40 Burst results for "Tel Aviv"

Fresh update on "tel aviv" discussed on Israel Daily News Podcast

Israel Daily News Podcast

01:05 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "tel aviv" discussed on Israel Daily News Podcast

"Wearing masks. And now it's officially legal. You can take it off my friends and colleagues say. They are walking around the streets of tel aviv. Feeling naked without their mask on but that is really quite something. clashes between palestinians and israeli. Police continued sunday night outside the damascus gate of the old city of jerusalem. Three palestinians were arrested as israeli police. Attempted to disperse the crowd using water cannons stun grenades and police mounted on horses. I can tell you. I've been part of these protests as a reporter before and i've had some pretty scary experiences. One time somebody said move out of the way and i said what and before i could even do anything. He grabbed my whole body and pulled me out of the way. I was inches away from getting run over by an officer on a horse. So these protests get taken care of with force definitely. The protests started at the beginning of the muslim holiday of ramadan which began tuesday east. Jerusalem palestinians are protesting jerusalem. Police departments effort to bar them from sitting on the damascus gate steps after nightly prayer which is seen as an unofficial tradition for them. The police say they set up blocks and barriers to funnel worshippers out of the area and created a rule not allowing people to sit and stay on those steps. Palestinians were angered by this and videos are circulating on social media of palestinians striking uninvolved orthodox jews and this has been condemned by both jewish and arab members of knesset such as achmad. Tb who said nationalistic violence needs to come to an end. The justice ministry police internal investigations. Division is also announcing that it will be opening an investigation into a video of a police officer brutally striking a subdued palestinian man in the head with his fist. Ramadan tends to be a contentious time between young palestinians and israeli security as violence between the two has come to a head in ramadan's past i would just like to point out. I don't usually share my opinion. But i would just like to point out that all all this violence is really male driven. I didn't see any pictures of women. I didn't see any pictures of women hitting each other or women hanging out at night. Honestly men talk to your children. Talk to your boys. Tell them to put their fists away an into their pockets. Because it's just. I don't usually see the women getting into these troubles in the headlines and i'm reading a lot of news so this is coming from me. I don't usually share my opinion. But whether you're jewish whether you're arabic talk to your son's tell them to put their fists away. Violence does not solve anything. Prime minister benjamin. Netanyahu met with the israeli defense forces disabled veterans organization. Sunday after hundreds of protesters blocked the i alone highway in tel aviv. The protest lasted for hours and prompted netanyahu to make a vow that he would work on a bill. That would reform current veterans support. That's supposed to happen within two weeks from now. The meeting comes after operation. Protective edge veteran. It's sagan lit himself on fire outside of a defense ministry rehabilitation department office. He hasn't died. This happened last week but the shocking incident has led to protests and uproar across the country about the government's handling a veteran issues. Netanyahu publicly admits that mental health services are out of date and added that the terrible injustice would be rectified on sunday. Israeli veterans and disabled idea of soldiers demonstrated outside of the ministry of defence and tel aviv. They're calling for better medical and financial aid said yan sister spoke at the demonstration. saying it. Six thunderous cry is your thunder us. Cry the cry of thousands of combat soldiers who have not been heard side janas in critical condition after lighting himself on fire. It's a move. Signalling that veterans are not getting the emotional and mental health services that they need last friday farm ministers representing israel. Cyprus and greece met in paphos cyprus as part of their new strategic axis in the middle east in the eastern mediterranean there was a fourth country present at this meeting and it made its debut. It's the united arab emirates. Since the signing of abraham accords the threat that iran poses to israel and arab gulf countries has widely been seen as the glue cementing. These new found relationships while iran is a major regional concerned that israel and the uae both share. It is not the only one they are. Equally concerned about. Turkey's plans surkey has emerged as a significant rival of the uae more than any other regional player including iran. It's believed that turkey on the uae are engaged in a decade long feud dating back to the arab spring aimed at reshuffling geopolitical order in the middle east and north africa the two countries each other as nothing other than existential rivals the uae. Joining the alliance of israel cyprus and greece which was born partly out of an interest in placing checks. Turkey is just another fold in the u. a e. turkish feuds so. This was news that a foreign minister from the uae came to this roundtable with israel. Cyprus and greece as a part of aid and alliance in the eastern mediterranean. Pretty cool israel. Daily news podcasters. If you have been enjoying this daily reports support it so that it can continue to come out daily you can send over a monthly contribution at anchor dot fm backslash israel. Daily news backslash support. We have one central link in the show notes which you can click on. And it'll take you to the page where you can make a contribution and feel good knowing that you're supporting independent journalism. You can also support us by leaving. A review on apple podcast. That's one to you can share the show with a friend and three. You can follow us on social media at israel daily news as well as shanna fold. That's my personal instagram. Account s. h. a. n. n. a. f. u. l. d. My name has two ends in it. And i'm very sensitive about that too. Jewish men were violently assaulted in jaffa on sunday. That's yesterday rabbi. Eliahu molly dean of the sheer arts. Moshe has yeshiva and director of the she'd yeshiva moshe shindo wits several right wing politicians including meena chairman of tally bennett condemned. The incident allegedly carried out by two arab residents of the city. Claiming nationalistic motivations. Two suspects in their thirties were arrested with regard to the attacks according to the reports molly inch to its were examining an empty building in the neighborhood that were owned by jews when the assailants began cursing and then physically attacking them prime minister netanyahu along with far right members of the knesset. Bits smokes rich. Anita mountain ben. Gavril called on attacks committed by arabs and palestinians against israelis to cease once and for all similar web and israeli online market intelligence company is gearing up to enter public trading in the united states. The company provides a service that allows customers to see trends in online business. So for example. You can compare your company to another company by taking a look at the difference between your company's website and the metrics of the other company's website and how many visitors they get numbers like that so how many people are clicking on their site. How many people go to their site with the traffic is like it's a technology coveted by many online business owners. Similar web has had its ups and downs. The value remains very high but so far there has not been much profit. The copeland nineteen pandemic helped the company's growth according to c. e. o. or fail but the numbers seem to suggest otherwise as growth slowed in two thousand twenty compared to the prior year now similar web seems to be on track for making an i. p. o. or public offering on wall street in new york city. It's a huge leap forward. The company which has almost four hundred israeli employees finished twenty twenty with major deals with some of the world's biggest tech companies in retail retailer's. Almost half of the revenue came from just one hundred eighty seven customers out of a total of two thousand seven hundred eighteen very interesting story but we of course are happy for any israeli company to succeed in the global market. All right well. That's it for today's show. Today is monday. April nineteen twenty twenty one. Tel-aviv has a low of twenty two degrees celsius and a high of thirty seven degrees. That's seventy one degrees. Fahrenheit for the low going up to ninety nine degrees for the high are writer. Kobe capital is going on a hike tomorrow and told him to be careful in that one hundred degree weather. Go get a hat and senior natural springs of water to cool down hope. He takes my advice so that he can be with us to write with us again. Subscribe to the israel daily news podcast on spotify or apple podcasts. Or wherever you're hearing it from. I am everywhere. Don't forget to sign up to our israel weekly news rapids and newsletter with the top. Five stories. coming out of israel from throughout the week you'll also get the cliff notes version of our original stories investigations and interviews. You can sign up by using the link in the show notes. I am going to send you off with after la by hud. Gaba a boulder based klezmer band boulder colorado. That is in the united states growing up. I always thought that klezmer was a genre actually called klezmer with an a at the end. And that's because of my mother's extreme new york accent. I literally have corrected people in the past when they said klezmer. I said no no. It's klezmer and they said no no. It's klezmer enjoy this song. It's a fun great and productive day and an excellent some some..

Netanyahu Tel Aviv Sunday Today One Hundred Degree Jaffa Last Week Thirty Seven Degrees Two Countries Thirties Spotify Anita Mountain Ben. Gavril Sunday Night Three Cyprus Tomorrow Monday Seventy One Degrees Jerusalem
Berlin-Tel Aviv 2036 Olympics Would Be ‘a Mark of Reconciliation’

The Promised Podcast

01:42 min | 5 d ago

Berlin-Tel Aviv 2036 Olympics Would Be ‘a Mark of Reconciliation’

"Come to the promised. Podcast brought to you on t. Lv one the voice of the city. That was just proposed as a possible venue for the twenty thirty six olympics which will be the thirty sixth modern olympics now that the international olympic committee just decided that the thirty fifth olympiad in twenty thirty two will be in brisbane australia. The twenty thirty six games are now for bid. The proposal was floated. in last. week's berliner morgenpost in a column written by franck koale ski a lead organizer of the two thousand and eighteen european track and field championships in berlin and ricard ming. The president of the german olympic association. The two men began by observing. What maybe obvious that berlin could not host the twenty thirty six games because berlin hosted the nineteen thirty six weeks which were by then german. Chancellor adolf hitler and held in stadiums festooned with swastikas. You may remember. There was some unpleasantness back. Then so berlin is out or is it. Kurowski wrote quote so why not send a completely new strong signal of peace and reconciliation in twenty thirty six a signal that does not hide from history but takes up the responsibility that comes from it. It would be such a signal. If and israel apply together more precisely berlin and tel aviv with the sailing and surfing competitions on the eastern mediterranean but also with other sports such as beach volleyball in israel's lively metropolis as a clear signal of how responsibility arises from

Berlin Olympics Franck Koale Ricard Ming German Olympic Association International Olympic Committe Chancellor Adolf Hitler Kurowski Brisbane Australia Israel Tel Aviv Eastern Mediterranean Sailing Volleyball
Fresh update on "tel aviv" discussed on The Jewish Story

The Jewish Story

04:53 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "tel aviv" discussed on The Jewish Story

"In tel aviv. But rather in jerusalem gentlemen. The jordanian army is smashed in our own. Army is at the city's gates. Our soldiers are almost in sight of the western wall. How can we tell them not to reach it. We have in our hands a gift of history future. Generations will never forgive us if we do not sees it. These were the words of menachem begin as he spoke an emergency meeting of the israeli cabinet late on june fifth hours after the success of operation. Mccade now bagan was a man who understood the gifts and the demands of history including the very fact that he was there at all huddled together with the other cabinet ministers in a storage room in the basement of the knesset. What the hand of god in history could propelled him from holocaust escapee to reviled underground fighter to perpetual opposition leader. Right to pillar of a unity government. Now one may doubt whether it was the hand of god that placed bagan in the cabinet this historic moment. When the question of uniting jerusalem rose. But there's no question as why is that. A critical discussion was taking place in a broom closet. That's because jordanian shells have begun raining down on west jerusalem at around nine nine thirty that morning just before king hussein declared on radio amman jordan had been attacked and that the hour of revenge had come at first general using our idea comfort in the central region hope that jordan would satisfy itself with bollock show of support for egypt firing off few shells and making proclamations like the syrians but essentially honoring the status quo. Furthermore he was under strict. Orders from defense minister diane to avoid any provocation so much so that in some border areas. He told his soldiers to remove the clips from their rifles. Less misfire set off another front. In the war nonetheless narkis had fought with the hurrell brigade in one thousand nine hundred forty eight and it's failed attempt to seize. the old city was in during memory. I would even say a motivation. As it was for every soldier who survived that failed attempt he later wrote in his memoirs. There was no order to conquer the west bank or the jordan valley yet. I was certain that war would come and certain that it would end in jerusalem despite this restraint and diplomatic attempts to hold off king hussein. The jordanian shelling intensified as the day. John the suburbs of tel aviv were subjected to a two hour barrage and just before noon the remains of jordan's air force sixteen american-made hundred hawkers struck natanya far circling for saba. The actual destruction was limited but the psychological in political impact of these attacks was immense syria. Seeing what was happening launched its own air offensive in the north and general narkis while continuing to restrain his own troops now engaged in exchanges of fire from the old city surveying the extent the attack the soviet ambassador to jordan told his american counterpart in amman. Our estimate is that if these railways do not receive arms. We think the arabs will win the war if they're allowed to fight to the finish in the coming hours six thousand shells rain down on jewish jerusalem and the jordanian legion was ordered to advance on mon. On see the government ridge which dominated the old city this combined with those sorties over natanya where enough to change john stance on avoiding a second front not to mention the fact that the sinai war was going smashing -ly pun intended just before noon finally relented in the face of whitesman insistence and the israeli air force was once again unleashed within an hour. Jordan had the answer to its shelling as the remnants of its air force met the same fate as egypt's as their fortieth armoured brigade devastated from the areas as the fighters. Look back over him. Have run and eurico. Even in the midst of the escalation though general oddball made an attempt to broker a ceasefire and it was attempt which was accepted by the israelis but though he informed jordan of the elimination of egyptian airforce contrary to the announcements remain. Hussein was in no mood for compromise. We are today. Living the holiest hours of our lives declared prime minister. Juma on his radio address we are fighting the war of heroism and honor against our common enemy. We have waited years for this battle to raise the stain of the past loudspeakers from the top of the dome of the rock blasted out a much more straightforward message. Take up your weapons and take back your country's stolen by the jews. The rest as they say is history. The battles around jerusalem continued for another two days. It was some of the most brutal fighting the war. Unlike the tank clashes in aerial battles over the sinai most jerusalem was taken through hand to hand combat streets bunkers and trenches as the encircle the old city international diplomacy began to swirl once again in the region that's owned storm and we'll discuss it. I think in the next episode. I only mentioned it now. Because by the afternoon of june six king hussein had realized the folly of his military approach and was attempting his own route to a ceasefire. But at this point mostly on was having nothing of it he ordered the idea to take all the high ground in you don showroom the so called west bank as well as descend to jericho and sees the jordan river crossings only as they surrounded jerusalem. Hesitate saying i want none of that. Vatican it's statement that reveals much in. Its double meaning the secular kibbutz nick. Diane felt no pool of destiny toward the temple. Mount on the contrary he dismissed it as a vatican in irrelevant religious relic. Furthermore they on also feared the reaction of the international christian community who he felt were not going to tolerate jewish control of their holy sites and if sites were damaged in the fierce house to house fighting which was certain to ensue with any concourse of the old city they would be enraged. Now he wasn't alone in that stance in fact his biggest supporter was actually high emotions. Shapira of the national religious party who resisted to the very end the notion of conquering the old city. It may sound strange in light of the hawkish stance that the national religious world takes today and that shift in the camp of the national religious world from the hawk a story which also lies ahead and in many ways is a response. The events were speaking of now but it will come. It will come in the end. It was once again. menahem begin. Who forced the issue when he heard that. The bbc reporting rumors of an imminent. Un security. council's cease-fire one which was supported by both the americans and the soviets which means it might have actually happened. He called prime minister school at four. Am waking them up and demanded an emergency cabinet meeting to decide the fate of jerusalem once and for all and so the israeli government gathered at seven am on june seventh. But this time the picture of the war was becoming clear and too many. It was nothing short of miraculous. The egyptian army was collapsing in the sinai. Gaza was all but conquered most of the hills. That you don taking including those north and south of the old city even with troon that fortress which dominated the jerusalem tel aviv rove where the idea had met a series of humiliating painful defeats in nineteen forty. Eight was in israeli hands. These the syrian front of taking the golan was becoming pressing. But for now the only real question on the table was the old city of jerusalem early that morning before they met eshkol had sent one last appeal to king. Hussein agree to peace talks. We won't invade but he received no response and so at long last after nearly two thousand years of waiting. The question of jerusalem was in the hands of jewish government. And the answer was yes. Send in the paratroopers..

Seven Am Hussein Juma John One Thousand Two Hour Mccade Shapira Jerusalem Diane Two Days Sixteen Gaza Fortieth Tel Aviv June Seventh Jordan Valley Jericho BBC Natanya
The future of drone delivery in urban areas

Electronic Specifier Insights

01:40 min | Last week

The future of drone delivery in urban areas

"Hello and welcome to series three of the electronic specify insights podcast. Today we will be speaking to ills. Aw c o of airways who are provider of management systems for a manned traffic management and drone fleets the company's counting psychic pa in the world's first mesh network drug delivery test which is underway in harrow. Which is just outside tel aviv in israel the of this program is to showcase the new technology to come one of the main barriers skating up commercial drug operations namely the limitation on the number of drums back nominate operate in urban areas. So hello and welcome to the podcast. Hello joe hill. Thank you for old excellent. I think stuff off the perhaps. Tell me a little bit more about and weighs in the work that you guys do. And also role with the company so The and co founder. William was founded by ex israel air force personnel. Basically we bring vigneault. How on how to manage namic aerospace's. That's what i did in the reserve and we founded the to bring division you know. Let's a scalable. Jonah perations in autonomous environment over the urban skies. And what we hope to do is to take what we know on. How do you manage you know and complex environment of Era vacation in how you take it and for phillips within your other drawn technology that the now with emergency no everywhere around the globe. That's what we're planning to do. And that's what we actually doing them. The pilot Obviously will expand.

Harrow Vigneault Israel Joe Hill Namic Aerospace Aviv TEL Air Force William Jonah Phillips
Fresh update on "tel aviv" discussed on The Jewish Story

The Jewish Story

00:36 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "tel aviv" discussed on The Jewish Story

"By the time he got alone. Arrived in the golan. Syrian army was in full flight. Seniors had tried to use this curie council suddenly willingness to confront israel in order to stiffen their troops fighting resolve. But it was too little too late. The route was so bad that thousands of men in uniform took refuge in jordan in lebanon. Add to that. Nearly ninety five thousand civilians who took flight deeper into syria out of fear in an evacuation from their own national guard. only the druze in circadian communities remain. Which in y'all is was the perfect outcome beyond questions of border security and the opportunity to expand the homeland alone had a larger vision of what such victory might mean. He and other israeli generals and politicians dreamed of an alliance of minorities in the middle east eight tribal coalition if you will of non arab peoples bound by common interests and facing a common enemy now such vision might seem crazy but it's not as crazy as it looks through the rear view of twenty twenty hindsight remember that in nineteen sixty. Seven the druze and circassian of the golan had kinsmen. Who were serving loyalty in the army advancing upon them in that moment. Anyway the series. We're in such a panic at this point that even their general staff and political leadership fled from damascus to aleppo fear of the israeli conquest of the capital despite all that the actual linear progress of israeli troops on the ground was still quite slow too. Slow you gal alone. One point is a tour of the front. He came across. A company of soldiers halted on the side of the road netra. He jumped down grabbed their officer and ask what they were doing. Sitting there. waiting for orders came the reply. Don't just stand there. Run now bellowed alone. The former general taken draw and it was quite an effective come in by twelve thirty. The had entered the city without significant resistance far from it. What they found were empty streets in abandoned houses. Some with hot lunch still on the table. Now this point there was nothing between the israeli armor and damascus. And he's fervor dotto actually urged chief of staff you tackle rabin's thrust deep into syrian territory. Proper and perhaps even surround the capital rabin outright refuse instead. Insisted that dabo stop advance immediately. These sole exception was to be mount. Come on which air force commander motherhood present at their discussion called the eyes of the nation because up there you can see it all depends minister. Moshe down wasn't there for the conversation. He might have balked at such a bolt sticking of claim. But you know maybe not. Because he wasn't there because he himself was buying timing it pretty underhanded fashion. They added informed oddball. Hours ago that israel was ready for a ceasefire and the two agreed to meet into area on the shores of the galley at two pm for a formal adoption. Only the un general was already in route from jerusalem. Dan change the location when they finally met up and tel aviv. After the mix up it was three in the afternoon and da gained a critical our of advance. Now things almost broke down right away. When general announced that what was needed was to break the cycle of israeli advances which triggered searing defensive actions which in turn served as an excuse for further encroachment by israel on syrian territory. Dan rejected that narrative out of hand and said that the activities with stop immediately an absolutely the minute. The syrian guns went silent. He also made it clear that no violations of that condition would be accepted not even if their units who had yet to receive the order in the end after some arguments. The two men agreed that fighting would cease at six pm and then they went their separate ways never really having liked each other. The defense ministers. I call was data. L. is are in the north filling in on the conditions of the agreement and warning that he would tolerate no excuses from the idea. Either and then diane ordered as or weizman and zebbie to draw up a map of israel's new border with syria. He gave them a warning as well. Control cells as the clock away. Data showed the helmet on every available man not accepting cooks apply kirks and had them run jeep or even helicopter to every strategic hilltop within reach the high water mark of his momentum. Perhaps of these determining events altogether was when colonel pinkas of the thirteenth battalion arrived by helicopter at mountain and planned to the star of david.

Jerusalem Lebanon Aleppo Jordan Six Pm Golan Two Men Two Pm Fervor Dotto TWO One Point Thousands Of Men Israeli Syria Nearly Ninety Five Thousand Ci Damascus DAN Twenty Twenty Tel Aviv Syrian
Israel Independence War Era Weapons Cache Discovered in Tel Aviv

The Promised Podcast

02:35 min | Last week

Israel Independence War Era Weapons Cache Discovered in Tel Aviv

"The day before yesterday as we record a gardener found underneath a bush at number twenty two cream as street a cache of world war two vintage bullets artillery shells and grenades which ordinance was stowed under a bush three quarters of a century ago by members of the haganah jewish militia to keep british soldiers and centuries from finding it such a hiding place for weapons was called a sleek from the hebrew root some lama couth to make rid of and in the one thousand nine hundred eighty s there were hundreds of maybe thousands all around the country though most of them were dismantled as soon as the brits left palestinian nineteen forty eight. But you know how it is. You put your grenades and your artillery shells in your bulletin a whole under bush in your yard and then you get busy ensure the brits go home but you tell yourself you'll empty the gun whole tomorrow and if it's not one thing it's another before you know it seventy odd years of pass that is just life in the big city so this week. The police bomb squad piloted remote control. Sapper robots under the tree and they exploded some of the grenades shells and bullets. And they neutralize the rest and sent them to the tel aviv. Forensics lab for further investigation. And for those of you wondering and who isn't wondering isaac jacob adolf. Crimea was the french jewish attorney who in eighteen. Forty along with sir. Moses montefiore made the trip to alexandria egypt to plead before Dive mohammed ali for the release of jews arrested in damascus blood. Libel that rocked the jewish world that year and crimea and montefiore secured freedom for nine of the thirteen syrian. Jews accused of killing christians for their blood. The other four having already died while being tortured after that chromium became minister of justice of france under the second republic in eighteen forty eight and he later founded the 'alliance eastern elite universal in paris in eighteen. Sixty one gathers that isaac jacob adolf creamier would probably not himself have hidden guns in tel aviv in nineteen forty eight but he probably would have understood the sentiment and arguably nothing captures the haphazard semi history city of this forever new and yet never really new city. We love so al tel aviv. Alto better than a gardener. Finding an old bag of old bullets and such tucked under a shrub to shield it from the prying eyes of the brits on a street named for a man who one hundred years before that sailed with an english financier to alexandria a city. Just four hundred fifty kilometers. Southwest of tel-aviv. In order to gain the release of wrongly residues in damascus a city just two hundred kilometers northeast of tel

Haganah Jewish Militia Bush Lama Couth Isaac Jacob Adolf Moses Montefiore Aviv Mohammed Ali Crimea Alexandria Damascus Egypt Al Tel Tel Aviv France Paris TEL
Fresh update on "tel aviv" discussed on The Jewish Story

The Jewish Story

00:31 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "tel aviv" discussed on The Jewish Story

"As he was leaving for the airport. Abbas even received a visit from un ambassador. arthur goldberg. who as we've noted was not only the ambassador to the un but as close personal advisor of johnson and it seemed to be at first an unofficial communication from one zionist to another as it were goldberg warned him against relying on what he called the rather impetuous remarks of johnson's advisers who are pushing to break the blockade. The ambassador convinced that no other nations in the end. We're going to join that regatta plan. And he told even bluntly because lives are going to be lost in your securities involve. Tell your cabinet that. The president's statement means joint resolution of congress and the president can get such a resolution because of the vietnam war or as president johnson himself had said ephron only two days before i- lyndon johnson half to get congressional approval. If i want to act as president dmitry it states otherwise. I'm just a six foot. Four texan friend of israel but then goldberg gave the foreign minister. A note from secretary of state dean rusk clearly. This wasn't entirely unofficial visit. It's last line was meant to make the american position crystalline. Israel will not be alone unless it decides to go alone. The general feeling amongst rusk secretary of defense robert mcnamara and the other senior advisors was that israel could indeed must absorb the first blow in any coming conflict. Their estimation was that she would survive and even emerge victorious which is easy for them to say their fear was that a preemptive strike would bring the soviet union in on the side of the arabs. And that the us then might be drawn in as well risking a direct super conflict which nine hundred sixty seven was the bugbear of everybody's nightmares. So israel's only major ally at this point was actually tying her hands. These are the thoughts swirling through evens mine as he was whisked off the plane in tel aviv and rush straight into the cabinet meeting in his diary later. The prime minister's military attache israel your called it the longest night. The room filled with smoke. The smell of sweat as eighteen cabinet ministers gathered through the night to discuss the fate of their nation. One side those who firmly imposed. Amy preemptive strike led by the national religious party had high moshe shapira who actually threatened to quit the government. Where the cabinet to vote for war on the other side was the army whose intelligence worn not only of inevitable war but of the disastrous consequences if they failed to strike first and now outside the streets were filled with the mothers and wives of mobilize soldiers even heard them as he exited his car calling for school. The step down as defense minister and begging him to be replaced with moshe dayan and over. Everything hung the assessment that every day of hesitation dream the country of another twenty million dollars in mobilising cost alone and once the war broke out would result in thousands of additional casualties. The question on the table when he entered was whether to declare war that very night. And as i said into the middle of it all stepped foreign minister abba. Even he's meeting with president. Johnson was for many in the room the last hope for salvation in so he was greeted with urgent cries. I handed over the written protocols of all his washington meetings and then he proceeded to details understanding of their position which was in a nutshell. Hold fast and wait for president. Johnson to come through on the regatta plan even left basser goldberg's warnings about the impossibility of gaining congressional approval. Off the record. I mean after all they've been given off the record. He focused rather on the president's firm commitment to breaking the blockade and his unequivocal opposition to an israeli. I strike in conclusion. Which is of course how he spoke. The foreign minister recommended that the army hold fast for the few weeks it would take the muster international support for the regatta plan when he was done a representative of the general staff leapt up to push back warning that beyond the costs of holding the molestation to hesitate any longer would be to lose any remaining respect that israel held in the eyes of the world even cut him down with a few words. There are no widows or orphans from prestige. He said in his eyes the world would only respect them in self defense and that meant not striking the first blow now. The ministers began to chime in some question. The army a certain israel was too weak to fight their world without american support high. Moshe sapir declared. I have more confidence in the american promises than i do. In the ability to break egyptian army others declared that the idea was their only hope. Israel can only be saved by destroying egypt's power said minister of transportation garnell in a strikingly historical reference. Anyone who says we can't stand alone saying that we can't exist here finance minister pinchas sapir. Didn't take a clear stance. He only added a grim warning. It's hard to create a state he said but easy to lose one and then you gotta alone. Put his finger on the raw nerve underlying their debate. This anyone around this table. He said really think that we should let the enemy strike. I just to prove to the world that they started it. And if you've been reading the news for the last. I don't know fifty years. You know that this question hasn't got away it was there in seventy three in lebanon. It's there in gaza now. We wouldn't have allowed a massive army dedicated to our destruction to position itself on our northern border. If there weren't a huge element in our national psyche which wants the world to believe were right and is willing to take terrible blows to prove it so now remember. Courage is more than the ability to push through fear. It's a clarity of heart which allows for right action in complex situations so the cabinet was split. The army was decided for war. And prime minister levi. Eshkol needed to make a decision at four in the morning. Worn out in depressed. He called a recess in order to give everyone a few hours of sleep before voting and the prime minister dismissed his colleagues with the following words. We must decide in whose hands we will. Place this generation into fates america's or two versions. That was the soviet ambassador. Now it's not worthy of the cold war context that he mentioned american the soviets and left the united nations out. But it's even more noteworthy. And frankly to me heartbreaking to hear whose hands were missing from that evaluation fate america russia way misra l. Where is god now. I know it may sound like we finally reached decision time but once again esco saved by the bell during the recess to top secret telegrams arrived from washington the i was basically repetition of even report that the president was willing to pursue quote any and all means in his power to reopen the straits and the other was a warning hand. Deliver by the american ambassador. Himself it read. It is essential that israel not take any preemptive military action and thereby make itself responsible for the nation of hostilities. Preemptive action by israel would make it impossible for the friends of israel to stand at your side. Those words were enough to tip the balance when the ministers saul them upon reconvening they were evenly split and though prime minister esko actually side with those in favor of declaring war. The decision was taken to wait for up to three weeks. The us to act on it promises in so our.

Arthur Goldberg Abbas Congress Robert Mcnamara Fifty Years Johnson Goldberg Six Foot Twenty Million Dollars Vietnam War Eshkol Lebanon Eighteen Cabinet Ministers Egyptian Levi Four Nine Hundred Sixty Seven Tel Aviv One Side
Pandemic Lockdowns Push Anti-Semitism Online, Report Says

The Joe Piscopo Morning

00:29 sec | Last week

Pandemic Lockdowns Push Anti-Semitism Online, Report Says

"In this age of covert 19 is flourishing in cyberspace. There's a new report from Televisa University that found that the coronavirus restrictions around the world Pushed people away from each other, and therefore antisemitic incidents dropped. However, the concern is that the antisemitic feeling still existed and was expressed online instead of in person. What did Laurie Kellman in Tel Aviv on Wall Street? The Dow is up

Televisa University Laurie Kellman Tel Aviv
Fresh "Tel Aviv" from The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

00:30 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh "Tel Aviv" from The Tel Aviv Review

"Dot. Fm slash tel aviv review. Scroll to the bottom and click the big red button that says patriots. Click and support us. Because we're counting on you our guest. Today's professor john. One head of the department of middle east studies at ben gurion university who specializes in medieval islamic history. This is also the subject of her latest book entitled sacred place and sacred time in the medieval islamic middle east historical perspective that was published last year by edinburgh university. Press daniele time. Hello hello and welcome to the review. Hello in thank you for having me so before. We delve into this specific case studies. That you always in your book can explain Maybe briefly generally the link between religious ritual and place and time on a theoretical level so no religion or no institutional religion can hold rituals without a place and time right. That's that's pretty obvious. The interesting question is how each religious tradition perceives of the sacred in what practices it has developed in order to designate and Play the security of places of times and also of objects and what does the slum come in as opposed to other monotheistic religions m- namely christianity. And today's not only. What are the specifics of islam. In this case. I'm not sure slum has a distinct perception of sacred which is totally different from other monotheistic religions But i was interested to find out How islam how muslim tradition and muslim society a plays out to the sanctity of its times places. Besides the very well known canonical orthodox cases of mecca the kaaba which is the a site of the annual pilgrimage an n. annual pilgrimage was which is incumbent on every muslim man and woman wants a lifetime end of the month of hamadan which we have just entered. Now it right. So those are well known. Cases those are the sacred time and sacred place of islam and Much of islamic ritual is centered around those two By throughout history. Muslims have developed additional. Perhaps we can call them secondary a sacred time privilege times and privileged places in which they held rituals and looking at those cases. One can see The development the dynamics of both islamic thought and practice. Can i ask you about the overlap between a book. That is very mind in a fascinating way focused on comparative religious literature in theory to understand the theological dimensions of this. But you also. You also emphasized that it's a historical perspective. So what is the interaction between a historical perspective and a religious studies perspective of the ritual place. in time. Right this is a very good question. first of all my stress. I must stress that. I'm an historian. I'm not a theoretician i. I'm not a religious studies person. i'm. I'm a great actually. That's a compliment Compliment with an easy to me. Because i am a religious studies person in my deep background so we can we can simply complements our perspectives right. And i think they must be complemented ice. Find a theoretical discussion. Much less appealing. If you will excuse me then then a discussion. That is grounded in in place in time in specific historical a background and What i wanted to do in this in this book was to tell a story actually to tell two stories with a plot with chronology and through those discuss perceptions and ideas and Also theoretical attitude towards the study of religion and religious life and as you may have noticed. A religious practice has the large presence. In this book it is not only about ideas. It's about the way people actually lived out or practiced their their religion and the waste there the ways they found to express their religious feelings. Their religious ideas both individually and communally. So so let's focus on the on the first part of the book which is the place part and it focuses on the several burial sites of the severed head off Al-hussein alley the grandson of prophet muhammed. Canonical figure in In islam right and It's interesting because the it. It's traveled quite a bit. The severed head off of Hussein can you. Can you take us briefly. Through the story of that sever severed head and how it became. How the the the ritual aspect of pilgrimage etc manifested itself in relation to it. Yes i'll try. Okay so i well. I must say that there are more than narrative as expected Regarding the whereabouts of the head it's odyssey and its final place of rest is so according to the a mainstream shia mainstream state the largest she denomination today the the she the she of iran in southern lebanon and southern iraq a. hussein the grandson of the prophet mohammed was martyred by the hands of the sixth calif. Calif yezid a when he was on his way to demand what was rightfully his the caliphate. Or the the spiritual and political leadership of the muslim community. It was in the six hundred eighty the might stopped him and Killed him according to the she Tradition he. He went to his death with open. Eyes perhaps we can liken his martyrdom to that of jesus other figures who chose death in order to make a point In order to seek justice and to inspire The muslims ages to come to seek justice and we competence and so the according to the she narrative the body was mutilated after hussein was murdered a massacred and the head. His head was sent off to the calif in damascus in a victorious procession and the body was buried at belowa which is until today the main sites of a sheep pilgrimage. For she's as important perhaps as mecca. According to the miami she's finally the head was rejoined with The body of hussein buried in karbala but Other she traditions have the head either buried in damascus and there was a shrine in his honor in the a communal mosque of damascus or traveled further a until ascalon. And this is actually where the the story. I am telling the story of the smart really Smiley shia a who believe that. The head was Hidden purposefully in the peripheral town nova ascalon and rediscovered in the late eleventh century by vizier. Like the right hand of A fatimid calif now. The land of israel palestine was under fatimid rule as were egypt and syria at the time. And so the emami calif rejoiced at this discovery Which had political implications or if it was a political asset to him have having regarding him regarding him himself. The whole actually fatimid dynasty regarded itself as direct descendants of al hussein and so a shrine was built in in ashkelon ascalon ashkelon in hebrew right. Which is today. A town in southern is right. became a pilgrimage sites but only for short time because Some fifty years sixty years later the crusaders conquered the town of ashkelon. It was actually the last town that the fatimids held onto After the crusader conquest of palestine and the retreating. Fatima took the head with them to be reburied yet again in cairo and Until today it's an important shrine Depicted beautifully in negi. fuses book. The trilogy about cairo as as really an important site of visitation. Both for and for People who come to cairo from all over the muslim world so just continuing the question about secrets space. Would you consider the shrine a matter of worship of the space itself because it is a pilgrimage site and because it had become just an important hub for the practice in ritual of islam. Or is it something to do with the head itself. A which has the greater focus as an as is the space of worship or the object of worship. Or maybe you say these. Those two are inseparable Will work separable because the head was taken away and this brings me to say that The object is of course extremely important. The relic right in in this case. The relic made the place sacred. But actually it's pr- it's temporary presence is enough. It leaves an imprint Which continues to.

Islam Late Eleventh Century John Last Year Ben Gurion University Southern Lebanon Edinburgh University Hussein Two Stories Fatima Jesus Both Cairo Today Ascalon Israel Fifty Years Sixty Years Later Southern Iraq Six Hundred Eighty
Fauci wins $1 million Israeli prize for 'defending science'

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

Fauci wins $1 million Israeli prize for 'defending science'

"Hi Mike Rossi you're reporting a foundation based at Tel Aviv University honors Dr Anthony Fauci Dr Anthony Fauci has won a one million dollar Israeli prize for his work during the corona virus pandemic the Dan David foundation did not mention former president Donald Trump but it credited file chief for courageously defending science in the face of uninformed opposition during the challenging cold food crisis last month after the change of administrations Fauci admitted there were things that were said be at regarding things like hydroxy chloride Quinn and other things like that that really was an uncomfortable because they were not based on scientific fact out she won the Dan David foundation prize for achievement in the present in the field of public health hi Mike Rossio

Mike Rossi Dr Anthony Fauci Dr Anthony Fa Dan David Foundation Tel Aviv University Donald Trump Fauci Quinn Mike Rossio
GOP senator urges Biden to confirm US will keep embassy in Jerusalem

America First

00:37 sec | 2 months ago

GOP senator urges Biden to confirm US will keep embassy in Jerusalem

"Republican Senator go, Haggerty wrote to President Biden, urging him to publicly and confirm that he will keep the U. S Embassy in Jerusalem Senate. An overnight vote session on Friday passed a nonbinding amendment introduced by Haggerty and Republican Senator Jim Inhofe of Oklahoma by a vote of 97 to 3 in support of maintaining the embassy in Jerusalem. The embassy was relocated there during the Trump administration from Tel Aviv after previous presidents had punted on the move. First term senator who previously served as an ambassador to Japan also urged Mr Biden to build on the Abraham accords a serious of agreements the Trump Administration broker to normalize relations between a handful of Middle Eastern countries and Israel. Edie Bennett in

Haggerty President Biden U. S Embassy Senator Jim Inhofe Jerusalem Trump Administration Senate Mr Biden Oklahoma Tel Aviv Japan Abraham Middle Eastern Edie Bennett Israel
Biden administration pushes forward with two state solution with Israel, Palestine

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

Biden administration pushes forward with two state solution with Israel, Palestine

"Of relations with the Palestinians. More that from AP correspondent Mike Grassi provided administration is restoring relations with the Palestinians and renewing aid to Palestinian refugees. The moves reverse Trump administration Policy and signal the new administration support for a two state solution to the decades old conflict between the Israelis and Palestinians. Acting U. S. Ambassador Richard Mills made the announcement to a high level virtual meeting of the United Nations Security Council. The Trump administration was heavily pro Israel recognizing Jerusalem as Israel's capital, moving the U. S Embassy from Tel Aviv and closing the Palestinian liberation Organizations. Washington office in September. 2018 might cross

Trump Administration Mike Grassi Acting U. S. Ambassador Richar AP United Nations Security Counci U. S Embassy Israel Palestinian Liberation Organiz Jerusalem Tel Aviv Washington
MK Yifat Shasha-Biton, first Likud lawmaker to defect to New Hope

The Promised Podcast

06:03 min | 3 months ago

MK Yifat Shasha-Biton, first Likud lawmaker to defect to New Hope

"First we have a matter that we're following with alert interest. Great concern is part of an occasional series. We call the premise. Podcast ponders the politics of pentameter and the use of the bard to advance a canard last week. The chair of the knesset corona virus committee. He fought shasha beaten announced that she was leaving the likud to join the new right-wing. Hope party where she would become. Don't sars number to an announcement that right away added five seats to the tally. New hope was showing in early polls. Shasha beaten is a popular politician. Mostly because as the head of the corona committee she overturned government decisions to close pools and gyms and stores in schools and even though her decisions were themselves overturned right back again by the government people came to see her as a straight shooter and someone fighting for the people trying to get to work and pay their bills and maybe grab a little exercise if they can. And who doesn't like a truth to power rebel. Also most everything about josh abi tone is wonderful. She grew up in the development town of kiryat shmona the daughter of a nurse from morocco and moshe feed a guy born in iraq who built up a bus company. She had a phd before she was thirty was deputy mayor of kyoto before he was thirty five and was a college vice president forty. It's partly because shasha tone has so much going on that folks and the likud were furious mad when she announced that she was switching parties and they insisted that she resigned right away. Shasha beaten refused on the grounds that she had been elected in this term and she would serve out. There are practical issues in play each sitting. Mk gets government allocated campaign funds when they run for the successive knesset. So if on stays and she'll have one point seven million shekels to use for new hopes campaign but if she quits now she'll be replaced and some other likud member. We'll get that cash lee cooed transportation minister miri regev tweeted quote. You've thought shasha beaten if you have a drop of integrity left resign. Immediately from connecticut and return the mandate to the national camp which you took for a ride for your own benefit a disgrace and when shasha baton refused the likud petitions something called the knesset house committee basically a rules and procedures committee to declare shasha beaten a quote unquote deserter which status would allow them to strip her of her likud campaign funding at the very least anyway. The committee met a few days ago. And because by then blue and was on the outs with the likud they supported chechen tone and she remains in the knesset with her one point seven million shekels in election funding which is when this happened. Uzi they on a likud. Backbencher angry by the outcome of the committee meeting convinced that chechen beaten had not gotten the come up and she deserves asked to be recognized by the chair leaned into the microphone and said quote. I would like to give some free literary advice to get on the of shasha zones new party that it was for matters such as these that shakespeare wrote in fellow i believe and then diane went onto quote not on alternate translation. I think of rabbani ios warning at the end of act one in fellow look to her more if thou has is to see. She has deceived her father. And may the shot a mile invoked up via gumbo which couplet was met by pandemonium in the committee with shasha be tone saying the volume clement. Actually came on the la. I have heard low things. But i must say that. I have never heard things as low as this. At this point mikhail cutler launch a religious blue and white. Mk screened uzi. Why are you referring to shakespeare. Why not refer to the woman who strays and you'll at least be using our own sources. The woman who strays as a reference to the book of numbers by bar chapter five verses twelve through sixteen about what to do with a wife who acts on faithfully to which topic an entire track date of the tomlin. My second sota is devoted later. Uzi dayan said quote. Someone wrote me and said on your life man. What a sexist remark. if that's how it was perceived. I really apologize and quote. And i know what you're thinking. That's a lousy apology. If that's how it was perceived blah blah blah blah blah. But i'd like to think the best of who was married to my favorite zoologist environmentalists tamar. Diane i adore her and she's lately been. The person who by force of character and charm willed into existence. The amazing new natural history museum at tel aviv university which is among other things. A brilliant polemic for sustainability and there ain't no one more feminists then tomorrow diane uzi on also mostly diane's nephew and yours on geffen's cousin so there's that he thought shasha zone for her part. Classically accepted the apology. And the matter seem to be over but all week. I've been thinking that there was an opportunity. Missed here and i can't get it out of my mind. Would it have hurt chubby tone to respond rather than with. I have never heard things as low as this. By saying with catherine from the taming of the shrew my tongue will tell the anger of my heart or else my heart concealing it will break. Would it have hurt. Shasha beaten to insist with don john and much ado about nothing. Let me be that. I am and seek not to alter me. Would it have hurt. Shasha be tone to say with polonius in hamlet this above all to be true and it must follow as the night the day thou cancer not be false to any man. Am i asking too much from shasha tone. I think not because truly. Now is the winter of our discontent. Elections are nine but a week and a day after the ides of march. But i'll stop. I'll stop because who knows better than me. That truly brevity is the soul of wit and that this is a tale told by an idiot full of sound and fury signifying nothing. This is how safe. Because i am that idiot today.

Shasha Knesset Corona Virus Committee Hope Party Corona Committee Josh Abi Shmona Moshe Feed Lee Cooed Miri Regev National Camp Shasha Baton Knesset House Committee Kiryat Mikhail Cutler Kyoto Morocco Shakespeare Uzi Dayan UZI
5 charts show what the global economy looks like heading into 2021

The Tel Aviv Review

03:07 min | 4 months ago

5 charts show what the global economy looks like heading into 2021

"Our yesterday's professor fluke. She's vice president of research. And the william davidson senior fellow for economic policy at israel democracy institute. She's the former governor of the bank of israel and professor at department of economics at the hebrew university of jerusalem earlier this month Professor flog served as the co chair of the idea is l. e. horovitz conference where the most pressing issues relating to israel's economy and society where discussed professor conflict. Hello and welcome back to the tel aviv review. Good morning. so. When corona virus hit it seemed like we were heading for an economic downturn that would rival the great depression but according to the bank of israel and always estimates israeli economy in terms of gdp per capita on employment growth and other measurements seems to be bouncing back and within a few years to return more or less to the levels prior to the crisis and it seems also that this crisis if everything goes according to plan will even less devastating than the two thousand nine hundred thousand nine downturn. So where the initial estimates and overreaction altogether anything wrong. I think we're still in the middle of a very serious crisis. It's true that recently we've seen some oppo revisions both today. A growth estimates of the global economy and also for the the projections for the israeli economy. But still we're talking about a very deep recession globally. Were talking about according to the most recent projections of the cd. We're talking about a contraction of over four percent this year and hopefully a rebound of about four percent next year. This is just in comparison to the global financial crisis the global economy contracted by only zero point one percent so we're still talking about a very deep recession and that's true also for the israeli economy If we are on the path as described by damore to mystic scenario that was a published by the bank of israel it means to the economy will contract this year by about five percent. And we'll rebound by about six percent next year. If we are on the less optimistic scenario where the corrina is not contained the pandemic is not contain then we will have a somewhat more severe contraction this year but much slower recovery by next year so i would say Were still talking about two very serious crisis. A very severe recession however it's true the israeli economy is doing somewhat better relative to other economists. I

William Davidson Israel Democracy Institute Bank Of Israel Hebrew University Of Jerusalem Department Of Economics Israel Depression Damore
The Age of Miracle and Wonder Women

The Promised Podcast

06:11 min | 4 months ago

The Age of Miracle and Wonder Women

"Come to the promised by gas. Brought to you on t. v. one the voice of the city where last week in honor of international human rights day. A huge pride flag was installed in a tubular seal frame atop a massive twelve meter or forty foot flagpole planted in a bit of concrete a ways beneath the soft warm sands of the most the lgbtq beach that divides the hilton from the c. Itai pincus arrived the alderman who holds what is referred to as the pride portfolio on the city. Council said quote. This flag will remind us that all human women and men are equal even if they need to fight for it tel aviv. Jaffa is one of the only cities in the world over which this flag will fly all year round and quote an argument. Nothing captures the spirit of this city. We love so well tel aviv. Feel better than craning back your head shielding your eyes against the sun with your hand and seeing flapping above you. The violet indigo green yellow orange and red stripes representing respectively spirit serenity nature sunlight healing and life and indicating that on these sands on these shores all are equal all are welcome and ideal that we never do meet but that we are always at the very least dedicated to fighting for with us in the studio is a woman who's lovely prose is forever a vehicle for spirit serenity nature sunlight healing and life. I refer of course to alison kaplan. Summer allison is written for politico. The new republic foreign policy that jerusalem posted jt the forward and many other very best papers and magazines. She is a columnist. With how are you have heard on. Npr pri and the bbc and you have seen her on. I twenty four television and aljazeera. Tv you can meet more though obviously not all of your marion hankering these days by listening to her host the arts weekly podcast alison also holds. A neighbor world tenor award for journalism recognizing. Excellence in the asper reported. Emmy simon rock our award for excellence and covering zionism alley in israel. Alison how are you doing. Oh you know. With the third lockdown being announced and fourth elections just spirit serenity and calm. That's that's true of us. All there was ever a time to join a cult at this time. Now i'm just going with the different stripes on this rightfully flag. I think that that we can go with those also with the stage just heard. His voice is a man who's recent contribution to offscreen magazine a journal of israeli film culture which was a joint interview about the newish. Borat movie begins with a single word. Wow naturally i referred to ohio dealt zubaydah. Ohio is a book reviewer. For arts aside from arts and offscreen you have also read ohio's fiction in granta. You probably have read him in the now. Sadly defunct must miss local newspaper ear for which he wrote i when he was fourteen between then and now he hosted a weekly show on halley tv on arts and culture in israel. He is admired for his genius. Love for his warm human decency and envy for his effortless cool. Oh had been too long been doing. It has been too long. I'm very happy to be back in the studio after my mid semester has posted the cutest photo of ohad is a young woman with the promise on my soul so little hair on my face migrated some people wrote in saying i always wondered what oh how to look like and you don't exactly look that way fourteen anymore. What he actually looks like i did. I did underneath when people are responding and saying that. I need to look my name is oh ephron i don't mean to boast but i just received another bottle of caffeine pills fortified with l. nin for quote unquote focused energy. And i have been popping those babies like tic tacs. And i don't mean to brag because that's not how i was brought up but as i get older and i swear this is true as i get older i become more and more. Judy garland every single day. This week we have three topics of non parallel importance. But first we have a matter that we're following with lord interests in great concern as part of an occasional series. We the promise. Podcast coolly considers the classic cohen. When is a friend and anemone. I was scrolling through headlines earlier this week at a news aggregation site called me. Zach live or live newsflash including these quote netanyahu colon blue and white reneged on agreement and dragged us to new elections and from tomorrow colon. Ten new vaccination centres serving all of the health cooperatives will open in the south and the north of our country and more than twenty arrests in demonstrations protesting the killing of a youth by police in the west bank and load colon injured three collided with a parked vehicle while riding his bicycle and tel aviv. Colon a youth hurt while playing with explosives and then this quote. A heartwarming discovery colon. The first anemone has been spotted in the reforest. The first nominee was spotted today by. Its sick lugosi. The j. nf forest ranger who works in the western negative in the same place a negative. Iris has bloomed as well as a tourist huck. Bit plant end quote just after. I saw this headline the new site wine at posted on facebook. A gorgeous close up of the anemone with the heading quote on our way to a red south. The first red anemone has blossomed in the berry forest smiley face emoji with big red hearts for is end quote from there. The item was picked up by all the papers including the online ultra-orthodox paper. Be ma where the reporter who usually covers the security and politics beat isaac gama is his name filed a story headlined report from reforest. The first anemone has appeared. See documentation of the blossoming which peace including two videos. As far as i can tell exclusive videos. One avai single red anemone in the middle of a large grass pasture. The other begins with a close up of four white irises. And then pans across an expanse of grass until it settles on what seems to be the same single read an emmy or colony as we call it in hebrew

Tel Aviv Lgbtq Beach Itai Pincus Alison Kaplan Emmy Simon Rock Our Award Jaffa Ohad Ohio Israel Zubaydah Allison NPR Marion Alison Jerusalem Netanyahu Colon BBC
Interview With Signet EVP And Global CIO Howard Melnick

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

06:13 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Signet EVP And Global CIO Howard Melnick

"Howard melnik. Welcome to second ovation. Thank you peter adding me. That's a pleasure. I thought we begin a howard with your your role. You're the executive vice president global chief information officer of signet. And i wonder if you could take a moment for those who may be less familiar with the company. Can you provide a brief overview as to what you all do. Let me tell you a little bit about my role and a little about signet. So i i've been at signet for about two and a half years and drew me to signet was that the company was launching transformation with a digital focus and a real customer first mentality. My sweet spot has always been integrating business and technology to create value as you mentioned. I'm accountable for information technology as well as analytics programs really focusing on things like being customer centric digital first or accelerating our cloud adoption and using analytics with machine learning in ai the Overall focus is really on driving business value. I part very closely with both our chief innovation officer arner chief digital officer To really create a world class customer experience. And so peter as you mentioned many people may not know the name sick but you're probably really familiar with the brands that we represent so first. Six cygnets mission is to celebrate life and express love so kind of what a what a great place to work at a particularly in these times where the world's largest retailer diamond jewelry and the largest specialty retailer in the us the uk and canada the brands that we have our kay jewelers zales. Jared piercing pagoda people's jewelers in canada h samuel and ernest jones in the uk and james allen which is actually a digitally native company which was a out of tel. Aviv's will thank you for that overview howard. I appreciate it Would love to talk a little bit about your your current strategy. I know from our past conversations that you've talked about the aspects like the path brilliants Some of the omni channel type aspects that you're doing and so on maybe you can dive a little bit further into some of the details of those if you would okay. Great peter so. I let me give a little background which i think really helps frame up the business strategy so signet. The group was founded in nineteen forty nine and grew organically until the late eighties early nineties. Back in february of two thousand fourteen signet acquired zales corporation which was based in dallas. And then two thousand seventeen we purchased to net. Which are the owner of the company. James allen which really starts to be our innovation hub so these acquisitions were great because they gave us breath and scale but gave me the ability now to say i have multiple technologies. Or how do i leverage that scale but at the same time be able to create really unique experiences by brand for our customers so with that we born are packed. Brilliant strategy now if you go back and think five or ten years ago. Julia was not a big on line. Purchase category jewelries intricate people. It wasn't a book and so we started to develop a strategy back in two thousand eighteen. That had three strategic pillars the customer first on the channel with a digital focus and building a culture of agility inefficiency and so peter when we last spoke which was about eighteen months ago we were just in kind of wrapping up to your one and one for us was fixing operational issues building a foundation getting us ready ear to came and that's really what strengthening our foundation rebuilding on the channel capabilities. We're actually getting us more product diversity and starting to really focus on innovation and then in year three where we sit now when we really were gaining momentum cova hit and coded for us was actually an accelerate. I would say in two months of kobe. We probably did two years worth of work. And so many companies kind of shutdown. We really started to accelerate areas of digital growth. And i think what we've seen is customer treads also accelerated things like buying line up in store curbside pickup. These are things that were kind of emerging at at slow pace but have really accelerated. I think in a post covid world are going to last forever very interesting and talk. Talk a bit if you will about the the way in which that. It strategy that path the brilliance supports the broader enterprise strategy with paths brilliance laid out. We developed an it strategy that had four key areas. I was when i called fix improved so a certain areas that we inherited that we wanted to make better Around people process technology data than the next area was with multiple brands. What are the areas. I should harmonize and then modernize and then the last area was really around innovation when we think of innovation innovation for us isn't just catch up. Its halloway leapfrog the competition. What can i do to really position as well so let me walk you through each one of those areas in some of the give some examples of things we did so if we look at one of the first area which was fixing improve. I'm a big fan of jim collins. The author good to great and one of the things he says. Is you get the right people on the bus. So the first thing we did is get the right people on the bus and then we started to look at our operating model and so since we had grown up with multiple banners multiple campuses traditionally were organized by technology by geography with some people sitting in akron in some people sitting in dallas. What we wanted to do is organize by foce. And so we started to make that shift where e-commerce team moved from traditional project teams to product teams but in other areas we started to leverage the concept centers of excellence particularly around areas like integration. Devops testing analytics.

Signet Howard Melnik Arner James Allen Great Peter Howard Zales Corporation Peter Ernest Jones Canada UK Aviv Jared Samuel TEL Dallas Cova Julia United States Jim Collins
A Man of Wealth of Taste

Unexplained

04:34 min | 4 months ago

A Man of Wealth of Taste

"The quest for immortality the urge to escape the inevitability of death has long been a preoccupation for us as evidenced by the ancient sumerian poem the epic of gilgamesh the oldest example of written literature known today in the poem written sometime around eighteen hundred bc in mesopotamia. The titular gilgamesh part hero part. Arrogant demi-god undertakes nordic Mission to find the secret to immortality ought to being confronted by the inevitability of his own death though we might not be demigods like gilgamesh his desperate refusal to accept the inevitability of his fate is a deeply human one and something that many of us can sympathize with whether we elect to place our hopes in the promises of religious teachers or in the invention and imagination of our leading bio gerontologist those that studied the mechanics of aging throughout many of us. Who haven't contemplated the possibility of existing forever in one form or another however although some of those may want for it being mortal israeli portrayed as something desirable and at the very least. There's something that can only be achieved at a great cost from the burdens of connor macleod in his pursuit to become the only remaining highlander to the pitiful efforts of melmeth the wanderer to convince another soul to take on his pact with the devil in return for another one hundred fifty years of life. In fact we take great pains to dissuade ourselves from wanting it. Perhaps this is simply to provide some comfort in the face of such a futile desire. But it doesn't stop us trying back in october this year. A team led by tel aviv. University professor shy f ratty published the results of an extraordinary study in the journal aging study to determine the effect of pure oxygen on the aging process involved placing thirty five adults over the age of sixty four in a hyperbaric chamber and giving them pure oxygen for ninety minutes a day five days a week over the course of three months through this process of frats team found they were able to successfully limit the build-up of senescent cells in the body cells. The today's to the point where they can no longer replicate leaving the body. Susceptible to many age related diseases incredibly not only to this delay the aging process but actually reversed it. Aubrey de grey. One of the best known by. Oh gerontologist has long insisted that medical technology will one day allow us to control the aging process. Even making the stunning claim this back. Two thousand and eight that the first person who lives to one thousand years old is already alive today through some however who'd say that this person isn't just a live right now but they've already lived to be a thousand years old. You're listening to unexplained. And i'm richard mclean smith. It was sometime in the seventeen. Seventies that counted adema marie-antoinette's personal attendant. I met him for her. It was his is most stood out. They were like nothing. She never seen before his teeth to were immaculate and all the more noticeable for being framed by such a thick head of luxury jet black hair and his clothes were simple they were nonetheless made from the finest materials decorated with the most exquisite jewellery. It wasn't a period. She assumed would be accompanied by a certain steely if not arrogant countenance however when she finally plucked up courage to approach one afternoon at the court though was penetrating so too. Was it soft and inviting despite everything countess. It heard about the man. It was quite something to see him. Finally in the flesh looking no more than forty five years old and yet it was back in seventeen forty three over thirty years previously. The first appeared mysteriously one day at the palace of versailles home to king of france. Louis the fifteenth looking exactly the same age

Connor Macleod Mesopotamia Tel Aviv Richard Mclean Smith Aubrey De Grey Adema Marie Antoinette Palace Of Versailles France Louis
Israeli parliament takes step toward new national elections

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:12 min | 4 months ago

Israeli parliament takes step toward new national elections

"Israel's parliament voted to dissolve itself yesterday and if the move is approved further readings. It could lead to the country's fourth election within two years. Well here to tell us more is less than kaplan summer. Who's a journalist for herat's based in tel aviv Can you tell us what happened in parliament. Yesterday it was quite a fiery session. Yes so there was a preliminary vote yesterday to dissolve the parliament which would trigger new elections that would presumably take place in march The vote was sixty one. Four dissolution and fifty four voting against it the block. The voted against it was prime minister. Benjamin netanyahu was Block this is just sort of a culmination of the dysfunctional relationship in the coalition government. That's existed now since last march when opposition leader. Benny gaunt's decided to join. Benjamin netanyahu government and ever since it's kind of been like gaunt's is a political novice playing checkers. And benjamin netanyahu has been playing a three dimensional chess. new election would be advantageous for neither of them But they are now a stuck in a position. It looks like we're we're rolling towards an inevitable for election less than two years. So is this. The end of what was a very shaky coalition extremely shaky coalition and essentially to be fair The prime minister has basically broken many of the elements of the agreement that they signed last march the most important of which being that they would immediately in a in a timely way. Put together a budget for twenty. Twenty one and israel at the end of twenty twenty still does not have an official budget for that year. It's been a series of Of temporary measures. So face of the fact that netanyahu is pretty blatantly Stating that. He's not going to honor their agreement in which Gaunt's would become prime minister this coming summer and in which he is continuing to stand in the way of the passage of the budget Gaunt's has lost so much face politically that he felt he had to stand up for something and And is now moving towards trying to end this government and move towards new elections. Which of course means he doesn't get his his leadership on under that agreement. Do you think that. Netanyahu ever intended to share power with guns. I think that he would have. He would have happily shared power with of guns had basically agreed to Everything that That netanyahu wanted netanyahu's top priority. It's pretty clear is to game the political system to his advantage. He is set now for his His corruption child to To go on in february and pretty much every move that he's making is Is heading towards that but it doesn't look like. He had a great intention of of moving towards rotating in the summer. that's connected to this This budget issue. I think his party fears that if they passed a budget that was good for next year. It would let the rotation go go through and if there's no budget then then there there's a lot of opportunity for for putting minefields in the in the rotation agreement but But perhaps if if ganz had been more completely submissive to netanyahu he would've he would've given him a chance but the more that submits to netanyahu the more his political capital Drops and drops. But one of your colleagues on herat says the party blue and white was the victim of the most sophisticated political sting operation ever managed by a first class master swindler. Pretty strong language is widely believed Yes it is. I mean guns struck an impressively noble. But a little bit of a naive figure When he agreed to enter this coalition agreement which was clearly to his disadvantage he had he had more political capital after the last election. then he Then he spent and he said that there was a crisis. There's a pandemic The country needs to come together and And netanyahu convinced him that That it wasn't the time for For political horse trading and competition and that everyone had to pull together so he kind of naively went into this coalition agreement believing or deciding to trust netanyahu to stand by his word and now many months later he has woken up and realized that That he has been taken for a ride. Israel of course like the rest of the world is gripped by a crisis without political stability. Can that be effective recovery. No and the most You know now that are hopefully looking towards a vaccine and the end of the actual Health crisis The fact that That we don't have our budgets planned that That there's no plan or any kind of vision towards economic recovery wants the pandemic is over is going to set israel many steps behind other countries I it is. It's a it's a terrible situation to be in the last thing that the israeli people want right now is a new election. But it looks like that's what they're gonna get

Benjamin Netanyahu Netanyahu Benny Gaunt Herat Gaunt Israel Tel Aviv Kaplan Parliament Chess Ganz
NBA Mock Draft 3.0

Chad Ford's NBA Big Board

07:14 min | 5 months ago

NBA Mock Draft 3.0

"And we are back talking two thousand twenty mock draft three point o our last mock draft of the year. It's draft day draft morning. What better to unwrap and a mock draft on draft morning. it's the second round. Now now's the time to confess. I'm really terrible at projecting second rounds like you know my hit rate and some drafts has been like one two three picks in the second round. It's it's so hard to keep track of the first round the wheels to sort of come off and these picks happened like every two minutes. I it's hard to really keep track. I did my best. I project where. I think particular players can go. You definitely don't really get deep into this when you're talking the nba scouts in executives about what they're going to do in the second round. They're still trying to figure out the first round as well. So i've tried to find some fits there so this is reported more chad ford speculation. Here about what's happening. The second round starts with the dallas mavericks this pick via the warriors taking malachi. Flynn the san diego state. Junior point guard One of the guys that frankly could go ten spots higher in the draft. I actually really love malachi flynn. There's kind of a lot of point guards kind of later in the first round which may push him out a little bit. But i actually think he's the guy who could step in play right away. I would actually love him in dallas. I think that'd be great. Pick for dallas at thirty one at thirty two. The charlotte hornets are on the board. They're getting this pick via the cavs. Paul read the sophomore forward center out of depaul. Have them going thirty two. This is john. Hollinger's been super high on all year. I think he's another guy who can guard positions on the floor. I really like him. Actually think he brings some stuff offensively as well. I personally like him. Better than precious. I'm right now. Could turn out to be a terrible take. But it's kind of what i think and i definitely think he could be an excellent fit. I'm in charlotte. Especially if they end up with lamelo ball and they're gonna need to add a defensive big man. As part of that package at thirty-three the minnesota timberwolves around the board. This'll be the third pick because they have to. First round picks. Tillman the junior power forward at michigan state. Everybody loves this kid. He's he's one of these guys like high floor. Low ceiling. just does his work every day. Great rebound or plays hard. I'm ken defend going. Bring be a great locker room guy is gonna find some rotation that somewhere I like him in minnesota on a team. That is trying to go forward. I think he actually adds a bit of a veteran presence to the locker room. At thirty four the philadelphia seventy sixers are on the clock. That get this. Pick via the hawks. Isaiah joe the arkansas shooting guard who is one of the best shooters in this draft. Crazy range. High volume of three point shots philadelphia. Always in need shooters. When you're going to be playing. Ben simmons on this team he certainly constructs the floor. And i'd like isaiah joe there them at thirty five the sacramento kings Via the pistons. Dan dotson to kansas sophomore guard. Who is one of the quickest players in the draft. He's an elite score excels off the getting to the basket not a great shooter a bit undersized for his position not really a point guard that's why he slides a few spots higher but could be instant offense off the bench for sacrimento at thirty five at thirty six the philadelphia seventy sixers back on the clock this time via that pick from the mix jordan aura the louisville junior who also is one of the better shooters in this draft. He has good size vers position. Good length i'm not sure exactly what else he brings to the table besides shooting but again i'm just loading philly up i with shooters at the moment at thirty seven. The washington wizards are on the board. They get this pick via the chicago. Bulls tyler bay the junior ford out of colorado who is one of the best athletes in the strath super explosive. Really hard worker on the defensive end still just kinda coming along on the offensive. And then i think that's been a concern. He's he's one of those guys that might be a little bit of a twitter. Not sure exactly what position he plays in the pros that causes him to slide. A few picks in this draft think this is still really value. and by the way when. We're talking about a lot of these guys dotson. Tillman for example malachi flan. These guys could all end up in the first round as well. Just have them the second thirty eight new york knicks via the hornets janis ramsey. The texas tech freshman guard again volume score can shoot it a little bit We're just loading the knicks up now with backward guys that can score the basketball. I'm not sure who's going to defend in new york. But he's an intriguing prospect. He's only nineteen years old. And i certainly there's upside there with the thirtieth pick in the draft at thirty nine the new orleans. Pelicans selecting this pick for the wizards. Daniela touro the minnesota sophomore center. Who had a really really strong summer season one of the more improved players in the country very skilled at big man. I'm great size. Adding just bore skill in size to this pelicans roster i'm at the moment If you remember earlier jalen smith. I'm selected at thirteen at forty. The grizzlies are on the board. This pick via the silence. This is the first pick that the grizzlies have been able to make in the twenty twenty. Nba draft a doco as a bouquet. The kansas center. Big guy seven. Seven wingspan seven footer. Really good athlete actually just dominant player in the pain. Terrible free throw. Shooter doesn't really do anything facing the basket. But when you have that size and length and athleticism. I think you get something done in. The and kind of reminds me deondraye jordan. A little bit and a little bit surprised. He doesn't go higher. I get there seems to be a penalty on the big minner plane or pain. Right now in the draft at forty one san antonio spurs back on the on the board yama dr the israeli guard nineteen year old for hop. Well tel-aviv and you know. He's such an intriguing prospect because he plays his butt off. His incredible energy is just making a difference when he's out there but he's not really a point guard. He's kind of more of a two guard in a point guards body. He's not like a great shooter. I'm athletically he's actually not bad at all but that lack of a jump shot kinda undersized i position that makes him more of a second round prospect at he absolutely wants to leave israel and come to the nba. And if it's the g. league next year and so he could be an interesting prospect for san antonio developed down the road

Malachi Flynn Philadelphia Chad Ford Isaiah Joe Dallas Ben Simmons Charlotte Hornets Dan Dotson Tillman Minnesota Dallas Mavericks Malachi Hollinger NBA Depaul Flynn Cavs Timberwolves
How to Cultivate an Entrepreneurial Mindset with Tamiko Cuellar

The Intelligence Of Grit Podcast

07:07 min | 5 months ago

How to Cultivate an Entrepreneurial Mindset with Tamiko Cuellar

"All right. So to me go. Thank you so much for taking time off. Out of your busy schedule to talk with me today. If a pleasure angle. Thank you so much for having me. I'm really glad to be here. One of the things that I really really wanted to Dig Inn on and learn from you today and have my audience calling from you was just around this concept in this conversation of what it means to really pursue your purpose. We just the name of your business and I think sometimes people mix up passion with purpose with Talent when you with all of these different definitions that are thrown at us all the time. So I think to start let's just get right into it and tell me I do pursue your purpose even come about Okay, so ironically pursue your purpose was not really intended to turn into a business. So okay the way it all started off was I was attending a particular Church many years ago probably almost a decade ago, and I noticed that there seemed to be a place for everyone to exercise their gifts, you know, whether there were a teacher or greeter or singer or musician, you know, there were all these different roles right and the church. Well, I could function in those things but it wasn't really an alignment with what I saw was most gifted in which was actually entrepreneurship and I thought well, what about all these other people who are sitting in the church who are like me where their gifts and their influence their anointing or the grace on their life is dead. Fully operational in the marketplace. So I was one of those people that was more suited to do business and to also raise up other people who were called to do the same thing. So I was just thinking how many more of those people are like me and so at that time I had been a business owner already for close to a decade and I wanted to be able to share my experience and my knowledge, you know just in the community and so I started hosting these meetings first. I asked my former Pastor off if he would allow me to start something some type of business or Marketplace Ministry and he was like sure and call it Kingdom preneur and I was like, okay ma'am. I can roll with that. So what I did was I started hosting monthly meeting in the public library. Right here in St. Louis and I started inviting people out not just people from the church, but also people from the community and it was a small group and people would come out Faithfully every month. They would come out and they would hear about like starting launching growing a business. So that's how I really hone my skills and how I started this because I really started to feel like this was more this would be less than the four walls of that church. And as a result, I started brainstorming one day with a friend and then I came up with this name pursue your purpose because I'm not all of our purpose is going to be like something and really spiritual or something. You know that we might think of when we think of like church or are calling in life is not going to always be something that appears to be spiritual but there are also people who are gifted to do what they're born to do outside of the church in within the marketplace so dead. How the name pursue your purpose was born? So that's interesting. What was your first business to me Co prior to pursue your purpose so prior to pursue your purpose. I I did a quite a few freelancing things today. They called them give entrepreneurs a gig for North where I would act as a consultant. I had also thought cold run a Roofing & Construction company. I was the administrative side of things a cold running that business. I had also found it a Tutoring company that remediated academic deficiencies between K and grades five and math and reading so I thought it was something that I did for a while because I'm really passionate about education and then there was also the past that the particular role that I had that sort of dead. Same way in to pursue your purpose with me actually taking a consultant role as like a small business developer and that came about because I was looking for a job actually at the time and I had just come out of corporate America and I was trying to reinvent myself off instead of looking for a job. I switched gears. It was just a moment where I just decided I don't want to work for anyone else. So there was a particular company that I had approached that was based in Tel Aviv Israel. And I was like, this is a really cool company was a text-based financial planning company, which was in alignment with my skill-set at that time and I am approached one of the founders and I say hey, I really love the concept of the business and I believe that my skills that can fit into what you all are doing. So I sent to my job And he was like great let's talk and then that ultimately led to him offering me a position there and I told him, you know, we'll instead of a position. Why don't we could talk about making me into a consultant and I come on board as one of your Consultants because I had a bigger vision for myself. I thought if I could just get five of these types of client Bots, then I can have my own company and basically exceed whatever salary limit that they had offer and so long story short. They were paying me like a hundred dollars an hour for that role and I couldn't believe it. Actually I was shocked myself and I remember the first phone call number calling my sister saying you not I can't believe this, you know, but I negotiated this like Consulting deal with this company. And so that sort of led me down the path of and what this company needed was they wanted a US presence and they didn't know how to wage. Their business into the US market, so I was basically telling them how to do that and then that open other opportunities for me at that company. But yeah, that's how those are some of the things that I had done prior to launching pursue your purpose.

Marketplace Ministry St. Louis Tel Aviv Israel United States
How to market Blockchain with Itai Elizur from MarketAcross

Bitcoin Radio

04:11 min | 5 months ago

How to market Blockchain with Itai Elizur from MarketAcross

"And partner at a marketing agency will actually to marketing agencies under the same roof when it's called inbound junction. Still active in historically into the bbc asked base. I'm a marketer for about more than ten years in the b. two b. safe-space which is very big in israel of work tel aviv based agency and about four five years ago we were getting pretty big fintech space and some are bigger and better partners in israel talks about about the growing space into my partners very early investors and bitcoin lost a lot of money in mccormack's ended just kind of opened a sister agency called market across and started working with projects. We were very active. In the seal boom downs of jean-ann we've matured with industry today. We are a full stack marketing agency working with a lot of big macs. How does marketing. How does marketing. For blockchain and crypto. How does that differ. 'cause said you're kind of doing both sides you have under one roof. How what's the. What's the core. Differences remark integration question. I would say lease the first generation of projects that i was part of thousands of so there. I always say that i think blockchain is over. Pr and marketed. Because there were actual products it was more of misstatements ideas and most of these eight based protocols again you know. You don't have a big city on the website of sign up or purchase. Or whatever. So very different from classical. I would say. Vw marketing which has literally a conversion point. Put something in relics alright optimizing towards a funnel or something like that. So i would think that that is the most core core difference between product marketing and more i would say branding and marketing and maybe even assisting fundraising style marketing. That's i think the core difference. And i think the other one would be today about. There's just so much charity very fast. So when you go to the other part which our product will be a wallet in exchange. Whatever you have environments where there's fifty or sixty comes king in two three years and it's so hard to differentiate especially for a marketer to try convey that message so i think that's how it this is so new and it kind of there. There are some leaders in some spots in the sphere. But but still. Is that a big issue. This this problem differentiation. Where we're as a marketer. You have to single out. You know you're trying to take your client and say this is why they're different but is the customer. The customer base even knowledgeable enough about about the technology that you could differentiate easily here. That's a that's a great question. So let's different you between i would say Based protocols and technology and then products like exchangeable so when people who come to us again mostly developers or developers in the blockchain space are very very techy. Maybe don't come from a business or marketing background. They'll come to us and say oh you know my network goes to eleven speed or whatever and you're in me as a marketer i'm gonna say right but what's on the block you know how many people transactions are actually processing so in. That's a. that's a big gap between when people want to sell the technical capabilities and want to say all right the me as a marketer pr person at least today people much more wanna see about adoption. So that's like. I think i'm the tech level where you need to go and say all right you're not gonna talk about triple charting. Whatever because that's not really the main thing had to bring that chored usable business use case and when it comes to product marketing and it's also a bit together. I think it's kind of like schilling. Is is great outside but when sit inside the strategy. That doesn't look right. there's a lot of exchanges. What's different about this other than you know. Argos secrete the easiest platform okay. Great but right now in other space would you giving people what's different in. How do you play on. That really executive could be the non. Kyc concept could be the fiat pairings. It could be a really good mobile interface. But we're in that place already. Were ordinary place where people are discussing that not just stating we're going to build a the nicest exchange so I think we're an industry. That's moving in the marketing. Space from wall want will ken to like our is in doing. So that's for me like my biggest mission with my clients. It's really trip. Notch it down from the potential to what's actually

Blockchain Israel Bitcoin Mccormack Tel Aviv BBC VW Schilling Argos
Trump's achievements in the Middle East

Between The Lines

08:58 min | 6 months ago

Trump's achievements in the Middle East

"Donald. Trump's foreign policy is all too often met with derision or simply chairmanship? Isn't it? The critics Maki's diplomacy and they pan the choice of son-in-law Jared Kushner as a Middle East envoy. However just dies away from the US presidential election. Trump has had a few certifiable victories to put in his closing advertising pitch to the American people. I'm of course referring to the peace deals between Israel and Bahrain the United Arab Emirates and Sudan these have been brokered by the trump administration well to tell us more about the significance of these Abraham. Cords. For the Prophet of Jews, Christians and Muslims alike. Let's tune to Greg. Sheridan, he's foreign editor of the Australian Gregg welcome back to the show. Glad to be with your. Greg, your assessment of trump foreign policy generally. Well I think. The media has done generally around the world agree poor job on analyzing trump because themselves have become. So polarized there the all against trump or a small minority of the mural for trump whereas I trump has had some wins and some losses. stylistically he's been very unorthodox and at times on counterproductive but you can look back inside that what trump has been a bath is being creating leverage. The United States in K. relationships is put tariffs on China, and that gives him something to negotiate with Jonah He's put sanctions on Iran that. Gives him something that Iran wants to get rid of an in every relationship? He's got leverage for the United States. Now I think he's done a lot of specific things that have actually been quite good. You can certainly criticize the way he talks about alliances, but it these actions rather than his words quite a lot of the things he's done have been very successful especially in Asia and the Middle East is increased the US military budget more than any other president and American allies. Niger very happy about that the allies in Asia. Have Been Critical of China and most inclined to stand up against Jonah namely Japan India Vietnam Singapore Australia a couple of Damon our full hours course I very good relationship with trump role. Bilaterally, a lot of his relationships been very successful India and Australia. His administration has built the quotes the quadrilateral security dialogue. He has recognized the nature of the Chinese threat to the international system and do American interests better than any other president. Andy's moved the debate along at the same time. There's been a lot of chaos in his administration, the White folks terrible but I think he's had some real wins and I think he's done very well in the Middle East. Okay. We're talking about the Middle East You have argued in the astride newspapers I amount to a major step forward in the pace there why these Arab states altering their relations with Israel is it because of the mutual fee of Iran or is it because the US has leaned on the Motley? Well it's by the size I think Tom plus some other factors as well, but you've just got to pause. And model at the size of trump's achievement in and. To even out of these words, probably you know get you sort of condemned by all international relax plots society at. A. O. Over knocks the of international relations would would excommunicate you for saying it. But you know Israel has five peace treaties with Arab nations. Three of them have come under Donald Trump. He has said we back Israel one hundred percent is move the embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem tremendous symbolic sign of his commitment to Israel. But he has said we all sat back the security of the Gulf Arab states and are opposed to Iran and we kind to put sanctions on it. We think the nuclear deal when far enough now, the Gulf Arab states all agree with trump about Iran. But also items cells to some extent lost interest in the Palestinian cause. They're certainly not going to allow Palestinian view of Israel to be a roadblock. Now, they say Israel is a very good security Patna and they are encouraged by the US administration to might place with Israel if you just change in your ABC's ready national with me Tom Switzer my guest is Greg Sheridan foreign editor of the Australian. Now Greg you've been one of Australia's leading defenders of Middle East policy for decades. Trump came to power on an America I strategic. He's goal a piece to be to reduce significantly America's military role in the Middle East. We just talked about this grand aimed Iranian coalition that can contain tyron wants the Americans have gone given that America is now energy independent moralists isn't this retrenchment from the middle. East if trump is reelected, isn't that a good thing? Well. I think. It's makes Grill Tom. I think it is probably a good thing. The thing tonight is about trump is that on the whole he has implemented a lot of his foreign policy promises. If you put trump's record on the Middle East, all together it's pretty impressive. The US defeated Isis and he's decided that the Iranian. Nuclear deal is a very bad deal. I agree with him about that because it recognizes the legitimacy of Iran's nuclear industry allows enrichment of uranium a whole lot of other things and then allows in a very short period of time I'm sales to rent said trump said that's completely unacceptable. He wants a new and much better they'll, and in the meantime he's applying sanctions to Iran. has significantly diminished Iran's ability to cause mayhem in the region but that brings me to the point about what happens if Joe Biden is elected knicks wiggle the polls. Many of the pundits the betty markets point to a Democratic victory next week if a bottom administration comes to POW, Greg dozen that increase the chances of everything you've just been saying being wound back, I? Mean wouldn't Baden for example. Revert to the Obama nuclear deal with Iran. Well Eight. That's what he says he'll do allow. Kind of the problem. So the final point from the past there is that trump is not engaged in any new military adventures whereas even Bama engaged in the regime change in Libya which had absolutely eleven offers consequences now, Baden. It's very unclear. What kind of Administration Baden will provide his advisors at the moment seemed to be dominated by retreads from the second, I. Bob. Administration Susan Rice and Ben Rides. But then his party has moved along why for an elect- with Anastazia. Cortes and Bernie Sanders and the influence of the crew he says he's going to make climate change the center of all of his foreign policy I think. He may repeat a mistake of trump's, which is simply to try to undo everything his predecessor is done whereas trump has left Baden assuming button does win trump was left on a lot of leverage tramples. Authorized the elimination of the commander of the Iranian could force SOMAINI and. The, Iranians, like everyone else are scared of trump and they're. Constrained by not knowing what he's going to do even though he hasn't done any major military intervention, I don't think I've boughten will WANNA put more troops back into the Middle East or anything like that. The story of the last ten or twelve years really has been Americans will will say trying to get out of the Middle East and finding it very, very difficult to do so but Baden would be. Tremendously mistaken if he didn't try to capitalize on the successes, trump might I certainly don't think he's GonNa WanNa Talk Sudan or by Ryan will will the United Arab Emirates? Out of normalization with Israel, but will is administration base smart enough to keep it going with other Gulf states in trump was saying the other day that he thinks Saudi. Arabia can might place. With Israel, we'll that would been shattering. That would be I don't tectonic shift in the Middle East and Baden if he's smart or his administration as. Will keep going down that road and then God bless them. They can get all the accolades for forever success they won't themselves. But if they get back to the Paragon the John Kerry paradigm, you've gotTa somehow miraculously solve the Palestinian problem before we can do anything else Well, I think it could be much less effective than trump.

Donald. Trump Middle East Iran Israel United States Baden United Arab Emirates Greg Greg Sheridan Sudan Administration Baden Tom Switzer Jared Kushner President Trump Australia China Editor Maki
Interview with Low Steppa

Back To Back

06:23 min | 6 months ago

Interview with Low Steppa

"Massive stuck spe has behind me. I did a livestream. An okay. Yeah it was up. It's been a long time. I did it's been forever and I don't know I mean have you. Ever actually like talked on the phone or anything, no member we used to we used to chat online when I lived in La Yeah in two thousand twelve. Both doing crazy fast. sped moment on tall things. Like. That's absolutely right. Bad. Yeah. That's it's such. A funny period like doesn't that just seems like another lifetime now Eight dollars an. Hour for. In the music was fun at the time but. I really believe what I do now is a bit more time less like I wouldn't go back and listen to. Think, high's music is a is a lot more a lot longer life span on. Glad I ended up. Doing nine basically. Well Yeah we'll. We'll talk about all of that for sure I mean I was just stoked to have you odd man. Thank for doing this in the first place not someone. Oh. My God Tel Aviv and I mean, how? How has your year been because I mean for you? You know I mean you just released the boiling point album, which is I mean that's a big deal for any artist I. Think for for what you've been doing. That's kind of like a benchmark moment but then we're in this weird time in the world right? It was meant to be probably the best year and We had to cancel half the album to album was coming out at the end of March. So we we come soda and but it's a funny one because it's a bit like it's a great time to release music as well as being a bad song because you can't really benefit off. Getting, loads of bookings off the back of your album when his notebook ins. Much doing I'm actually doing a few things lately outdoor things. Yeah it's not the same bombing still Scott veto and it's better than nothing. Yeah. Well, when you say you've been doing stuff have you been late are outdoors shows that are happening over in the UK? Yes. Lhasa idea to and you capacity car park and everyone was. Set in these little metal so a cages. Saddam Dune a bigger one with Jonas blue, which which is more in the country. saw it up. North. It looks really Nice Scott Stream flowing through it like between the DJ in the crowd and. So that's good. That's great. For Dj's you don't want to interact with anyone because there's a river separating. So. We lose call I'll say everyone sat on tables and then. The Saturday after similar one down Saif. Paperless starting to do stuff but the winter's come inside don't know what that means. Really. Yeah. I mean there's been some of those. I'm in Washington DC I. Know I should have you been there for that where you were back in the day no I've Kinda bounced all over I've been in DC now for about a year and a half before that I was in San Diego and I back when you and I were talking, I was probably still living in Chicago back then so I bounced around a little bit. Think. You're American. Oh really. Where did you think I was from? The French. French awesome in. All right. Yeah thought you'd moved from somewhere to America? Now I'll take it man. I'll lean into that. That's great. He's probably all that Jack Daniels or used to drink. Fish. Are you are you off project Daniels now hostility during but not not a lot but I don't J. Daniels and I remember back in the day there was some there was some. Times at Avalon in Hollywood and stuff fly that it was. Fun. Miss some. Signs a bit of a mess right now. Yeah. I mean here in America we've got kind of a perfect storm of the pandemic mixed with with trump, which is its own nightmare and you know it's you're kind of seeing like the decline of the American Empire Right now so it's it's just a bunch of shit happening all at once you know people are becoming much more aware of like the racism in this country and it's all happening at the same time. So it's with all of it on top of each other I mean, how has it been in the UK what's the? What's the mood over there? I'll think. Think paper a little depressed really because. It's just so dragged on iron. Eight. So my slyke nothing's changing fast. It's am I it's nor it's gay normal Iran, and even when paper during these events allow vape lawyer that's rubbish in ice of a guide and it's sad because right now, I can't see them letting clubs, I've paypal sweats and all ivory. Anytime say Moi worries for next year because if next year suffers hits a bit like these big companies that do all these big festivals, they gonNA thing. Let's do something else. You no longer pay for going to hang around to make no money I'm hoping next year things Greenfield's of their line up for next summer Kazakh Wisconsin obviously this summer so that people are not like they are expecting to do things but The job is to think of the government don't care about. They saw this Paul Life Really. Yeah. I mean I should cause always say it makes a lot neighbor hates obviously not their priorities it for young people to have fun. Yeah.

La Yeah Jack Daniels UK America DJ Saddam Dune Wisconsin MOI Scott Hollywood J. Daniels Iran Greenfield Jonas Blue DC Washington Donald Trump San Diego Chicago
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

07:18 min | 1 year ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"They cannot read it officially but but state managed to get the with the internet or even before that no no weekday Internet. That made a huge. I mean you can you know send a pdf of that book to anyone. But we opposed to was one of. I think the most exciting moments of my life was last year I went to Germany need for a concert of a very very beloved Iranian singer and there in the audience I all of a sudden met. I mean I so oh I knew how he looked like the one of the poets. Here which in my introduction. I say that. He is my favorites in maybe Moussavi and and he was standing there and he he knew that I translated his poetry and I introduced myself and there were standing hugging crying and it was so in other poets that I've been in touch with of very very moved by the fact that they're poetry was translated into Hebron a one of the amazing things. was that after it was published. I started receiving. I wouldn't say hundreds but many any dozens of manuscripts by Iranian Poets both from inside Iran. And outside begging me to translate. They're working to Hebrew. Why because it is also way of resistance because the the of course the poets they choose our political in the writing and The enemy of my enemy is my friend sort of Logic so translating into Hebrew and to avail to make it available for Israel audience which is the greatest enemy of the Islamic republic. We've considered to be a very radical political act in Iran today. Let's any any opposite reaction saying you know we are dissidents. We don't like the Iranian regime but still no reason to suck up in inverted adverted. KOMO's to to the to Israel designers or whatever now I never heard of in fact what of course I couldn't be in touch directly with all the poems but but I I was very concerned that it might. That might be doing it because there's no way to ask for their permission to and all of those who who were in contact with told me reading courage me until we go ahead those you chose would all want them want you to do that. Let's talk about one last poet who cannot speak for herself through high falls on. What does she bring to Iranian poetry? As a woman I mean she was considered iconoclastic kind of classic. She died tragically. Yeah wow she's I mean. We have like a few minutes. Full Farrow is. Yeah I mean She died before the Revolution of course very tragically in a very young age difference in a car accident but until her death again in a very very young age she made not just one revolution she made several revolutions in July two the eight at a young age she was very outlets only eight. I mean she was. It wasn't just her poetry that was so at -rageous I mean she wrote about Sexuality Feminine Sexuality in such a way that no I mean that left everybody completely shocked flushing blushing. And she's excellent so she did it brilliantly but she lived very outrageously she had a child outside the marriage she had an open affair with at the time who was at the time the greatest Filmmaker rain filmmaker who by the way also had an NFL. We'd ideology Bobby Coffee. Because translated into English I noticed that she also talks about the Dalai flour. Yeah I This guy had something for women poets and good ones to blame Golani. That was. That's his name. So she I mean she is is an icon in and she was also feel maker fashion icon. I mean she. She had his own shoes. I mean nobody compared to her Afterwards and I mean since that can we talk about one of her poems. I was thinking of. Yeah I pity the garden thought it was an anti war poem. Yeah is that well it. It said a definitely I mean when people turn their gardens into storage for ammunition than But it's it's anti-war and it's I think it's about the craving for something is that you cannot always articulated. Collate it what it is that you're waiting for but you know that it is not a reality that you live in your waiting for something as and that that a change should appear somehow in that. It's a sick sick reality. Of course it's a very political point because The father the mother the brother and the sister that she refers to in that poem all present different political sectors or sections in the then Iranian Fear so it's definitely very very poorly which is a little bit like the colonel too because all of the children have exact loins from it. Sure I I assume you again in foresee or we'll do the Hebrew afterward. So that's I pity the garden. That's the personal trash. That's a wonderful wonderful dylan. Barry Book Jimmy Susanne. That's the name of the Kissy. Buffet could goal her niece. Kissy Kissy Buffet. Remo he ernest Kissy Nemi Hall had Boulevard Kibaki Trudeau at Mira Kick Album Bakshi Zero off-topic Veronica Kazan book. Cheer Dora Oron as hot to SABs that he me Chevette. His cyborg Chenggong cheesy major media. Dust Kita Anza voluble chip roussy. Das- D- I know that's the beginning. I think we have to admit that Persian is also beautiful language as it was. It's a language that was born for poetry. There's no doubt house. I don't think I have anything to add to that other than to say that everybody should read or Illinois in Hebrew. If you can and you also have two of them Translated translated into English. The two books we've been discussing are the poetry collection. These are strange times pretty one and the novel the colonel early. Thank you being on the show for being on the thank you very much. And thanks to His Eminence. Demure are sound engineer to Georgia Foscarini. Andy Tisha them or producers into the van Leer Jerusalem Institute for their generous support and now a request many or most of you. Listen listen to us on the apple podcast APP. We'd like to ask you to please consider writing a review. Just go to the ratings and reviews section and write us one we like critical reviews stellar color reviews any kind review kind of do you too can support us by going to our website..

Iran Israel Sexuality Feminine Sexuality Germany KOMO van Leer Jerusalem Institute Moussavi Andy Tisha Farrow NFL Buffet Bobby Coffee Kita Anza engineer Hebron Dora Oron Georgia Foscarini Golani apple
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

13:34 min | 1 year ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"I feel like we're already by the weights. Not even his real name is really was. Elliot's fan diary. That was yeah sunny mighties Nehemiah. She just considered to be the father of modern Persian poetry. Not so much because of political reasons although there is some of that as well but because he was the first to break the very very strict frames of what was considered to be good and proper poetry which is The right thing and yes yes. And he opened it up in the structure and in the content and therefore allow the whole whole new genre new generations of poets to express something to make to turn the their poetry into something something much more personal any very interesting dialectic process actually from that Very intimate its place to say something even more significant amount society and large. That's her interesting. Because that's the feeling that I got reading. You're not the novel you translated the kernel which I feel like is very very very intimate internal monologue but so much about the state would you say. There's an overlap there. Oh absolutely and The author of the Coronary Mahmoud Nolato Body in which who is considered to be the greatest Iranian novelist that he is leaving. Today he came from theater and He is done also some poetry and That's I mean I think that it's the essence of the greatness greatness of Iranian good literature. Exactly what Dole out over these doing in that novel took turn the very very intimate and personal into a very very blunt criticism political criticism. which by the way was never published? That was never published in Iran itself. Enforce it was censored keeping in mind that nobody still he still lives and writes in Iran. Itself makes it even more courageous. I WANNA go back first to Nina and his stylist stylistic changes and those changes they introduced and others followed. How much of a challenge? Was It for you as a translator. I mean did you try to stick to those stylistic innovations I mean how faithful where you how conscious way you you of the stylistic amount of all that translating poetry in large is an incredible challenge I mean it. Pros has its own challenges translating prose but poetry in some ways it made it easier actually because for example I would never dare ear to touch the poetry of the great classics such as half as Elmar High Yom Gelatin Roomy et Cetera. Because because they're the structure is the essence and if you cannot bring the structure in its entire in its holiness into Hebrew than you lost the not just the beauty and the aesthetics but also the essence so what a tragedy. They really feel the sadness that you know. Everybody to learn Farsi Jester. Enjoy classical court because there. There's nothing like it so modern poetry's easier in that sense because it's it doesn't seats a new as heavily and you can actually do something with it. Then you have other methods to translate the aesthetics of it into Hebrew but there is a different technique of Cunene huning into what. It's a very interesting process to it's like you know in the old Radio Oh yeah the dial that you you search and search and search and at one point you say okay now. I can hear it without the noise around. When you fall on that frequency then you can translate into the other language but it's actually made the Work of translation is your I think the new form of of Far silly give you more leeway yes yes definitely. We really want to talk about some of the poems themselves and I I mean we. We did read a lot of the book but I just have a few questions about the first few by a shallow. I mean one for example is the first one is called dead end in English and it says God must be hidden in the basement. These are strange days. My pretty one which also gives the title of Your Book. It's all my first thought of course was very literal. Because I'm not a poet I thought which days are those and uh-huh do you think he was really referring to a particular time or is this a metaphor for some bigger universal theme. I feel free to read inspired to falsely if our say would love to amateur. I'm louise a good example for a poet that was persecuted both by the Shah and By I the Islamic Republic in that specific poem was written at the very early days of the revolution after the revolution so I think he was talking about a particular moment in time but then it could have been easily written before the revolution as well because he was in this sellers. He was tortured there and he was imprisoned and they were dissecting affecting the smiles off of the lips in the times of the Shah as well. But then you know a sad of a poem as it is I think that there we something very comforting about this repeating line. These are strange days which implicates somehow that. This is not the Way of nature that that this is deviation from the the the the way things should be that's the strangeness of it and that's the the normal order of things is something different. I find some comfort in that cystic. Would you like to read us. This is actually maybe not the entire thing because it's it's but yeah maybe enforcing me nothing. Yeah we hear all the time over here this is that in bombast. That's the name of the poem by Amateur. Do the Don I throw me beyond Mabo. Docu giftable she do staffed. Ram Dealer throw me began. Who's the Garda Caribe Kazini Asia Clark? Enormity regular band does your name is on and screw that pass through your horn in homeboy at the cat. That Imam Best Ketchup each ceremonial or tash raw. Besides Boris through the share foods. On Me Dr and Bandy she Dan Cutter macron gotTa Caribe. St- knows any so that just a taste of You know what one of the things that always fascinates me about Iranian cultures. This duality you know on the one hand as you said earlier wearing your hat Iranian it is the cradle of civilization Asian that is how it's perceived by many people in Iran and on the other hand there has been quite a lot of foreign meddling and influenced and not just meddling with direct mailing by the great powers but also influence and in the introduction Chow says that a lot of the poetry poetry in the early twentieth century was influenced by developing political developments in Russia next door. And also you know how you know. Iran Iran in the turn of the twentieth century opening up to the Western world to an extent. And all that word. How do you think this duality crops up in in the poetry that you've reviewed for this collection that duality I mean opening first of all it should be said that Iran at no point? It was a shock down to the outside world. It's not it any has never been North Korea for example. Not even today so there is a lot of Influence in both ways but also this has been always a way of resistance distance by itself because for example today making dialogue with Western culture for example is a way of resistance for younger the people the younger generations in Iran. There's a wonderful film called. No one knows of Persian cats and it's all about the underground the young culture in Tehran. Today and you listen to those bands all working on the ground making and wonderful keep hop rap any coat any Western form of music that you can think of but they feel those structures with very political Iranian content. So it's not a one way. There was at some point a very. I mean among Sir intellectuals the prominent intellectuals in Iran in the sixties for example there was a fear of Westernization And I don't think it was ever about that. He was about you. Know looking outside enriching yourself and your tools and then pouring pouring Iranian very raining content into it. I think that that's an interesting point that That Iran is has always involves sort of mixture of cultures in one of the cultures that it's involved including linguistically as Arabic and one of the poems. I'm going to skip now to tell me if I'm pronouncing it completely wrong for federal flood full-fat all set. I almost got him. Do you have footnotes in there. which is another interesting thing? You note a lot of this to help the reader understand the references and when in one of those footnotes you explain about the Shawahma Shannon Right. Yeah and you explain. The shadow wrote a pure Persian almost without Arabic so to what. What is the intermingling of the Persian Arabic language? And and then how does it influence a culture. Because I think that's another good dimension of what you guys were just talking about not only the culture. It's a huge political issue today in Iran huge ever since the revolution because it's LOM is essentially in Arab exactly exactly and with a slam conqueror originally so each each. If you take what you know the Iranian alphabet is The Arabic alphabet. We have four additional letters in Farsi. That do not exist assist in Arabic basically you can take an Arabic text and read it even without learning how we can pretty much understand it. I would say more than seventy percent of spokane Farsi today is a words from Arabic roots but ever for for centuries Tories this has been an inner Iranian struggle with that Arab elements not just in language but also in culture etcetera and and if the Islamic republic tried to put the Islamic identity above the Iranian one then the the backlash or the the resistance to that was also made and still is made in cultural methods a- as well and it's really interesting to see how contemporary poets go back Writing Poems using strictly pure Iranian Manian Awards the names all of a sudden you see new generations of kids with names from the Shana may which we had never heard art before when we lived in Iran and all of a sudden in every way that Iranians today those who oppose the current regime can express their loyalty to the Iranian culture as opposed to the slummy culture which is connected of course with the Arab identity they do it and of course plus also in literature and is that an indication that people who are critics of the current regime view them as somehow foreign influence. Our arporn influence. I don't know you tell me I mean. Do they see it as somehow foreign to. Who Rolls Royce of course of course for those people Iranian nationalist especially the monarchists? The Arab conqueror of Iran or the Islamic conquer of Iran was the conqueror of the barbarians of the greatest civilization on on earth and that is to some the eat it explains to great extent austerity that still Iran Iranians have today towards the Arabs. which is incredible? The you would see levels of pure racism freely against Arabs because of that thing never forgot that take their barons from the Sahara desert concord dot great Civilization.

Iran Shah Coronary Mahmoud Nolato Body Elliot Sahara desert Garda Caribe Kazini Asia Clark Dole Tehran Nina North Korea Ram Dealer Mabo Boris Russia St Ta Caribe Bandy Chow Dan Cutter
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

12:38 min | 1 year ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"To US please give a little goes a long way? Our guest today is only noise. She is an editor at the independent Hebrew website. Local call a political activist and a translator Farsi poetry and prose. She is a member of the executive board an activist with the Ballad political party. She's translated five books. Three novels one book of poetry and another one on the way which may be. You'll tell us about and we'll be focusing on her. Most recent book a collection of Persian Asian language poetry called these are strange times pretty one published by Kotov web publishing in two thousand seventeen and we will also maybe talk a little bit about the colonel published by Hogle books in two thousand twelve which is a novel and we should also note that two of her prose translations. My uncle Napoleon and the colonel have also been translated into English Orleans Orleans. Welcome to the show. Thank you hi to be here. We don't have too many translators on the show and you are a translator with emission. Can you explain why you've worked worked so hard to translate so much of modern Persian literature into Hebrew tells you how I got into that business of translations Years ago I was searching on Google. I don't remember exactly even why I was searching but I typed the words Farsi. RC literature into Google and Google replied. Did you mean Russian literature which I thought he burning was in Hebrew and I thought where Google it doesn't have a sense of humor. It's he's not joking he just really honestly. Doesn't know the concept of Farsi Literature. Maybe if Google was sheesh that isn't good but then I thought that it's It's truly absurd that a culture are of thousands of years which is for me. The cradle of at least eastern civilization has almost no representation in the Hebrew language. Certainly not contemporary Farsi Literature. So I thought somebody should start doing that and I did clearly really I mean it. Has You know political ramifications and the reason that was such scarcity was political so in Adapting of the body of Iranian Persian literature in Hebrew in selecting those even in the process of translation whether any like you know key elements that you thought were particularly relevant for Horita. This was really since it was the political mission for me since the beginning because they think that It is a political reality. Orator reflection of a political reality the end the marginalization of Muslim and Arab culture in Iran in Israel the choosing and being the first translator of Contemporary Very Farsi literature into Hebrew. There was a significant question. Of what do I start with. Do I start with the classics. Do I start with poetry. Start with pros was what sort of pros and my choosing might more process of choosing was Directed by my identity both does Uranian and as as an Israeli as an Iranian. I thought that the best it was a question of quality I mean I wanted the best best literature to be translated into Hebrew as an Israeli a wanted very much things that in some sort would be relevant to these really reader so that combination of these two guidelines Sort of dictated the since you raise that you have Iranian part of your identity. Maybe explain a little bit. How do you know Farsi so well? What is your Iranian background? I was born and raised in Iran. We immigrated to Israel at the very beginning ain't GonNa the Revolution in nineteen seventy nine. I was nine at the time but I grew up in a very proud national Iranian family. My parents made sure that my brother and I read Farsi throughout the years. I maintained not only A good level of Farsi but also very very solid Iranian identity. How does your family owned up in Israel northern Los Angeles like the rest of them or Vancouver you know sometimes people ten to reconstruct retroactively their life stories so today I asked my parents they will tell you? Of course you are always good Zionist and we all we always knew that we would end up in Israel. I'm sure that had it not not being for the revolution we would never have ended up here but we we had had some family at the time in Israel already and if we just made more sense and I'm really glad that that was the choice of my parents and naughtily well as you point out there. There isn't a Persian Jewish community in Israel. Why was it that all of that time? There was no translation of Farsi language literature into Hebrew. I mean for you to be the first and I think your first. Two novels were both published published in two thousand twelve. That's a long history of Israel without any person literature. How do you explain that? I mean it was it. Was it political conscious political suppression or. Just nobody but he got around to. And we've got to bear in mind that it was an Israeli around became fierce enemies only in the late nineteen seventies so even before that when the souls you know so called Golden Age of Iranian relations with Notre insatiable to ever when you put it that way. It's certainly sounds astonishing but when you bear in mind it's not only I mean there is not such a small Iranian community in Israel. But if you bear in mind that almost half of the Jewish population population in Israel or from Arab origin and how many translations of from Arabic pros into Hebrew. Do you know of love. So it's not so surprising in its within the broader context the political context of suppressing any link to to the culture and identity of the origin countries The the Muslim Arab countries that was part of the of the inner explicit deal that Zionism did with made with the Mizrahi communities in Israel that you can come inside inside but then you will need to work very very hard to prove to us that you're not one of them because you look like them share their language and he story story memory in culture etcetera so that became is likely project to suppress Their native identity and in culture. And that's the result but then they get the image in Israel of having no culture primitive exactly catch twenty two okay. Let's shift the focus from Israel to Iran and in introduction through. These are strange times. You're right that out of all the arts. Poetry has been the most influential in shaping modern Iranian identity. Can you explain how not not just I mean Iran is now. I will speak as An Iranian nationalist. She's putting on her other hat right now as we speak but I mean Iran is a country that really truly briefs Culture. It's all about it's always been about culture and that by the way this. This is why Iranians have an identity that does not depend on any current regime. I mean regimes come and go so outdated update very long history of Iran but the Iranian identities based on its culture primarily and of all the cultures in Iran is Mastering all of them but poetry is Ju- of the crown. I mean it's so what if you go to through the remotest of village in Iran and you speak with complete an alphabet who doesn't cannot read or write he will cite by my heart. Hundreds of Lines from the classical a uranian poets. So this is the manifestation and of the Uranian Identity more than anything. So it's an oral and written tradition. Yeah absolutely in the introduction. You know that many of the poets especially the ones you chose. I don't know if you focus particularly on these but many of the poets over the years have been bander imprisoned. Some cultural figures have paid with their lives. I guess we'll talk about about them but from asthma shampoo to four referral Huzzah. You'll tell us if I'm pronouncing them currently well. I guess I have a couple of questions but I'll start with one And do you think that living under oppressive regimes whichever one it is somehow gives rise to a particular focus on you know great culture and the need for this outpouring because there's such heavy political repression or is it. The opposite does that kind of political repression and and very oppressive regimes stifle culture. Could it have been more if there were more more permissive regimes. That's a great question. I didn't think about it that way. I mean I wouldn't want to sink that Political oppression is needed in order to create a great arts in general or literature. Because it's then it says something very very sat about human nature but I think it's true mainly and you conditions even more in the Iranian cinema which to really became magnificent. After I mean there there were some really good Simmons. There was some really good semi before the revolution but after the revolution and one of the things that happened was that since they were not allowed to show love stories you know intimacy exposed opposed women et CETERA. Then they needed to focus more and more on the deepest of roots of social and political problems and then it created a new level of quality for the Iranian cinema. And I think that to some extent this is true also also in poetry but then I mean Iran has always been. I mean it has never experienced a truly open open democracy so we cannot. We know what would have been if you can rest assured that I asked the same question. An interview with Lisa Resolve Ski. Who writes about Russian culture and we had a very similar similar kind of non-decisive responsible? Because of you know similar reasons I'd like to ask about the nature of repression. I mean during the shod in monarchy she and later with Islamic regime this very radical change of regime did it change anything about the nature of repression and therefore the nature of resistance to it as appears as emerges from the poetry. It's so sad you know one of the only things I mean. Iran change obviously dramatically Matichon after the revolution. One of the things that did not change is the oppression in not just the nature of it but also the mechanism of oppression. One of the things that survived in its complete is The suck the security the secrets it's security services that's were. I mean the same mechanism. Sometimes the same people who imprisoned and tortured political ACL Objectors in during the Shah's regime continue to do so after the revolution is will and it wasn't as this. I mean I think that today it's more dangerous for people to by the way. Some of the poets that appear in in. That's a book have been imprisoned both by the shy n by the republic so in some ways the continuity here is the culture in the poetry Gasa. So let's talk about the origins or some of some of the greatest influences on modern rainy in poetry. And I want to go back to the name. That comes up in every discussion about this. which is in both the your introduction and the introduction by slowly Sony shop so tell us about the father of modern Iranian poetry NEMA NEMA Yoshi I call him name?.

Iran Israel political repression Google Uranian Identity Kotov US editor executive Napoleon English Orleans Orleans Uranian Shah Horita Los Angeles Vancouver Mizrahi Sony NEMA
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Jews a meeting there right when we moved to New York into Tel Aviv you have these people who create a New York style lower east side style coffee houses you have Tel Aviv in Jeff style of coffee houses and it doesn't die with any decisive moment. That didn't happen something like that. Suddenly Jewish culture was obliterated from the cities. You don't have the sense of World War Two as the end off Europa but it's more subtle. You know it's still there. It's still there in the a sense that this particular wall again. We don't want to be nostalgic about it up. Oh failed which I mentioned. He says it in the most <hes> you know is he loves coffee houses and what he says explicitly that one of the reasons why he was attracted to them in Jerusalem Tel Aviv was because it reminded him of furor but says don't be too stodgy about it because because these people were refugees right but then it it really ends in the sixties and seventies because this sense of Jewish culture there is really dependent on the Migration Asian and you know people in Tel Aviv and in New York become too much in the place itself in New York. They move away. They leave in the oppo aside the huge apartments. They don't need coffee houses anymore. Yeah yeah in Tel Aviv went went in Haskell casino this whole generation. Shen they suddenly you see a change in new generation of Israelis who maybe don't need. Maybe we're not wondering anymore. We don't need these places of refuge right. I I mean yeah. That's definitely part of it. That's shocks on that. Note guys think about that. Professor Sharp pinsker has been talking about his recent book rich brew. Thank you so much for being on the show. Thank you very much pleasure and thanks to the Muslim era are sound engineer and to Georgia Foscarini anytime show them our producers and to the Israel Institute for their generous support now a request many your most of you listen to us on the apple podcast APP and we'd like to ask you to please consider writing a review just go to the ratings and reviews section and write us the good bad ugly we take all kinds of critiques yeah you can support us as well by going to our website t. l. v. one dot. FM Slash Tel Aviv review and subscribing on our Patriot campaign checkout archive. We have over five hundred interviews news and please also consider liking us on facebook. <hes> our page is called the Tel Aviv review podcast ideas from Israel and follow both men Gilaad on twitter join us again next week for another edition end of the Tel Aviv review and until then good bye.

Tel Aviv Jerusalem Tel Aviv Israel New York Professor Sharp pinsker facebook Georgia Foscarini engineer Israel Institute Jeff apple Gilaad
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"<hes> international context reading lolita in tel aviv and i enjoyed very much working with professor over banjo who's the specialist on kurdish affairs ars and a culture here in israel on reviewing the first <hes> english language book kurdish novel reading lolita in tel-aviv is a a funny slogan but basically it's breeding regional and international literature and reviewing it from an israeli perspective with focus on minority languages in the middle east with right with a focus on minority lame to them. I'm excited hopefully to offer for issue issue for <hes> some writing on modern syrian <hes> culture and also its relationship to israel so that's very original. I think compared to other their reviews in in the approach that i really like about <hes> a magazine is that we're not trying to reinvent the wheel i mean we are trying to offer <hes> the international audience glimpse into israeli culture but we're not trying to create it out of nothing and for this purpose we partnered with several hebrew language literary magazines and intellectual magazines unlike the tel aviv review of books that fill the void that needed feeling feeling are quite a few that we could choose from which is great and we're basically choose pieces with an international appeal over berlin international potential and we translate them into english and it works beautifully because even in the technical sort of exercise we are merely by virtue of translating pieces from the hebrew regardless of the content which has ultimate caused regardless of the content. We're we're offering our readers agreements into these letters. I can yes what he's really interested rested because speak on who had no personal connection to israel provide boost up twelve years ago. I'm always struck by one hud very very strong opinions. Many people outside israel have about his role and on the other hand very limited scope of information about a draw from and certainly about context what we can do is to use that academic series and sometimes. I feel a bit. It's a comfortable with but works will is to privatize the play golf. Properties is set to give more context more feeding adding.

israel tel aviv professor berlin twelve years
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

05:36 min | 2 years ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"That's whatever's is, that's why it's a politics that we have to oppose even if we support the national liberation of juries, or Palestinians or whoever, for Kurds. But, you know. Terrorists to reform and become thesis state actors can few pools the IRA or even a vacant? We're not taking ES. They have to I be defeated. Yes, but you raise the issue of asymmetric warfare, when, when we have a, I tech army, like the American army, or the idea of fighting against a Motech insurgency, like the Taliban or HAMAs, and so far in modern history, the high tech army doesn't win. That is a major problem because some of these wars, the high tech army was the right should have one was. Right. Was fighting on the right for the right cause. And that forces us to think about asymmetric warfare as a politics as well. A military, even a bigger problem is the fact that terrorism makes boundaries disappear warfare and civilian life. The militants are so embedded in a moment, civilians, that really makes the whole notion of military intervention puts it in completely different life not completely different. The issue is still. How do you have you fight? In ways that minimize civilian casualties. Have you fight in ways that minimize the risks that he were imposing on, on civilians? And this is. This is an argument in the US army, and in the idea, and the crucial question for this kind of war. The crucial moral question is what risks do we ask our soldiers to accept in order to avoid to reduce the risks? They impose on enemy civilians who are being used as cover by enemy soldiers or militants, and that's a very, very hard question. And, and it is comes up in internal debate. In the army's crucial army that are fighting these kinds of wars are the US army, and the Israeli army, and these, these armies are debating this question. Can I? Let me give you an example, from the American war Afghanistan. Which I was told I was given this example by Colonel, but just back from Afghanistan at the army war. College in Pennsylvania. And this was right after general mcchrystal had announced the new rules of engagement for American soldiers in Afghanistan. So imagine this happened often an American army unit gross fire from the roof of a small apartment building in an Afghan town. The Taliban is on the roof. They don't know who is the building. What do you do Colonel said to me in the old days before the new rules of engagement, the soldiers would just pulled back and call it the air force, and blasts the to attack the Taliban on the roof? And destroy the apartment. The new rules of engagement say you can't do. So what are the alternatives? Well, you can cry to get a scout into the building to see if there are families in their if it's empty then you could call in there for. Or you could try to get soldiers onto an adjoining roof who can fire directly at the Taliban on without injuring people in the building. But both of those are more risque for your here's whereas calling the strike doesn't isn't risque for any of your soldiers, but very risky for civilians, if there is a billions in, in the building, and the new US rules of engagement at that time. This is twenty eleven. Required. The soldiers to take the additional. And the same argument, and there was protests. The New York Times reporters spoke to soldiers on the ground who said, we don't wanna fight under these rules. They make it to danger, some soldiers said that other soldiers this was the right thing to do in the same arguments go on the Israeli army, and that question it's not an easy question. Because the Solters our kid..

American army Taliban Israeli army Afghanistan general mcchrystal US Pennsylvania HAMAs The New York Times
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

06:45 min | 2 years ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"When weapons of mass destruction. We need an international system, and we need to be working to produce a stable international system. So I. Elation doesn't a. Sensible our see even if it were moral politics, even if we had no obligation abroad, but given our trade policies, given our interventions separate America do have locations broad. What happens when state interests contravene the moral Gatien of the left to help the oppressed victims of violent elsewhere, you say that you still are status believing in the power of the states to be predominant age critical agents in the world, but that the discount, distract from the agency of people, and in relation to Iran, but the Iranian human rights activists shooting about the quote, here that human rights defenders university professors international NGOs, should give aid to democratic institutions in this Baltic countries. So let's say, for example, you know, you can rely on states to deliver that what can. Individuals. All civil society groups do to do that. I mean, how do you envision that in practice? It's I I better playing what I mean by calling myself a status. Right now, the crucial agency of any for social action is sent. Sent. People who don't have states are in trouble, people who live in failed states are in deep. Trouble. The greatest human suffering in the world today comes about because of stapling. Stay and stay in the midst of civil war states. Run by more lords without a Regina that can bring law and order. We need. Are before you can really think about a better issue, national order, you have to complete the state system. Because. We should know this better than anyone else of the state of Israel's created in nineteen forty eight and it was a necessary creation. We know the history of owner ability and suffering that underlies that. That gives us the sensitive that, that proves the Stephanie of a steak. The Kurds the state, the Armenians Palestinians need state until everyone is everyone in the world. Is has the support of a decent state. It's aren't done with statehood and sovereignty once we have created a world of peace instead, then we can begin to think about turning the boundaries into Donald lines. Fostering communication and trade and scientific work across all around. But I people in the state there is no other agencies that can guarantee physical security welfare education, decent economic regulated Connolly there is no other Asian in the world today that can that can do those things except the modern state. And so we should all be say this. We're not living in post west failure age cosmopolitanism is green for people who are which is only possible for people who are already living in strong and safe places. Most of the world sorts interrupt. What happens when the threat comes from those state actors such terrorist groups? Yes. And then I mean, we as do as Greg believer in the state wants to send regular armies to fight those threats of terrorist groups. But the regular army of quite often many, many times are ill-equipped. Yes to address that threat. So I mean, I completely understand D benefit of hearing to state system, but it often doesn't do enough to undo the. Well, some of the threats come from groups trying to establish safe that was the Irish revolutionary army, the, the FM. Glenn out your. Kurds and the Turks call terrorists. Hilo. I have no sympathy with leftists, who make apologies for terrorism. I think it's very, very important to condemn. The politics of terrorism because it's our -tarian politics grapevine of carolers comes from cracks. Who said terrorists one can make the people happy without the participation of people. And that gets it. Exactly right. Terrorism is a lead us activity acquires. Samna zealotry self sacrifice, but the, if the terrorists win, they will create an authoritarian regime, because they are, and they lead movement, claiming to act in the name of the people, but without mobilize the people to act on their own behalf..

Iran Glenn America Irish revolutionary army Israel Hilo Regina Connolly Donald Greg
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

06:16 min | 2 years ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Regime in Venezuela called itself socialist, but it, it wasn't. It was a left populism, which is very much like right up Eliza. They give money to the poor which is what makes them popular and they keep giving money to the poor until the money runs out, and then they print money and that reduces inflammation, and then they can't rule out repression and that's the history of populace regimes. And that's not what socialists. So she would diversify the economy, strengthen the working class, they would they would try to create a sustainable welfare state. That's history. So full democracy and western your, which is one of the great achievements of the post World War, Two period. Socialists, south from Democrats from Scandinavia to across western Europe, created probably the most recent political social were James in human history. Now, they're in trouble. They need defense. And I think a lot of less politics, these days is defensive. Brunswick through another point that you elaborate new book, that he called the default position of the left of having focused predominantly on domestic leftist policies, and neglected foreign policies. But unfit to really into twine they should take western Europe. And the motion plan was decried by someone the left as imperialist intervention. But at the end of the day, this intervention is what has enabled European countries and establish as say modal leftist. Gene. What do you say to those people who want as a result of this default position of the left? Be the default position very old and in the scribe and get in the book I start with the biblical prophets. Who told the people of Israel? This is God's message if you do Justice. If you saw oppressing widows and orphans, if you stop grinding, the faces of the poor, if you stop worshipping idols. I will stab wish you in this land ever, and I will defeat the Assyrian about balloons, and all you have to do. Is several Justice at home. In order to be a light unto the nations. All you have to do is sit still and shine. And that, that is, I think that message from Isaiah is, is what meant most leftist believe, let we are best at domestic. And always have it. Stop grinding the faces of poor. That's the beginning of less politics. And. Most left this really believe. That if you create a Justice -iety at home, then you have done. Of what you have done is a great benefit for humankind, because they will see your accomplishment, and will want to imitate it and you will be a light unto the nations. I think that's a that is a standard left position. But it knows the problem of that deal. You are living in international society. That is a knock dick unstable, and awesome very dangerous. And so you have to be able to act outside your own border. Not society. I would argue because if you look at it inequality at home. And sense of prevention because of domestic policy is reads America first move. Right. They say we don't get the services and the money and what we should be getting as citizens of very wealthy nation. Even don't say explicitly. This is really the mechanism behind it. You know, think about us before you think about other people elsewhere. So there is some mileage in that default position to say that way to ensure a strong international presence for wealthy nations such as America is to ensure that there is popular support for it at home. And the way to do it is to cater to the needs of people. And that's one of the issues now in the debate over global. Was action. And is you have to regress leads of your own Selo citizens, and there is a sense, which they come first, but. We live in an interconnected world, the existence of strong trade unions, for example, in Mexico, or China would be a great benefit for the American economy. As well to the people of Mexico and China, so we have interests abroad. We also have interest at in a stable world. Order in a less dangerous world, especially in eight. When weapons of mass destruction. We need an international system, and we need to be working.

Europe Eliza James America Venezuela Mexico China Selo Israel Scandinavia Isaiah dick
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

05:52 min | 2 years ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"We can understand why the Neo cons many who were extracts is would have supported would have supported the second because they had the first still in their hands. But those that. It's the poles who have to establish communism in Poland. And it's the Iraqis who have to establish democracy in Iraq. And a foreign army is not the appropriate instrument of that kind of political transformation to juice say that only the urgent call to stop massacre. That's already undergo. Or is about imminently about to undergo only this is the moral obligation to intubate that any of the mall, south defenses, the classic and self defense can involve as in one thousand nine hundred sixty seven preemptive, self defense and defensive others is also those are. Self defense and the defensive others self defense when you are attacked defensive others, when they are being attacked. Those are think the crucial justifications for the use of force. The problem with militants mention is that as, as you're saying that it's normally a unilateral and is sponsored. I think that in this respect focusing down from a leftist decision could play into the hands of right wing, critics of because it's the left salt spots the left, what the soft spot of the life of the blind spot because it's a week for left is than. This regard other aspect of leftist, international attitudes such as consideration multi-lateralism, things like that, that the left can pursue with fewer qualms, I would say. It's a bit. Like if you were a right wing commentator saying that the right has a problem that made problem override is inequality, socially quality, and that's right. I mean, I think everybody accepts that but they say question priority, right? I mean, we are we accept that inequalities problem, but we bring in the values of the merits to offset that. We'll send to that puts an okay. Leave Mitterand avenge Cyprus second, and as left this, that sun a break, and that's construct. And let's promote and both Stor. International system that is based on consideration of them. Wouldn't that be a better way for? Yeah, it would be if it were possible, and when it becomes possible, I hope people on the left will support it, but. We have to go back to the questions of when the Vietnamese went into Cambodia and shut down the killing field. There was no one else who's going to do that. The UN would have voted against in intervention, which means voting in favor of continuing the massacre. If there were you win with a force of its own capable of intervening in timely way in the right places. Yes, we would certainly support that. So, in fact, in Rwanda, there were five thousand U, N, Krupes, and the commander of those troops cabled to the secretary, Joe and said. With small reinforcements. We can stop the massacre. And the Security Council who fuse to authorize him to do that. And his troops stayed in the barracks while eight hundred thousand people will will murder, so. Yes, if there is a u n force capable of the me that would be better than Abell Belgian or French, or American force, but unilateralism is right now need an option that we have to live with, because the present an alternative isn't that defeat this approach for a leftist. I mean you. I'll roll that. This is too big. And how we can make society betta will progressive while you're giving up on reforming the UN, for example, setting up another multilateral organization, bowl, maybe expanding mandate of NATO, for example, to cater to those needs. I think that in cases where it's possible to put together a coalition as in Kosovo costs of was essentially NATO intervention. And Kossovo today is a NATO protector essentially. Yes. I think that's better than than American interventional though. I'm frayed native wouldn't have acted if America happened decided to support an intervention..

Joe NATO UN Poland Iraq Cambodia Rwanda Kosovo Security Council Abell Belgian America Kossovo murder secretary Krupes commander
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Now they had strategic and Chris, I'm sure. But that stopped the killing there is no such thing in politics, as a pure, moral will. Motorists are always mixed. The Indians intervened in East Pakistan, helping to create bumble debt, stopping a terror campaign by the Pakistani government that had produced millions of refugees. They also had through teacher interest, but they stop the terror. Pens, Ania overthrew, brutal regime of Idi Amin in Uganda. Another intervention that I'm sure had strategic purposes. But they overthrew a brutal regime. I don't expect anywhere even in non-imperial pelvis. I don't expect a purely moral politics, politics is, is always, motivational lead. Mixed. But there if. But if we get certain results that are morally important, like stopping the massacre, then we can live with the fact that the Vietnamese then set up a satellite regime Cambodia. Okay. That's better than a murderers who she. Then I mean. If to take it back to again, Erica. But even when it's not an urgent, call such stopping massacre, but it would take the invasion of Iraq in two thousand three that on papers seemed like. Tiny moral mission to bring the city. To a country that suffered from brutal pression on the terrible tyrant. And. The problem is always the reality is just too complicated. And I mean there's. What do you do? One defining your own moral philosophy when it's just that, you know, the very dog aspect of politics, always that haunt. I mean I'm my second sympathetic to those doubts exactly. For those reasons. I mean, you just never know what's lurking behind the corner. But you have to learn something from history of stopping a massacre is reason of good reason for sending an army, of course, a border regime change is not a good reason. The model that we should have thought of immediately, the, the parallel is the Red Army in nineteen nineteen marching on Poland to create a communist regime in Warsaw. American army many years later marching on Baghdad, to create a democratic regime. In, in Iraq..

Iraq Red Army Ania Idi Amin American army East Pakistan Pakistani government Chris Cambodia Uganda Baghdad Erica Poland Warsaw
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Please consider giving Tel Aviv review depends on your support. I'm your host get out Halpern. And my guest today is a professor of Middle East. Studies at Tel Aviv university. He is the author of the shape of shakes myth gal phase and tribal leadership in modern, Jordan. It was published recently in English by Stanford University press, professor Avalon. Hello and welcome to the Tel Aviv review. Hello, so myth gal. Fires is that. How you pronounce his name several ways you can the way he put on his own gal gal that the bedouin way. Who was he and why does he deserve bail? Graffiti when Mikhail was one of the greatest shakes of Arabia in the twentieth century. He was the leader of big tribal confederacy, which lead in the areas that. Now, Jordan, the Hashemite king of Jordan. He was very influential leader who was to power in the late nineteenth century early. Twentieth. Century played an important role in the first World War in the twins to Jenin four as an ally of Ottoman empire, by the way, then he played a very important role in their starving of Jordan in nine twenty one under the auspices of the British empire, and then he led his tribal confederacy for nearly fifty years, and he lied. I didn't ninety sixty seven even today. We can see his legacy in Jordan his descendants. They play poem in troll into politics to stay here. For instance, his grandson is now, the president of the Senate upper house. So when you thought about writing this book was it because there was virtually no one else more important in the formation of Jordan other than perhaps some kings or members of the Royal family. There are several things why such right about infest of all there is. Nearly nothing written about tribal leaders in the Middle East and those people were willing potent figures, and they played a very important world for centuries in many ways still do today. So I want to feel that lacuna and also Mikhail attracted me because I stumbled on him in the archives in the central tiny arc of Jerusalem. The very early stage of my democrat. He had very interesting relationship with the Jewish Agency in Palestine, thirties and forties. We'll get to that. In. I realized that a lot of historical material about him usually the problem with writing about tribal leaders of his Tuchel is that they did not invite. So that didn't leave any historical records. But he was someone who happy because it was so influential and powerful he trusted many writings, and there's a lot of stock records about him written by British officials Zionist officials Americans and many explorers who visited his camps..

Jordan Tel Aviv university professor Mikhail Tel Aviv Middle East Halpern Stanford University Jewish Agency in Palestine Arabia Senate Jenin Jerusalem president Royal family fifty years
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

08:33 min | 3 years ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"This is GAL B one one. The Tel Aviv review. Hello and welcome to the Tel Aviv review programme dedicated to the word to the thought and to debate Brought to you by the Van, their Jerusalem Institute, which promotes humanistic democratic, and liberal values in the social discourse in Israel, I'm Dahlia Shenlin an armed lot Hope every week we'll be talking about books and research and other things that have called her attention. Our guest today is Oreo severe tease the scholar of Islamic law. Theology and politics is the head of the Department of Arabic and Islamic studies and of the religious studies program at Tel Aviv University. In addition to his work because the scholarship, It is a former journalist and the author of bestselling novel and 5 bucks where young readers were. We talking about His latest book called scientific and political freedom in Islam. A critical reading of the modernised apologetic School published by Rao pledge in two thousand seventeen. And we'll be asking whether religion, science and government can ever Coexist specifically, but not exclusively. In the case of Islam, Professor aureus of you tell when welcome back to the Aviv review your Metro, having the. So at this caller Islam, my question to you is, is it really a uniquely Islamic question what makes this a specific topic of inquiry in Islam relative to say a chase question about religion and systems of government or the same question in Christianity? And all of us to the question of religion, science is not unique to each Tom, and because religion represents an absolute truth. And science is about exploring new truth or exploring truth that something that has not been achieved yet. So all the stayed. This is universal question, But I think the two things we can say about Islam in my book pretty much is my my my expiration of the topic, pretty much derives from them. A There is a scientific up in the Muslim world The over in modern times. The scientific contribution of Lissom societies has been very, very modest, I should say. And the second point is that there is something which is unique to Muslim societies. I think which is that the mainstream religious establishments and mainstream religious callers appear to have managed to come up with a way of reconciling religion and science, which is possibly more sophisticated and more widespread than parlours in Judaism in Christianity in us was So basically the question I was asking if As Troon these true, then How does that make sense? But tell us about the history of Islam and science because as you point out throughout that history, this phase where you say this logic world has not contributed that much to science is actually a more modern development. And in earlier stages, Islam did have a particular relationship to science can take us. Some of that Italy's slum never had the contribution to science Muslim societies had must two signs of Meet the question of the science people just science, absolutely and people who are religious, who and religiously Muslim, they contribute to the greatly to science at a time when the Christian Walden and other world civilizations were not as developed and humanity owes a great that two Muslim scientists and selected emerge from those Muslims as opposed to Christians or Jews in that time. Is there any particular reason or adjust was an Well, this is very much debated, but I have to say it for contemporary Muslim scholars. This is the point though, was I alight? There was a time in history when Muslims wall, the ones who contributed most to size. Therefore, the problem is not with a slump. Obviously the problems Nova's Tom Christianity, Judaism. The problem is with the way people interpret them in the way that practice them, that what we should point two is something that changing our world over the last three hundred years. Largely in the Western Wall than that is that religious establishments are no longer are no longer in a position where they can monopolized truth and monopolize science. And we see a very obvious correlation which by the way Muslim scholars, the ones I'm dealing with in my book also recognised. They also acknowledged the correlation between the secularization of the West and the great scientific and technological advancements that we are enjoying. So. All the itself recognizes that in the West, The West owes its great advancements to the fact that it secularize This is what the greatest Muslim scholars of all time. The ones I'm dealing with that they recognised We're talking about a period that saw the somewhere in the 19th century and has lots of unt until today. In a time when of course there were two during all that, you know, creating oldest intellectual debate in the shadow of the great prominence of the Christian or post-Christian World western powers at cetera. Was this debate polemical in any way were the engaging in it just because there were facing the the Christians, They were engaged with it because they were terrified. And let me tell you what they will really terrified about it. Often imperialism is is the thing that's mention? No, They were not terrified about imperialism. There were terrified about death. Let me explain what I mean for some why I am way. In other words, they seldom afraid of dying. I just don't want to be there when it happens. The wealth. Yeah, well, he said Mullah many things that we did. Here's the thing for some one leg Mohammed Abdel for example in in the sense, the founder of Islamic modern is for someone like him. It was obvious. It was absolutely obvious that there is got. That Hamann was the prophet of God, and that the Coombe is the book of God, and therefore that there is enough to live And there is Heaven and he's going there because he's done all the right things. And then at some point in his early life, he learned something which is shockingly learns that there are people to think very differently. This can live with. But those people think very differently. Those people will thing the two plus two six They're the wind while superior thou far more advanced and they have become. So only after they became secular, He recognizes acknowledges that they owe their advancement to becoming secular. And therefore you can see what follows. He needs to answer a simple question. Could it be that for us, Muslims to also become more advance. We must also secularize. This is a very, very troubling notion because what he's about to lose is not just about the Japan independence. Almost him independence. It's about the afterlife, which as we all know is much longer than this life. So there is a. Lot at stake here, And therefore he needs to devise an answer which would either concede that indeed, to become secular, to become doubt. Face person is the only way to march forward in modern times or to suggest something else any he does in what he suggests an and this is still very dominant in the most Wall today. This is mainstream thought is that Christianity is a singular experience. The Christian societies all unique because of certain limitations they have because of So then characteristics of Christianity. Christianity and science uh. Not comments you right, they cannot live side-by-side, And he slum is different. Islam is the friend of science in slum is the friend of technology Islamise everything Christianity is not therefore the problem of Muslim societies. The reason why there are not scientifically advanced is not that they all Muslim, but the not truly most. And here Hamad Abdel makes the very famous statement, which by the way, has all famous state Smith, I could never find a reference to. He says, I was in Europe and everywhere I saw a slum. But I did not see Muslims. I returned to Egypt everywhere as so Muslims. But I did not see Slump. And the idea is actually very simple. Aim being scientifically and technologically advanced the Western as a more Muslim than the Muslims themselves. Though for the problem of wisdom, society is not the they are Muslim, but the not Muslim enough, The truly Muslim and the way to become truly Muslim is to become scientific. Technologically advance which Islam not only allows, but in fact commands. I think this is an interesting segue into understanding the really the core

Tom Christianity Tel Aviv Mohammed Abdel Tel Aviv University Rao Department of Arabic Aviv Israel Europe Dahlia Shenlin Egypt Italy Jerusalem Institute Christian Walden Van Professor Japan Mullah Hamann founder
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"The tel aviv review hello and welcome to the tel aviv review a programme dedicated to the word to the thought and to debate brought to you by the van their jerusalem institute which promotes humanistic democratic and liberal values in the social discourse in israel i'm dahlia shenlin and arm get on how peng every week we are we talking about books in research and other things that have kotaro attention our guest today is dr konare at la hug she's a senior lecturer in the uh women and gender studies program at tel aviv university today we're we're talking about a new book it's called a table for one rescheduling single hood and time it was published by manchester university press just recently in 2017 cannot loudon hello and welcome to the tel avi review hello welcome thank you so you'll study focuses on the temporal aspect off female singer who women are referred to as still single the refer to as old spinsters and of course the ubiquitous his presence off the biological clock why is it important to focus on the temporary aspect and what light does it really shed porn your analysis i think that in general single hood is too large extent still very under theorized in understudied and i think that's one of the biggest challenges for a single hood scholars today is trying to debunk the stereotypes and stigmas that single persons are subjected to an an every day basis and also in the next essential framework has well and when i began my study i actually was thinking of researching single hood and social emotions of trying to understand single hood in relation to shame and humiliation and jealousy and anger and happiness but the more i dwell into the textual analysis the more i read about single hood i.

israel senior lecturer tel aviv university jerusalem institute manchester university
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"World or at least in moments that you wanted to try to convey well i was told by a scholar that this was an exercise in in meta fiction and i he thought i pretended that i didn't know what that was when asked what that was asked what that was a rarest to say exactly and i'm not either i think it's sort of writing consciously about the writing process within this story at least you didn't say now i'm writing which i can't stand personally but right right but it's again about imagine worlds from the world in which we find ourselves writes that the main character is in tel aviv during a sandstorm and an imagining his wife in china of its in romania visiting her grandparents graves and great ships in time and place and sensibilities and it's not just thinking in the third person thinking in many different third person's yes narrators jump yes yes does that get confusing for you during a writing it must it is over doesn't translate onto the page well i think it doesn't away but it's an interesting confusion because in many ways i think it is how we experience life if you know you're the kind of person who goes around in tries to understand who the people are around you and also keeps us on the edges of a seats and it reminds us that life is so dynamic especially in israel i'm in one day so different from the next you never know what's going to come next analysts here i mean i'm one person i mean you have characters has sort of jump into that story for just a fragment of a sentence him but it it reminds you g that person that i might not have noticed who's just a teeny little part of my life is a full human being even if i only see one little tip than us burden did you experience any critics are reviews will reduce trying to compartmentalize you you know writing about israel and having moved to israel.

china romania israel one day
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Cbs implicitly i haven't been aware of it and it was pointed out to me yet it's something me back compartmentalize so i'm very very aware of the conflict and think about it a lot but i'm just not brave enough to tackled and fiction or maybe i don't want to merge this fiction with reality i'm not sure it has to be but i'm not saying yeah sure sure i have to say you reminded me of the british film director stephen frears i'll tell you why years ago when to one of his movie talks i think it was the film festival in jerusalem and healthy of his selfdeprecating english after all it was iit yeah was steroid switched on the camera and lo and behold there was the film i feel that when we're trying to analyse you'll rioting uaw almost like taking the step back and talking about it also from a detached that are distanced perspective just like your characters perhaps i'm trying to think why that is why you treat you writing in a very matteroffact way which is something i have to say i'm not used to big epiphany coming guy hoping to get an some sort of insight into the creative process i'm not necessarily saying this is a criticism can you take us true your creative process i mean just pick the story at random sure perhaps swiss one that russia is is wonderful first of all i don't know it selfdeprecating to say i turned on the camera and there was the movie because i love the net analogy that stories often right themselves and i think there is a great truth to that and maybe that's what stephen frears men right i just turn on the cabin there was the move it here so i like that in terms of the with the impetus for a story again sometimes it starts with the setting sometimes with a with a mood an atmosphere swan street is a good example i was living in boston tell us about the it's story so it's about a new immigrant to america who instead of settling in and starting a new life you moves into a bed and breakfast and refuses to leave so it's this idea of sort of the temporary versus permanence and it was based on an encounter i had with the russian jewish immigrants in boston.

Cbs jerusalem uaw russia boston director stephen frears america
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"I felt this sense of longing very intensely or reading these authors you're longing was for israel from a merry s all you had you had a vision of spending more time here and will always wanting to come here right and i never thought it would happen to be out in and it did what it was it like ruin englishlanguage author who gets published mainly in the american provocations foreign american audience other than the detachment from the places that you write about do you feel that you are also detached from your professional luther amelia and how does that affect your work you mean living in israel now yes well i i just have live in constant fear them going to lose language so i have a good community of writers here and allies in that sense but only beverage of subscribing to the new yorker and atlantic to a feel connected with the language nobody is it like selfimposed exile that may undermine your creativity i certainly hope now at w what's funny is that because writers need conflicts to produce good material often and here i feel utterly at home and not in exile not uprooted i thought you know i'm i'm going to be too well adjusted to ever right again but that forced me to rely more on my majid nation than on things that were happening in my own life we'll since he mentioned conflict i feel like we have to ask i mean i'm thinking about the other fiction author is that we've had on the show and actually all of them have been had dealt on some level with the conflict from the reach for beyond who wrote about an arab jewish relationship had enough garon who wrote about a third rogue settlement and and others that we had greater komo and glen ackerman of course who wrote about it a israeli palestinian friendship between women so i'm not saying force that that has to be the but isn't the conflict so much a part of the backdrop whether it's explicit or implicit in the israeli mentality and has that maiden appearance in your writing it i don't think it has consciously i don't think it's penetrated the stories perhaps it's an looking there in the background so certainly not explicitly in these other is italy not explicitly.

israel luther amelia new yorker garon komo glen ackerman selfimposed italy
"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"tel aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"It changed the way i i saw the world we have to know which seen i know and i can't remember salary shows going in every member sure it wasn't the dream sequence where he has like a dream please falling into sleep in the dream that's what i remember from the castle i just i remember that afterwards i didn't see the world the same way again that's okay i get the impression that left me with what about uh talked earlier about uh the jewish american leon the jewish cannoned i'm trying to think were isro fits into shoora to the all some references in the booster is robot actually unlike dolly i didn't feel like it was using a jewish atmosphere did not say they i asked the question here as i say because i think there's a lot of us the okay but that's how we for i thought that if i didn't know your stolen when i read i mean your identity and win read the book a wouldn't be able to feel that was particularly jewish but if you'd like to expend more on on the issue of the jewish identity of fuel characters of youth themes but also flesh out where israel fits in sure sure so i think the characters they are many of them are jewish many destroys actually set in israel and many of the characters are aware of some kind of collective past and they like referencing that passed in ways easily not very arrogate ways 'cause i feel myself i know so little about things jewish but just ways to connect them to the past and to have a conversation with that past so in the stories that are sudden is rather not trying to convey a particular idea or a message but some kind of atmosphere so what there's a story said in tel aviv and what conveys tel aviv from me is actually something that i observed recently an ancient man being pushed in a wheelchair by an equally ancient man and there is something about that i felt conveyed tel aviv but it's not necessarily the jewish experience but maybe the jewish experience because again there's this idea of you know two friends i'm taking care of each other but that's again going very let's stretch but do feel that uh moving to who's road train.

israel isro