the executive branch to rule. And what do you mean to rule to have their own decisions quickly with no interference of professionals or any other people like maybe judges and all of course to to implement decisions immediately now of course. A ministers elect politicians are to rule. That's true but in a democratic government. The problem with the way that governance is understood in israel and is used by the politicians is that is that it is directed to their immediate implementation of the decisions and why democratic government especially in. The modern state is very complicated. It has different. Branches has lots of experience. If things are being checked the you have to know the professional substance of the issues. You have to know like the international affairs situation or implementation. What happens like ten years ago when we started or try to walk the same way the same path. What's our experience and so on and so forth and and the way that the democratic system is built on his checks and balances like you have on one side the experience and the knowledge of the professionals and on the other side they ideas or the policy that is brought by elect and this has to be balanced continuously and governance real governance sos cdc for example is defining. Has this overall look this combination of professionalism and policy and on of course listening to the citizens having participation of civil society and so on but even before that before this very important stays within the government. This checks and balances between professionals and politicians is very profound essence and governance s. It is flagged by some of the politicians lately. Is something very different like. Don't bother us with your ideas you professionals or your knowledge or your knowledge or your experience. What the losses is sometimes something to bother us just changed the law so we can do. What we we were looking for or we had in mind and and this does not fit a real democracy. It fits more popular regime's authoritarian regimes. So if you look into real governance democratic governance it is based on these different ideas of governance and as The always city for example. He finds it. it has twelfth principals. Not one not the way. I govern immediately and quickly. It is participation responsiveness efficiency openness rule of law of course to mention before ethical conduct competence and capacity innovation openings to change and and so so on there are twelve principles of of the city. And i wish. I i hope that our new government is Heading towards a better understanding and better implementation of governance s. It seems we'll see. And i hope so too but i want to try to clarify a distinction that you make in one of the articles that we read between what you referred to either as the common good or the public interest by contrast to the issues that come up from time to time every day. Why is that distinction so important. And which sides represent the different which government governing branches or agencies represent the two sides. Well it's it's. It's a very very delicate issue. Wanted to raise. Well the the issue the common good which i referred to is like the basic values of the regime and the way that we wish the government to work in into light of i. We expect the government to work. According to the rule of flow to be open to civil society to be professional to be ethical to be honest and and these similar values that our democratic values and.

Today hurrell fisher edna hurrell fisher two sides second half ten years ago twelfth principals today israel Seven four twenty five years tel aviv one side Democracy institute earth one of the articles israel democracy twelve principles first last israeli
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

09:35 min | 1 year ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"So if you see the body in a work of art shameful if you see the body represented on in dance or not shameful if the body is naked but with its own family than it's not shameful and it's not even sexual looking that hard with that piece is about trying to kind de sex serve the nude body unless there's a service sexual encounter and so yes. I think to answer your question. It does serve. Take away from the fact that sexuality isn't necessarily just intercourse can just it can be sensuality. Can be this other sort of type of human experience the jurors you got when you meet someone who have that good energy with weather not at ever manifested in anything and for nudists. They really wanted to high. They understood sexual power. Sexual energy is being very difficult to control right House lovie societies. Organize themselves around containing women trying to control gender it's about sack sexuality becoming elusive and hard to contain so nudist. Try to really tie everything back to the physical body so much like the body breathes yes it has sex. That's just one other function of the body. It's not the nudity is about this. So they're trying to really separate the nakedness from the sexuality which is kind of interesting strategy right because on the one hand for people who are. Not nudists nudity often signifies a sexual situations certainly if you're around other people and nudist were trying to say no you could be naked and if you weren't so weird and uptight about sex in the first place you wouldn't even be finding this an exciting arousing set of circumstances but it's a pretty thin line and it really has to do with likely you're talking about and where you are and what the expectations are. I'd like to go back to what we touched upon briefly before and that is about the origins of the movement in germany and britain and the nudist philosophy and it's the migration of these ideas through the united states and our petition to this the particular political and cultural context in america however many years later. Can you take us through some some of these ideas and maybe those more interesting those who left behind that in make it to To america i can't really speak to those who didn't make it big movements in those In in europe. And so i really in the book focuses on the american presence and if you want specific names actually a little bit rusty so this may be one of those Editing out moments never watching my professors. No it doesn't it doesn't really matter the the name really the broad themes same lines. The talks about the living in germany. Maybe you can develop that a bit. Lebanon's reform was a cultural movement in mid nineteenth century. germany. I'm reacting basically middle class movement reacting to the rise of industrialism and so it was an idea that if people were going to be safe from toxins safe from overwork on safe from coal mines pumping out. Can you know dirt into the air. People needed to get back to a state of nature and so this is the origin to a great extent of outdoor exercise proposed. Exercise and hiking. And i'm yes nudism also vegetarianism and new prohibitions against alcohol and tobacco and serve a purification of the bodies. You consider see how this would end up. Getting connected to notions of the uber. Mench like fifty or sixty years later. I'm already developing by the late nineteenth century certainly and in the early twentieth century. And even before you have a lot of germans moving to the united states big migrations of germans in the eighteen fifties and they come as far west as california. Anaheim disneyland is was founded by germans and this is in the fifties eighteen sixties and they brought some of these lebanese reform ideas with them and so part of it manifested in organic farming very early like ideas around trying to grow your grow your own food. Even though the beginnings of large-scale agribusiness was already thing. I'm not eating processed foods so that sort of the things that we think of his hippy. Stuff or the health food store right things so specific to california was already had been in been brought in from the nineteenth century from germany already happening and then the other thing that happens in california. That's worth thinking about. Is that in the eighteen fifties and sixties. You also have a large chinese population. And guess what the chinese bring with them apothecary punctual. Turn it of medicine to them is an alternative alternative to the west and american doctors including the american medical association. Were very very intrigued. They were heart. They were racist and cheated the chinese horribly but they were fascinated by chinese medical practice so california becomes this place. That's all ready. This alternative body space largely because of what these incoming migrants were bringing with them and ended up staying and so when you get the nudist stuff coming to initially not california but new york. That's where it starts with. The former takes here in the united states is an urban practice and so these nudists in lincoln twenty nine nineteen thirty in new york city. Wanted to bring that lebanon's reform stuff the getting back to nature Weave it into the fabric of american city because people aren't going to go live in the country anymore like people are moving into the cities. Let's make this an urban experience. We can do it on our rooftops. You could do it on our porches on our our team story new york brooklyn apartment buildings but of course. They kept getting arrested doing that. That was not going to be accepted even when they tried to rent the ymca have a little neatest thing their neighbors call them the cops drag tomorrow. So that's when you start in the united states getting this movement into the country to practice nudity. Because they can do it in the city and in the countryside they could buy their own land. And so that's when you ideally top ideological changes in the united states. Allow this with private home. Ownership private land ownership notions about the powers that come with owning your own land and capitalism right so once you are in control of your own property These fights over property rights as opposed to necessarily the morality of what you're doing but you had to be on your own land do it. And then what happens is that we get nudist colony. Set up in upstate. New york we start to get a big movement westward Soon by the thirties and forties people starting moving west and then they end up in california where there already is this alternative culture that goes back sixty years right and now these things weird about this book is that the tendrils of the stuff connecting up was very surprising to me can using a little bit between the different phases when what you just mentioned now when when new nudism was something to be practiced outdoors in public ways but also when it becomes a private a matter of in the home family nudism. And because i think that's a an interesting distinction. I love you to explore what they stood for but also how it ended up overlapping with architectural movements. Against obvious when you talked about it but but it it was not something i would have anticipated so love for you to expand on that sure. I'm so if the origins in the us of the Social nudism was to be in cities and that was not didn't work so well so people moved out to the countryside. And that's still true. I mean the idea that nudism is tied to these retreats to retreat culture. Getting back nature going camping. I mean it still has similar attributes to this very day but starting in the late nineteen thirties but really during the second world war era. The emphasis was on moving nudism. Indoors and part of the problem was that there was a sense that the nudist many of whom had connections to social communism were coming under more scrutiny because of the war and i'm the Means wartime it's could eat conservatism. Serve ends up trying to contain the population like he want everyone on board to like for the good fight. Don't need to have these subgroups off doing things so there's a push to move. People served indoors in this push isn't really coming externally. It's coming from within the culture because nudist are always constantly fighting legal battles. That are very expensive there stressful. I've examples of people end up in jail for months or years. There's real cost to this and there's a feeling they're under more scrutiny in surveillance so it's better to move it inside and make it private and also need assessment. Doing better fighting fights that involve private property so you start to see the.

new york california america nineteenth century early twentieth century New york mid nineteenth century europe eighteen fifties lincoln late nineteen thirties Anaheim disneyland late nineteenth century germany tomorrow fifties eighteen sixties sixty years later era new york city fifty
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Former soviet stead space have ruled for very long periods of time Lukashenko's been in power for twenty seven years nassir by in kazakhstan for twenty nine years In azerbaijan aleve ruled until he died. So and now. His son is ruling now. His son is ruling so So russia is really the great test case for two our main ways of thinking about transitions on the one hand. The social factors suggest that we should see a transition to a more open and more liberal society given the level of education organization closest europe and other factors but the type of person autocracy that russia has make these kinds of transitions far more difficult far more volatile often. More violence So you know. I wish i could tell you which of two factors was going to rule out but it is going to be fascinating to watch absolutely and in the meantime we encourage listeners. To radio really brilliant book. That's really accessible and a fascinating read so full of data my favorite part absolutely a timothy. Frye thank you very much joining us today. And it's my pleasure. I really enjoyed the talk. Show him manager of t. v. one studios and producer ariel cohen and once again to israel office of the konrad adenauer foundation for the partnership and support for this series. Now we've got a request because many or most of you listen to us on the apple podcast app and we would like to ask you to please consider writing a review of any kind you to support us by going to our website and subscribing onto a patron campaign. Check out our has well over six hundred interviews and don't forget to michelson facebook and follow me dalia and the podcast tel aviv review. Podcast on twitter. Join us again next week for another edition of the tel aviv review and until then from dahlia. And for me..

Lukashenko twenty seven years ariel cohen konrad adenauer twenty nine years next week two factors dalia europe two michelson facebook kazakhstan tel aviv twitter today israel Frye t. v. one studios over six hundred interviews
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

10:47 min | 1 year ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Is a big predictor of of support for futon and foreign policy successes like the annexation of crimea. And the amazing thing is it's also true for yeltsin yeltsin period. It's almost a correlation between support for yeltsin and that goes down over time as the economy continues to dwindle down so in a lot of ways russians are reacting in to their leaders in the same way that leaders and other countries are and using a lot of the same metrics even though they had a very different experience political experience in relationship with the states over the last nine years than we see In in other countries. So i think it's easy for us to overstate the extent to wedge Russians react and behave politically differently than other people. There's to areas where they're rushing. Attitudes are different in that the longer one lived under communism. The less supportive of the people are of democracy in the more supportive. They are of the welfare state. And that's that's kind of understandable but in lots of other areas you know whether or not you lived under the soviet union or not is not a really good predictor of your political attitudes or behavior. I want to ask you now about the early years of putin that you said that were not as repressive as later years and ask you to. What extent do you think. It is similar to the model of illiberal democracy that we're seeing now in eastern europe predominantly in In hungary and especially because the way you put just to quote you you said that there's a it's very important in russia to have democratic constitutionalism but without the basic tenants of liberalism this kind of what scholars call. Autocratic legalism is the commonality between russia turkey hungary venezuela where political opponents are Sidelined technically not for their political activity but for Violating laws that have nothing to do with politics so say nevada for example. Right now is in jail for violating his parole conditions. Not for any political activities. He's been engaged in a often. You know Violation of tax laws is another very common strategy that these illiberal rulers us one dividing line. We might st between a more. Autocratic country as russia has become and the can merely illiberal countries of turkey and hungary is at the local level. There's a lot more opposition For example mayors in major cities are often from the opposition party in in turkey and in hungary and even more so in venezuela and by this point didn't rush You know the governors are all on the side of the kremlin and that has allowed that has changed politics that the open level of political competition is different in the two sets of countries. What about nevada. i mean how. How effective is it to pop off your opponents for putin or to try to try alleged this the i think the people often inflates Being an unrivaled ruler like putin or or air land or or child has in his time with being omnipotent and the two things are very different in that you know you can be unrivaled politically but still have very difficult relations with the bureaucracy or be unpopular unable to persuade people to do things you would like them to do and for guten. Yes he can certainly sideline alexei. Navalny he can you know Up route his organization but the problems that generated nevada levels of corruption low levels of trust in the government's weak economic performance. Those aren't going away. You know alexa me. Being in jail is not going to solve those problems and in a country like russia. One might expect there to be continued resentment that that allowed someone like nevada to flourish. Nevada is a singular character is very talented. A politician so he obviously would be difficult to replace But one would expect that there would be others to to try to mantle. Okay i want to switch gears for one more topic if we have time for more. We'll see but going back to the annexation of crimea. because that is an important turning point. I think in your understanding as a public opinion researcher of putin's popularity. And you make the case that it has to do with an enthusiasm about russia returning as a major global player. But i also wonder if there's a distinction or if that overlaps with garden variety nationalism was it also just a matter of modern russian nationalism and pride in the triumph of the nation bringing back the lost territory. The annexation of crimea is a is a key moment. And i think to the surprise of the kremlin even more popular than they expected and it really kept putin's popularity ratings in the eighties for around four years and many people who are luke. Warm about bench shifted to his side. It really struck and emotional court at the same time. Russians are very sensitive about loss of life in foreign policy and support for example. The russian intervention in syria has always been very modest support for introducing troops into eastern. Ukraine has also been quite a quite modest. There's been a lot of opposition to that. Support for unification with belarus is also only about the one in five russian support it so that annexation of crimea is really the exception in the way russian. Society sees russian foreign policy. They tend to attribute russia's global power status more would victory in world war two and russia's great scientific achievements than at any specific foreign policy moves. putin has has chosen maybe a concluding question question unless dahlia has more. The title of the book weeks strongman. Because from what you say it seems like he's a strong strong man. Right is relatively popular even after all these years in power he's managed to control the political apparatus in an extremely effective way even the political discourse about the nineteen ninety s about western democracy. And all the other things that you mentioned works in his favor wisey week so the week's strong men title is just that emphasize the difference between being omnipotent and facing difficult trade-offs For example on the economy about trying to Use corruption to reward your cronies but not too slow growth in that putin has to work so hard in order to be popular is also evidence of the idea of a week's strong men and that he can't just Do these photo ops a go swimming hunting without his shirt on and have people automatically support him He has to produce economic growth in order for people to support him. And that's why his popularity ratings Have fallen yes. He controls the bureaucracy But he's had very little success for example in bringing russian money back. It's been a stolen and taken out of the country Popular protests continues even as the regime has become a more repressive. There are still in fights among the elites that putin has to resolve and there are no easy kind of foreign policy. Victories like crimea that he can turn to derail support and we do see the trust in putin. For example in the last five years has fallen from around sixty percent around thirty percents so You know the week strongman. Tyler's less like analytical category. Just an attempt to draw attention to all the constraints on putin. We often fail to recognize. So i think we have. I have a follow question which may be really as the end how. How sustainable is this. I mean at one point when his popularity was higher you make. You made the point that he himself was very popular but there was very low trust and public institutions and is. That situation sustainable. You're already pointing to the decline in his power. He can't rule forever. there is a natural end. what happens next. And how long can a society with that kind of contradiction so personalist autocrats can rely on repression in stay in power with relatively low legitimacy for considerable periods of time we see that in other countries than in the former soviet union but the type of rule is much more difficult to pull off because putin would like to rely on personal popularity. Resounding electoral victories. good economic performance and repression is really the last resort and as those other tools have become more blunt. He's had to rely a lot more on a repression and on the one hand. Russia is too rich in well educated for it to be so Repressive so that would suggest that you know it'd be difficult for putin To maintain a power at the same time you know we see that other person lists autocrats in the.

Tyler world war two syria eastern europe nevada Navalny alexei russian two things hungary russia dahlia eighties around sixty percent around four years Russia two sets nineteen ninety s five one point
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

09:28 min | 1 year ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Line between autocracies in democracies the real key issue is a free and fair elections and we can Complain about Voter registration laws in the united states campaign financing and other flaws in us elections But the gap between the uncertainty about. Who's going to win an election in the united states and who's going to win an election. Russia in russia is enormous. And if we look at the cross national data sets tried to code countries as a democracies autocracies. We find that people come up with a lot of different rules for how to how to categorize these countries but they often agree on what countries fall into which box the correlations across these different data sets are often are often quite a quite high. So in you're right that a number of the problems you know. Politicians democracies also face This kind of balancing act with the weight of The average voter in democracies still much greater than it is in In autocracies where in autocrats can control access to the ballot a very important tool Influence the media far more than they can into democracies i'm so there is still a this dividing line and a lot more likely to happen in autocracies than democracy. That is an additional source of threats for For autocratic rulers and indeed autocrats are more likely to be overthrown by their inner circle than they are by revolts from the mass seems like both sides both masses and the inner circle know that elections aren't a very good way of expecting a change of powers that that's where the energy gas elections are elections though in autocracies. Still fascinating. Even if we have a pretty good idea who's going to win in part because they are still a signal strength of the autocrat. For example if the autocrat has to engage in massive fraud in order to win the public can often see that and also the members of the elites who are often involved in in helping to rid the ballot can also see that and their recognition of the autocrats weakness can be revealed through the course of holding an election. A good example comes from belarus Last summer where President lukashenko claimed to have received eighty two percent of the vote and it was just so plausibly incredible That you know people took to the streets And we've seen political unrest in belarus Ever since whereas you know early on putin's You know. I two terms as president. He could run elections as a very popular candidate. The economy was really growing And he could plausibly claim to win honest majority of the vote as time has gone on in. The economy has sagged. Putin fatigue has set in and there are no foreign policy is not so much a source of a of popularity You know he's had to rely much more on manipulations like keeping people off the bala askew maybe about the What you call the russian exceptionalism that you that you basically opposes as an explaining factor but still what is it about russia's past That has allowed for someone. They put in to emerge. And i'm not only talking about the fact that russia was never democracy and therefore it explains But more about its place in the world the lost empire and also about ninety nine hundred. That putting in many ways was a backlash to yes. That's right so we want to recognize that The factors that brought into power Are also present in other countries Is well and we. I think it's helpful to think of russia as part of a wave of autocracies personal autocracies. That we we see you know. In in a number of countries hooten has One of my colleagues. I too putin As you know. There's peter the great ivan the terrible vladimir the lucky. I like that line. And this is a good one and he comes to power after the chaos of the nineteen nineties which happened in lots of countries the collapse of the soviet union regardless of whatever strategies governments chose was really messy time of high inflation. Stayed collapse He comes to power at a time when when oil prices are rising in basically when he comes to power although prices are near historic low and then within five years that are there at a historic high and putin manages this inflow petrodollars very well and he oversees a doubling the size of the economy within within one decade And this gives him a tremendous popularity that he's able to translate into a consolidation of political power. So one thing that. I think we can think of russia. Russia's reliance on natural resources as a key determinant of the type of political system that has emerged and an interesting thought. Experiment is this. What if in the nineteen nineties oil prices have been at one hundred twenty dollars a barrel when russian politics was much more competitive and people's living standards were soaring because of that in this relatively well educated urban country on the fringes of europe. Would we've seen a different outcome than this oil shock happening during the period of competitive politics and then You know Putin taking advantage of Taking advantage of these high oil prices putin has played remarkably well on the chaos of the nineteen nineties. Recently used this as along with references to world war two to really legitimate his power. As the situation russia's become less stable economy has sagged he keeps pointing out. Look you want to return to the nineteen nineties. And i'm the one that can guarantee stability. I'm the one that can guarantee order. And that's why you should continue to support me. And he's been very good Laying on that. So let's talk about that predilection for leaders who bring stability and we might even say. Strong leaders appreciated. Is there such a thing as a russian personality in politics homeless soviet icus or even i might go further a whole slava gus because i think that the slavic some of the slavic countries in general seem to appreciate the strong leaders and you know it is sort of a reductionist approach maybe condescending. But i'm curious how you address that claim. I'm pretty skeptical of drawing these kinds of broad stereotypes in one of the things i try to do in. The book is to bring data to bear on this question to show for example in the nineteen nineties. During the period of russia's most competitive politics voting rates in russia in the nineteen ninety six in the two thousand elections were much higher Than they were in those same presidential elections in the united states They were around seventy percent in russia in the low fifties in the united states. So if we think that russians according to the homeless vehicles view which is still very prevalent in popular discussion. are passive towards authority. Appreciate a strong hand. We wouldn't see the same kind of active engagement in a electoral politics. Also if you ask. It's very interesting. If you in the survey data from russia and the quality of survey data russia's actually quite good for an autocracy recy- if you ask people whether they liked democracy relative to other countries russians answers are usually somewhat lower. But if you ask them about the constituent elements of democracy. Oh yes we like a free press. Oh yes we'd like to see. Multiple parties compete in elections. Yes freedom of assembly is really important is just democracy that we have qualms.

Putin europe russia two terms world war two Last summer lukashenko two thousand elections five years ivan around seventy percent both sides nineteen nineties one decade President russian one hundred twenty dollars a b one eighty two percent both masses