18 Burst results for "Teen Magazine"

"teen magazine" Discussed on Trumpcast

Trumpcast

06:00 min | 8 months ago

"teen magazine" Discussed on Trumpcast

"Before we had out. We want to give you recommendations so heather. What are you loving right now. I want to recommend listening to music. Okay so partly wanted to be a troll and be like. Hey have you heard of it but specifically i want to recommend if you are a podcast listener podcast listener like i am forcing yourself to listen to music. Sometimes which i really did have to force myself because i don't do it because i'm just i'm always behind on my podcast and everything but i've sort of developed this routine of like maybe i'll listen to a few songs by walking to the subway in a summer strut esque way to invoke the culture gap fast. And i just love it. And i had completely forgotten how fun it is listened to music which is so stupid and basic and one thing i particularly like to do is to endure something also. Very simple is a shuffled playlist so using the shuffle feature. I have a playlist on spotify. That i've been keeping since i started my spotify account whenever spotify started like eight years ago and so it has so many songs on it that i forgot i added and i just love when a song i haven't heard in a while or maybe even forgot completely comes on and i'm like why did i add this. What is this. i don't know. And then i get to the part that i really like or that just is very pleasing to my ear and it makes me think. Oh that's why added this. I love this song It's so cool to reconnect with whatever past version of myself is still enjoying the same. Sounds okay so rebecca what about you. What do you recommend your recommendation is like calling me out. Because i never listen to music on my headphones. I think what you're recommending. He's listening to your headphones. Because i was oh yeah maybe that's it. I will hot while. I'm working like sure. But when i'm like on my headphones like walking to work i will not. I only listen to podcast. Because i have so many to get through as you said but my husband is always like listen to music. It's so meditative. And i'm like i don't have time for meditation. I know right consume content. But you're right. I really should do that. So i'm going to recommend a show called victoria. Which is a pbs. Show about the early life of queen. Victoria that i watched on amazon prime and it has gentleman as queen victoria like. I don't believe in royals. And i have a hard time understanding how much i like it. But it's very beautiful. I didn't know that much about the life of queen victoria which is ridiculous call. I really liked the nineteenth century. Weirdly learned a lot from watching victoria. And then while. I'm watching it like googling wikipedia getting the various figures political figures that appear in it which as a method of sort of. Bring yourself up to speed on a type of history. I don't really recommend. But in a way i kind of do you recommend but the main thing about victoria is beautiful all the interiors and the dresses are really beautiful. And there's a really hot romance between victoria and her husband albert. Who's played by tom hughes. Who's a lanky serious german guy and if that doesn't sound hot like i don't know but you should watch it air flops. Over his eyes and he kind of intensely leans towards her ear quite a bit and he also wants the world to be a better place and he tries to teach her how to how to also work for that. Now again was queen. Victoria actually like a saint. Who did all the things that are depicted in the show like probably not but i could not stop watching the show and i'm sure i will keep on watching it when whenever returns which. I'm not sure it will but if it does it will be there so i recommend that and then i also recommend the book amanite by nicola griffith which i'm currently reading Which is about an anthropologist who goes to a planet where all the men have died of plague. And i'm reading it. Because i'm writing a piece about why the last man which is a show that is currently airing and the idea of a place where all the men have died of plague an and is like seventy times better than the show. Why the last man. It's really good and smart. And i recommend it a planet where all the men have died of plague is just a great one line pitch. Yeah sounds wonderful. Well and it's also like it's like a couple of one hundred years after that's happened so the woman have like adjusted in various ways and there different tribes that do different things and have like different traditions. Well i haven't actually figured out the secret of how they reproduce yet. Because i think it's not totally revealed to me but it has to do with meditation Speaking of meditation. Maybe i took on my headphones. Response ashley reproduce which would be actually unwelcomed. So i'm going to go back to my pocket okay. That's our show this week. The waves is produced by sheena raw. Susan matthews is our editorial director with june thomas providing oversight and moral support. If you like the show be sure to subscribe rate in review wherever you get your podcast. Please consider supporting the show by joining sleep. Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any slate podcast and bonus content of. She was like this one. It's only a dollar for the first month to learn more go to slate dot com slash waves. Plus we'd also love to hear from you. Email us at the waves at fleet dot com. The way it will be back next week. Different hosts different topic. Seen time and please..

victoria heather plague Victoria nicola griffith tom hughes rebecca royals amazon albert sheena raw Susan matthews ashley
"teen magazine" Discussed on Trumpcast

Trumpcast

08:13 min | 8 months ago

"teen magazine" Discussed on Trumpcast

"Now. I wonder what you think about this. Because i feel a little bit sort of like suspicious of this some degree and in two thousand eighteen when seventeen. Shut down its print edition. I wrote a piece for slate. That was like i'm glad teen magazines or done. And one of the reasons that i brought up was that i feel like they treat teen readers teen girls as like this one community. One sort of kind of person like an american teenage girl. And because you're you're always trying to sort of pick your magazine to advertisers. You don't ever want to say actually we're only going to serve a certain kind of teenage girl or whatever like you have to say that you're going to try to serve everybody and create a community for everybody but honestly looking back in two thousand twenty one. I'm not actually sure that. That's that's possible. So heather as a person who as you just said Came of age during the golden age of teen magazines. Did you get a feeling of community from it and were you inspired to do to go into writing from it. I would say no. Or i don't know maybe a little but it's interesting trying to think about it. I think i. I loved reading between magazines for sure but a lot of it was for superficial reasons like i really wanted to see the prom dresses and the pictures of celebrities. I liked photo shoots. And i even like the ads like there were ads for new hair and makeup stops that i then wanted and go and i remember. That will say i'd apricot scrub. Oh for sure but also my knee jerk reaction to you saying it's a good thing that this doesn't exist anymore as no like i have so much nostalgia for reading the magazines and i'm trying to separate out whether that's because they were important to my development in some way or whether i just liked you know looking at now polish you know. It's okay to like looking at now polish. i don't know i think they should have more value than just. Oh it provides a nice break from screen time so it. It's good for you to read things. That aren't your phone. But did the way that i think sassy actually had sassy writing like funny and inspiring writing. I don't know that. I really felt bad about teen magazines. I mean maybe there there were like l. girl. I thought was kind of different. And funny. And i did their worst things in them. That were influential to me. Like they would recommend books. And i think i found some of my favorite books one book in particular. I remember i left in high school was sloppy. I and i think. I i saw that a teen magazine but i don't feel like they are are what guided me towards wanting to be a writer. I think i got that more from reading. Entertainment weekly even premier other things so slightly older magazines for slightly older people that were still about topics that you were interested in. Yes which was totally your argument in the piece that we shouldn't separate out what the content we give teen readers. They just read about what they're interested in not just read teenage staff but it also matters to me that there was a magazine for teen girls. I think i thought that was so cool. Then and i you know. I think it's so cool now. And i'm not sure like mis Dinosaur who needs to be disabused of these notions. And i thank you for doing everybody up. I just want. I just want to know more about why you think it's cool. I know what you mean about that. But it's interesting. Because i actually just started in preparation for this podcast. Been listening to the podcast. Listen to sassy which has a couple of hosts including tara arianna who. I'm a big fan of reading old issues of sassy. And i started listening to it. Because i wanted to. Just be remember like reminded of what the magazine was about. And kind of like being able to articulate a little bit better on here. Why i liked it so much and why i felt a sense of community from a and it's funny because they have respect for a sassy and they really like sassy but they're also like very merciless about some of the parts of sassy. That are a little bit embarrassing in hindsight like and listening to them. I'm like i actually think that the parts of sassy that are embarrassing were embarrassing. Because it's like when something is for teenage girls. You have to be a certain way like sassy was like very like alarmist about drugs like they'd be like you know someone would right into the health advice column and say can you die from from marijuana and one of the writers would write back and say well. I don't think so. But i did have a friend who wants virtually from smoking marijuana and like the host of this podcast like this is preposterous. Like like no no no no. That's not what happened. I mean famously. Sassy was like personally brought down by attacks christian rate who basically hated them for implying. That sex was okay. Which is the way that you're sort of let constraints but you know there's all kinds of other problems you could find with the magazine now. The voice was still in my opinion. Sort of like foundational for internet writing but fundamentally it is like when i look back at it and i'm like yeah it was like quote unquote cool as you put it that. There was this thing that i could read. That had like. It was just full of things that i would like and some of the things were like cute boys like pictures of boys and pictures of fashion that i liked and some of the things were as you said the advertisements. Because i think there's like a special kind of consumerism that you have is like a child and a teenager. My four year old daughter already kind of has it like she just likes to look at the backs of lego instructional booklets and see what other lego she could get the teen magazine sort of served as that kind of like like bastion of consumerism. Mixed together with like a bunch of like sort of bigly interesting features. I don't know. But i but looking back on like that i. I still don't know if. I think that was a good thing but like you say more about why you think it was cool. I think i was just always excited about the the trappings of being a teenager and a teenage girl. And i don't know like now. I'm trying to think about why and i'm like. No that was toxic. Everything i dunno. I thought was cool about it. Like the idea of going to prom and like boys and like having a locker in highschool. Why does any of that matter. But it was something that i wanted and was really interested in. I guess i've always been drawn to coming of age story. So so maybe that that's part of it especially when i was younger but i was trying to figure out who i was and there was some element of even if in bad ways the teen magazines were showing you how to be a teenage girl and i think some of that messaging was obviously not great but maybe it was also of comfort. I think about it a lot with my daughter. Because she's she's just sort of like absorbing she's just falling in love with various texts and you can see how when you're sort of like a young person and a teenager particular attacks like imprint on you and maybe it's more about like the experience because you're thinking intelligent person with like a lot of reflective capacity. So you had this experience with a piece of media where it like imprinted on you in some weird way and maybe now girls are having that happen with like you know. Some instagram posted. A star puts up that like brands itself into their brain over member. I think the experience is still valuable. We're.

tara arianna heather Entertainment weekly Sassy
"teen magazine" Discussed on Trumpcast

Trumpcast

06:51 min | 8 months ago

"teen magazine" Discussed on Trumpcast

"Now there are none and the teen magazines that still exists or limping along online on the women's side. Things aren't much better. Glamorous stopped publishing the print edition in two thousand nineteen have mary. Clair's print issue. We found out a few days ago as we were preparing. This episode is also discontinued. What are the reading populations that once turn to these publications reading for fun now and where and contemporary media can we find their legacy now. This is a topic very close to my heart. Because i started out in media at a teen magazine called. Ym and i wasn't completely happy there but it was also a teen magazine Sassy the great durable of its asi. Whichever one in generation x. remembers that made me feel like. I even wanted to be a magazine writer and right now. Today i doubly wants to talk about this pressing issue because had there has just published an excellent piece on the one time editor of cosmo girl and seventeen who now has substance and is becoming an instagram personality. A tusa rubinstein heather. Why is this topic close to your heart. I was also an avid reader as teen magazines. And the time that you're talking about when you graduated college. That was when i was a preteen at end early team but there was a particular like mini boom of them. That's been cosmo girl started. Which is the magazine. Bet a tusa. Rubinstein founded that's when teen people started l. girl teen vogue And i also used to love reading the print versions of women's magazines. It used to be so fine. Like i would look forward to riding on a plane because i would have like magazines and candy or going to the nail reading magazine like just so luxurious and fun and now that seems like a total acronym so a tusa was sort of this mythic figure from my teen years. What really sticks with me about a two. So when i think back to then and reading magazines she was. The editor of cosmo girl and then went on. To seventeen is her editors letters and in particular. She always posted these dorky photos of her. I don't know they just looked so embarrassing to me. Her photos from So dorky her haircuts. Or i don't know what she was wearing and she just you know. Put it all out there even then and that would become a in her life I guess and it's relevant to what she's doing now so something i didn't realize at the time about a to say is she was also super successful just in her media career and it wasn't until i was in college and sort of started starting to think maybe i wanted to work in magazines but i really understood button achievement. That was that she had founded a magazine so young. She found it when she was still in her twenties. But that's also when. I was starting to feel more cynical about teen magazines thinking. I wish i had been part of the sassy generation. And i sort of wonder what would have happened if it had been more of an option for me to work in teen or women's magazines like is that direction. My career would have gone if i were ten or fifteen years older and it. It's interesting to think about. It would have been a totally different life. Resonate with so much of that. And i can't wait to talk to you about it and so coming up. We're gonna talk about the idea that women's and teen magazines created community which is something that people who work at women's on teen magazines would often talk about and the idea that they supported young female writers who might not otherwise have gotten chances to have a media career off. This episode is brought to you by hp plus in a world full of smart devices. Isn't it about time. Your printer got smart to now. Printing is smart with hp fuss and the hp smart up is how all happens. You can print from your phone with just a tab no matter where you are even from your garage slash home office slash yoga studio. That is smart. Hp plus learn more about smart printing at hp dot com slash smart. Thank you so much for listening. I wanted to take effect in and welcome all our you listeners. And our old ones to haven't forgotten about you. If you're loving the show. And wanna hear morris subscribe to our new episodes. Come out every thursday morning while you're there check out our other episodes to like last week's hosts emily packed and shannon palace. Talk about whether disgrace theranos founder. Elizabeth home is actually a girl boss. Okay let's talk about what teed magazines and women's magazines meant to us as young graders so among people who do sort of miss the era of team and women's magazines there is some discussion of the idea that they're like an incubator of community and place. Where young female writers can kind of get a start. There's people from the mid century era. The often mentioned in connection to this so sylvia plath was published in seventeen and betty for dan air at a bunch of her ideas for the feminine mystique in ladies home journal which is sort of like unexpected counter narrative that you find inside these magazines that were actually very much established to serve sort of like a white middle class. You know woman who would sort of follow very traditional path within society but some of these starry examples aside once community and career advancement really what we got from them when they still existed. Maybe it's because. I worked at one. But i just always have so much trouble with the sort of representation of teen magazines as a place where people could connect so for example. There's a quote from two thousand sixteen. That wasn't a refinery twenty nine piece that had a bunch of good quotes around two thousand sixteen about teen magazines in this kind of nostalgia and this quotas from the one time teen vogue editor elaine welter off. And she said for being part of a community that you identify with is so important subscribing to a print title even two thousand sixteen. Which again is when she's speaking to. This reporter is like signing up for club that serves you on a more personal level at teen vogue. We have created a community for our readers to belong to be seen in hurt identify with the stories that we tell.

rubinstein heather Hp Clair Rubinstein shannon palace theranos ladies home journal sylvia plath morris emily Elizabeth betty dan elaine welter
"teen magazine" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

06:00 min | 8 months ago

"teen magazine" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"Before we had out. We want to give you recommendations so heather. What are you loving right now. I want to recommend listening to music. Okay so partly wanted to be a troll and be like. Hey have you heard of it but specifically i want to recommend if you are a podcast listener big cast listener like i am forcing yourself to listen to music sometimes which i really did have to force myself because i don't do it because i'm just i'm always behind on my podcast and everything but i've sort of developed this routine of like maybe i'll listen to a few songs by walking to the subway in a summer strut esque way to invoke the culture gap fast. And i just love it. And i had completely forgotten how fun it is listening to music which is so stupid and basic and one thing i particularly like to do is to endure something. Also very simple is a shuffled playlist so using the shuffle feature. I have a playlist on spotify. That i've been keeping since i started my spotify account whenever spotify started like eight years ago and so it has so many songs on it that i forgot i added and i just love when a song i haven't heard in a while or maybe even forgot completely comes on and i'm like why did i add this. What is this. i don't know. And then i get to the part that i really like or that just is very pleasing to my ear and it makes me think. Oh that's why added this. I love this song It's so cool to reconnect with whatever past version of myself is still enjoying the same. Sounds okay so rebecca what about you. What do you recommend your recommendation is like calling me out. Because i never listen to music on my headphones. I think what you're recommending. He's listening to your headphones. Because i was oh yeah maybe that's it. I will out while. I'm working like sure. But when i'm like on my headphones like walking to work i will not. I only listen to podcast. Because i have so many to get through as you said but my husband is always like listen to music. It's so meditative. And i'm like i don't have time for meditation right consume content. But you're right. I really should do that. So i'm gonna recommend show called victoria. Which is a pbs show about. The early life of queen victoria that i watched on amazon prime. And it has gentleman as queen victoria. Like i don't believe in royals. And i have a hard time understanding how much i like it. But it's very beautiful. I didn't know that much about the life of queen victoria which is ridiculous call. I really liked the nineteenth century. Weirdly learned a lot from watching victoria. And then while. I'm watching it like googling wikipedia hitting the various figures political figures that appear in it which as a method of sort of. Bring yourself up to speed on a type of history. I don't really recommend. But in a way i kind of do recommend but the main thing about victoria is beautiful all the interiors and the dresses are really beautiful. And there's a really hot romance between victoria and her husband albert. Who's played by tom hughes. Who's a linke's serious german guy. And if that doesn't sound hot like i don't know but you should watch it air flops. Over his eyes and he kind of intensely leans towards her ear quite a bit and he also wants the world to be a better place and he tries to teach her how to how to also work for that. Now again was queen. Victoria actually like a saint. Who did all the things that are depicted in the show like probably not but i could not stop watching the show and i'm sure i will keep on watching it when whenever returns which. I'm not sure it will but if it does it will be there so i recommend that and then i also recommend the book amanite by nicola griffith which i'm currently reading Which is about an anthropologist who goes to a planet where all the men have died of plague. And i'm reading it. Because i'm writing a piece about why the last man which is a show that is currently airing and the idea of a place where all the men have died of plague an and is like seventy times better than the show. Why the last man. It's really good and smart. And i recommend it a planet where all the men have died of plague is just a great one line. Pitch sounds wonderful well and it's also like it's like a couple of one hundred years after that's happened so the women have like adjusted in various ways and there different tribes that do different things and have like different traditions. Well i haven't actually figured out the secret of how they reproduce yet. Because i think it's not totally revealed to me but it has to do with meditation Speaking of meditation. Maybe i took my headphones response. Ashley reproduce which would be actually unwelcomed. So i'm going to go back to my pocket okay. That's our show this week. The waves is produced by sheena raw. Susan matthews is our editorial director with june thomas providing oversight and moral support. If you like the show be sure to subscribe rate in review wherever you get your podcast. Please consider supporting the show by joining sleep. Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any slate podcast and bonus content of. She was like this one. It's only a dollar for the first month to learn more go to slate dot com slash the waves. Plus we'd also love to hear from you. Email us at the waves at fleet dot com. The way it will be back next week. Different hosts different topic. Seen time and please..

victoria heather plague nicola griffith tom hughes queen victoria rebecca royals pbs amazon albert Victoria sheena raw Susan matthews Ashley
"teen magazine" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

Slate's Double X Gabfest

05:10 min | 8 months ago

"teen magazine" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

"And in some way that you couldn't probably say you recognize that it was working before we had out. We want to give you recommendations so heather. What are you loving right now. I want to recommend listening to music. Okay so partly just wanted to be a troll and be like hey have you heard of it but specifically i want to recommend if you are a podcast listener podcast listener like i am forcing yourself to listen to music sometimes which i really did have to force myself because i don't do it because i'm just i'm always behind on my podcast and everything but i've sort of developed this routine of like maybe i'll listen to a few songs by walking to the subway in a summer strut esque way to invoke the culture gap fast. And i just love it. And i had completely forgotten how fun it is listening to music which is so stupid and basic and one thing i particularly like to do is to endure something. Also very simple is a shuffle playlist so using the shuffle feature. I have a playlist on spotify. That i've been keeping since i started my spotify account whenever spotify started like eight years ago and so it has so many songs on it that i forgot i added and i just love when a song i haven't heard in a while or maybe even forgot completely comes on and i'm like why did i add this. What is this. i don't know. And then i get to the part that i really like or that just is very pleasing to my ear and it makes me think. Oh that's why added this. I love this song It's so cool to reconnect with whatever past version of myself is still enjoying the same. Sounds okay so rebecca what about you. What do you recommend your recommendation is like calling me out. Because i never listen to music on my headphones. I think what you're recommending. He's listening to your headphones. Because i was oh yeah maybe that's it. I will out while. I'm working like sure. But when i'm like on my headphones like walking to work i will not. I only listen to podcast. Because i have so many to get through as you said but my husband is always like listen to music. It's so meditative. And i'm like i don't have time for meditation. I know right consume content. But you're right. I really should do that. So i'm going to recommend a show called victoria. Which is a pbs. Show about the early life of queen. Victoria that i watched on amazon prime and it has gentleman as queen victoria like. I don't believe in royals. And i have a hard time understanding how much i like it. But it's very beautiful. I didn't know that much about the life of queen victoria which is ridiculous call. I really liked the nineteenth century. Weirdly learned a lot from watching victoria. And then while. I'm watching it like googling wikipedia getting the various figures political figures that appear in it which as a method of sort of. Bring yourself up to speed on a type of history. I don't really recommend. But in a way i kind of do recommend but the main thing about victoria is beautiful all the interiors and the dresses are really beautiful. And there's a really hot romance between victoria and her husband albert. Who's played by tom hughes. Who's a linke's serious german guy. And if that doesn't sound hot like i don't know but you should watch it air flops. Over his eyes and he kind of intensely leans towards her ear quite a bit and he also wants the world to be a better place and he tries to teach her how to how to also work for that. Now again was queen. Victoria actually like a saint. Who did all the things that are depicted in the show like probably not but i could not stop watching the show and i'm sure i will keep on watching it when whenever returns which. I'm not sure it will but if it does it will be there so i recommend that and then i also recommend the book amanite by nicola griffith which i'm currently reading Which is about an anthropologist who goes to a planet where all the men have died of plague. And i'm reading it. Because i'm writing a piece about why the last man which is a show that is currently airing and the idea of a place where all the men have died of plague an and is like seventy times better than the show. Why the last man. It's really good and smart. And i recommend it a planet where all the men have died of plague is just a great one line pitch. Yeah sounds wonderful. Well and it's also like it's like a couple of one hundred years after that's happened so the woman have like adjusted in various ways and there different tribes that do different things and have like different traditions. Well i haven't actually figured out the secret of how they reproduce yet. Because i think it's not totally revealed to me but it has to do with meditation Speaking of meditation. Maybe i took my headphones response. Ashley reproduce which would be actually unwelcomed. So.

victoria heather Victoria rebecca tom hughes royals nicola griffith plague amazon albert Ashley
"teen magazine" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

Slate's Double X Gabfest

02:35 min | 8 months ago

"teen magazine" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

"Such an interesting pete like sort of like piece of bridge history where it's like a forum that came from a teen magazine as far as i can tell it seemed like teen. The magazine was like not really trying too hard to like moderate this forum or like do very much to like help along people who were on it but in some organic way coalesced into this group where she actually like sort of learned a lot about politics figured out even through disagreeing with people like what she thought about the event which is like this sort of best case scenario maybe for what can happen from these things but i just really enjoyed that pieces like a description of what actually happen if the community is that. Come from this kind of media. Actually coalesce and i think that piece was really good at maybe articulating a feeling. I was trying to talk about before about. She looks back. She finds some of the actual posts. She wrote as a teen and she's like these are factually inaccurate. And i have no idea what i'm talking about but like now i see that i was kind of trying to work these things out and a thought. Her perspective was really valuable. Yeah yeah the message was called terrible. Tuesday which is just like too perfect teen magazine. This used to be me. So i can say this struggle to like try to put q. Headlines on the stuff in the magazine that was more serious which is actually still a very internet problem today. So maybe that's another way that teed magazine sort of like Like language has issues have persisted on the internet. But yeah we always like how how you put a q. Headline on this piece about like a brother. Dying of cancer. Like how are we going to make this like something that people are going to want to see next to their oil of olay ad or whatever right and that does i mean point back to we have to sell every piece on its own as a piece of content you know it needs to be marketed in some way. There's not this package that things come in that you got with a print magazine. And there are downsides to having to break in that way where every piece has to kind of earn its keep but there are definitely i mean. See this getting back to what you're listening and the other segment. It's it was cool in a way. I mean it goes back to how i thought about. Sassy is like an ongoing story like some of the issues were. It's.

pete The magazine cancer
"teen magazine" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

Slate's Double X Gabfest

09:27 min | 8 months ago

"teen magazine" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

"Naronha talk about the legacy of teen and women's magazines in the actual writing that we read. This is a key area of thought that i like to noodle around when i think about the legacy of teen magazines as a person who wants to root for one and now writes totally different stuff. And this question is a key part of heather's a tusa profile tusa now has confessional sub stack where she tells all kinds of stories about her life so in two thousand nineteen. There's a piece in the washington post by lasagna. Nahthen and about women's magazines and decline and i wanted to read one particularly good paragraph to you how there and see what you think about it as a connoisseur of websites and they're writing style She wrote the women's magazines wants delivered to readers from new york to topeka to sacramento. That girlfriend style advice the gospels of orgasms and equal pay the reminders to always be. Dieting can now be found many places online from the hashtag pittsburgh post on instagram to junior feminist sites such as jessie belle which is l. in on coverage of pop. Culture hashtag metoo and the workplace make bloggers and youtube influencers now dictate the next big lipstick cover color and how to get that. No makeup makeup look culinary sites like food fifty two which side. No ira on you really. Love have cornered what the lady rags to call cookery with none of the gender notions about who does the cooking and low stakes cheerfully unscientific personality quizzes. Now there's buzzfeed for that. So what do you think about this idea. do you see sort of the dna of teen in women's magazines in the stuff that you read on the internet. And if so where yes. I i think that paragraph was dead on I don't know what do we see the influence of women's magazines in instagram tutorials. And stuff or is it just that those topics are now covered in that way right like is it just the topic or is it. Also the style is the question right. I think the style you we can talk about more in terms of writing. And i think one thing that i talked about a little bit in my piece is that there was this sort of moment a few years ago. Like let's say circa twenty twelve twenty thirteen when the personal essay became this lightning rod online. I guess if this still happens it's still a lightning rod hamby but a certain type that that was pioneered by sites like exo jayme Where it would just be confessional is is the word but the whole point would be just like reading something completely in a voyeuristic way and it wasn't the person learn something or there was this insider literary value it it was just gawking at someone who had a crazy story and i guess one aspect of that that sort of controversial in journalism is you know why didn't editor not protect that woman from herself and airing that thought. And that's something that laura bennett. Who is an editor here at slate. Wrote about in. Sort of a seminal piece. The first person industrial complex about how one of the ways that women can get started with writing is kind of telling their worst most revealing story about themselves and getting paid like fifty dollars for it and instead of reporting women can sort of like sal their their narratives. I mean it. Interests me because i mean x. Jane is like a really good example. Because it's a direct descendant of women's magazines right like it's gene products website or it was and so jane pratt was editor sassy and then. She was editor jane and then she became human then. She edited exo. Oh jane and now. I don't know what she's doing but sassy despite my listening to this podcast. That has now convinced me that maybe it wasn't as good as i remember. One thing about sassy that was like imprinted on my brain is a writer. Was that they. It was like the whole magazine was the first person essay like a basically use their writers as characters in this ongoing story of the magazine so all these writers were like twentysomethings in new york and then their tastes and their interests became the magazine and for a long time. I don't know if it was always. But i think it might have been. They just refer to themselves. In first person so it would like their bylines would even be like by margie or by christina. The mass of the magazine was like the personality of the magazine. And that way of sort of using the writer as like a character or personality like looking back at it from the viewpoint of twenty twenty one when you have a much better chance of becoming a successful internet writer if you can also make yourself into a personality or an influence her well that you can debate whether or not that proposition is correct and many have in various essays about it but i do think that that i that what of writer for a teen magazines have had to offer in. The sassy era was their own lake. Sort of personal take on things like their their their actual person in a way which was sort of what it was doing to to some degree as the editor. Although i it didn't really extend her staff as much as it did with sassy but but that idea is basically the whole internet now. I feel like there's a a line in my piece. One of the people. I spoke to as sort of like a media critic said that a tusa was actually very early to the influencing game because she was sort of an influencer before there were influencers in in developing this cult of personality around herself and she wasn't the first editor to do that. As you said. Jane pratt did that. And you know that goes back a little bit in the history of magazines but in it's interesting if you look at what she's doing now so she would definitely not use the word confessional because she sees what she's doing different and i see it as a little different too because she her end goal is not just to get clicks. She is in trying to get clicks or or even subscribers like she's much more concerned with kind of mental health and really being honest and burying her soul. And so a tusa you know was like this super famous editor and then just sort of left the industry and disappeared professionally for about fifteen years and one of the reasons she did that it turns out is because she was dealing with a lot of trauma from her childhood up when she was sexually abused by a family member and so a lot of her sub stack relates back to that and that's not clicky at I like to put it in very crass terms like. She's writing about that because it matters to her sort of i understanding how her life experiences how she views so much this lands and kind of getting to a point of self love but she also is chairing lot about herself a telling a lot of very personal stories or she started that way anyway she has said she wants to move sort of in a new direction of sharing other people's stories and and she's done some of that and i think she sort of figuring it out like it started as substantial but maybe it will develop into more of a community which sort of brings us back to to something. We were discussing earlier whether these magazines are a community. I do think that's when potential interesting avenue For for her project that. I think a lot of people draw a lot of value from you know connecting in small groups online where they can maybe recreate some of what they liked about about old media. But it's also it's on thing. Yeah we didn't get to mentioned earlier but we wanted to the. There's a piece in input magazine recently. Among was the only one of the only september eleven memory pieces that i was like Drawn to which is a piece by jenny's about the the magazine called teen. It's hard to say it without. I'm spelling it out. That had a forum that was after nine eleven populated by like a small group of girls that tried to figure out what they thought about. Nine eleven through this forum and she started like excavates the different the different personalities on there and the people that that she met there and that.

tusa Naronha Jane pratt hashtag pittsburgh post jessie belle rod hamby exo jayme laura bennett topeka jane washington post heather new york sacramento youtube margie Jane christina jenny
"teen magazine" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

Slate's Double X Gabfest

01:35 min | 8 months ago

"teen magazine" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

"Nineties movie. Titanic my work has been seen by millions. My work up save lives my work on platinum. Because i helped deliver the vince lombardi trophy lifesaving medical devices and equipment. The records biggest hits. I work at fedex apply now at fedex dot com slash careers. Fedex's were now meets next. This episode is brought to you by federal. Football is back and the best bet you can make is downloading the fan duel sportsbook app. It doesn't matter if you're new to gambling or an old pro fan duel has something for everyone and as an official sports betting partner of the nfl. You know your pets are safe. There's also never been a better time to use fan duel because right now you'll get up to one thousand dollars back. If you're i bet doesn't win. You can even turn a small wager into a big payday with same game parlay bet. Just sign up with the promo code spotify to place your i bet risk-free on fan duel sportsbook download vandeweghe today twenty one plus and present in virginia. I online real money wager. Only refund issued as non withdraw credit. That expires in fourteen days. Restrictions apply see terms at sportsbook dot fan duel dot com gambling problem. Call one eight hundred gambler..

"teen magazine" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

Slate's Double X Gabfest

03:44 min | 8 months ago

"teen magazine" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

"I'm like i actually think that the parts of sassy that are embarrassing were embarrassing. Because it's like when something is for teenage girls. You have to be a certain way like sassy was like very like alarmist about drugs like they'd be like you know someone would right into the health advice column and say can you die from from marijuana and one of the writers would write back and say well. I don't think so. But i did have a friend who wants virtually from smoking marijuana and like the host of this podcast like this is preposterous. Like like no no no no. That's not what happened. I mean famously. Sassy was like personally brought down by attacks christian rate who basically hated them for implying. That sex was okay. Which is the way that you're sort of let constraints but you know there's all kinds of other problems you could find with the magazine now. The voice was still in my opinion. Sort of like foundational for internet writing but fundamentally it is like when i look back at it and i'm like yeah it was like quote unquote cool as you put it that. There was this thing that i could read. That had like. It was just full of things that i would like and some of the things were like cute boys like pictures if boys and pictures of fashion that i liked and some of the things were as you said the advertisements. Because i think there's like a special kind of consumerism that you have is like a child and a teenager. My four year old daughter already kind of has it like she just likes to look at the backs of lego instructional booklets and see what other lego she could get the teen magazine sort of served as that kind of like like bastion of consumerism. Mixed together with like a bunch of like sort of bigly interesting features. I don't know. But i but looking back on like that i. I still don't know if. I think that was a good thing but like you say more about why you think it was cool. I think i was just always excited about the the trappings of being a teenager and a teenage girl. And i don't know like now. I'm trying to think about why and i'm like. No that was toxic. Everything i dunno. I thought was cool about it. Like the idea of going to prom and like boys and like having a locker in highschool. Why does any of that matter. But it was something that i wanted and was really interested in. I guess i've always been drawn to coming of age story. So so maybe that that's part of it especially when i was younger but i was trying to figure out who i was and there was some element of even if in bad ways the teen magazines were showing you how to be a teenage girl and i think some of that messaging was obviously not great but maybe it was also of comfort. I think about it a lot with my daughter. Because she's she's just sort of like absorbing she's just falling in love with various texts and you can see how when you're sort of like a young person and a teenager particular attacks like imprint on you and maybe it's more about like the experience because you're thinking intelligent person with like a lot of reflective capacity. So you had this experience with a piece of media where it like imprinted on you in some weird way and maybe now girls are having that happen with like you know. Some instagram posted. A star puts up that like brands itself into their brain over member. I think the experience is still valuable. We're going to take a break here. But if you're enjoying.

Sassy
"teen magazine" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

Slate's Double X Gabfest

06:30 min | 8 months ago

"teen magazine" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

"Like last week's hosts emily packed and shannon palace talk about whether disgrace their nose founder. Elizabeth home is actually a girl boss. Okay let's talk about what teed magazines and women's magazines meant to us as young graders so among people who do sort of miss the era of team and women's magazines there is some discussion of the idea that they're like an incubator of community and place. Where young female writers can kind of get a start. There's people from the mid century era. The often mentioned in connection to this so sylvia plath was published in seventeen and betty for dan air at a bunch of her ideas for the feminine mystique in ladies home journal which is sort of like unexpected counter narrative that you find inside these magazines that were actually very much established to serve sort of like a white middle class. You know woman who would sort of follow very traditional path within society but some of these starry examples aside once community and career advancement really what we got from them when they still existed. Maybe it's because. I worked at one. But i just always have so much trouble with the sort of representation of teen magazines as a place where people could connect so for example. There's a quote from two thousand sixteen. That wasn't a refinery twenty nine piece that had a bunch of good quotes around two thousand sixteen about teen magazines in this kind of nostalgia and this quotas from the one time teen vogue editor elaine welter off. And she said for being part of a community that you identify with is so important subscribing to a print title even two thousand sixteen. Which again is when she's speaking to. This reporter is like signing up for club that serves you on a more personal level at teen vogue. We have created a community for our readers to belong to be seen in hurt identify with the stories that we tell now. I wonder what you think about this. Because i feel a little bit sort of like suspicious of this some degree and in two thousand eighteen when seventeen. Shut down its print edition. I wrote a piece for slate. That was like i'm glad teen magazines or done. And one of the reasons that i brought up was that i feel like they treat teen readers teen girls as like this one community. One sort of kind of person like an american teenage girl. And because you're you're always trying to sort of pick your magazine to advertisers. You don't ever want to say actually we're only going to serve a certain kind of teenage girl or whatever like you have to say that you're going to try to serve everybody and create a community for everybody but honestly looking back in two thousand twenty one. I'm not actually sure that that's that's possible either. As a person who as you just said Came of age during the golden age of teen magazines. Did you get a feeling of community from it and were you inspired to do to go into writing from it. I would say no. Or i don't know maybe a little but it's interesting trying to think about it. I think i. I loved reading between magazines for sure but a lot of it was for superficial reasons like i really wanted to see the prom dresses and the pictures of celebrities. I liked photo shoots. And i even like the ads like there were ads for new hair and makeup stops that i then wanted and go and i remember. That will say i'd apricot scrub. Oh for sure but also my knee jerk reaction to you saying it's a good thing that this doesn't exist anymore as no like i have so much nostalgia for reading the magazines and i'm trying to separate out whether that's because they were important to my development in some way or whether i just liked you know looking at now polish you know. It's okay to lake looking at now polish. I don't know. I think they should have more value than just. Oh it provides a nice break from screen time so it. It's good for you to read things. That aren't your phone but did bay the way that i think sassy actually had sassy writing like funny and inspiring writing. I don't know that. I really felt bad about teen magazines. I mean maybe there there were like l. girl. I thought was kind of different. And funny. And i did their worst things in them. That were influential to me. Like they would recommend books. And i think i found some of my favorite books one book in particular. I remember i left in high school was sloppy. I and i think. I i saw that a teen magazine but i don't feel like they are are what guided me towards wanting to be a writer. I think i got that more from reading. Entertainment weekly even premier other things so slightly older magazines for slightly older people that were still about topics that you were interested in. Yes which was totally your argument in the piece that we shouldn't separate out what the content we give teen readers. They just read about what they're interested in not just read teenage staff but it also matters to me that there was a magazine for teen girls. I think i thought that was so cool. Then and i you know. I think it's so cool now. And i'm not sure like mis Dinosaur who needs to be disabused of these notions. And i thank you for doing everybody up. I just want. I just want to know more about why you think it's cool. I know what you mean about that. But it's interesting. Because i actually just started in preparation for this podcast. Been listening to the podcast. Listen to sassy which has a couple of hosts including tara arianna who. I'm a big fan of reading old issues of sassy. And i started listening to it. Because i wanted to. Just be remember like reminded of what the magazine was about. And kind of like being able to articulate a little bit better on here. Why i liked it so much and why i felt a sense of community from a and it's funny because they have respect for a sassy and they really like sassy but they're also like very merciless about some of the parts of sassy. That are a little bit embarrassing in hindsight like and listening to them..

shannon palace ladies home journal elaine welter sylvia plath emily betty Elizabeth dan Entertainment weekly tara arianna
"teen magazine" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

07:22 min | 8 months ago

"teen magazine" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"Slates podcast about gender feminism and brave new world where teenage girls read the same things as everybody else every episode. You've got a new pair of women to talk about the things. We can't get off our minds today. You've got me. Rebecca onion a staff writer for sleep and me. Heather sh fidel a staff writer for slate. What has happened to specialty teen and women's publications and should we care in the year. Two thousand when. I graduated college there were seven major teen magazines in print. Now there are none and the teen magazines that still exists or limping along online on the women's side. Things aren't much better. Glamorous stopped publishing the print edition in two thousand nineteen have mary. Clair's print issue. We found out a few days ago as we were preparing. This episode is also discontinued. What are the reading populations that once turn to these publications reading for fun now and where and contemporary media can we find their legacy now. This is a topic very close to my heart. Because i started out in media at a teen magazine called. Ym and i wasn't completely happy there but it was also a teen magazine Sassy the great durable of its asi. Whichever one in generation x. remembers that made me feel like. I even wanted to be a magazine writer and right now. Today i doubly wants to talk about this pressing issue because had there has just published an excellent piece on the one time editor of cosmo girl and seventeen who now has substance and is becoming an instagram personality. A tusa rubinstein heather. Why is this topic close to your heart. I was also an avid reader as teen magazines. And the time that you're talking about when you graduated college. That was when i was a preteen at end early team but there was a particular like mini boom of them. That's been cosmo girl started. Which is the magazine. Bet a tusa. Rubinstein founded that's when teen people started l. girl teen vogue And i also used to love reading the print versions of women's magazines. It used to be so fine. Like i would look forward to riding on a plane because i would have like magazines and candy or going to the nail reading a magazine like just so luxurious and fun and now that seems like a total acronym so a tusa was sort of this mythic figure from my teen years. What really sticks with me about a two. So when i think back to then and reading her magazine she was the editor of cosmo girl and then went on. To seventeen is her editors letters and in particular. She always posted these dorky photos of her. I don't know they just looked so embarrassing to me. Her photos from So dorky her haircuts. Or i don't know what she was wearing and she just you know. Put it all out there even then and that would become a in her life a I guess and it's relevant to what she's doing now so something i didn't realize at the time about a to say is she was also super successful just in her media career and it wasn't until i was in college and sort of started starting to think maybe i wanted to work in magazines but i really understood button achievement. That was that she had founded a magazine so young. She found it when she was still in her twenties. But that's also when. I was starting to feel more cynical about teen magazines thinking. I wish i had been part of the sassy generation. And i sort of wonder what would have happened if it had been more of an option for me to work in teen or women's magazines like is that direction. My career would have gone if i were ten or fifteen years older and it. It's interesting to think about. It would have been a totally different life. Resonate with so much of that. And i can't wait to talk to you about it and so coming up. We're gonna talk about the idea that women's and teen magazines created community which is something that people who work at women's on teen magazines would often talk about and the idea that they supported young female writers who might not otherwise have gotten chances to have a media career off. This episode is brought to you by hp plus in a world full of smart devices. Isn't it about time. Your printer got smart to now. Printing is smart with hp fuss and the hp smart up is how all happens. You can print from your phone with just a tab no matter where you are even from your garage slash home office slash yoga studio. That is smart. Hp plus learn more about smart printing at hp dot com slash smart. Thank you so much for listening. I wanted to take effect in and welcome all our you listeners. And our old ones to haven't forgotten about you. If you're loving the show. And wanna hear morris subscribe to our new episodes. Come out every thursday morning while you're there check out our other episodes to like last week's hosts emily packed and shannon palace. Talk about whether disgrace theranos founder. Elizabeth home is actually a girl boss. Okay let's talk about what teed magazines and women's magazines meant to us as young graders so among people who do sort of miss the era of team and women's magazines there is some discussion of the idea that they're like an incubator of community and place. Where young female writers can kind of get a start. There's people from the mid century era. The often mentioned in connection to this so sylvia plath was published in seventeen and betty for dan air at a bunch of her ideas for the feminine mystique in ladies home journal which is sort of like unexpected counter narrative that you find inside these magazines that were actually very much established to serve sort of like a white middle class. You know woman who would sort of follow very traditional path within society but some of these starry examples aside once community and career advancement really what we got from them when they still existed. Maybe it's because. I worked at one. But i just always have so much trouble with the sort of representation of teen magazines as a place where people could connect so for example. There's a quote from two thousand sixteen. That wasn't a refinery twenty nine piece that had a bunch of good quotes around two thousand sixteen about teen magazines in this kind of nostalgia and this quotas from the one time teen vogue editor elaine welter off. And she said for being part of a community that you identify with is so important subscribing to a print title even two thousand sixteen. Which again is when she's speaking to. This reporter is like signing up for club that serves you on a more personal level at teen vogue. We have created a community for our readers to belong to be seen in hurt identify with the stories that we tell.

Rebecca onion Heather sh fidel rubinstein heather hp Clair Rubinstein shannon palace theranos ladies home journal sylvia plath morris emily Elizabeth betty dan elaine welter
"teen magazine" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

Slate's Double X Gabfest

04:24 min | 8 months ago

"teen magazine" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

"Welcome to the waves. Slates podcast about gender feminism and brave new world where teenage girls read the same things as everybody else every episode. You've got a new pair of women to talk about the things. We can't get off our minds today. You've got me. Rebecca onion a staff writer for sleep and me. Heather sh fidel a staff writer for slate. What has happened to specialty teen and women's publications and should we care in the year. Two thousand when. I graduated college there were seven major teen magazines in print. Now there are none and the teen magazines that still exists or limping along online on the women's side. Things aren't much better. Glamorous stopped publishing the print edition in two thousand nineteen have mary. Clair's print issue. We found out a few days ago as we were preparing. This episode is also discontinued. What are the reading populations that once turn to these publications reading for fun now and where and contemporary media can we find their legacy now. This is a topic very close to my heart. Because i started out in media at a teen magazine called. Ym and i wasn't completely happy there but it was also a teen magazine Sassy the great durable of its asi. Whichever one in generation x. remembers that made me feel like. I even wanted to be a magazine writer and right now. Today i doubly wants to talk about this pressing issue because had there has just published an excellent piece on the one time editor of cosmo girl and seventeen who now has substance and is becoming an instagram personality. A tusa rubinstein heather. Why is this topic close to your heart. I was also an avid reader as teen magazines. And the time that you're talking about when you graduated college. That was when i was a preteen at end early team but there was a particular like mini boom of them. That's been cosmo girl started. Which is the magazine. Bet a tusa. Rubinstein founded that's when teen people started l. girl teen vogue And i also used to love reading the print versions of women's magazines. It used to be so fine. Like i would look forward to riding on a plane because i would have like magazines and candy or going to the nail reading a magazine like just so luxurious and fun and now that seems like a total acronym so a tusa was sort of this mythic figure from my teen years. What really sticks with me about a two. So when i think back to then and reading magazines she was. The editor of cosmo girl and then went on. To seventeen is her editors letters and in particular. She always posted these dorky photos of her. I don't know they just looked so embarrassing to me. Her photos from So dorky her haircuts. Or i don't know what she was wearing and she just you know. Put it all out there even then and that would become a in her life I guess and it's relevant to what she's doing now so something i didn't realize at the time about a to say is she was also super successful just in her media career and it wasn't until i was in college and sort of started starting to think maybe i wanted to work in magazines but i really understood button achievement. That was that she had founded a magazine so young. She found it when she was still in her twenties. But that's also when. I was starting to feel more cynical about teen magazines thinking. I wish i had been part of the sassy generation. And i sort of wonder what would have happened if it had been more of an option for me to work in teen or women's magazines like is that direction. My career would have gone if i were ten or fifteen years older and it. It's interesting to think about. It would have been a totally different life. Resonate with so much of that. And i can't wait to talk to you about it and so coming up. We're gonna talk about the idea that women's and teen magazines created community which is something that people who work at women's on teen magazines would often talk about and the idea that they supported young female writers.

Rebecca onion Heather sh fidel rubinstein heather Clair Rubinstein
"teen magazine" Discussed on The TryPod

The TryPod

04:13 min | 10 months ago

"teen magazine" Discussed on The TryPod

"Keith made a brief appearance. To confirm. I was very confused. listen to the episode and you won't clear but yeah it's called the head gun podcast. You can listen to it wherever you get your podcasts. We've had guests like lauren lap gifts. Zach vin wolford. Amir's on it almost every week if he's not on it jake. Hurwitz is on. Its jake and amir does not look you in the is. He doesn't look me in the eyes over zoom or in person He's in town today. He he lands tonight right. Yeah jake's getting in town today is i. Don't even want to say but unless plane crashes only want wanna put it in the ether plane crashes. You clearly wanted to shoehorn shoehorned. We weren't even talking about. That'd be a horrible thing but would make him. The majority shareholder would be this weird fucking bizarre feeling. Gotta being sad that what am i. Great friends is no longer here. But i have more cash to show for. It feels conflicted even talking about it but it's utter joy pants are getting tight heading podcast. Yeah so yes. Start with zack's episode and if you like what you hear We release it every friday. it's a lot of fun. It's utter chaos. Basically the miles of that. i guess. And if you don't like episodes without me if everybody listening to this show doesn't listen to the podcast. You're fired basically because now everyone's going to not listen on jeff isn't close like we basically gave him this really golden lead like appearing on this awesome show with the. Don't give me that face with the intent to siphon audience members grow the brand as it were me. i'd really loud punch sound affects the point of you being here take our audience and never return. Yeah yeah poaching away. I came on the podcast was so no one would ever want to listen to our. Our goal is to leave with zach. U2 and no offense fails to sort of run the ship okay or write it as it were miles taking your fence offense because like you're kind of replacing zach and kind of like a dick it'd be make me sort of foul. Yes s. our man. That's good match man so anyway. Yeah so what. I'm trying to say is. Listen to the podcast. If you want jeff to continue to have to be gainfully employed at had yeah or by one of his watches that'll give them a couple of just by the twelve thousand dollar. Actually you know what it's thirteen thousand now. Why we her this famous famous value. Now watch episode tom. Hanks episode nine hundred sixty seven. Grimes was there. I think grant grants on grime. Grandma grandma grandma. Grandma grams was present when this watch was discussed out. So is this a tripod pun. We we didn't really clear that up at the end of no it's not not a pun. Tripod of word is if you want it. We're trying to do a podcast. Perhaps that's pun. that's good. It's very trying podcast. Listen to normally this. Four hosts and miles shares saw three six seats in the room. Let's not leave for another week and a half. we all die for the water of comfortably to warm now. Yeah was like we're all getting sleepy. Yeah now outside where it's like eighty to feel like a breeze. It'll feel nice that door. Oh somebody leave. The refrigerator open says with vigil about the thousand dollars is not too much no not too much or a nice nice watch head on over and by his watch so he knows is is worth twelve dollars tripod. He'll next time stay beautiful. That was incredible. That's our official theme song..

jake Zach vin wolford Hurwitz Amir amir zach Keith lauren jeff zack Hanks Grimes tom
"teen magazine" Discussed on The TryPod

The TryPod

07:21 min | 10 months ago

"teen magazine" Discussed on The TryPod

"That. You have a second home in i. Another fifteen bags of deco. That does it appreciate. I can't help but feel like especially if you shut down. The company have enough fans that that the t. will approve. It's organic visiting dots. Do you think he'd be a good party. Planner a better partying. Be maybe see yes. I'd throw the bash of a lifetime. Terrible up the executing planning parties. Got that stuff through a heck of a bachelor party for keith. Recent ono it was twenty. Seven eight hundred seventy vegas nice via mgm. Corporation helped us out with a bunch of free dope was like very like all the scenes. You'd have in a crazy movie but we actually did it. it was wearing. That's awesome the equivalent of three hundred thousand dollars worth of stuff for free. Wow a lot of it is just bottles of alcohol that they up charge nine hundred dollars the manufacturer dollars. You're at a party nobody's dancing. Ua decide to be the first one out there. Woo be ask your cross dance view or see. Grab your girlfriends and go. They've abandoned the justin bieber like a fucking random quiz that an intern four minutes. Before would he like you at his party. And based off your answers you would like you there. So i'm gonna. I'm the kinda guy who's not afraid to start the dance for him. Somebody's gotta do it. And i can take the hit a good attitude. Yeah me too for a little different reason. I'll do it because i'm trying to leave that party. That's trying to get out of there as soon as much as possible in a terrible idea though be rushed someone that you don't really know that well to dance on an empty dancefloor audacity selfish. I haven't even had it hot hotdog weenies. Yeah so see grabby girlfriends and go out there. I think that it's a good idea to grab a crew of friends to hit the floor. I so especially if the grab a bunch of girls go out there. You're going to get a couple of guys go up a couple more girls go out there also interpreted but i think they mean. Leave the party. Oh you're right. They do mean that. I think he means young people. Yeah what believe. What words would you want. J. b. to say to you after his word man thought about. I wanna dance with you all night long after the party bieber four nights leave. Never forget what you did for me ooh. Jd i've never been more surprised. Bnc both are similar. You know they sound not good. Yeah you do for him. I'll never forget what you did for me to do. Something party gross of the season. One finale of successions level shit went down. Bieber killed someone in your alibi or like. I don't know maybe. He was choking on a little hotdog and gave him the heimlich and saved his life. I think that's the best option. 'cause you want him to always remember you and always. Oh you something. Yeah what if. It's also never forget what she did. Tell good did for me right not to me did for me. Yes never forget what you did for me going for that be. Yeah yeah okay. Well this final crash only fifty more. It's thursday afternoon are going for like a bookstore or bieber's car leaves the station. Traveling west questions left. It was the end of the party at the last question. Well end of the year dance. End the new part bieber's struggling to learn the stinky leg dance shimmer leave with your girlfriends you. Hey teach him how to dougie for the end of the year. Dancing suggest a disco ball and eye-catching laser lights be a video slide show full of picks from the year or see a red carpet and ice cream sundaes. Hey hey trippy lights. One hundred percents bieber talking about. We've seen how he ages. He's into like weird shit lasers or the way to go laser disco balls. They get their money's worth. I'm an ice cream guy. Though and the last one sunday bar was it or just a loose sort of bowl of wet fudd cream heath bar ledger. We want that the fudge. The better the nudge. Gimme see the rhymes going to take it. I don't even know what the fuck is the answer to this. Now we're going through. The barney was about. So this is how the great emma roberts gwen stefani the answer So it's mostly as mostly mostly cs. We actually got equal sees anna's so they got lazy with the fucking greatest. Mostly we go to the party. I take it unforgettable during eighteen is important. So you do everything in your power to make it memorable for j. b. you're organized and a party planner so make sure justin's bash was go bigger. Go home photo. Booth red carpet fireworks. This guy's limit that was a anc. Or i was see. What was you'd bring the fun radio. How was the first line of c. c. Was you'd make it unforgettable and the whole reason we did. This quiz was to say good. Why would just invite you to is. Beat wasn't no matter what we're going. Yeah so i'm planning the whole thing with being paid for it. You know what's crazy is that someone went to four years of journalism school. I said i wrote that. Do you want to call deal ever checked your eyes on the sign. What time it is about movement baby in a tiny apartment in southern california to college dropouts teamed up to create a watch company that broke all the rules with fair prices. Unexpected colors a clean original designs movement grew into one of the fastest growing watch brands shipping to over one hundred sixty countries across the globe. Pretty dope on july twentieth movement is celebrating. Its eight year anniversary by running a huge sitewide sale. Every single thing is twenty eight percent off. That's twenty eight percent off all the best selling watches..

J. b bieber mgm justin bieber keith vegas Bieber dougie emma roberts gwen stefani barney anna anc justin southern california
"teen magazine" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"teen magazine" Discussed on Pantheon

"You know I feel like I played that song on playlists. Why so I feel like she's like really known for the boy is mine duet or Monica you know. So but I like tear song with Mace top of the world. Felt Like I was always playing that when I was. Dj. Or. About you. The I love the early brandy singles notably, I wanna be down as well. I think that that was when she was first coming out and I would see her videos on MTV like who is this? I of dig I think as the years progress that she got a little more pop a little more dancey I guess. I lost interest, but I think those from me, the first couple of singles a really great. Is it true that you interviewed her at some point Oh? Yeah. I did when I used to work a like a teen magazine when I graduated college I interviewed her it was back in those days where like you didn't you know you had like these like Weirdo phone recorder thingy. visualizes whatever. And leg I don't even remember which kind of is using whatever it was like just did not record the interview. Do Interview I realized that it's not recording. I'm like panicking and I'm just like So funny. Story Way. None of this was recorded. The interview. was she like what she say? Like. Obviously Lake. Adenoid used so like nice that she was like. Okay. You ask her the same questions again, I asked the same questions. and. That's how I'm brandy and A. Really Really Nice 'cause like I felt like if it was me, I'd be like so annoying be like you could ask you five questions. Well I had an instance like that as well where I actually was working with a someone who was doing video for me, and then the video worked the audio never did and I didn't realize until I got home, it was trying to play with the material and I was so bummed. Got To interview that artist over the phone afterwards, and it was fine. But yeah, I asked the same questions I. Guess it happens from time time but it is I could see how it'd be super annoying for the. Music. It's kind of devastating though like when you're on the other hand. Oh. Yeah. It's embarrassing..

Adenoid MTV Monica teen magazine
"teen magazine" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"teen magazine" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Remember the days when America was in trouble and we would all come together we would stand together we knew that things that were happening in China were evil we just knew it and we could recognize it and we would never work to further the goals of the Chinese well big tech is working to further the goal of the Chinese and that goal is the enslavement of all people through technology well you also have big tech you have big phone companies now that are also working against you they're working against you every single time you make a phone call because they take a portion of what you pay and they give it to people like Planned Parenthood did you see that what was it teen magazine one of the magazines for teens is just come out with the series on how to have a how to have an abortion if your teen yes keep raising as it always is it's teen vogue artists teen vogue every time I think this is just their brands now like try to anger conservatives and parents well anyway there is a way to put your money to work even the money that you don't think that as it always is its team folk artists teen vogue every time I think this is just their brands now like try to anger conservatives and parents well anyway there is a way to put your money to work even the money that you don't think that he is working against you is when you pay your cell phone bill to eighteen tea or whatever a lot of that money is going to fund the laughed stop that you need a great service to replace it well I have one it's patriot moles mobile they have a special offer right now upgrade your phone to the brand new moto.

America China teen magazine
"teen magazine" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"teen magazine" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"My goodness. Things this time. Did you? Do you giving Fisher cold? How does that happen? Why are you talking about the dissecting fish? I don't know. She's just all over the place, isn't she? My god. She ping pong through many subjects subjects. What did you have a question about? Jeez. The fish. We had the same thing. My goodness. Oh, I love the note within the node felt like little inception. There. It is. It's like inception. Oh my gosh. And then we've got the whole Bill Cosby. I mean, I just I Mike is junior Barnes related to digger Barnes. I don't know. Who knows? I mean, why she watching one thousand nine hundred sixty seven clip of Bill Cosby, Steve Martin on the cover of a teen magazine. That's another mystery. And I are the same age. I know who was on our team. I remember them. Well, Kirk Cameron. The core. Always Corey Feldman Corey Haim. Maybe he was a little, you know, those little to buy three pictures on the bottom corner. Maybe I mean, he's still on the cover lacks Steve Martin. They've never on a t. Nice. Try lax. I mean, maybe no Johnny Devon. And Steve Martin note little guy there Steve Martin was never on. Never cool. The teams. Had a band gel. Not much we as human agree on. But I think we should be able to agree that I highly doubt that in the late eighties early nineties. Steve Martin was on tiger beat need or sixteen. I would almost bet the farm on that one. I don't know I read because even in. Okay. So let's let's see here late eighties. Like his movies would have been Roxanne. Dirty rotten scoundrels. Yeah. James? The guy the gray hair next to Kirk. Oh. Oh, man. He was on in playboy. Apparently, I'm trying to find you know, was he writing articles. I think he was interviewed one of those famous playboy interviews when he was at the height because you know, he just is crazy guy. And then all of a sudden, he just left stand standup. I mean, he was filling arenas people forget that young was pursue popular. Huge. He was one of the first comedians to sell out stadiums arenas shows as a stand up comedian. And then all of a sudden he just one day. He was telling Howard Stern he just stopped and started doing movies. He said he was just he couldn't do it anymore. He just couldn't do the couldn't do stand up anymore. Then the jerk happened. I love it. Mama. I got rhythm. Dirty rotten scoundrels twenty in that. Oh, it's so good with Michael Cain. Love it. It's hilarious. Oh. Oh series talking to one..

Steve Martin Bill Cosby Corey Haim Kirk Cameron Howard Stern Corey Feldman Barnes Fisher playboy Michael Cain Johnny Devon teen magazine James one day
Ex 'Beverly Hills, 90210' star Luke Perry dead at 52 after stroke

The Ralph Report

01:16 min | 3 years ago

Ex 'Beverly Hills, 90210' star Luke Perry dead at 52 after stroke

"Of all we mentioned that he had suffered a massive stroke and sad. Sad news. Luke Perry from nine to one O N. Riverdale has passed away at the age of fifty two. That's crazy. That's that's that age fifty two terrifying. Luke Perry, of course, best known for his role as Dylan McKay on the smash hit drama Beverly Hills nine oh, two one oh on FOX in nineteen ninety became a teen heartthrob and by all accounts, it was hard for him because he was kind of a serious actor, and you know, it's out of your control. You take any job that you can get when you're struggling actor. You don't expect sometimes the byproducts of those shows, and he became on the cover of all the teen magazines and stuff and something he apparently was not always been ever come with that fail. But I'm glad to see that. He worked a ton. And of course, he was a stars. I mentioned on CW's Riverdale at the time of his death. So he he was able to get other roles. He wasn't really typecast. But still shocking that age of fifty two we could pass away from massive stroke crazy, I've got a friend of mine. Teddy who worked on the crew of that show for its entire run. And said just a sweet sweet man could not have been a nicer guy. So hard

Luke Perry Dylan Mckay Teddy FOX O