33 Burst results for "Tedtalk"

Peter Kozodoy Talks About How Great Leaders Use Brutal Honesty to Succeed

Dose of Leadership

05:36 min | Last week

Peter Kozodoy Talks About How Great Leaders Use Brutal Honesty to Succeed

"What an honor to have you on dose of leadership. Welcome to the show. It's a pleasure to be a rich excited for your stuff man. This brutal honesty. Thing is is something that i've it's one of my pet peeves particularly in the world of business but managed just seemed like it's something that so needed and so lacking in everywhere we look. Right it depends. I've had folks say to me like you're out here championing strategic brutal honesty as if that's going to help in meanwhile i turn on tv. And i see scandal after scandal in both the public and private sector. And they're like so. Obviously it doesn't work. And i'm like no no obviously it does. Yeah look at all of the scandals that we now know about that. Twenty thirty fifty years ago. We had no idea that is honesty and transparency at work. That's the whole point. Is that you know how does a leader achieve outcomes in the twenty first century where everyone has a smartphone. Where everything's being recorded you know. Some way are In a world like that the entire point is that it will no longer pay to do anything but be honest and transparent and the evidence. That is all around us. Yeah what things i appreciated. I agree with you hundred percent and one things i truly got. My listeners have heard me say this cal time on the show but one of the great takeaways. I got from the marine corps. It was a very brutally honest when it worked. Well it was firing. All cylinders are brutally honest culture. Meaning i walk in the work. And say i look like a bag of doughnuts. There was no whispering it was in your face. Get out of here. You'll like a bag of doughnuts and go fix whatever i mean and i love that. I love that kind of you know out in the open standards expectations. And if you don't live up to them you're going to get called out. And i think there's something to be said for that. Yeah in culture after culture that a profile in the book and honest to greatness. I show that you know essentially cultures that get out of their own way. You remove that sense of ego removed the self-doubt and really get to brass tacks. What happens is they're far. More efficient shouldn't be rocket science to anyone. Writes like if we're not farting around figuring out how to sidestep in around cathy's ego than we can get a lot more done. You know what i mean. It's not i say in the book think said my tedtalk is. There's all kinds of research showing that positive reinforcement works right like positive as reinforced people. That's what helps people who Come together and she better. Let's not confuse the truth here. The reason why that's true is because of our delicate egos that does not mean that. If we can remove our delicate he goes and have the culture you described where we can just actually be brutally honest. That actually is the more efficient way to go. Did you see what i'm saying. I know exactly what you're saying. It you the whole. I have used the term. I love the turtle honesty. And i've used that a lot in in my coaching and even when i was consulting an organization that twelve month gig i used that word a and then i was had somebody on my show and i can't remember who it was and they did not like the word brutal because it gave these images of people's feelings getting hurt or people kinda cowering in the corner And they almost argued that the term brutal honesty kind of reinforces the kind of the dominant culture. That's kind of the metoo movement as has effectively exposed. What are your thoughts when you hear me say that. Yeah that's that's one of the most important questions and let's unpack that. As i started down this road which by the way surprise me like it should be a shock to anyone that meet like if anyone knew me in high school i am the guy talking about like brutal honesty and transparency and all this crap that would be a shock to anyone right so say if i can learn this anyone can but one of the things that happened started writing. Speaking about this people were like. Oh wow fantastic brutal honesty. I'm brutally honest. I just tell it like it is. I don't care. And i look at them like. Oh that's cool. That's not really honesty. That's just you being an asshole right. That's a different thing. And i think one of the one of the things i needed to do right out of the gate has redefined. Honesty even means in front of you read the book like i spend the entire book really weaving through that explanation. Because it's not as simple as you might think One of the ceos makes a great point. Says if you're flying in an airplane you're aviator so you're going to get this one rich. You're flying in an airplane and pilots come over the intercom and they say well folks that we've never seen stormclouds like that before. So please a buckle your seatbelts. Not quite sure if we're gonna get burned to the ground but we're going to try our hardest. Is it honest. Yeah maybe but is it helpful. No right honesty is only as good as the trust that it creates in the outcomes that achieves so one of the things i had to do was re define honesty and in sometimes does mean being brutally honest with right. Hey i messed up. i'm sorry. Hey demand by giving the direct feedback. It's not pretty so on and so forth. Sometimes that is the best thing. And there are many instances in my book of leaders and organizations who who took that route got brutally honest with their vendors with their customers with their partners and investors right right but other times rich very important we need to be brutally honest about others.

Marine Corps Cathy
Cultivate Calm During Chaos With Neil Pasricha

The LEADx Show

04:58 min | 4 months ago

Cultivate Calm During Chaos With Neil Pasricha

"Welcome everyone to this lead x Webinar with Neil Pastor Rita. Thank you so much for joining Neil. Past reach is the author of seven bucks including the book of Awesome. The happiness equation Awesome is everywhere, and you are awesome. His Books Are New York. Times and number one international bestseller's and have spent over two hundred weeks on bestseller lists and sold millions of copies. Neal is one of the world's top brings speakers and his first Ted Talk. The three days of awesome is wearing to one of the ten most inspiring all time. He thinks rights to an speaks about intentional living, and all of his work focuses on the themes of gratitude, happiness, failure, resiliency, and trust welcome Neil. Well. Thank you so much for having me guys. On this cold slash hot sunny slash cloudy Friday afternoon slash morning. I am in Toronto Canada. And it is cold and cloudy and the afternoon here, but I can already see people chiming in on the side Jason's. That's good morning from. Kansas, happy Friday everyone. Guys, please. Let's the chat open that box open on my screen the whole time. I would love to be reinvented time. Why because right now? During coronavirus, one of the biggest sort of needs I feel that I need and I feel like you probably feel it too, is community. Connection. betsy, high from Boulder, Sonya Hi, from California. This is wonderful for Michigan Los Angeles anyone not a not from America it'd be great to hear as well. I don't know. Who I'm talking to the other thing that would be great to salvage front before we get into our exciting conversation. Cuban a love all the texts coming in, thank you is who knows me so when I ended up. Speaking to groups of people, hundreds of people like I'm doing right now. What I don't know is who have you have read the book on some or Oj Geek from India I'm hearing these great ones Calgary. High highly shot cloudy Gog always touting car, isn't it now I'm just kidding but I almost called love. coury loved the Chart Cut Restaurant downtown props to independent restaurants bookstores. Guys got to bring him back. So I. Don't know who's read any books book Balsam the happiness equation you are. Does anybody listened to my podcast three bucks? Maybe some of you were when you get to hear me other places has anyone ever heard me give a speech a Tedtalk? Have you seen like dislike me? Know where you touched my stuff, if at all, or maybe you're like I have no idea who Zappa at me so? You quit your Yapper, but let me know so I'm seeing a seeing I'm seeing some Yeah, Berta, I've never heard of you until now. Diane says you are not unique to me, but I'm already intrigued. The says I've read the happiness equation. oh, I watched you on. Ted Ted or lead Ex. Yeah, so there's lots of I like the newest Story never heard before. Guys don't be sorry. There's eight billion of us in the world right now. I'm one person My community, which I'd like to welcome you into. Is You know one hundred thousand people? These are people that want to live a deeply intentional life. The reason I want to do that is because about ten years ago. My wife left me. My best friend took his own life. These two things happened in the span of a few weeks. I was devastated I stopped. Eating I stopped sleeping. I! Was a skeleton of myself mentally physically psychologically, and then I started a blog called one thousand awesome things, dot com, and for thousand straight weekdays I wrote an entry. Cheer myself up like old dangerous playground equipment like the smell of bakery, air or wearing warm underwear from out of the dryer. The blog took off one best log on the world two years in a row one hundred million hits. It turned into a book called the Book of Awesome so that book here the black. One came out sold. A million copies was a big bestseller I thought that's my fifteen minutes of fame. I kept my job at Walmart the whole time. I got my blog went by. Everyone gets like one viral fleet in their life and their life, but it kept going, and it turns up. I needed to when I got remarried five years later I ended up writing a guidebook to my unborn child than how to live happy life that became my book called the happiness equation more recently. Now I have three boys, five three and one very happily married my wife, lastly on lucky say, and ever in a brand new book all about Resilience Okay so you are also came out last November. On Book Two right now, but of course everything shut down that about resilience. The subtitles had navigate change, wrestle failure and live in attentional

New York Neil Pastor Rita Ted Talk Ted Ted Neal Kansas Toronto Walmart Chart Cut Restaurant Canada Michigan Jason Calgary Diane Berta Sonya Hi Betsy Zappa
"tedtalk" Discussed on Reproducing Churches

Reproducing Churches

04:08 min | 5 months ago

"tedtalk" Discussed on Reproducing Churches

"I don't want this to sound try but but it truly is a gospel centered movement, and so we just kept going back to the word of God. We kept going back to prayer. It was such a spiritual process because there were times when I would come back I'd say, Oh, here's our next milestone and I'd hear it coming out of my mouth and I would chicken out. In the most terrifying thing for me was when other people through prayer reflection journaling scripture said I agree we all know that when they said, we need to do this I was like Oh shoot I thought somebody was GonNa talk me out of it because then I could looked like the great adventuring leader but I would have said, well, I tried but we'd see these stupid sheep that didn't want to go where I wanted to go. It's like that Tedtalk isn't it? You see dancing naked guy. and. He's another I just as low cut, and then they say that's the importance of the first follower of the first person ships in adds legitimacy. So now you know you're you're not just dancing naked guy anymore you're like you got a follower it's on. Yeah that's you know I'm not sure I'm going to pursue that analogy, but we'll just let that one standard is. I. Can't say enough good about this this group of people that that started with. They had such a level of faith in adventure and I to this day lift that group of people up until those stories because it was such a state building time for me as a pastor and a planter as well as it was for the whole, you know this this developing church. So I if I go back to to the next church last. So when I Churches Alive two, thousand and nine. This is successful. We launched into the extra name reform this network, and then we send away we were just about getting two hundred, seventy, five to two hundred people in worship on the weekend..

Tedtalk
How Does Stress Trigger Physiological Conditions?

Not Another Anxiety Show

06:17 min | 5 months ago

How Does Stress Trigger Physiological Conditions?

"Hey guys welcome to not another anxiety show I'm your host Kelly Walker and joining me today as my co-host Erica late them. My, Darling. Good sweating just existing. It went from the dead of winter in a like distortion. What was that show that I never watch game of thrones like the white walkers are coming to the Sahara chocolates too Humid Sahara. If the Amazon. My hair is huge right now I've got some curly hair, so my friend was like. Why is your hair so curly? Did you check the humidity? It's like a thousand percent. That's what. Science! Science it can become a thousand I am drinking the air so. In such rated we'll. However you tell me everything. All besides that, you know just. Just hitting up the Instagram, where I saw an interesting, a really great question. Right like we have a great question. We got a great questions, but this one was. And I will read it to you any second now, but this one was something that we both went. Okay okay, we can talk about this like it's even beyond. Anxiety bites because it's sort of getting back to the basics of song. Yes, so. and. I think there's like you know I WANNA make sure. We sort of answering a no read it in a second here but I wanNA. Make sure we sort of answer the question, but there's a little more to it underneath the surface that I, also WanNa touch on, which is why it's not just like a simple anxiety bites because it was like sort of an evocative question for us and I definitely thought it was worth probably something we've touched on here and there, but never like dedicated an entire episode to so Yeah I think it's. It's definitely worth taking some time. Okay Ready. I understand that things like heart palpitations may lead one to think that they have a heart condition, which is not actually present. I'd like you to do a segment about how stress can trigger actual physiological conditions. Love. This thing I mean you remember this coaching? air-cooled heart palpitations, but I was like yeah, okay, thanks a lot for the vice. Mine's real. And, it's no less real, but. Yes. Yep Yep and so I WanNa make sure I answer this listeners question about stress, and how it, how it impacts our bodies, so I'll take a second to sorta like dive into a biology lesson, which is my favorite thing. Ever sorry Erica bear with me. There's going to be I listen. I love. The biology I just don't understand sixty two percent of it. To Hey. That's passing right on. Oh. Yes, that's passing. That's a New York it is. That's passing. So yeah, I do WANNA speak to to how stress can trigger actual physiological conditions I don't want to share them here, but she she sort of shared a few things that have arisen for her as the result of anxiety so. It is it is well researched documented that chronic stress is one factor keyword one factor of so many others that can contribute to the development or exasperation of physiological conditions. Right stress makes chronic pain worse. It makes gastric issues worse. It makes cardiovascular issues worse. It makes it really exacerbates everything because. Stress touches every single one of our system, so I mean it really does make sense since chronically elevated stress, hormones like cortisol disrupt so many of our body's metabolic functions, but let's hear Mon. that's the one I can remember cortisol. I. Bet you know more than you, thank. For years later. Okay so! I wish it was as simple. This a little more nuanced I wish it was a simple saying. Anxiety and stress caused sickness right, but. We've sort of touched on this or mentioned it in a few previous episodes Dr Kelly mcgonagall. She's a psychologist from Stanford and go watch Ted Talk She's. She's very. He has a Tedtalk But to like basically some up her ted talk on and her and her research She's focused on how. Our understanding, of. Stress. And how it affects the body so. Finding was that when we change our relationship distress, or whatever are currently ship is, we can change how stress affects our body. More, specifically yet right like it always feels like an end. She says this in her Ted Talk. She's like you know I came into practices as a psychologist demonizing stress, eliminate stress managed stress, control, stress, right, but so many of us in the anxiety. Psycho are well. Of how trying to control stress or anxiety goes tension rises, anxiety rises. It's not very effective and Her major finding was that when we change our relationship to stress, right, we change how stress affects our body more specifically when we relate to stress as a natural response that exists to prepare, motivate and protect us than we don't suffer the same negative health outcomes is someone who relates to trust to stress as something to be entirely. Avoid it when we relate to stress as the former, a completely different physiological response occurs different ratio of stress hormones in addition to protective hormones are released mitigating the effects of stress on our body.

Anxiety Erica Bear Dr Kelly Mcgonagall Ted Talk Amazon Kelly Walker Cortisol Darling New York Stanford
Raising Emotional Intelligence and Resilience for a Meaningful Life (with Susan David)

Janet Lansbury Podcast

07:01 min | 7 months ago

Raising Emotional Intelligence and Resilience for a Meaningful Life (with Susan David)

"Can you talk a little about emotional? Agility what it is and why it matters. Yeah absolutely so most of my work. All of my work infect is focused on one key question and that is what does it take internally in the way we deal with our thoughts motions and even the stories that we develop over time that help us to thrive in an increasingly complex world because we know that no matter what grades children have an no matter what they outward skills aw. Ultimate V. what's going to be the Nicholas of whether they all well and happy and thriving. Human beings is determined much more by what goes on inside of them their capacity to navigate difficult emotions thoughts experiences so that they can bring the best of themselves forward and semi work ready focuses on that you know one of these fundamental skills that critical for children and that also as it turns out are critical for us as parents and to be able to offer this to our children. Often it's important for us to have it ourselves and that's one of the reasons I refer so many people to your tedtalk and your book because I want to help parents be able to help their children by recognizing in themselves the importance of understanding and feeling okay with the discomfort of their feelings. Absolutely you know a lot of what I do in my Ted talks in my work in general is I ve very much come up against this idea that you know a lot of us have in society which is that. We want to be happy all the time. We want to chase happiness. Happiness needs to be a goal and often we have that same one to design with great intentions for children. We want our children to be happy. And sometimes what happens is that idea of happiness becomes then almost muddied with the other idea which is if they show unhappiness than it means that not happy. That's a that's a bad thing and so what has happened. I think in society in general when it comes tall more difficult emotions back sadness. Fear Grief Boredom anxiety stress. Is We have very much this narrative that these are bad emotions that the negative emotions and her decayed sounds like a good thing. You know that we have joy and happiness and that the other emotions go away because they are suppose if he'd negative or bad but not allowing children to experience difficulty motion's actually undermines the resilience their wellbeing and they happiness over time. Because the truth is that our children are growing up in a world to use the phrase that I use my tip. Talk in which lacks beauty is inseparable from it's virginity. I'll children will one day be rejected by some of the folded narberth. Oh they'll lose their jobs or bell flanker school test. They going to have difficult emotional experiences and says parents want about. Most important roles is to help. Our children develop a sense of comfort and competence with these difficulty emotions. So that no longer scary. But the actually has the resilience capability checks. She'd navigate effectively and these are these fundamentally emotional. Not Skills that I'm talking about this idea that it's not about positively unhappiness it's xp about developing capacity with the full range of emotional experience so the children are able to navigate the world as it is not as we wish to be. That reminds me of something. My Mentor. Magdi Governor used to always say which is if we can learn to struggle. We can learn to live. It's one of my favorite quotes from her love. That and what you say which is discomfort is the price of admission to a meaningful life. It's easy for us to feel fine when things are going well but it's when we can be comfortable with that discomfort then we're free we don't have to feel like we're just walking this tightrope by fall off. I'M NOT GONNA be able to handle it. I can handle all of it. I think that's EXEC because what happens so much and this is what a lot of my work has looked at how people if they experienced in difficulty actually been instead of just experiencing the difficulty. You know I've lost my job. I'm feeling unhappy here. Things aren't going well in this relationship. That's what we call a tough one experience but then what we ought to do as we start nehring on type two difficulties on the difficulties you know not only am. I am happy at my job but I'm unhappy about the fact that I'm unhappy because I should be happy or we become judgy with ourselves about a we get into this internal struggle with ourselves as to what emotions we should be allowed to feel what emotions we shouldn't get out of feel but our emotions even the most difficult ones guilt as a period for instance our emotions contain signposts to the things that we care about. And so if we move beyond this idea of trying to crush difficult emotions and we instead stock being curious and compassionate with them. Gee I feel guilty right now. Oh I feel I feel frustrated and instead of trying to push him aside we studied. Say What is it that venue? What is it that I care about that? This emotion is trying to sign post to me. So much guilt is apparent. That doesn't mean that guilt is a fact. It doesn't mean that I am a bad parent but what it might be helpful to do is for us to just slow down into solves and say what is this guilt. Kinnock me about what I care about. It might be telling me that I value prisons connected this with my children and I don't have enough of a crash now so what that does is it's liberating it. It opens up our capacity to make small meaningful changes Thomas and so. Yeah when I when I talk about this idea. That discomfort is the price of admission to meaningful less. It's ready this idea that you know. We don't get to have periods of growth without discomfort be apparent raise. A family started a new job. Boy You businesses leave the world a better place. We don't get to do those things without stress and discomfort and so if we can lean into an open assaults up to that discomfort and learn from it that is profoundly hopeful in terms of being able to move forward effectively

Nicholas TED Thomas Kinnock
Adam Greenwood and Dr. Arlene Astell discuss alleviating loneliness in care homes

The Voice of Healthcare

04:23 min | 8 months ago

Adam Greenwood and Dr. Arlene Astell discuss alleviating loneliness in care homes

"So we'll get started here The audience wants to know what we're talking about today so I'm going to give each of your chance to describe the product and say this is what we're doing. This is the advent of it and this is why it matters so adam go ahead started for us last year when I watched a tedtalk. Khuda what makes a good life by Robert Loading and he said a Hob- professor and he was talking about the Harvard Study of Adult Development I'm sure you guys are aware of it. Seventy five years seven hundred plus men and then about two thousand that children where they were looking at the work the hung life and the health people from lots of different socio economic backgrounds For for an unprecedented length of time and the. I suppose what the amazing results were that it wasn't about upbringing. It wasn't about health or money. It's good relationships. Good relationships keep us happier and healthier Social connections all good for us and ultimately loneliness kills and I was doing some research And I came across a piece by a UK charity Kool aid UK and they said that around half a million older people. So that's sixty five plus you can go as long as a week without speaking to another person We as an agency is digital digital agency have been looking at ways that we could use voice. Tech- Lots of different Scenarios over the last two years and this is something that I felt really stormy about And so we wanted to find out if we could use voice tech- to help to tackle the problem of loneliness. In order people excellent Arlene so my interest in this has come from working with older people and trying to get technology into their hands to make lives better The this many existing off the shelf devices and APPs we can download really have functions that can benefit people but often the pros has tried to connect people with the technology trying to find the people who will benefit has being challenging particularly came to us with some work. A few years ago is set to pay 'em a network of Ph D. students who are looking at Health and wellbeing in later life. And how technology could help and one of them was very interested to work with the the people who are really hard to reach people who are lonely. The people who are isolated who may be not having contact with services but sitting in their own homes with Shrinking social network shrinking an ability to to make contact to make new contacts. And how could we stop to to look at where they emerging technologies could could assist them and particularly things like Anything would make new social connections so I was up to see delighted to To be connected with with Adam and Greenwood Campbell when they wanted to start looking at putting boys technology to to tackle loneliness excellent. So what is the product do? And how do you deploy it? And what's been the response what we wanted to do with this study. First of all was just find out if the if the acts of talking to voice assistance would help in in tackling learning us so what we did is So we've been working with an organization called Abbey Failed. I'm here in the UK they They have a bow About four hundred retirement living homes around you can't about seven thousand residents so We all stem if we'd introduce Alexis Google assistance into some of the residents rooms so that we could start to do some qualities studies about the Their effects on loneliness. And that's that's when we start to work with Arlene to help us to try and understand initially how to gauge loneliness in order to people And then often the study we could find out if it made any Tackled it in any way

Arlene Adam UK Robert Loading Harvard Study Of Adult Develop Hob- Professor Abbey Greenwood Campbell
An Open Source Economy of Abundance with Marcin Jakubowski

Buddhist Geeks

11:07 min | 8 months ago

An Open Source Economy of Abundance with Marcin Jakubowski

"Hello everybody Vince Horn here for another episode of Buddhist Geeks and today I am very very delighted to be having a conversation with Martian Jukovski. Good to have you on the show Martin and thank you so much for taking the time to chat with the Buddhist geeks. I'm really excited about this conversation. Because so much of what you're doing. Feel a resonance with but it's also different from what we're doing here Buddhist excited Dick's where the intersections excellent. So let's dive right in. Okay I've got my bathing suit on and I'm ready to go seven Fahrenheit and sweet Maysville Missouri. But I'll join metaphorically awesome are you. Are you at the factory farm right now yes. That's the Kansas City area. Okay cool and I and I understand that. You have also google fiber out there. Oh and that's an addition since about a year now and that's why we can have this conversation hopefully seamlessly today. Yeah no mood. That's a big game changer fiber. We spent the money on a week. We got the pipes run here. Trenched bury them and the whole facility with Up to four GIG. Wow that's awesome. See if you're kind of you're living the dream for me. Which is you've got high-speed gig multi gigabit Internet and you're out on a farm building Chit Really Cool. I'm excited to talk about your work so so I saw. I saw your tedtalk a number of years ago. Odds probably about ten years or so ago now Something like that and and just immediately was like okay this person and your partner Katharina. Y'All are doing really interesting work with the open source ecology movement and In that talk you spoke about the global construction kit which you know. Last time I checked this is like a fifty fifty or so different items that you're looking to build open source that the kind of you would be necessary for human civilization to To to this global village construction set fifty industrial machines to create small-scale civilization with modern comforts essentially the critical machines from tractors bread ovens production equipment energy equipment and and Carson everything. You need to create infrastructure. That's the basis of thriving than so we can talk about then getting meditative but you have to provide some basic needs. I yeah you can't you can't just Meditate without without some basic needs Yogis the the people they had their comfortable caves and flame. That's right that's right. Yeah and some nettles to eat right and and and you're going to see the vision that you'll have is is going well beyond that. I mean you're talking about being able to replicate modern comforts without having to rely so much on the sort of centralized modern systems that we've all come kind of dependent on. Yeah exactly the idea is. Let's distribute the economy. So right now we're in a state of centralization but the fund that by fundamental design we have a distributed world and I think that comes from the first principle of energy energy is distributed. Solar Energy is distributed. That's pretty much where all the power for today's economy comes from. It's from the sun right so by nature. We have a distributed system but the way we created we kind of reformulated as humans isn't into a hugely centralized one so to get back to more in touch with those principles of distribution decentralisation that gives power to everybody literally and metaphorically to tell me more about like the journey that you've been on with the global village construction set because I saw you've you've made a tremendous amount of progress on that front. You know it's one thing to hear someone give a Ted talk about about something that's like an inspiring idea prototypes. It's another to see your ten years later. Like have made real progress on the stuff again to hear about that. Yeah definitely maybe you know you can say at the time of Ted Talk. Were a few percent down right now. I would quantify it as like one third done so we've got hundreds of prototypes Twenty or thirty unique prototypes everything from tractors to CNC machines. Three D. PRINTERS HOUSES. Akwa punit greenhouses. In fact we actually added the house as a critical machine since we kinda thought well. That's a living machine. Actually belongs in the global village construction set but the power is yet getting a comprehensive said along a construction setup route. So we're looking at it more as building blocks and to derive from how Lennox Open source. Software has there is one of the keys to success was large modular break down into very small parts can have thousands of people working on at the same time. And that's exactly what we do with hardware breaking down into modules and development steps for each module sewer inching along at the time of the Ted. Talk I kind of felt like I missed my great opportunity because I had so many people contact me. And all of that and we didn't have an organization. We hardly have an organization right now. We really don't yet. Were not at that level of having a business so to say like a real solid organism. But we do have a lot of foundational work. I think we are. I would call ourselves an exponential organizations laying a solid foundation with all the prototyping that we have done now ready to to convert that to economic impact so transitioning from the Playing prototyping to to the to the next step which a lot of open source Projects Forget and that is a product. So what what are the products that we can offer that anymore? Anyone can use okay. That's cool. I mean it's interesting. I'm thinking back to win. I got even more kind of interested in Y'all's work and I think at a certain point I started to really feel this kind of poll to be sort of subtract myself out ourselves out of the sort of capitalist system a bit more to be able to offer meditation teaching more freely. You know to be little less dependent on a pay for service model and you know one of the big questions that comes up is like okay. We'll around like housing costs. And how do you? How do you reduce your cost like housing is like one of the major costs and you all were some of the only people that were talking about being able to build an an ecologically sustainable you know house for like twenty five grand? Yeah and that's unheard of you not to be able to hit those kind of Knows numbers and that's what I think is really interesting about what what you're trying to do is you're really setting a goal of kind of price reduction that really competes with the capitalist markets on their own terms in a way. That's hard for them to be. It'd be hard if you're actually able to pull this off for companies to To to have any response to tenth the Price House or tractor or brick press or all the things that you're building. Yeah that's exactly right so let's dive into. There's actually a very interesting page like when I look at the WIKKI statistics. There's a page on our wicky open source ecology that org slash wicky which has cost of living. And you said it. The number one cost of living is housing on average. I have some stats here in. Its sixty eight hundred dollars a year. Then the second one is your car. Thirty four hundred dollars a year and then food twenty six hundred dollars a year and yet it adds up to about twenty thousand or so. Just let's see the the number actually is twenty thousand per year per person according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics for a household doesn't sound too bad but Ideas let's so let's go for example to the CDC home just to show you like a very tangible example so in a CD go home. You mentioned twenty five thousand dollars okay. But where's the Labor that's materials so the model there is a client? Pays probably like ten thousand dollars service fee. We host a workshop where we swarm on the build with about fifty or so people and build that in five days and I think that the more like a turnkey cost to the client. We more like seventy thousand. That's kind of what if we if you'd actually start full cost accounting like the twenty five thousand dollars as materials. Yes so you'd have to figure out how to do it but we did with a swarm based build the idea there is you are providing an immersion education. So basically you're selling inexperienced. People participate in get a lot of skills have a lot of fun shatter some of the limits in their mind about what's possible in terms of effective building using very collaborative learning rich learning environment. That's very supportive. So that's the product we're trying to develop and probably if you look at economics probably like seventy thousand dollars for a a house builder a basically the House. The person who wants to have the house before fourteen hundred square foot house so still about was Chris in the cost of industry standards. Right we actually roll this out. So there's a whole organization to behind it and sell. That's kind of how it looks right now. Now of course if you're a skilled guy and you've got a family that can build that while you're not gonna be able to do it in five days but over a month he can take our modular construction methods because everything in the system is designed to be handled by people not not example cranes or large machines the way we designed modular construction method lends itself to a swarm belt with normal people and really reducing the skill set by essentially trying to turn this into. Lagos as much as possible That's interesting and and from what I gathered like everything that you're doing the documentation around the processes like everything is part of the open source model like everything is shared shared. Absolutely everything. There's two levels so one is design seconds. Dente price design. And that's that this is where we talk about the concept of distributive enterprise. Yes the idea if we do it. And it's good for the world. Everyone can use it and and people in modern society. People think that you have to be proprietary or you have to have a competitive advantage based on Ip Order to win here are competitive. Advantage or collaborative advantage is the the opposite. Is the fact that we're collaborating? And if you think about it you're in kindergarten you'd understand because at that point we kinda were talked to to Cher but from High School Into College. Johnny were completely taught the opposite and right now. There's a huge cultural barrier that prevents people from comprehending that. Hey we can actually do. More together. Annihilate the AB- the material scarcity issues that are still central to life in the west end in the developing

Ted Talk Buddhist Geeks Google Kansas City Missouri Vince Horn Dick Martin Price House Cher Partner Trenched Bureau Of Labor Statistics Carson High School Into College Katharina Johnny
Exploring The Canopy With 'TreeTop Barbie'

Short Wave

09:53 min | 9 months ago

Exploring The Canopy With 'TreeTop Barbie'

"Hey everybody matty Safai. Here was shortwave reporter. Emily Kwong today. We thought you might appreciate a little joy in your life especially now that's right here on short wave we want to bring you up. Does it explain what's happening with the corona virus but also episodes that feature other interesting science like this one from the very first week of shortwave. It's probably one of my favorites. Oh yeah mine too. It's got rain. Forests SLINGSHOTS A DECADE-LONG CONFLICT WITH BIG Barbie bad gets rope burn. Let's not love the rope? Burn Kwong it's clearly the roburt. These are the sacrifices you make manny right onto the show enjoy. You're listening to shortwave from. Npr One day this past summer I got to visit a rainforest. Okay that's licorice fern. That is the scientific name. Is Paula podium vulgarity? Ecologist NENAD CARNEY. This is called sledge. This is called Club Moss. It's actually very primitive Plant leaning has been studying in exploring ecosystems like this for thirty five years. Okay so that is called Bikram. That's another species of Moss. I like to call it pledging moss. Just because it's so soft and so please so much like a little pillow. Here's Flynn's this is recommend trim. There's like three four different species of MOSS RIGHT THERE. Couple other things about this rainforest. You're probably thinking rainforests so tropics now. We were in the Pacific Northwest Olympic National Forest in Washington state and it's called a temperate rainforest A. Rainforest because we get it's characterized by having a lot of rainfall there about one hundred twenty inches a brain a year. The other thing about this trip to the forest. Is that all these plants so see how soft these mosses are yes. Don't you just WanNa sleep on them? Yeah all of new weenies. Decades-long work. Okay I'M GONNA come up side by side with you. All of it is about wow sixty feet off the ground for many. This is awesome awesome. This is called the canopy pretty much everything above the forest floor all the way up to the tops of the trees. Come up with me now. Little Rope canopy. Here is a dizzying thicket of bright green leaves and Mosses and ferns all bathed in sunlight. And we knew very little about it because the canopy is literally called the last biotic frontier. It's been so poorly studied. It really aren't very many people who studied the canopy. Feel like when you say. The last biotic frontier should look off into the distance. Ready to the last biotic frontier so today on the show pioneering scientists Malini non Carney on the canopy plus a little later on in the episode weenies decades. Long fight to get more women into science. And how she found unlikely ally in Barbie. Yeah I thought it was weird too. It's not that we're the sticker up and you're listening to shortwave from NPR. Alright so let's back up down back on the ground in Olympic national forest. Malini told me that in the grand scheme of things canopy sciences. Actually PRETTY NEW. People have been studying forest for centuries but it's only been in the last twenty twenty five thirty years that people have actually climbed up into the forest canopy to understand the environment up in the tree tops. One of the hurdles for scientists was literally just figuring out how to get up to the tops of the trees so noelene a few friends figured out a way to adapt some mountain climbing techniques to get up into the canopy and that means shooting ropes into the trees. So I invented this thing called the master caster which is metal rod and we welded it so it has this little hole here for the line. Basically this master caster thing is part fishing. Rod Part slingshot. This looks like a garage sale. A fourteen year old boy's dream could both and and so with a fishing weight loaded into the slingshot. So I'm thinking right up there. Malini cast masterfully. You we set the ropes now on your weight on this got harnessed in step down and then started the long hard process of inching up the road. You're going to go into a crouch and lift your legs up. That's kind of like a caterpillar and then San exactly you. Well you know. I've got to kind of over. The course of her career researching canopies in the Pacific northwest as well as in the forest of Costa Rica. Malini has documented all kinds of things about the canopy sixty feet up this giant maple tree. She shows me one of the cooler ones. Just looking at the underside of these mosses like. There's this canopy soil Allowing Dig Samat over here. Malini peels back a thick fistful of Moss from the branch on the tree. Instead of bark we're looking at tightly packed bed of Brown dirt. I mean that has actual soil that is basically composed of the dead and decomposing. Moss's that live up here and there are like earthworms that live up. Here are a big round up exactly. It's called into canopy soil. Wow look at that. And it's a weird you know you hear smelling the soil smell. But you're you know you're up sixty feet above the forest floor. So it's it's this sort of whole world that the canopy creates they're living plants or mosses there ferns their soil and it's all kind of invertebrates that live here birds that forage for these invertebrates that live in the canopy soil. So it's like this microcosm this mini co system. That's going on kind of independent of the forest floor. But at the same time interacting the forest as a whole of course today canopies all over the world face threats from climate change from logging fire deforestation and a lot of work. Now is about trying to figure out what would happen. If we lost such a complex interconnected ecosystem. I think it's important for canopies to be as intact as possible. Because they do foster so much diversity that you can get seventy species of mosses on a single tree and each of those mosses sort of living life with its insects and invertebrates and supporting birds. And so it's just part of this sort of whole cycle of what makes a primary important. Here's another thing leany discovered when she was first getting started in canopy research. There were very few women. Scientists doing this kind of work and so she set out to change that this was. This was just a fabulous day. That happened in my lab forest. Canopy lab undergraduates worked there. My graduate students would work me and we were just kicking around by these. Look how could we make the forest canopy more meaningful to mattress other scientists but to regular people like how about young girls? They need encouragement. And somebody said. Well what about Barbie aright pause Barbie time because she was busy enough helping to basically create an entirely new field of scientific study in the early two? Thousands deleted decided. You know in her free time she would try to create market and get into the hands of little girls and boys everywhere treetop Barbie. What took iconic doll which is so symbolic of what young girls aspired to. What if we just put this shell around her? Which is a canopy biologist? So called Mattel the company that owns Barbie and then when I propose this idea they said no no no. We're not interested that has no meaning to us We make our own barbies. You know you can't do this. Forget it forget it. So that's when we said well. Why don't we just do it ourselves? And if Mattel's not going to take a couple of trips to goodwill later to get some recycled barbies with the Angela's making our top barbies. And I started bringing campy Barbie along with me and you know talking to my fellow scientists and saying look guys we not only have to do our good science we need to start encouraging people from outside science and and this is one way that we might do it trees are wonderful arenas for discovery this is Malini is two thousand nine tedtalk which by the way is a hugely nerve wracking thing for scientists. And you're hooked up to this hands-free Britney Spears Mike to give a talk. That will basically be your top. Google hit for life to stand on stage. Showing off a little plastic treetop Barbie. Should I really be spending time with this? Are PEOPLE GOING TO THINK? It's weird that me as a scientist and me as a woman scientist is a brown woman. Scientist is spending her time doing this. they're sort of risk. That goes along with that but I felt that the potential good that could come out of it of providing a real role model for a little girl. Who doesn't even know that that the canopy exists to study. You know like when I was a kid and so if that can happen then I think it's worth the risk what we do my students in my lab and is we buy barbies from goodwill and value village. We dress her enclosed that have been made by seamstresses and we send her out with a canopy handbook. And my feeling is thank you that we've taken this pop icon and we have just tweaked her a little bit to become ambassador who can carry the message that being a woman scientist studying treetops is actually a really great

Malini Barbie Scientist Emily Kwong Nenad Carney Pacific Northwest Olympic Nati Olympic National Forest Matty Safai Club Moss Moss Reporter Manny Mattel Pacific Northwest Paula Podium Google Flynn A. Rainforest Britney Spears Mike NPR
Why do Muslim women wear burkas?

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:38 min | 9 months ago

Why do Muslim women wear burkas?

"It is of course generally the case that women were is discussed an judged in a way that what men were is not that discussion and judgment is exponentially more intense. Certainly in the Western world where what? Muslim women were is concerned. To the extent that roughly nine hundred million women of wildly various nationalities cultures beliefs backgrounds at cetera often reduced to one garment. Which almost none of them. Actually wear a corrective now exists in the form of. It's not about the Burka. An Anthology of essays by Muslim women writers activists poets and more including two monocle twenty four contributors some Danny and Yasmin Abdelmajid. It's not about the Burka subtitled Muslim women. On faith feminism sexuality and race is edited by Mariam Con. I spoke to marry him at Midori. House earlier before we get into the contents of it's not about the Burka of let's start with the title of it because intern. Certainly if the way that the you know I don't need to tell you this but in terms of the way that the media discusses Muslim women in particular it has become about the Burka. Why do you think that is why the fascination with this one garment not really worn by that many Muslim women? I think it's many things I if I'm honest. But it's also so so many things being it's easy to use of lead or perpetuate or portray a group of people. If you say everyone is like this one thing everyone does one thing whereas one thing so it's that also we live in a patriarchal society so it's very much this obsession with women or women just in general and their bodies and having power over them and what they can win what they can't wear so very much From all sides within the Muslim community outside of it though I would argue that the Birkat narrative has been built on the outside of within the western sphere And so yeah that's where it comes from and to the reason that is not about the backer is it's not about the back is because back when me and my publisher looked into. It is the most politicized Tom. Or what around Masuma if you type in Muslim women burqas most likely unless it's changed in the last year year and a half and I very much doubt that with our current prime minister continuing tests? Fallas stereotypes I would. It's dillistone such Tom. Even though I can't I can't remember the stops for the UK Whitley but for France which banned the buck When they were in that legislation there was only about two thousand women wearing the buck in the whole sixty million population of the country. So I find that. Really curious that people feel the need to Control and portray missing minute specific way and it's just easier to control a bunch of people if you say everyone's this one traditionally submissive type of way so the idea is presumably then that it's not about. The Burke is a corrective to that. You get several female. Muslim writers to write about being female Muslims. If you want a show and say yes if you want the longer answer we live in a society that is capitalist on. You need to sell a market audience. Something they can recognize on the you know the Shannon's and the the you know Giles's and the Tom's need-we to recognize a narrative that has been built around Muslim women and it's not about the backyard the buck is what they recognize about. Masud women think. Oh this is great. It's going to be exactly what I know completely does the opposite so that very much. I didn't go into it. Thinking this book was not called. It's not about the bucket from inception. actually hated figuring out a title. It was the worst part of the entire process. I can guarantee you that And it was kind of a very bitter bitter part for me because I came to this realization that regardless of whether I wanted to or not I would have to undo a narrative that I played no part in creating So I did it by literally giving them the title and thought well the books not going to give you anything about. Boko the job. How did you go about assembling your roster of contributors very much so Research and People often think it was me and a bunch of Friends. Very much was not This is me literally so really trying to reach out to as many of women as I could from different spaces and spheres age-groups coaches religious practice within the Muslim community And saying Hey. I'm doing this thing. Would you like to be a part of and there wasn't any special person? It was literally just research googling and speaking different seen who they were influenced by as well and so so people like Yasmin Abdelmajid. Everything that happened with her in Australia was a huge thing and I had been following that and I really love the way that she carried herself but she was honest integrity. And then Salma Donnie. And Her TEDTALK mcquay regular voices. On nautical twenty four hours and. They are very powerful with that. Voice is an apologetic. And I knew I wanted that. But then I also didn't want this book to be a collection of known voices or without form. So then you know respectfully not to say the EPA didn't have platforms or even an audience but they weren't as well known Osama and Yasmin. Russell people like Jamila Heckman. Who writes about a struggle with mental health and You know the part that I wish you talked about was how she believed.

Yasmin Abdelmajid TOM Yasmin Mariam Con Intern Masuma Salma Donnie EPA Publisher Danny UK Prime Minister Jamila Heckman Osama Giles Russell France Australia
Oprah and Tracee Ellis Ross: Your Life in Focus

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

08:45 min | 10 months ago

Oprah and Tracee Ellis Ross: Your Life in Focus

"All my goodness look at this. This isn't a room this is beyond a room. Riina thank you for all the way to Dell oh I would fly to Dallas for you. I'd fly to the move. This is actually very first time together. One on one a GAL has dreamed. Well it has been so really meaningful and delightful to watch you from afar. Just flourish just your flourishing and flourishing into everything. It means to be a woman who is completely full as I've been talking earlier full and filled with life to herself. And you say that you're living in abundant you call it juicy life and juicy enjoyable life. What does it look like to you? Well it's interesting. I feel like as I've gotten older I've become more myself and the more I am myself. The more my life looks like me and it's not the same as anybody else's and so it's been this process of first coming to know myself then accept myself. I love myself not on every day. Be kind to myself. Even when I don't feel like I want to be and then ask myself all those questions of what I what I really want from my life talking about. Yes and it's such an intimate journey that has taken time like even after I've discovered the things I like the things I wanna do my dreams who I am then the courage to actually walk towards those things is in and of itself. Its own journey. So I've been watching you from afar and I've seen you do lots of things you the first black woman ever opened the tedtalk. That was incredible. That was one of the one of the scariest things I've ever done. That was but that was fantastic. I like that very much. I thought you were in your power but the thing I loved so much that makes my eyes water. Is that speech that you didn't glamour in two thousand seventeen and you said something at that speech that reminded me of a moment that my Angelou church with me years ago. She said when she was in a really downtime and that she was with someone who said remember God loves you and she said God loves me and the realization of that God here all the title is but you don't realize and you had one of those moments so everybody with that was for us so we walk around. Like I'm doing what I WANNA do. I'm living laugh. I'm Mike Makeup Dreams Happen. I'm putting one foot in front of the other. I'm making it all go. And then you have these moments which actually came journaling. I had broken up with somebody. We'd been broken up with each other for quite some time and somehow I was having a ton of anxiety about telling him again when a repeat had been broken up for some time I had anxiety about telling him I wanted to date other people. What is that? What is that and these are the moments that I say to myself like? What is that like the kind of question like what is running me right now like. What is this dialogue? I'm having where did it come from? Is this some tape? That's mine. Is this a cultural tape? Is this me thinking I have to ask permission of somebody to live my own life and in my journaling I wrote. My Life is mine and it just I mean I say it and it takes my breath away because one doesn't realize really particularly as a woman particularly as a black and Brown woman in this culture. In the swirl of Patriarchy and racism and sexism and all of these things these things that are sort of giving us a map that is not necessarily our own that we can actually make choices for ourselves that are not just externally for ourselves but that actually match that very quiet voice inside our hearts and it launched me into honestly the life. I'm living right now really. So did y'all hear that my life is mine. My Life Mine. I just take a minute. Take a deep breath because the echoes crazy. Are you used arena? Talking here. Seventy thousand feet was a lot of its arena talking. We're arena dog. It's just a little intimate conversation. Yes but when that realization hit you in my life is I would think that that would bring tears to your eyes and that would be. The kind of that would be like Whoa. It brought tears to my eyes also begged a lot of questions where the places where. I'm not living my own life. And so many of the epiphany moments that occur are met with grief and tears and my own judgment and then even when you have a moment like that even when I had this moment of naming those words and holding them and hearing them then also didn't just do it right away everywhere people and you know his moments. It's interesting when I did that. Speech I was terrified to do it. I felt like I needed another three days. I knew it was too long. Didn't have time to cut it down and I kept saying to myself. You are enough just as you are even if you think it should be different you get to show up just as the speeches and that works. This is fine but I was also terrified because I felt like there were such important things going on in the world and I felt like this was not an important thing to talk about the fact that Your Life Is Yours. And empowering other people do the same which it is really the only talk about important. Most important didn't even dawn on me. Then then afterwards I had a lot of shame about having revealed something so vulnerable and then it took me about two years to realize how revolutionary the thought is particularly for a woman. Yes that we know you can applaud for that. That's all of us to actually live in your own life. You know in the seventies speaking of living your own life and what bottling for other women is in the seventies for me. It was very tyler Moore. Mary Mary Richards was on TV. She was a single woman. She was a heroin but she was a fictional character. And in twenty twenty. I know you realizes that a lot of single ladies point to you as an example of what being an unmarried woman could and should look like and I imagine. That's not a role that you ever thought you'd be playing which I like. Many of us was taught to grow up dreaming of my wedding not of my life and I spent many years of my went to the choir and also waiting to be chosen. Well here's the thing I'm the chooser and I can choose to get married if I want to. But in the meantime I am choice. Family single happily gloriously single and. I do wish there were more examples and one of the reasons. I'm okay talking about it and by the way my life is mind. That speech really was geared towards that I was like you know at the time was forty five years old and single and I had just pushed out my fifth kid on television. The irony of that in that context so many people ask the question. Have you ever thought about having children like I mean my child gave my life meaning? I'm like are you saying my life is not meaningful and because of the structure that we live in. It is so easy for me to feel undermined with all the accomplishment that I've had and my accomplishments I don't mean the Walker stuff I mean like I take the garbage out before it stinks like I eat food. That's good for me. I get my sleep. I show up for my friends. And that makes life very meaningful and somehow the rug gets pulled out so quickly when people put me in the you should be married why are why aren't you married yet. Like what's wrong with you. Well you know I got that until my fifties so you got a while to go. I only have three years but people might keep asking me and I don't mind if people keep asking me because every time they asked me. It's an opportunity for me to change the narrative and expand the story of what we can be who we are as

Dell Mary Mary Richards Dallas Tyler Moore Heroin Walker
Gaining Financial Dignity with Stacey Flowers

RISE Podcast

06:41 min | 10 months ago

Gaining Financial Dignity with Stacey Flowers

"What I would love to know. Because I'll tell you how I discovered you but I I think it would be no. I'll just say how I discovered you because I think it was an act of God. I always feel like the universe conspires to make things come together. I was watching a youtube video about. I don't even remember what. And then you know how youtube serves up little tiny videos on the side. I saw your head talk and clicked on it and literally within twenty minutes of senior Tedtalk. I had creeped on everything about you online. I had sent you a DM on instagram. And ask you to speak at Rice. And the reason I tell that story for you but also to our listeners is I think that women struggle so much with putting themselves out there and wanting to show off their work or acknowledging it and if you hadn't put that video on your youtube we wouldn't be having this conversation so it's super super important to talk so much about power to stand in your own power but I'm gonNA assume that your origin story is did not start from the place that you are now. So will you tell listeners who you are and what you do and kind of the story of how you got to where you are absolutely so what? I tell people in the morning when I do. My show is that my name is stacey flowers real last name because nobody believes me and I make a living through talking. Just like Oprah I do it from the stage and from the sage I talk about happiness empower also. Do It via coaching with me. Coaching women to be more amazing than I do. Avia influencing and that's kind of weird sort of our story intersected with you finding the Tedtalk and then finding other content so on the influencing side on Youtube I've been documenting restoring my financial journey after like this big huge monumental public failure in my company Started with me making about eight hundred dollars a month working part time at cafe to now earning about ten K. A month net working part time in my company and the like to kind of give people that background because it gives you the scope of like how I am as a person in terms of the work that I'm putting out but I think the other thing that's really going on in my life right now. That gives a little bit. More of the backstory is that I'm a mom of nearly eighteen year old human being which feel crazy when you ever seen. Stacy you need to go. Look at her instagram right. Now you will not believe. It's possible that she has an eighteen year old yet like I I know it I see it. I barely believe in so like I'm in full blown like empty nest syndrome slash. How is my child almost like legally able to Mary and another another? He wants to like it. Just it doesn't make any sense. Oh I'm in this very interesting space right now in my company and in my personal life with regards to those two things being there and then the last thing that I love for people to know is that I'm an eight because the deeper we dive into on the Graham. I don't know if you do any Graham. I think are talked about the queen of India. Graham it is our favorite conversation here at the office and I feel like when you know. Someone's number you're like okay. We Are you an eight seven. You gotta be an eight. Yes eight seven. Yeah Yeah. I'm an eight seven but I like to tell people that because before I knew that I was in eight like I really didn't have a framework to sort of organize a lot of my experiences. That led up to this moment but the minute. I took it I was like what? Yeah now my life makes sense to me. So it's been it's been really exciting so that's kind of a little bit about who? I am now and like the work that I do now. It's super interesting about that too is that. I don't know a lot of women who are eights who will confidently claim that number. And if you don't if y'all know what we were speaking in a language right now if you please a I feel like I've talked about ten million times. You can go google it but if you understand any Graham you understand. The eight is the challenger which oftentimes gets a bad rap but also the eight is a world changer. Mother Theresa wasn't a Martin Luther King. Junior was a there are so many powerful AIDS but not a lot of women. Of course your your whole thing is about power. Not a lot of women will own that. What was that journey like for you? Where you immediately like. Hell yes or did it take you a moment kind of come to terms with it. It took me a moment to cut so privately. I was like yes I know. Why why him? But it was a very private thing because then I was like Oh my God like all of the things that I thought as a kid. They're true and like now people like people are going to know and so it took me a little bit but like what I like about. The Graham is a gives you like the range of how you how you are when you're at your best and then how you are when you're under stress. And so when I looked at it I was just like you know stacey all of these years that you've been trying to pretend that you're not an eight this is what's making it hard for you like this is what's making people have a bad reaction to you being a woman who is as powerful as you actually are. What would happen if you just Kinda show up in your full eight minutes likes what would happen if you did that. And honestly that's sort of like what happened from with my tedtalk going out like that happened before I had my big fall and so it's just like that was already out there so when I started documenting my financial journey which was really hard because it was such a contrast to the experience doing a tedtalk and traveling around the world. It was like I have these two really contracting experiences. But I'm like if I'm going to talk about it I'm GonNa talk about it completely in that directly came from me wanting to own my Eytan and being like even in this space where I'm starting over at the bottom. I'm still just as powerful as I was when I was standing onstage delivering that Tedtalk and since making that decision has been just like the best thing ever. That's why I always like to mention it because it's just like when you know that at the core this is who you are it's like why would you why fight it like why. Why rail against it anymore in the more and more of embraced it. The more opportunities like rise have shown up that I've been able to say yes absolutely I will surely come to your stage and do my thing like versus me being like. Oh pick me choose me. It's like I don't have that sort of thing happening in my life is much anymore. It's more people are noticing me and they're like Oh and I'm like yeah been here like but it's like the reason you didn't know because I was afraid to really embrace the nature of it because as you said most women are not aids and if they are as it's not it's not an easy thing to do because people automatically assume that we're GONNA be like this aggressive like zero tolerance type personalities. Just like no. I'm all woman. I'm just a different type of woman with a whole lot of

Youtube Graham Tedtalk Instagram Stacey India Rice Google Mary Martin Luther King Theresa
The Generosity of Scars with Scott Mann

The EntreLeadership Podcast

09:21 min | 10 months ago

The Generosity of Scars with Scott Mann

"I'm your host Alex Jones and today or conversation with Scott Man he's a retired green beret. Okay who is waging war against the loneliness epidemic by focusing on an answer that says old as time itself human connection and as as with most lessons of enduring value. This is one that Scott didn't learn in a textbook or in a classroom. It's one that he learned through pain through suffering suffering and through his own personal experience of rock bottom. Yeah I was standing in a closet. It is where I found myself my lowest moment coming out of the military holding loaded forty five pistol in my right hand and no intention of coming out of there alive. I had I stood there wonder. How in the heck I got to that point? You know. Just a few years earlier I had been a green beret. A career Green Beret. At the top of my game I had operated in at risk high-stakes places around the World Columbian Afghanistan and had led. You know very strategic missions and just in a short period of time just a couple of years. I had spiraled into this place where I was devoid of purpose. My mood swings were so unpredictable but that my wife and three sons would just literally get up and lead any room that I walked into my house awesome. I was starting to really question my relevance on this Earth that I had run my course you know my contributions were done and my time was over. There's just nothing left for me to give. The survivor's guilt had really come through strong the post traumatic stress. All the things that I had pushed down for years I once I got to this place where I was disconnected from purpose and and and really struggling then it came on full force and I just didn't know what to do with it. I had become severely isolated from Pierce Pierce in all of those factors created a very very nasty cocktail and so it sounds like you were in a place where you had literally lost. Hope for for the teacher. Yeah I think I think that's accurate. I had lost hope. And you know for a special operator. We pride ourselves at playing at the highest level and being super relevant to strategic situations. And I just couldn't see that relevance anymore and had it not been for the voice of my Middle Son Cooper out in the hallway I I heard his voice talking. He'd come home from school and it just totally jarred me and shocked me. I looked down at that pistol and I was just just so ashamed and so just at the bottom of the barrel when I saw that and and so on shuffled out of the closet. But I still wasn't where I needed to be. I mean there were many more moments like that that followed but that's the moment that sticks out in my mind and you know as as a point where in really I you know. I'll be honest with you. I never told that story. I I did it at a Ted talk just recently. Yeah I'd never talked about had not talked to my wife about. It had not talked to my kids about it because I had moved on. I'd found it was actually sharing. That story with a buddy who who was considering suicide himself had served in combat together so he told you this he did. We were at a conference for helping veterans transition and we pulled off to a corner and we were talking and he made it very clear that he was he was close to check it out. He told you that and at that point. Is that when you shared literally. That's the first time I had ever shared shared that story and when I did the color came back into his face I could see that he realized he was not isolated. And in that moment for just a moment I got a glimpse camps of what storytelling you know or what I call being generous with your scars. can do if you're doing the service of others and it was just a moment but I felt connected naked and there was something to that and so I just kind of kept pulling that thread for the next few years I started. I started pursuing storytelling and sharing lessons from my past in the military. That were not necessarily pleasant lessons but lessons where I had learned lessons where I had changed lessons that could serve other people and I used storytelling to do it and it really pulled me out of that dark place until finally just this past year. I made the decision to share that story about the clause in sole reason Alex's because because I've lost so many friends to suicide in the last few years were high-performers Navy Seals Green Berets. And I thought you know what if I can share my story about that dark place I was and it can help someone step into the sunlight. Let's do it you know I love that specific point where you tell your friend the story of where you had been. And you describe it as his eyes lighting up. Because it's like we've got two guys sitting in a corner of conference telling each other that they've both both had thoughts about ending their life. Yeah I would not think that that moment is when people's eyes start to light up but it sounds like something happens internally early in a person's heart and soul that I know the word you used was connection that creates connection absolutely you know one of the major things that I teach as a former the green beret in leadership around human connection. Is there certain things that draw us together right whether you're sitting down with a teammate from the military or whether you're sitting being across from a client where you're talking to your teenager struggle is a universal singular that binds us. I don't care what your religion is. What your ethnicity is is where you come from? We're all creatures of struggle. And if we have the courage to reach down and lead with our scars you know the things that scuff us up up in our life and we share those in the service of other people. It accelerates trusted accelerates connection and it makes you relatable to the people you serve and and their armor comes down and it's one of the most powerful tools that leaders can use today in almost none of them do and I love how you use the word scars so as we kinda China dive in to. How do we make this practical for people? I'd love for you to tell us. What is your personal definition of scar as it relates to all of this this and then how do people start to identify these in there so I started speaking in storytelling? As I came home. You know and using stories from my past brothers others. I'd served with lessons I'd launch. Did you ever think you would do whatever now acting. And and that's about a mid life crisis but all of that stuff you know do what scares you. I lost so many friends in combat and I think what they say to me still is hey manduwa scares you. Don't pull back because because they gave up so much at such an early point in their life that you know. I'm I'm still here. I'm still here and I'm still running and I think the best way that I can live a life that they'd be proud of is to do what scares me a healthy way. Yeah it's it's crazy to think about the fact like you've been shot at Scott and the thing that scares you is telling a story but you're you're being serious but you know there's a reason he's in that most people fear speaking more than death right in it's again it's because go back to human connection. We are status creatures. We worry about what the other people around us. I think it's how we've survived for for Millennia and so those things that we feel when we get up in front of people that we feel nervous about anxiety and our hands are sweating before that sales meeting or that call where we have to get up and give a keynote. Those were real physiological symptoms that we feel like we're GONNA die right. It's fight flight or freeze. The sympathetic nervous system is kicking in and the same thing. She fell in combat. It's the same symptoms right and it's because we don't want to be voted off the island so I started pursuing that it scared. May I love the way it felt. It had that familiar. Feel to run in missions. You know and so speaking to other rooms and groups of people in storytelling in particular. Just really let me up. I did a talk called rooftop leadership which really talks about how Green Berets go into these rough places and they helped villages to the rooftop and fight back and how does that work it it was a tedtalk and when I got invited a few years just recently to go back and talk about where the Ted speakers are now. I told the story of scars generosity of scarves because I wanted people to understand it from me. My rocket fuel in this world is it is that it is tapping into the struggle and leading what that struggle. That's how I define a scar and the scar you know webster in Google scholar is like a superficial mark on the skin. I define a scars mark on the soul. You know that has really scuffed us up but it has the potential to bind us to other people so our scars universal absolutely. They're absolutely absolutely universal. You won't find anyone that hasn't been scuffed up. That has an incurred those internal scars in their life. It's just part of living but what happens. Is We live in a society where we are conditioned to put those things away. Push those things down. Do not show those scars. Do the Selfie look at me. Look at what I've done. Look at what love accomplished in these five easy steps you can do. This people are so tired of that it's unwatchable we're already in a low trust society so if we're not willing to lead with our scars ars and be authentic in how we communicate where we've been in our life. It's very hard for people to follow where we're

Scott Man Alex Jones TED Scars Navy Seals Green Berets Pierce Pierce Columbian Afghanistan Sympathetic Nervous System Cooper China Google Webster
Is TikTok Really a National Security Threat?

Slate's If Then

03:36 min | 1 year ago

Is TikTok Really a National Security Threat?

"Washington Post Technology reporter. Drew are well is spending a lot of his time these days working on stories about tick tock a massively popular APP that's experiencing the kind of growth right now. That facebook and instagram did back in their heydays so drew. Are you on tick Tock. Do you have account I do. I'm not what I'm not a creator. I'm just a weird lurker. My editor is also kind of obsessed with. Uh you haven't posted any videos. No I haven't posted anything. I feel a lot of pressure because everything that goes on. There is really funny and smart and clever. And I'm none of those things. My favorite tedtalk doc. Video that I've seen so far is a bunch of quick shots of a guy throwing slices of cheese at the windows of cars sitting next to him at stop lights and each time a cheese slice sticks to a window. Now the music is sinked. So that a huge drops it tip narcotic year when I look at it. It's it's there's always music everything and there's a lot of pranks a lot of sort of a quick one liners funny visual stuff. And it's all young people. That is the core user the team the very young person under twenty five yeah. It's almost entirely young people. That's changing a little bit but like the highschoolers who would never dream of going on facebook. They're all talk and it is sort of the capital of of the comedy today so far. This sounds like you're pretty standard. Social Media Story Qian's flock to some new APP where they post rocky ocoee videos adult scramble to figure out why this is the hot new APP meanwhile celebrities and brands scramble to figure out how to use the APP to connect with the teens and market. Things do them. Doc Will Smith Reese Witherspoon the NFL these entities all have a presence on Tick Tock. But here's where it gets weird last month Democratic Senator Chuck Schumer and Republican Senator. Tom Cotton sent a joint letter to the director of National Intelligence. They asked about security risks. Around Tick Tock and wondered Tick Tock is quote potential counter intelligence threat. We cannot ignore. It seems crazy right. And that's the thing. Washington is just starting to explore. When you look at Tick Tock? It's really easy to see the sort of fun videos. But it's also this incredibly instrumental communication platform for kids and young. The people the government has had its issues with facebook and instagram and twitter and snapchat and some of those issues of touched very directly on politics elections and national all security but those social media companies are all American in Tik Tok is not its parent. Company is Chinese which has got lawmakers asking a lot of questions questions lately. Thank you all for being here. Thank earlier this month. Republican Senator Josh Hawley convened a hearing about tech companies with ties to China. I'd also like like to highlight two empty chairs today which I say for two invited witnesses. Who apparently don't share your commitment to discussing this issues wants shares for tick tock he drew on some of the reporting that drew has done for the post and Holley said this about tick tock accompany compromised by the Chinese Communist Party? Already knows where your children are knows what they look like with their voices. Sound like what they're watching and what they share with each other Holly makes this sound pretty scary. What happens when the big social media platform the one? Everybody's on based in China. Does it raise different concerns about security or data privacy or censorship or propaganda or is this just fear mongering about a geopolitical

Facebook Editor Senator Chuck Schumer Drew Instagram Washington Post Technology Senator Josh Hawley China Chinese Communist Party Reporter Senator Washington Tom Cotton Holley Tik Tok Reese Witherspoon Qian DOC
"tedtalk" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

Gettin' Grown

23:47 min | 1 year ago

"tedtalk" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

"You're given a platform like the Ted talk platform to kind of Say What we had to say what would that message be how will we WANNA show up now it's never gonna be this level however I that's I think that's awesome that goes along with what you are doing important work please hearted Kinda like how like what kind of like how method up L. is show was like how to successfully get your boss together without game fire Oh that was good that was a good question that was good and they and they were right to that was to learn how to crochet in ways that are still in don't make you a target I a worship real shade throw this out you don't need to what I would call it real shade throws you really just have to set the stage for the alleyoop that's really it that's it are we gave Ted talk he did and I feel like that was about pettiness like how he had a message signed it well actually you know what I'm GonNa find the link for that and posted in the description box so you guys watch it like one of my one of my favorite moments on doc hundred forty four ways to say no Avocados ever see me but I what really read the forty four really say no one hundred forty four ways it didn't even take me that long that's how I know that this is something that the law gauges what is that he wanted me to say I feel like I was gifted for such a time in this I want to excel in the area I would probably call that one how to let it roll off aurorae back onto this boom it one person at a time for the most charismatic slave ever not where do you think your why is it's like why do you do why why do you do the things that you do why do you think that you've been gifted to do the things that you do oh I actually you know I think my why and why I'm giving this tedtalk generally the why is I'm going to answer why would I be giving this Ted talk on why can be successful fuck up because there's so many people on this earth who beat themselves up and I am not exempt from that whatsoever but what I think I've really tried to implement in my life is letting things roll off my back in trying to push forward because I've I sit back and I look at all of the things that have happened I looked at the entire trajectory of my life and I'm super grateful I had a moment today where to stop and I had to have a moment of gratitude I talked to my plans for a second I do this on a regular basis I was actually like really cleaning the house because I wanted to sit down and do some heavy work and I love to do that in a clean space so I had moved from the front of the House to the back of the house before I walk back after I looked at my plants and I said thank you which I tend to do and then I stopped and I just said thank you in general like you know what I'm really grateful for my life and I'm really grateful for my emily my loved ones and for my opportunities and my constant opportunities and I'm grateful that anytime I thought things were not going to work out they always work out and they work out better and so I wanna give this Ted talk because I feel like there's so many ways in my life in which I have fucked up and I really beat myself up about those but then there's many things for me to be grateful for and I'm super super grateful for where I am in this place right now and I'm still learning and building and really really really find in my purpose but I know that I'm going in the right direction and I feel good about the direction that I'm headed and so I want to empower others to step into the as well and that would be the why of my talk though what about you well we yes yes that was that was amazed thank you sis I think when I think about my why I think I think a lot of a lot of my life has been or the major lessons that I've learned in my life have been through change and I know that we as people can be resistant to change 'cause changes uncomfortable but it is necessary and and I also feel like we we do a lot of talking that's not always followed about like follow through inaction actionable items so like at I want to think about all the common threads in my work I think it changes central we talk about Visteon and challenge and change in navigating the change the transition of being you know a real adult and what those changes are and how life has changed so much I and my work you know at work we think and we literally guy institutions through processes of a massive change and transformation in thinking about what that looks like practically and how to assess their how to assess progress toward in the same community that we bill getting grown I've always aim to build because nothing nothing there's no transition greater there's no change greater than you know education in navigating that prostate those processes occasion and the kind of tools and tricks of the trade to understanding and getting through that seamless seamlessly fli literally locked in kind of two individual experiences and we've been socialized to be competitive in I share that and I think that has cost us a lot as a people so i WanNa create spaces where we can book against in brick against you know divisiveness and competitiveness and and and anything that makes us feel like there's not enough space for all of us to be great doc Ted ex up getting grown we got some ideas you know there should be honest the Ted talk on that I wanted to do and I know that they ted Ted talk people have fellows program and I said that I was gonNA apply this year but did everything to talk myself out of applying why I don't know man when it came down to it I even got the application and started eh and literally just like did not allow myself to finish it because I didn't feel like I had a form the big idea like I felt like I had all these tons of ideas kind of floating around in my head and I mean just kind of allow business and and procrastination to just you know you know I'm a stay on I'm still you because we got to see I mean we'll wait maybe next year being a better place in because these ideas here's our solid this right here you can put this right on into an application and I know homey accountable you in the rest of the game grown van come on getting getting grown league I want you to tap into your inner troll and we are going to get in kids ask because she needs to equities which needs to put out this this Ted talk are they they may not even they need to hear from the doctor about diversity and change so many so many other brilliant people they don't need me exactly which is why my raggedy to talk with literally they totally wherever I just got off over here yes you did you did she said that I appreciated that it is you don't have to be the most eloquent in the room I definitely am not I'm not the most swirl well-spoken well read not nearly anywhere close to the most educated but I think that that's what makes this so dope and what I have learned this is why team type of fast is like so clutch for me because I think a lot of the other organizations or or commute entities are still so isolated where it's like you know you have the engineers only kicking it with the engineers academic academics the this right so I and I feel like I get my life because the people a lot of people that I'm closest to and I don't know what the says about me or anything or you know us or whatever but I think it's dope but most of the people that I'm closest to people who I love talking to the most are people who don't have Jeez now I love my community my scholar Fan my sisters and brothers in the fight the people have actual relationship with but I find that like my closest friends the people who I love like the people who I think are most brilliant are people who have high school diplomas people who you know have a bachelor's degree people who'd ain't go school at all people who have ged's people who have who have lived lived life to the extent that they're they have perspective that Oh have and I feel like that's why teams I've ever faster me so because I think academic kid learn a lot from an entrepreneur and vice versa and I think that this who says that I have and I've been blessed to cultivate are helpful to people who are not in spaces that I'm in so like you know I have one my closest partners is a real estate agent and we we support each other key work is vastly different like the ways that we move our complaint really different but I get so much life from conversations with her because sh because of where she is and how she does this in the world she's able to to bring things to my attention that I would have no knowledge of otherwise so that's why I just feel like that's what makes an in talk you know organization in same everyone who is not someone who you know is published or what have you you know they're just people who are who had have insight in information and something to offer it doesn't matter where you got it from no you're absolutely right you're absolutely right and so that's all that's part of what the Ted Talk I was talking about would be is like you don't have to be all these things in order to be quote unquote successful in success doesn't necessarily come in a monitor very in a monetary form but it comes in you really feeling like you are living out your purpose and your passion so straight like that that's kitchen table talk this week let us know if you liked our little mini Ted X.'s. I had it maybe maybe one day we'll actually like we'll prep in actually right out fo Ted talks and do them on the show I think that's a good idea let's let's take these ideas that we talked about here and turn them into Ted talks talks that will make okay let's do that too all right yes we coming back but now we gotta honesty box so let's go there let's get it meet the scheduling assistant that.

Ted one day
"tedtalk" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

Gettin' Grown

16:38 min | 1 year ago

"tedtalk" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

"It to the head must gather around the kitchen table I don't really know what inspired this week's topic nick but it was just something that I had written down in my little journal notebook here Halo maybe because I don't know I haven't been kind of listening to of seminars and webinars lectures and thinking trying to reflect in get my mind together around who I am and how I show up and what are the things that I would like to work on in the coming days and months and in the New Year So this kind of thought came to my mind so I posted it and she agreed that it would be something that we could talk about today so for those of you who are familiar Ted talk is the platform that's become increasingly popular over these last couple early years but as an organization that kind of is centered around big ideas uh-huh and giving people platform to share their big ideas or their thoughts in around certain topics and I think Ted talks are super cool I think it's been an interesting way for us to learn about people and the interesting that they're doing people in the experiences that they have and how experience kind of shaped the different you know the trajectories of their lives so I got to thinking and one of the things I love about Ted Talks is that they're very kind of straight to the point yes you get like a very finite amount of time to just kinda like say your spiel what's your idea is what your platform is why you feel that way and you know why people should give a crap Dan I've been you know ask Sahu Can Kinda be abstract and lofty and as evidenced by the way I'm describing this as someone who can use too many words at Phnom drawn to the fact I'm drawn to the you know the real kind of direct and straightforward way that talk Ted talks are laid out so I thought that it would be cool if we had to if we had to do a Ted talk if we were so I ask you I mean we can kind of have to have one that's kind of lighthearted and fun and then one I guess that's more serious so but you can go whichever direction you you're more comfortable with firs Well if you if you had a ted talk jade where would did your Ted talk be about what would you what would you tap be with your message what do you have to say okay if I had a ted talk I'm sure everybody thought I was GonNa say was going to be about weed or food you are wrong into season how to clean your kitchen like Appro I actually you know what that's GonNa be my light hearted one how to properly clean your deb kitchen because mostly don't know how to do it and then I will go into the house and that would being including wiping down counters wiping down cupboards wiping down cabinets pulling appliances oh and cleaning behind those cleaning the appliances off taking the stove apart is scrubbing it down making sure you include that that hood event as well you've got to clean that to your walls your dishes do not greasing decreasing don't leave your sink dirty I would have a whole how to clean your floors properly make sure you get up in them crevices make sure you get up in that refrigerator it will be a whole to do how to organize the spice cabinet how to organize your Pantry I think I could also be like a kitchen table talk okay well you know what let's table that and that's not even my real talk yeah all right so for your first Ted talk what would it be about I'm going to serious I because this is kind of like something I've been thinking about today okay so I feel like and I kinda talked about it briefly on twitter a year I've just noticed kind of a common response to a problem or something that keeps coming up so I've noticed that when a company or a corporation is found to have or exposed for racist practices or problem and AAC ideologies just some evidence of like you know some bull swanky one of the ways you know when people respond to the East things is like you know we're GonNa do some diversity and inclusion training we're going to develop a task force and we're going to you know find some resources into do you know these under served under a marginalized communities and often times that is done through scholarship programs or the development of some sort of program designed to support you know students of color and you know I'm not GonNa say that that scholarships and those kinds of programs are ineffective or not useful because that's not true because I wouldn't be sitting where I'm sitting without those programs I mean they do absolutely have you know great value insignificant than they do impact any for people who don't always have access to opportunities with certain opportunities but I just feel like that's kind of low hanging fruit so I feel like if I was doing the Ted Talks doc I would really want it to really be about how like you know everyone wants to talk about change but nobody wants to change and I wanNA talk about like you know the rhetoric of change versus the actual activities of change what's required for a chain is to happen and I would speak specifically around like change in higher education contacts because that's where I live and move and breathe steady but I will want to talk about that because I think that we have been conditioned to kind of talk about changing inclusion and diversity and even equity social justice in very superficial surface China ways but we really haven't or you know there are few of us who have really yet kind of a knowledge the level of death that's necessary for us to really drill effect changing and for these corporations and and and specifically I think you know we gotta start calling out the ways that you know racism my wife premacy have existed in this country and how they've really shaped every institution and colleges and universities are not exempt so we're going to fund if we'RE GONNA if we're going to do you know throw money behind scholarships you know that's cool but it's insufficient of addressing the whole problem and if we're being one is like throwing money in the way of scholarships at this problem is like you know just sit in our students up with an all expense paid trip to suffering the same right but if we want to really say we're changing the conversation that we want to like really have a reform agenda you know that that really gets us to where we wanna be we also have to find initiatives that really kind of look at the way that institution ends I dismantling you know how racism and white supremacy and deeds problematic you know Xena phobic ideologies have are demonstrated in our everyday lives so I will I wanNA talk about that I will talk about the real business of change in the dirty work of change that nobody wants to do and how you know for a long time when it comes to diversity and inclusion we blame the victim we blame the people who are have been victims of these injustices without really questioning and being critical of the injustices themselves and instead of throwing our energy behind you know students which is important I think if we really want to have well rounded comprehensive conversations around ways to really get at this we're going to have throw our money in our energy and our weight around institutions and leaders and people who have influence in the way that they leverage their influence You know in places that that really counts right so I think you know that that's kind of that's kind I know where I will go if had that platform right now 'cause 'cause I'm just in knee-deep in this paper that I'm presenting one of these conferences so that's probably what I want to say if I if I had that to do now because you know that's on that I can say academics racist as an academic communities but I do feel like you know organism nations like Gucci who have you know so awesomely so awesome committed to uh-huh affecting change in doing this diversity work in meaningful ways and are out here doing the work like I have people I know people personally on Gucci's Diversity Council talk about the the awesome things they're doing but I feel like you know awesome add on to that work is you know you know thinking about institutions and how institutions and organizations chain how these systems function and organizational levels and what kind of initiatives we can design and implement to address those things thanks I don't even WanNa go again after then I don't eat it I'm like okay so okay 'cause I mean I brought me to this conversation is like what's your why like what do you want to do so maybe we can right there oh no no I have one is just never going it's not going to be on that level it's just deep in in this paper right here's smoking like what's happening we leave new we need us we need lots of us on this earth the report I think my I think my tedtalk would honestly be would be I think I would title you too can be a successful fuck up that's actually good it will get lots of hit so that it would basically be about all the ways in which I have fucked up in life but how it's led me to wear him now in finding my real passions in my purposes is that still on this earth some of those I guess maybe specific examples would be I've gotten messages from quite a few mothers who have let me know I really love the fact that you smoke publicly I really love the fact that you advocate for weed because I smoke but I'm a mom and I've always been really quiet about it because there's a stigma surrounding it so I would want to incorporate that in some kind of way and somebody else might call me a fuck up for call me whatever because they don't agree with it but yeah I'm a weird mom but I'm a good mom you know what I'm saying or you know jobs in which I've lost that have led me to being able to really find what my real passion and purposes as relief led me to where I am now in being able to develop and create in the ways in which is you want to and not have to be boxed in to a specific a specific box period you know people hear about people cooker cater do you work in a restaurant catering baby showers but it's like I've been able to turn this into something totally different expound on different levels and really nick put a lot into my different creative passions with what I wanNa do and so that's what my tedtalk would be about you too can be successful checkup absolutely I think that's dope I think if I had to do like I don't know if this is light hearted but another one I think I will want to do is how how Kinda like life falling apart definitely uh-huh things now going to ask planned like ended up being ended up bringing me too uh like lots of new perspective and unrelenting better and I mean now I also feel like it's also important to talk about like you know how to a question that I get off the and I got it at the at one of the QNA questions in the friend zone Pan writes a key and said Dr Kia we think you'd be the perfect person to answer this important is important I feel like you have order was weighing I told somebody no one hundred and forty four way literally listed you remember when listed I feel like you could also write gave a Ted talk effective trolling practices something that you thank you elicit all of these things though all of all of the awesome ideas that we have share around your particular speciality's your your your proclivities from cleaning kitchens to trolling the masses.

"tedtalk" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

Gettin' Grown

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"tedtalk" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

"For Genesis and the greater Atlanta to host donation boxes if you don't live in the greater Atlanta area and you would love to give a tax deductible donation please visit our what website safe-space property management dot com for any other help or questions please email me at twenty Edmund Essays Raise Property Management Dot Com and all of that will be in the description box help us make the holiday season for children affected by domestic violence a little brighter thank you so much for being my comedic relief jade and Kia all the best so I thought came across that in our email and I thought that was a really dope 'cause Dan I think it's really dope that they have a nonprofit totally created for him by domestic violence survivors of color I think that's such an important space for us to have Jeff and so I'll be sure to put all of the information in the description box the email the website and all of the information on how you can contact twin you awesome do it and get the children their toys I'm glad we were able to get their shot out in you know right as we wrap up domestic balanced awareness month yup so this is an amazing cars and I'm happy that we can highlighted on this segment always I do have an update from Megan who we shouted out last week Okay Megan sent me I wanna read it quickly. She said I let me say I sat at work today in just whipped on getting grown sisters have been sending me the most inspiring uplifting messages I'm going to beat this thing gene this much I know thank you for the shout out for the love in for the support you don't know how hard it's been for me to ask for help my pride is so big but it's been something has been really taking me to task on my surgery is scheduled for November fourteenth so we'll keep you updated it's been a lot to come to terms with but I know greater is coming I don't use twitter like ever as you know we'll follow follow you and Jada on Instagram just reached out because I know that this is you know a platform that you guys use thank you so much and may God continue to bless us all as we continue to battle through this thing called life y'all have showed up and showed out Megan is under a thousand dollars shy of her goals I think she has just about eight hundred dollars left before she will have all this she needs to pay for her surgery but she has enough to have that schedule so I'm just really excited in Ingraham let's one has you know donated and is helping one of arguing grown sisters to you know really you wish needs to do in order to be cancer something that she has been struggling with for quite sometime so thank you guys we'll ah posted a link in the description box again just so we can make sure they can get Megan to her goal we love you Megan and we're very proud of you and your commitment to keep fighting and thanks to all of you guys Yes for getting joining us sisters amber others because I definitely see some of our getting grown men friends G G G maybe I would like I have a specific request I want to hear more from our DGB's Oh I want I want all the speak up I want to know how you came on the show and why you listen to it especially in so women centric and that's not because is just because I'm very curious I want to know and we we want to know you all as much as we hear from my ladies and we hear from my ladies quite often i WanNa let you all know ladies are the ones who come out support the events ladies are the ones that come out to live shows and it's affiliates who show up but are black women are really are really are bone so we also we also want to We WanNA show love to our brothers as well so we want to hear from you so sweet though I'm just reading I think they're common thing get grown sent me gained ground saint me stay strong Oh yoga makes cry almost so dope you guys are just I love it that's what this community this is what this is all about this is really what this is all about that makes me really happy well Megan we are continuing to stand behind you and support you and we love the fact that you know the listeners are showing up and showing now and you guys have created a family we've created a family got a whole family here so keep supporting Megan is basically all I heard you drinking well do you didn't hear me on the phone because I can look and see that this sound is not in the microphones you might hear me in your headphones but the people do not hear me drink I just watch I don't know this weekend in Dallas key is petty peeve was hearing people drink and DP was that I don't like to hear the contents of anybody's will and I think it was not targeted at you it was at the Muck Bang People's but as the last elbowed Gulp Brigade as a as a part you took it personally you were the hair dog hollering what you wear if negative let's go to kitchen table unlike other wine clubs I leaf uses your feedback back in reading secure a wine selections personalized to your unique tastes I leaf is so confident in the quality of their wine they have one hundred percent satisfaction guarantee not if you're not feeling a particular bottle of wine firstly full cover it completely the I leave quiz was so dope like it was so thorough. it not only ask you it asks you it gives you a variety of wines like Pinot Noir do you like this type of wine do you like the Chardonnay d like this once you break that down then it gets into delighted buttery do like crispy do you like it fruity do you like it dry do you like it bitter and then you go onto the next like it gets oh detail down to do you like these particular brands are there any of these brands that you do not care for start by taking the first leaf wine quiz to assess your exact wind taking preferences firstly for in create an introductory six pack of wine for.

Megan Atlanta Edmund Dan Jeff eight hundred dollars one hundred percent thousand dollars
"tedtalk" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

Gettin' Grown

14:39 min | 1 year ago

"tedtalk" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

"Pets Oh we'll make forty years that it's time release why earned with high wreath ler website safe-space property management dot com or also looking.

forty years
"tedtalk" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

Gettin' Grown

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"tedtalk" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

"Saying that she should look to be taken care of but as a person she should look to be partnership as as someone who's GonNa be raised to be independent it'd be able to financially support herself right I would encourage her to look for the same quality any partner exactly whatever whomever that partner might be Nicole Ari Parker situation that the one who wrote the the letter instead and look for all the things said all the things she wanted a partner and then spun Abaco herself to see if that's if she was going to be those same things that's how I would teach Noah you know what I'm saying like don't look for anything that you're not willing to to be you know what I'm saying like and my mother always instilled in us to take care of ourselves but she like she didn't turn us against having relationships but she was like aw I want you to always be able to take care of yourself she's like and not taking care of nigger like right you are not getting ready to be sitting up here busting your ass working hard going around all over the place taking care of lazy s neglect reciprocity is key to like you know I don't want I just like I don't want no guy no no partner I don't want no partner around here expecting me to care for him without you know just just to care for him without him doing anything for himself I don't think the is fair for me to have the expectation that I'll be able to sit in here on my behind and just less than like less than my take care of me but either way and as like he has daughters I'm struggling I'm really struggling retelling them then what are you with like that's dumb I do feel I understand to see how he would feel away about her maybe not now that I'm saying that because I don't understand how any parent would feel away about another parent advising young partisan that win they marry I don't know if I would say don't marry Mary Security that Mama Joyce right that right there you know and I feel like that is something I could see how woman of her age and you know given the things we've observed her do I can see yeah that's something that she might say I don't know that I would say that but I don't know if I will go so far as to say that women get training or are you know taught things about relationships that got like Nah we're not gonNA do that and Aussie that so and if so like what's wrong like I think I just have lots of questions but maybe we can table that for a kitchen table talk he's just always every time every time did you did you hear that Ti is going to be having a podcast. I'm not surprised talk what is it about I don't know what it's about but the title of it is expeditiously force it because why wouldn't it be he said something along the lines of expeditiously as a word that he likes and the lettuce Ti are and I'm just like that the dumbest thing I've ever heard like you could make up anything if you put it the other way it is it which is the last two letters and shit which is what you are full of like I mean he trailer on Youtube so he may have said like more to it but those would beings that that made a lasting impression on me I don't like Ti let me be clear I don't dislike him I find him to be entertaining but downfield yeah I find him to also be very the the word is overused but I find him to have very problematic ideologies ski calm down and I feel like I struggle because I do feel like he is talented Austin oftentimes the things that he says he's out of his mouth just proof positive that men were men and women see the world in very different ways yes oh yes and yes I just I just I just don't know sometimes the the gap I feel like it's so wide that we may never be able to sued to bridget when things when things like that are said I'm right there with you because I'm like Yo are you you can you can't actually believe the things that come out of your mouth but I mean like like he's not the only man who Ooh I feel that way about no so I feel like they're two men in my life there are people who I know personally and they men that say things and I'm just like wow my head just my mind is blown I know nothing about men the only thing that I know regarding men is that I know nothing about them I don't assume to know or expect to know how they do anything why they think that way they think and I don't and I'm just coming to the fact that that's old k says as as the married one here Yup don't tell my husband I will never know as the married one here I can say fully with full confidence that I'm right there with you I don't know half the time I don't know what the fuck this Nigga is talking about and I actually there have been cases this maybe not all the time with IAE but in most cases I seek to learn at maybe it is my maybe it is ah just by I love to learn but understanding is huge and I really want you get to the place where I can understand but even in that I have learned there's some things are just beyond my understanding it's ironic that escapes how who as simple as one two three and I don't know if we can even make it that simple but we will see understanding is what I need beat Ti Mama Joyce is still deep in other people's business forever be I feel like when she's I feel like when she sixteen to get to so let's get to it so we have a shout this week from a listener she says Hey Jaden Kia I am tonia Edmund and I love love love your podcast I feel like you're the only people I know who understand ghetto adulting really understand how ghetto adulting really is less struggle I'm reaching.

"tedtalk" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

Gettin' Grown

31:04 min | 1 year ago

"tedtalk" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

"And now praise your you only can rescue me and that's obviously for the zone came out for the friend zone but we support you for those who came and came to the friends grow meeting green came and bought merge and all of those faces were having a symposium apart of the conference we were we were selected and to be a part of the conference program which is really super exciting and oh is going to be at the conference and monitored to come kick it with us at the still retaining each other symposium I think we're scheduled for Friday November fifteenth at two P the M M and yeah it's going to be dope and we're hoping to continue the tradition we had our very first hey sis meet up at the ash conference we're gonNA continue that at this year's conference we're still working through the logistics maybe even building on the model having more of a happy hour or meeting for dinner at a local rest the exciting but nerve wracking because I think it ready yes says you've got to work dot no no no but you know this is everybody belongs is what does this is this for doctors only oh I mean what everyone is coming to the conferences I mean the ash converse is not for doctors only their people there who do not have the conference for people who study higher education but not everybody who studies higher education has a PhD so I study high education so I'm going to go all right yes but I mean that's just that's just you know one of the things that I'm looking forward to the next couple of weeks I got tons of typing to do but in any case and I'm right there with just in different capacities but I'm really proud of you that is awesome awesome awesome work that's super exciting even if you're not in the higher education or in any sort of Education Phil that's dope work in general and I'm proud of you guys were doing it in Dr freeze you know how I stand for she she's so amazing is stand for she and you would love Dr Turner Kelly as well because both of them are just you've mentioned way was she at your dissertation no that's Dr Griffin Dr Gricha thinking yes kimberly yes yes I remember her specifically okay but I know you've you've mentioned Dr Turner Several Times yes indeed okay well one day I shall meet you if you listen to this foolishness but we have trashed to get into Chesney not very lower education but we can go in and Mosey over there all right let me Gavin it's lower education time let's get into this trash so you're the firm Summer Walker came up again oh recently I watched the interview by the way I did you I so actually very much enjoy she's flipping that's the word that I want us she's very flippant she-she's a high point and I I'm here for you I actually enjoyed the interview very very much in our Lennox is stupidly funny to me I I enjoy I appreciate her vulnerability appreciate her full blown honesty and I think her lives are hilarious catch them or the videos that catch afterwards but anyway you girl summer walker black twitter decided to black twitter because she posted an instagram story with her saying my washing bowl. Ll I get to wash in my bowl. I hate showers Oh no daddy summer oh me and she posted her washing bowl full of like doctor doctor till's foaming in some toner and some facial wash and some some baby oil which I didn't know Nigga still used baby oil but and some huggies now she decides clapback because of course the Internet went all the way in yeah baby wipes away but the Internet decided to internet and you know of course they posted all sorts of memes and gifts about the nastiness that they you know that they get yes she also posted a video some time ago where she said she uses her own spit to remove her makeup yes so she that that's that's I don't know that right there they're right there uh-huh any other way like need add it I like I like your demeanor and your album is is nice I not that don't seem right I feel like the majority of the germs live in your on your body living your mouth and it's not okay they tell you shouldn't blow on your makeup rushes I guarantee politician not remove your shadow with your saliva can get with it so she decided to respond to all of the gifts and the means then all of the comments about her not liking showers and she said stay up my comments with the dummy Shit I take showers I don't like them because I like baths and very nice jacuzzis or garden tubs if I don't have time or whatever I'll take a whole bath in the sink something that every female has taken in their lives yes I use Oh fuck I hate people man who t.f really walk around never wash themselves people really just mad miserable so oh you know I I understand what she saying you know what I'm saying if she's saying she prefers baths and people took her I hate showers as a as a literal thing that I can see how that can be annoying but you know the Internet is going to Internet so if you say stuff like that sometimes you just got to take that L. and laugh along with the foolishness twenty-one average although the situation is different but I really have never yeah I the the makeup thing I was I was pretty gross pretty grossed out to find out about the road she also had a performance at at a editor music festival in San Antonio this past weekend called the Molly Luna Music Festival apparently she was twenty minutes late and then I don't know if you remember from the interview but she says she avidly hates performing like if she couldn't perform again her life she would not perform like why would you make a record she's like listen I have social anxiety and I do not like to perform and I'm going to be very vocal and let you know that I hate performing I'm in because she likes to sing but I mean if you'd like to sing it you don't like to perform I would ask just don't feel like this is not uh this is not the lane this is not the lane but okay you know 'cause money and bills and things like that but I don't know I guess I can respect honesty but you can't show up to the festival twenty minutes late and then she she left the stage early and she was really pissed off about her own team when she was leaving the stage of the fans could see her like getting somebody's asset she walked off the stage Yeah so that was interesting but that Summer Walker so the COP who murdered Eric Garner James Daniel Pantaleo he is suing the NYPD to get his job back and he might get it because that's just how the system be looking now sharpton decide to speak up and was like oh no no no no no no no no no no no no we won't be having an the of that he was like if this goes to trial he was like I'm showing up to the courtroom and I'm having a whole rack of folk show to the courtroom braces so I was like you know what I'm not mad at it I'm not mad at it because I think this is absolutely disgusting and this better not go trial I hope they throw this out I know they won't because again like you said the system just keeps on me but I really I really I hope that this does not go to trial because this would that would just be a huge slap in the face to the Garner family indeed so question for you do you know who Willie Perry junior is I cannot say that I do he is Dj Casper also known as creator of the cha-cha Slide Okay twenty sixteen he was diagnosed with two forms of cancer renal and neuro in doctrine in I don't know I could be saying that completely ballot neuro is integrating yes ingo new rule I don't feel bad the so which is the which which is the kidney and liver He was diagnosed with that but he has good news he has beat his cancer also actually like fighting for his life and he decided to slow down a little bit he said it was God's way of slow him down and he is he is now beat his cancer so congratulations say I just thought that was the were worthless noting because black people still cha-cha slide to this day and ain't golf out no they're not even if we never want to hear this song again so aridjis went on the Wendy Williams show and Oh wow we talked about how recent the very first episode of this show and I don't think we've ever spoken about here beget so he went to the Wendy Williams show ahead lie where have you been like where you disappear for about four or five years like where did you go or three three or four years uh-huh fail she said she said You'd be here like three or four years where have you been he said your husband ban me because he thought I was flirting with you what Oh my word oh uh where'd yes show by word anymore a about it I just think it's absolutely Hilarie look stupid okay so there's now I know she rang her brain trying to figure out all the negatives stopped her friend trying to figure out Andy Williams is he was he married did talk so much anyway I just thought that was I thought that was the funniest the world I don't know why the lastly we talked about this a little bit Dustin actually brought this up to us and then I saw the article about it when do I B F but tiny said that Mama Joyce told her to marry for security and not love I will mama joy like mom uses like I want her to get business she's got opinions about everybody else is if everybody else's everything eh but she just cannot seem like Wiz Mama Joyce's relationship is what I WANNA know we've never I don't have we ever seen it I don't know Oh do she got a uncle Charlie Mr Charles or somebody she probably does she seems like the type who probably had a negative for a really really longtime that lives in different house like just up the street or around the corner if I'm yes but this was all in an interview so apparently Ti interview viewed interviewed tiny and so she said she'll never forget when she was about fifteen or sixteen enjoys candies mom told me do not marry for love Mary for security when she said I didn't understand it at the time and so ti of course away about that and cut her off and according to the Y.. Bsa Comparing how Young Women are schooled he decided to cut her off comparing how young women are schooled about what relationships while young men don't get the same treatment said women are trained and conditioned at an early age to look for partners can give them a particular lifestyle tiny says she was blessed to have found both love and security in their marriage and then he asked her if she thought it would be easier to be married with money but I can't I I'm not surprised that he said those things but of course I want one hundred percent disagree like we've had conversations about this are you kidding me yes that's what he said there's a whole interview actually posted a link in the description box where you can listen to the full episode of Ti talking about this but yeah he said women are conditioned while men do not get the same treatment me with it yeah are you kidding me away women the fucking like laugh I watch on bewildering orchestras face ledge. I'm like ha how how wou we've had talks about say something like that that is literally fast like okay so honestly he's saying let me go back to it first of all what is wrong with that at you know how nick is our women I trained to to what a certain kind of next hold on he said he he cut her off comparing a young women are schooled about relationships while young men don't get the same treatment he said the women are trained and conditioned at an early age to look for partners who can give them a particular lifestyle what is wrong with tiny says she was okay yeah but Yes helped me understand where that's problem I don't because you all are trained and conditioned to be never mind I'm not it is as whole as you all you all are trained to do whatever you WanNa do like half the time because you're not just rained because people are not telling you half the time out of a decent you'll be it's fair I think it's a fair critique that I don't the either I don't think men nor women last week for myself I don't feel like I got and I said this before I don't feel like I've been trained around like having healthy relationships like I don't feel like APP I have had healthy models like with my grandparents seeing a healthy relationship but again as a grandchild I don't get you know insight into the inner workings of their relationship right I don't know how the communicate or what works for them but I did grow up seeing two people in partnership in ways that were healthy right at least from where I where I from my perspective but as far as like I don't think I've like I don't feel like I've got training they were just me but I don't think no one ever are you know schooled me on maybe maybe the kinds of relations are the kinds of man the kinds of qualities to look for in a partner but I don't know that no I know that nobody told me how to maintain a healthy relationship like it I say all that to say and I'll ask you as the actual mom because I'm only in here parenting plan but I feel like should ever and who knows at this point should I ever become a mom and it should I ever mother daughter I don't think that there is anything wrong with me suggesting that amongst the many qualities that she should look for in a partner one of them should be this Nigga is actually capable of caring for her right and then if you take it a step further not even just caring for her but I just feel like we're being able to support himself financially and to support his family yeah caring for her maybe not the right language but I'm not I'm not.

Ti twenty minutes four years one hundred percent five years one day
"tedtalk" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

Gettin' Grown

14:25 min | 1 year ago

"tedtalk" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

"The They could bring this is my if you were my if you were mine wouldn't want to go to have fun bearish the day I stayed in the same key though I mean don't show so you really never have really I just don't your love is not kink apparently drowning in your heart you'll all of a sudden long sound like one long song done to me it is the truth of my existence I mean it is one Never Ending Eternal Mon I was today years old what I learned that I have an all the years that I've known you knew you didn't maxwell but I did not no you did not shy day do not wow day makes me Asanuma News it's a news oh li-pei but I understand that the people who showed a are avid Shod Day fan so I just allow people to have what they have in love what they love and I keep my opinions all all the more right just let you all have your fun and not just be in the bag all right okay yeah like I'm not gonna I'm not I just you know everything is not for everybody decided no you're absolutely right audie with not for me 'cause Gospel like that right so you're right everything's not for everybody I can enjoy occasional Yolanda Adams because she can sing boots you know I like the Clark Sisters because they too can single and there's something but gospel is genre yesterday is an artist the computer fan I mean I understand where you're going but I just feel like that is worth noting okay all right the ad this like no no no I get it I don't Frank Ocean me night you know what I you never told me that but I somehow knew I what is not an I feel like people that they know wa I know I don't know why I just assumed belt that people assume that they are just wouldn't expect you to get into Franklin and this is nothing to do with him who he is they seem oh no no I don't Frank Ocean 'cause I don't like the Knicks Music Mumbling is a lot for me and the moaning mumbling and it is just the music of it's just discontentment sailing even when he was singing about the grisly clean I said we did it on exit in this sweet Queen Martin Sweet Queen Coretta our Berry Nataly found no it is it's a lot and even I struggle with enunciation articulation are big things for me and I never felt like I knew what he was saying like even when that song what he did I miss you would beyond say am I was like what what I don't know what he was saying actually always no I love I love Frank Ocean as a person I'm proud of who he is absolutely who he and how he existed this world because people because you know people like the Mehan ed box and know better than anybody you I wouldn't even put that on you know thank you so much but that has been something that has been said to me before and I'm like well Lemesurier church there situ back out on my business I don't know if that's why maybe probably I don't know but I do feel like people tried to put me in in in that box and I'm just like you don't know my life friends you don't know my struggle you think about me no I would never because of that you said if I don't if I don't fool with Frank Ocean musically I cannot imagine Kia does I mean I understand I it's like you know the the same old towel robe but I'd go up for low Nasdaq's right I can't I can't but it's you know now anyway praise the Lord negatives that was a lot going back to another episode of gas growing with Jaden Kia Kia aid and we are back to talk about this damn that is adulting and Oh what a mighty and in in masterful scam that it is normal man so yeah we'll talk about all things adulting good bad ugly disaster trials twist attorneys the temptations and the taxes of being a real life though in the the of our Lord's one thousand nine hundred which is just about over this done that's crazy I think I saw on facebook other day that someone was saying like thanks giving is in like less than thirty days or almost thirty days or something dumb I'm just like I thought about that yesterday so I jumped on the jumped on the website too to see what the delivery situation was for the honey baked ham because I said you know what maybe I'll make my life a smidge easier this year and it purchased the honeybaked ham instead of purchasing a ham in making all the coding and all the things myself the glaze well I lied got on the honeybaked Ham and the thing is about seventy five dollars and I we ordered them before when we when we had our Nigga friendsgivings thing where people are doing different things right but when you are cooking for the masses I realize why I'm like this is why every single a year I make my own Turkey and my own hand because this should is expensive yes it is I spend at least four five hundred dollars on groceries as for Thanksgiving along I haven't cooked for Thanksgiving in in many years now because I'm in the bed I'm pretty sure I'm going to be here in this bid on I don't imagine that I'm GonNa be elsewhere but we can talk about that later come here Chow I mean I enjoy Thanksgiving and I enjoy friendsgiving I think what what makes me tired is the travel not as real I don't really like traveling around the holidays is pain and since I have to do it for Christmas I says I have to do it like for work me I'm sitting either I have to just be in my own home is most welcome that's fair I get it but yeah I don't know we'll see maybe Things change I don't know how things will shake out schedule wise but we'll talk about it so yeah you how's the week I know I just saw you so this feels like you know a dumb question but so happy to see how are you I'm good I'm working a lot and we had getting grown this weekend and we were featured with the friend zone in Dallas and that was a good time Dallas showed a whole lot of love absolutely I really like like I really genuinely appreciate every single person key and I both who came out and supported support again grows Puerto again grown for meet and greet things time and it's a good time and a huge thank you to our siblings for inviting US along this is a fun ride so far this is the first stop but you know is a good time when we get together most Sautin so how was your week my week was cool busy full conference season is upon us I'm getting ready to get like three conferences coming up over the next month or so so we'll be out here You know the ash conference is going to be in Portland this year last year we were in Florida we're GONNA be in Portland Oregon I'm a four week in second come smoke some some good Google we'd listen I'm sure that's going to be on everyone's itinerary it up turn it up with the doctor Yeah Yeah I mean to ask conference is going to be a good time very busy ash conference but I'm excited I'm excited about one session in particular so just allowing just nerd out for just a moment Dr Sheriff Brit Gossip heard me talk about her ah great length on this show because she is like one of my favorite people on the planet in Mentor My she was my dissertation chair but in man had to be a should know this by heart but some years ago she and another African American woman scholar by the name of Dr Bridget Turner Kelly published article call retaining each other and it was essentially a story or they're they did a steady like an auto with Nagasaki of their relationship in the ways which they as African American women supported each other and retained each other throughout the academy throughout third doctoral training and while navigating early career as faculty and they develop this framework that essentially you know kind of outlines the characteristics or the ways that the African American women women of color retain support each other and create space for each other in the sometimes hostile environments that educational places and spaces can be so that work was published ashed some twenty years ago now and there are those of us myself some other colleagues together and use using that framework you know have have created other spaces both impersonation digital where we you know the other through different parts of our academic and professional trajectory so you guys know I'm talking about team type and fast but there are other out organization ends and communities out there talking specifically about sister PhD dot com site a sister site assisted dot com in schooling life podcast and I also through gained grown into the equation as well because we do the graduation announcements and the like so all five of us like myself my other colleagues I'm organizations and communities digital communities and digital spaces will be having an interactive symposium at the Ash Conference with Dr Freeze were in turn key Kelly to continue the conversation about all the dynamic ways that we are building upon that work in extending into like the digitals having symposium it's going to be called still retaining each other and I'm excited I love to kind of build on the existing framework again we're excited I know that Dr Fritz Dr Turner Kelly are working on publishing again and I don't know maybe a book or some other sort of you know manuscript to talk about how that work has continued on throughout their careers and we're just excited to be apart we're going to have an awesome conversation so if you or anybody you know Ryan so we're moving and grooving doing exciting things and I'm really excited at present a paper and I'm going to be a discussing all over the ash conference this year which is we gotta do is important and I'm just I'm just blessed and honored and privileged to be able to do it and do it in meaningful ways and have fun and and I can still be myself and have you know Rebbe's down to my butt and you know we'll I`Ma put on my blazer and my glasses and walk in there to a cloud November fifteenth. I'll just go sit down and pretend like I belong because.

thirty days four five hundred dollars seventy five dollars twenty years four week
Senators want TikTok investigated for "national security risks"

Tech News Today

11:08 min | 1 year ago

Senators want TikTok investigated for "national security risks"

"Senators chuck e. humor and tom cotton have asked the acting director of national intelligence to inquire into any potential national security risk posed by tick tock well we have alfred here from seen it alot all right thanks for having me thanks here first things first how can the talking anna dancing lip synching app via national security risk in the first place this is where we've got to start going try we forget history a lot player you know people kind of over short term memory of what's online right like so yesterday mark zuckerberg was congress and they go down this whole laundry list of all the ways that facebook was a threat to US democracy with election interference that data breaches discrimination using that platform but there was a time where we looked at facebook the same way we look at tech talk now oh this is cool way to connect with my friends i can make funny videos on it i can make these silly looking photos there and it's weird at this new shiny app comes along all the genza teams are on it and it seems to be this innocent fun app and it's weird that was forget history so quickly and that's one of the main concerns that these two senators laid out here is that they have his algorithm that collects data on at least one hundred and ten million americans and and there's nothing there's nothing you know that we know about it we don't know what they're doing that data we don't know how that impo can be used against us we don't no if other nations are using this to perhaps spread disinformation come election day or you know ways to affect like US democracy so actually are like a few concerns around tick tock here yeah that makes sense and in fact i wasn't too terribly long ago i saw one of the i don't necessarily go to tick tock it's on its own a whole lot but i'll see them come through on twitter where people are sharing them and someone pointed out that a pretty popular category on talk is just funny videos that people within our military post on tick tock and with that came the concern that if there are folks who are working in undisclosed locations or who are you know in the midst of troop movements are posting these videos is to the social service and location is attached to that then there's very likely a concern that that data could be shared with bad actors and oh i think you know on on the face of it we do think of this like you said has just this this app and we're not considering the history but in fact there are turns that we are sharing more information that we intended to my question here is what makes this app different front some other social media apps i mean you you post to facebook post to twitter you post whatever and you may be sharing your location there you may be you know they are collecting information about you so what's the big deal with tik tok in particular i think a big difference would take talk is that they are a chinese owned companies facebook is owned by a US company twitter also US company google apple etc when you look at tech talk you know this is a chinese company based in china and so there bound to chinese rules where there are chinese laws where if you're a tech company you have to have somebody from the government on your board and you compelled to turn data over so even if i'm making these videos on military bases like uploading to youtube which google owns they're not gonna turn that data over to most governments unless there's a warrant behind it or something like that in china it's much different story so if i'm uploading video there bacon request that video and it's not like the folks behind textiles we're going to really tell the chinese government no right yeah so tick tock says that the data that they are uploading is stored here in the united states and so that's sort of tick talks immediate return to to the question but the lawmakers are saying yeah you might be storing it in the united states but that doesn't mean that the chinese government can't hold the company which is based in china too the rules that are in place in in china so what i find fascinating about this conversation that sort of split into two two areas one is the the problem with data but the other one also seems to be the problem it was mark zuckerberg who talked about this with with the great firewall in china that folks who are using apps that are from their chinese based apps in the united states are still affected by the chinese it's sort of great firewall as it were and i'm curious are the lawmakers that we know are are they considering that perspective as well or is this or focused on it has become a problem for the for american government until we think about the national security concerns while now they've definitely looked at it from the grapevine all perspective as well we talk and we see these funny videos right but we don't really see any content from the protests in hong kong we don't see anything from a sin jang where more than a million muslims are being held captive currently on and that's because they are chinese owned app and in the same way that the NBA blizzard has basically said yeah we're not going to touch any of that take talk is gonna do the same thing where they have been actively censoring any kind of content related to any kind of anti establishment perspective so censorship is definitely a big part of that as well absolutely now when this is not the first time even within the month that there has been some activity in washington around us there was a there was a moment earlier this month were senator marco rubio also you know had had a congressional request what what's the difference between the two the difference here is that this is a lot more bipartisan this from senator chuck schumer a democrat senator tom cotton republican in the past i i think giving follow politics it's pretty hard to get people to agree on this but i also think that this is after the issues that happen with blizzard that have happened with the NBA where this is a war at the forefront now and this is a much bigger concern now for US politicians well particularly because we've seen i think the tampering from from foreign actors in our election cycles one of the concerns that it seems folks are raising two is the spread of russian propaganda in the sense of the way that they've they've affected the election through facebook and other platforms i'm curious do you feel like tick tock is an app that's particularly prone to being able to do this and i'm asking this because the times that i have scrolled through the app the videos tend to be short bite sized little things and like you said it's mostly people dancing or doing some sort of lip sync and partnering with other people wear where are the where's the room for for these videos to spread and is it just sort of a an issue of me missing them or they actually are we seeing some of this the concerns that they have yeah so the disinformation campaign from the two thousand sixteen election was also primarily targeting teens you know i had looked at a lot of these pages that russian actors made and they were there was a good chunk of them that were like mean pages that were nima counts where it's like a right wing james or left wing means and things like that but there were a few that were like memes for teens where we if you look at who they targeted these adds to it was people between the ages of thirteen and eighteen in and that is exactly what talks a prime demographic is currently and you know on monday facebook had a press conference where they talk about a three information campaigns at the dismantled a one was from russia the other from iran and then one more from china now the chinese government is fully aware that tectonic has a graph on american teens and that's an audience that's right for disinformation you know they're the ones that are going to be voting in a few years and they're the ones is that are really easily influenced especially through something like an app i remember seeing a few months ago there were articles about how teams have been using talk to help protests for teachers teachers were going on strike because they weren't getting the resources that they needed and students were kind of rallying for them using tick tock now zi hao political adversaries might see that in think oh we can use that to spread this relation to get kids to start rallying against this thing that we want them to go behind that makes sense the one other question i had is do we know how sort of regional some of these filters might be or when i'm specifically speaking of the censorship perspective the reason i ask this is i think it was even just yesterday pretty peeler person on instagram she was on the netflix show queer eye and she had just joined tedtalk and was posting videos there and there are a lot of comments on this instagram post about well tick tock sensors LGBTQ content and it's been my experience that on the app that has not been the case but then it had me thinking you know while i'm in the united states i'm logging in from the united states i'm seeing this from the united states do we know if i mean like i said tick tock such new app that bit hasn't really gained the kind of scrutiny that we've given to facebook google and twitter when it comes to social media and i think this is a move in that direction where you know let's not let them pull the wool over our eyes again where we know this is a social network we know that have an algorithm to get designed to get you stay on it as long as possible we know that they profit off people's data why are we acting like this is a cool fun new toy again uh-huh where i think this letter is pushing them is is kinda speeding up to where we are now with facebook already and so i i think that more people might start taking a look at it soon but as of right now we don't really know how regionalize the content is

Tom Cotton Acting Director Chuck E. Alfred First Things First
Entrepreneur Jesse Henry on Overcoming Personal Challenges

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

02:55 min | 1 year ago

Entrepreneur Jesse Henry on Overcoming Personal Challenges

"WanNa talk a little bit about and you shared some experience that you had as a as a child having a stuttering issue and it's always amazing when I have people that come on the show when they take their their weakness and they make or they take their. I don't want to call it a flaw in a negative way but they take to being that they had that was a problem and create a career out of. It's almost like I'm gonNA. Kick the crap out of this thing so talk about turning that that that spot where you where you took this this this issue that you had with with speaking in your turn that into your biggest strength now yes. I think if I go back to my childhood one of the biggest frustrations was that I had all the ideas dog like I knew what I wanted to say. I knew the order that I wanted to say it but I couldn't communicate effectively so even when people asked me hey what's your name and I would start by saying Jesse. It was almost like people like wait. Did you forget your name like they automatically. Assume your stupid because you can't say your name or you can't say the first sentence right it's so. I knew that that it doesn't matter if the words are in your head if you can't effectively communicate those words. How are you going to get to where you WANNA go. Oh in this world and so I knew that because this was my biggest weakness I had to flip the script. I had to turn this around. I had to give myself an opportunity to lead in a way that I a new best and because it was my biggest weakness because every room I walked into. I was the worst communicator I just tirelessly pursued enhancing my communication Asian skills and so you know in high school when I was cold calling people I was terrible like I literally lied about my name so because I couldn't say Jesse and this was even tenth eleventh grade when I was doing this internship. I said Hey my name is Alex because it was the easiest way to start the call. I don't stutter when I say the word egg so all of a sudden. I'm leaving voicemails for people right in the the the front desk lady. All of a sudden starts getting calls back for Alex and she sends out this angry email one day like who the heck is this. Alex Sky like I keep getting calls for Alex. There's no Alex in the office like someone playing a prank on us and I had to have very awkward conversation with the Front Desk Lady on why call myself Alex instead of Jesse and so as a as a kid with a stutter you you come up with all these innovative solutions for how to effectively communicate but just throughout college. I started realizing hey if I just get out there and share my message if I start these entrepreneurial clubs if I start a couple of companies that I'm putting myself in an environment where effective communication is necessary and I'm now at the point where I've studied this stuff and I've practiced this stuff for a decade plus. I know I can do this and so I kept putting myself in those environments and then at at the under senior year I I did the tedtalk which eventually propelled me into the career with Tony Robbins so it just everything turned with the Ted Talk. I had no idea I I had no intentions to go. Be a public speaker after college at just kind of evolved as my communication got

Alex Sky Jesse Alex Tony Robbins Ted Talk One Day
"tedtalk" Discussed on Homophilia

Homophilia

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"tedtalk" Discussed on Homophilia

"I dunno when you start with a tedtalk start with a tedtalk bs on the net flicks tip now the tim tim robbins and show oh yeah i think you should leave is so funny i i'm embarrassed myself in my own home by how hard i was laughing last year a absolutely cry laughing is really really really funny and short every episode like fifteen minutes on that you're in you're out it's a it is really really funny end i'm gonna say this i may set it on the podcast for i find him run some very sexy sexy yes that's what yes why because he's weird looking and confident and he makes me laugh and i'm carl i said well i i feel resentful of that big why why because he's not he's not empirically hot now he is in a way that we bandar minds to believe four straight men end oh we're not really i don't think we do that for other i dunno 'em i i think a gay person who looked like him would not have his confidence that's that's what i'm trainers that yeah and i think a woman who looked like kim would not have this would be socialized to believe that she was not right you know what i'm saying yeah 'em yeah but there's just something about the force of the personality and it works on me well i can explain it a meal i have a lot of a puppy fardie stuff in the show i will say it does go the saudi poopie pp oh which i don't love that is my least favorite kind of copyright does go there a lot but i forgive it because it is so weird and funny yeah i don't love it either even though it feels like this is kind of a scatalogical show almost because face farts so much show and i i would have to acknowledge it but i don't do that i don't think it's funny and i'm not trying to be cute ryan said sort of did the latest literally defuse the situation yeah yeah yep a no but that is my recommendation i just loved it great i can't wait the only thing elmore oh why must you go there sorry some anything else i i started watching special rhino call i did to wait is he running o'connor or you're right there's on connor ryan connors next to us right now ryan o'connor ryan o'connell the pack theater but then those ryan o'connell ryan o'connell's he has been on the show a is delightful it is it's very funny yeah very sweet also super short yes i think i like that's a fun trend and get on board with that get me out 'em you know also wanna give a shout out to jonathan bradley welsh end david crab who have a show called eight special presentation amazon recently hand a vague talk about old tv shows in there to a delightful very funny gay writer performer types of end the the lighthearted fun tv show i chose to talk about with the leftovers a little silly like a very.

tim tim robbins fifteen minutes
Burnout syndrome is real, and getting worse

The Big Story

11:47 min | 1 year ago

Burnout syndrome is real, and getting worse

"I love making this podcast for you guys. But man, I have my days you probably know the feeling work even the best kind of work the kind that's engaging and interesting and fulfilling can cry on you. If you're balancing a couple of gigs, or more as a lot of us, are, it's even worse. Sometimes all it is a bad run work gets tougher. A bit gets really busy, and you look forward to Friday or to your next vacation or you just take a day for yourself. And you come back ready to go sometimes, though, that's not all it is you get, so fed up or overwhelmed, or anxious that even job you might not hate becomes a weight around your neck and you burn out and then never mind a good job. You don't want to do any job. And this is the part where you need to lessen because burnout is an colloquialism anymore. It is a syndrome officially recognized. Last week by the World Health Organization, and it is more prevalent in this generation than previous ones. Some of you may be listening to this podcast wealth coasting through a day job right now because you just don't have the energy to engage anymore. And if that is you while the good news is you're not alone. There are millions of people in the same boat. The bad news though, is that not everyone on that boat makes it safely to shore. I'm Jordan he throwing and this is the big story. I'm con is an author a speaker, an, an educator, particularly on the subject of burnout. He has suffered from it himself is written a book about it news, giving a tedtalk thanks for joining us. Thank you so much for having me, Jordan. How you doing today? I'm doing really well. I'm luxuriating in the fact that the raptors are in the files, just the whole idea that we're even here in the first place is just put a smile on my face ear. This man is the opposite. But you've done a lot of work on this topic. So I, I guess, because I think it's something we all throw around, but don't actually dive into right? What is burnout now that there's an official definition for it, right? And shut up to the World Health Organization for coming out and reclassifying Burnett, because since nineteen seventy four when the term was first coined by Dr Herbert Freudenberg. Dr Gill north, what's amazing is that they would submit papers on burnout to their community. They would submit them to various journals, and they would get rejection letters. And sometimes they would be rejected on the basis of being pseudo signs. They would be laughed out of rooms in some cases. And so we've sort of languished, in this period from nineteen seventy four till very recently without a formal definition of burnt out there hasn't been a consensus. And now finally, the World Health Organization has put their foot down and said, burnout is a state of complete physical mental and emotional exhaustion and v consequence of chronic stress unmanaged in the workplace I didn't realize. That the term had been around for so long and being used that way. So how did it originally? Come to be. And what did it? What was it? What was it coined to define? That's a great question. So some of the earliest cases of burnout were found within the human service industry. So we're talking about childcare workers, social workers, nurses, educators, so on and so forth. The first documented case of burnout was related to a nurse named miss Jones. That was her name, and they're trying to figure out what was happening to miss Jones. She was a top performer in some cases in overachiever, but she just became more and more distant from her work. More resentful to the people around her. She completely flamed out. And so to try to describe what was happening to her, and then all of the other people that were working with her, and in similar industries, they had to explore that there was something about the way that they were working the way that they were moving through the world that was resulting in this level of chronic stress, and it wasn't just a simple medical element that was unrelated at the time. So kind of cynics question, then I guess the way you just defined it, aren't we all burnt out at some time. Yes, we are. And, and some cynics would go as far as saying that burn out as an excuse for laziness. And I'm going to go that far burned out. And I'm sure that we all have. But where's I guess what I'm asking is, do, we have a sense of where the line is between that sort of like the last couple of weeks have been really rough? And, and I'm feeling I'm feeling burnt out versus okay? We have a problem here, right? And so the World Health organizations reclassification of this into something that has a direct medical causes really interesting because we often saw burn out as a symptom of something deeper. We saw it as symptomatic of stress in the way that a runny noses symptomatic of a fever. Right. But now in describing burnout as something that is tied directly to chronic workplace stress. We now can speak with it with level of specificity and use the right language to validate people who are experiencing things like adrenal fatigue, were experiencing actual medical conditions that lead down the path of burnout. So what does that look like that? If i'm. If I'm a manager or even just a co worker in an office. How can I tell the difference between when one of my colleagues are employees is just again having along along week or is actually, like, we need to get them some help? I'm glad you asked can I give you two answer. Yeah. So I want to read off, if, if you don't mind over here, what the World Health Organization has characterized as there's three dimensions the first feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion. The second has increased mental distance from one's job or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one's job. And last one is reduced professional efficacy. So those are like the three sort of umbrella categories of things that might be going wrong and throwing you off for equilibrium. But the one thing I was excited to share with you at the twelve stages of burnout, which I'm sure you've researched in preparation for the podcast. But for the listeners, I would love to share those twelve stages, if you don't mind, sure. So it usually starts the same compulsion to prove oneself, which then leads to working harder than neglecting, one's needs. Displacing conflict, revising values denying emerging problems in your about halfway into the burnout cycle. At this point, then. Withdrawal. You experience behavioral changes de personalization inter emptiness, and then stages eleven is depression and stages. Twelve is burnout syndrome, all together. And so, by the time you've reached age twelve year needed Dr medical support. What is distancing yourself? Look like like in the workplace I I'm fascinated. And I always asked this question to two guests is like we can classify things all we want. But what does it look like on the ground? That's a great question. So I'll tell you a story reflecting on my time, working at a large educational institution here in Toronto, where experienced my last bout of berno. This was in two thousand fourteen and so I look back at that period of my life. And I remember that, while I was in the thick of burnout. I found myself, declining every opportunity to socialize. No coffee's no lunches out become very, terse and hurried in meetings, I would almost antagonize the people around me including my own immediate teammates. And I just became the worst person to be around. I think and I think the way that, you know, my partner describes me my friends, my colleagues at the time described me. They said that you were becoming very negative. Cynic. Closed off, and you're just unpleasant to be around while you were going through it. If anybody talked to you, they tried to. But at that point, I wasn't hearing it and I think that leads directly into this stage over here, which is denial of emerging problems stage, number six at that point, I was just in the mindset of it's not me. It's you, what are you talking about? The sinister thing about burnout is by the time you're able to self diagnose that you were going through or have gone through Bruno it's already too late. You've made it further along the burnout cycle than you think. You're so why has the WHO made it a syndrome? Now after thirty some years of not as it is on the rise. Do we have stats on my goodness? The stats are absolutely staggering. I think that's what inspired me to really go down this line of questioning and research around, burnout is because when I first tried to understand what had happened to me when I had burnt down in spectacular fashion. I found that the stats were just so alarming and overwhelming and not enough. People were talking about, so for instance, Ipsos came out with a survey that said that five hundred thousand Canadians don't show up to work every week because of some sort of stress. Rated challenges. Another one is the world other organization has classified in two thousand fourteen that stresses the health epidemic of the twenty first century check this one out. So in China today, sixteen hundred people approximately are going to die because of overwork, which is mind boggling, when you think about it, the it's gotten so bad in some parts of the world day today, six hundred people die every single day and this was found in Bloomberg. I think four years ago, and it's so bad that they have words for it, so they have in China and I think in Japan, karoshi, and goulash z respectively, which translate to literally death by overwork wild. Do we know anything about what's at the root of phys increase in overwork leading to burn out? Let me go back to this. Have you ever experienced Bernard? Well, it's interesting because I would have said, yes, coming into this conversation, but listening to you put forward a fairly clinical definition of it. My kind of feel like I've never really gotten that far along steps. I mean like. I kind of alluded to everybody has weeks at their job when things get tough, and you get mad and, and it feels crummy coming into work. This is the best job I've ever had and still every once in a while. You're like, oh man. This is a lot, right? So that's why I'm fascinated by by Bernard in general. So I would have said two days ago, I would've said, yeah, I've been burnt out. And now that I've learned more, but we're not as I would say, probably not. And there are some cases, I think the one case that really inspired me to, to make this a big part of my life was the case of a gentleman by the name of air. It's more heart who was twenty one and died because of overwork he died as a result of a seizure. But that seizure was caused by chronic stress, the coroner's found, and he was the same age that I was feeling very pressured to work in a high pace fast environment of banking, I was working in the record in record time and reading his story made me realize that there's one potential ending for this way of overwork this way of living, your life out of balance that has fatal consequences. So you asked the question of what are the? Root causes of burnout that are happening in the workplace. So I have something from the Canadian mental Health Association over here. They say that some of the factors are laws absenteeism turnover and healthcare expenditures, but the root causes that when you get down to, like, what's truly causing this it's performance pressure. That's, that's, that's some total of fear of job. Redundancy variations in the economy and generally a feeling of not feeling like you're enough. Not feeling like you're enough. And I think this is a pervasive problem in just North America. But around the world where people don't feel like they're progressive enough fishing enough perfect enough satisfied enough innovative enough. And so you start to act out in ways that are unnatural, and then disruptor equilibrium. We hear a lot about the current generation Eleni owes but also boat, the generations coming after them, not having like full careers anymore, where you're able to start with one company and progress and move up. And you know eventually rise to management, and you're kind of secure, right? The gig economy is a term that gets thrown around how. How does that impact levels of burn out? And is that because none of the stuff that you just mentioned is applicable to people who are who are moving from one temp job, odd job, reviving job to the next. That's a great question. So actually, my Uber drive over here. I was talking with the driver and he was complaining about the fact that he's behind on a couple of payments, and that he can't get enough hours from Uber, and he can't get enough hours with lifts so on and so forth, and he's describing a very frenetic work environment that he's in that he's created for himself, or I shouldn't say that he's created for himself that he's found himself in rather. And that made me think about two factors that usually to burn out. I as a frequency of stress in your life. And Secondly is the impact of stress in your life. And so when I was going through it, I had to ask myself the question of how can I reduce the frequency of stressors in my life, and how can I increase my resistance to the impact to, to

World Health Organizations Miss Jones Jordan Bernard Canadian Mental Health Associa Dr Gill North China Raptors Fever Ipsos North America Official Toronto Eleni Dr Herbert Freudenberg Reclassifying Burnett Partner Bloomberg Japan Twelve Year
"tedtalk" Discussed on LadyGang

LadyGang

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"tedtalk" Discussed on LadyGang

"So the one that article I read about it some girl did it about like sonic, the hedgehog like so finger random like the Sega Genesis game. And then everybody just like drinks learns about something new. And it's you talk about something you're passionate about X family. They do something like that at the holidays. Like, they you'll do they'll give you a topic. And then you have to present. Yeah. Kind of like that. But like what kind of topics like his sister had to present a whole thing about Mersa? And then they gave sack his just general topic was things that dangle. Both. Yeah. You can imagine Dingle dangle danke gearing. Yeah. Well, could you give a forty minute presentation on Celtic me? I'm yourself for sure. That'd be like a six Kelsey nights. Audubon how to get to a hundred thousand followers. I could probably do an inspirational speech on chasing your dreams for forty minutes. Yeah. It'd be your tedtalk or you Tony Robbins. Honestly, I think better than Tony Robbins. Inspirational y'all know racial people have to have kept you guys going don't. Here's here's the thing. You're not inspirational, but you are inspired. Thank you inspired her inspiring. She's inspired like fierce office, very inspired by myself. Yes. You are your biggest fans. No, I'm not you're your biggest critic one hundred percent. Biggest critic biggest fan. You know? I realized my biggest fan is after all these years some random guy. No, my mom. She this whole time like growing up. My mom is always been hard on me with lower. She is is your mom. Mom's hard on. You. Your mom is like you're the best thing that's ever happened. My mom is the kind of mom that will give constructive criticism. Because she thinks the world isn't given it to me. But like the world is giving it to me so hard for that. I just need you to love me. But should be like, you know, you look one step away from death without a spray tan, and you're like, oh, thanks mom, or she's like trying to help your hair's darker now. She's leaves it like, I know. Gonna again. And you're like do you not like the way it looks mom? But anyway, when I was getting to one hundred thousand dollars on Instagram. No, one was a bigger true. That are then Sheila daily morning night updates.

Tony Robbins Mersa Dingle Sheila one hundred thousand dollars one hundred percent forty minutes forty minute
"tedtalk" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"tedtalk" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"So actually, you gave this tedtalk in twenty sixteen and what was remarkable was that just a year later when stories about Harvey Weinstein came out, you spoke publicly about what happened to you. You were you knew all these things and you couldn't talk about the onstage because of. I guess the fear and the whole infrastructure of Hollywood that prevented people like you've from talking about this for so long. I mean, you gave this talk. There was so much more that you couldn't say or guest feel safe saying, well, the good news is I'm a teller, and when I was molested for the first time when I was seven years old the first thing I did was run to two adults and express exactly what had just happened to me. Now, they were neither equipped nor prepared to respond to me in an appropriate way. Because they said he's a nice old, man. That's not what he meant. And when you know, I was harassed in that peninsula hotel room in the summer of nineteen ninety seven when I was making his the girls. My dad was visiting me from Kentucky, and he was downstairs in the lobby. I came straight down, and he could tell by the look on my face that something devastating just happened to me, and I told him right away. But we didn't know what to do with the information except to try to steer clear of Harvey Weinstein, which was a really difficult thing to do at the peninsula hotel. He loomed ominously large at that place. And then variety was doing one of their women in film issues. And I was speaking with them, and they asked me in this was in twenty fifteen whether or not I'd ever experienced sexual harassment, and I told them the entire Harvey story in even greater detail than is included in the New York Times piece that Megan twohey and Jodi Kantor wrote that the differences the world wasn't ready to hear it yet. No one was paying attention. You know, when when I made the decision to be the name source in the New York Times, I went on a run on my favorite little country road near where I live in rural Tennessee, and I thought you know, I've made tougher decisions. This is not a significant decision. It simply might truth, and I am entitled to share my truth and to be a Thomas and dignified in hold my head high in my lived reality. What is it that in your experience? What is it that you think many men and some women don't understand about the conversations we're having around gender now? I think that one of the difficulties. For boys and men is to accept that. This really is the water in which we swim in the air that we breathe and that these microaggressions and more overt explicit aggressions occur on a routine basis. And so it takes courage on my part in my stomach, even feels funny when I say that to be really honest about my lived experience as a woman, you know, the invitation hopefully is that men can have the stamina to listen to our experiences. In equal measure to the way that we have endured those experiences, and when I talked with men who were honest and vulnerable enough to express their discomfort. It's not a competition to say a good, you're uncomfortable. While I've been comfortable for a long time. It's about empathy and shared understanding. I recently spoke at the international school in Leipzig, Germany, and it was very interesting that the girls were crying because of the street harassment the experience this young woman shared that. She saw a woman being harassed at a tram stop all these people stood there and watched and she was the one who walked over in disrupted it..

Harvey Weinstein New York Times harassment Hollywood Leipzig Thomas Germany Jodi Kantor Kentucky Megan twohey Tennessee seven years
"tedtalk" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"tedtalk" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"Tedtalk called start with why and also book by the same name, and it's targeted toward you know, business leaders. But really when you think about it as parents where we're leaders to relievers in our home. And so as I read that I realized that's why are so wrong because we had started with what with our kids. So we said this is what the rules are if you're, you know, you're on a device to what happens that we realized instead needed to start with why Nancy. So how that plays in plays in is that we got our kids involved. Okay. So we started the sink call the family tech think-tank, which is kind of a mouthful, but basically, I think tank is a brainstorming session that accompany might do. So they might pull all their bright minds together, and they'll do a strategy session. And they're just gonna brainstorm, right? So that's what I think tank is. And so I. We thought well that would be great. You know, we know that we know family councils are effective amick cancels good what if we kind of mesh those two ideas together. So that's kind of what we did got the kids together and got them on board to create a family tech plan to. So if you're okay, I'm gonna wanna trade back in force or mesh bit of some of the things I love and one of those this nurtured her parenting approach, which in that one. It is the you don't wanna be the punisher you wanna be in a position where you can in encourage build inner wealth. So the theory there is that you do like this idea the ink tank, so it is the we wanna come up with the rules together. So that it isn't just you saying this is the rule is that kind of where we're going with that. So then they let you know. So that if they're they're raking the role, they can't say, well, I don't like the rule because they were part of making the rule is that that approach always lovingly manipulate is that what you do here too. User little bit of that. Yeah. I mean, obviously when we're leading discussion we've got a a little bit of an agenda in mind. Like, we've talked about it together head of time, and we are trying to steer and guide the kids in a certain direction. But I think that's the key word is guide, and then we're encouraging dialogue. And so it feels a lot less force. It also gives the kids an opportunity to shape the rules, or maybe, you know, bring points that we wouldn't have considered or thought of ourselves. And it helps them see why were putting these rules in place rather than just coming down with a set of rules that they have to follow Malone do. So then our family tip thing. Taint in is is really the brainstorming session is. Yes. So then you talk about you guys knew going in your you had an idea. So I mean, your whole kind of a goal is in parents. Have positive screen time strategies. Right. So you kind of go what you recommend that they are going again, parents are gonna have a pretty will not well-oiled machine. But they've talked about this a lot before they go into the family tech think-tank. So had. Okay. What are some strategy recommend that as far as with the, you know, the positive screen time? Yes. So obviously, our main strategy is having this family tech thing tank and so coming up with family technology.

Tedtalk Nancy Malone
"tedtalk" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"tedtalk" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This tedtalk. We are losing our listening. We spend roughly sixty percents of our communication time listening, but we're not very good at it. We retain just twenty five percent of what we hear. Now. Not you not this talk. That is generally true. Let's define listening as making meaning from sound. It's a mental process, and it's a process of extraction. We used some pretty cool techniques to do this one of them is pattern recognition. So in a cocktail party like this. If I say, David, Sarah, pay attention, some of you just sat up we recognize patterns to distinguish noise from signal, and especially our name different singers is another technique we use if I left this paint noise on for more than a couple of minutes. You would literally cease to here we listened to differences. We discount. Sounds that remain the same. I said at the beginning. We're losing our listening. This is not trivial because listening is our access to understanding conscious listening always creates understanding a world where we don't listen to each other. At all is a very scary place. Indeed. Jillian treasure thinks there are all kinds of things getting in the way of our listening. Just think about all the sounds around you every day. In Europe, where Julian.

Jillian treasure Europe Julian David Sarah twenty five percent
"tedtalk" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"tedtalk" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"So we'll link to his books in his sights and his talks. He's amazing. Tedtalk red-hot about twos anyhow and thrills to introduce him to you. If you don't know him and you are gonna enjoy him. You're gonna wanting to your friend in new for sure. Gonna wanna follow him everywhere. So guys helped me. Welcome Alexander a. k. so Kwami. Alexander welcome to the for the left podcast. I'm so excited. You're here. Thank you for having me. I'm excited to hear. Listen. I've just I've been paying attention to you for a long time, and I think your work is so special and it's so interesting and you are so. Original and unique. And so I'm really excited for my listeners to some of them are going to be for the first time today. They're going to be so glad that they did. So do you know? I don't even know if you know this, but I was also speaking at the festival of faith in writing this year where you were keynoting. Really? Yeah, I was at their. I came in a day after you and I was so mad that I missed your talk. And I've, I told the vet coordinators unlike a blue. It just absolutely blew. Did you get stuck in that conference? I did. I didn't. I had to get in and out because I was in the middle of book tour on a bus thirty cities thirty days as an intense tour. Thirty. What you say. It was thirty thirty two cities in about thirty days. We had. We had a tour bus and it was it was the tour bus that was wrapped in the cover of rebound we had four bunk living room kitchen, a master bedroom. Two bathrooms shower and and seven flat screen TV's. What do you need that for? So we on the road for the entire month of April and it was pretty incredible. That's fine. Your whole family? No, no. My family guy brought my daughter and wife and some of my daughter's friends there ten euros on the buzz about days and they were like many Rockstars. For the duration of the tour. It was me. It was Randy who Randy usually performs with me guitarist and travels with me to schools, and it was our tour manager. It was three of us and the drivers. It's an adventure. It's a wonderful adventure. And yeah, so uncovering and discovering the beauty between the pages of a book. Yeah, that's exactly right. And I do a bus tour with my particle Norman and our crew. We have a tour that we run in the fall and the spring, and it's kind of a blast. I wouldn't wanna do it for much longer than a month because the bus gets a little cramped, but we put nine people on the bus and is shimmer goodness. Gans I can't even. I don't even wanna fly any more. It's like whenever I tour, I just want bus is now from Nell, and that's my with you. That was my first time to ever do it. And I'm like, I don't ever wanna see an airport for the rest of my life. Right. Terrible. This embarrassing cuss. We haven't even got into my million questions for you, but the very my friend to call is an artist musician. She's been on lots of bus tours, so she's telling me all what's amazing about it..

Alexander a. k. Randy Nell Tedtalk Kwami Gans thirty days
Unshackling ourselves from fossil fuels - Richard Barker at Iona Capital

Inspiring Sustainability - Podcast

04:05 min | 2 years ago

Unshackling ourselves from fossil fuels - Richard Barker at Iona Capital

"Inspire sustainability cast. My name is all, and today I am delighted to have rigid vica of Ireland capital. Join me here to be here. Yea and Richard is an adviser, an investment committee member of the complete. Well, how to describe computers I am capital is is an environmental destruction. So it invests in new energy projects, waste recycling, projects, all centered around sustainability look on projects on us today that you can. This is making UK greener center, how reach it was he was getting told a conference which I found really interesting one just recently he's actually ten toll last night on some of the conversation that I'll the will be talking about it recommend you, listen to this denied, go watch that tedtalk as well. If you wanna find out more about inspire stability, align confined his inspiring dash sustainability dot com. There's all the poll casts that more information about as an organization. And then also you can obviously I find the podcast on, you'll buy egrets app on your smartphone, so richest in the conversation before we started this podcast, you said something which I think I wanna stop growing down in big, bold letters is you said the realities busy enough money on wealth in the world. And that was really interesting for me because it might not seem intuitive to people enough money to solve the climate challenge that we've got here. So less thou- that Whiting's bombshell. And I'll stand way coming from. Okay. Well, first of all, let's unpack that question. When I said this is enough wealth enough money. What what I didn't in a status? I'm kind of I am Catholic, so I believe the wealth lease grow develops on all Sundays enough. Money will say what I'm saying is enough wealth in the Wilton issue that we've go. The GDP is around twenty tree those year. You will take a few tens of truly depending on size of combing and pension funds have anyway between the sixty eighty trillion dollars funds onto magin across the globe. If you look at some of the reports. In order to hit in the Paris accord to degree ceiling, we need to be investing five to six trillion dollars thirty dollars a year in sustainable infrastructure from current investment around three to four trillion dollars a year structure, which is most. Now that is around us three percent change in global GDP investment, and it is absolutely within, you know, the kind of envelope helicopter financial system. We socking deploying pension fund money, banking services. So this for me is, is people say, well, how we gonna tackle this problem, whereas money get account for it is an absolute wealth. Absolute availability issue in the grand says, one his Matt, how we invest direct that money, the most appropriate way in what we have is certainly from what I see is we have a financial sector globally. The center primarily in New York London, tranches his wish. Probably fifth of hopes for the next says, he fifty years Burma. She's based on some of the traditional structure. As the pension funds invested into allocation bones inequities real estate of RAV. Thinking about the mega trends teams, one of which these on chain, hey, I know the demographic shifts as well. And I think a lot of fans who set it is not. His head around how these all change to me, the kind of investments that are required to make transitions blow transition. Also, risks, change this apply. And you know, just give you a simple story.

Deepal Richard Low Castle Adam Lou Pool Nasa Sewell Twitter Thomas KAY Lincoln Fifteen Years Twenty Years
"tedtalk" Discussed on High Noon

High Noon

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"tedtalk" Discussed on High Noon

"Now for live TV that means no practice. No. Here, man who they opened that thing up and all these. That's not live. Mex. Okay. Don't tell me in your rehearsal. You didn't cry. There. It wasn't. It wasn't a hall of fame cry. Do you believe Ray Lewis if he's saying twenty five minutes, max is going to be a lot longer than twenty five minutes and we have to admit this, we got, we got to look at some stuff up, right? We saw Ray Lewis tedtalk we did. I know hesitant talk and I cannot say is the most substantial thing that I ever heard, but it was invigorating in their absolutely. And for the record TED talks, I believe our eighteen minutes. That's the general died. Eighteen was what I heard. He came in at twenty three twenty two twenty three. And I noticed by the way that there is some cuts, unbroken shot of Ted talk with this man who is behind us being expressive, cannot help put fill the room with his presence. Yes, and we want him to do so yes we wanted to do so for a very long time. And in fact, if you can keep up this video of Ray Lewis from the lockout, yeah, just understand American going to be the safest place in the world during the hall of fame induction ceremony, right. Watch, you'll understand lease a little. Port on saying is what we're going through right now with way more than us, how. The people live. Walking the streets the way I won't. I'm talking about. People who work and stadiums fans. Yes. Yes. Yes, who they lively. Dude is research if we don't have the season. What how much evil. Which we call the trend. Town pizza takeaway gained. What do you think there's nothing else to do..

Ray Lewis TED twenty five minutes eighteen minutes
"tedtalk" Discussed on Just a Tip with Megan Batoon

Just a Tip with Megan Batoon

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"tedtalk" Discussed on Just a Tip with Megan Batoon

"So putting my romantic aside of five for this guy across the world getting over someone, I guess we can talk a little bit about that. Do you have any tips on how to get over someone that you thought was like? The one is a sad. I feel like I've talked about this so much that I'm like, I don't have feelings anymore. I have none of my own advice have been hearing other people say some things about this may or may not be true. So you and whoever's listening can take this for what it is. I've heard people say that when you are trying to get over someone outside of relationship, especially when you weren't chose to leave that relationship that you shouldn't idealize that person, you should like trying to be realistic about the way you enter your memory. So every time you're like entering some like golden, shiny version of what the relationship was, you should be like, but also like after that memory of us having like the best date in the best sex in the best conversations like we also then the next day woke up and had a huge fight like you being late for work or me, you know, not welcoming you enough into my emotional experience, this whole fight. And then I felt like ask for four days, you're supposed to think about that stuff. That's a good way of going about it. I remember I wrote up with somebody and for months I was so. Sad because I, I would only reminisce on the good times and then I do at one point I had to take a journal and write down everything bad about the relationship, and I would have to every time I wanted to reach out to him or think that I made a mistake. I would go back into the journal in read by line-by-line why I didn't want this to work out why we weren't good for each other. Why would we why we would be better separate? Just do it said look, really? Yeah, maybe I should do it Ted talk. You should definitely do it. Ted. I could never. I would watch that tedtalk multiple times. I could never do attend talk. I've actually it what's ridiculous. I'm so scared of public speaking, which is because this is different. This is we're recording it right. It's just hanging out in a room. A Ted talk is a bunch of other people waiting to laugh and waiting to get enlightened, whatever. If they don't laugh the wrong love that. I would be so I wouldn't even know if you could give Ted talk. What would it beyond? Why would spend like quite a while thinking about it? So you would like prepare. You wouldn't have to give a tedtalk now stage, you have to do ten minute. I mean, I would sing some songs. Okay. I have that prepared. That's good. I would. I would sing the song that I have that starts about watching Ted talk show with watching it. Ted talk that songs not out. I would. I don't know. I'd probably like stumble over ideas the I'm doing it right now where you ask me questions and I'm like, I have no idea at all how to do any of that. I like that. That's what that would be my tedtalk. I'd get up there and be like, here is some uneducated advice from an uneducated person that may or may not help you in your life. Oh, very open ended. I like that. I would say what's on my mind. I like that I think might had talked would be on how to stay off then tick in a world that's fabricated. Okay. So you're, you aren't going to give a tedtalk, but you already have the killer title like. The titles there. I feel like that's the one thing that I have been able to navigate a bit with, like the amount of brand deals I do, and this person needs this in the audience wants that it me as an artist wants this. I figured out a way to balance it where everyone's happy seemingly. Or if I didn't do Ted talk about that I would do on it. So clear to me, I have nothing on the tip of my tongue. Doesn't Ted stand for something the educate? Yeah, technology, something in design, technology, education and design. That's right. Is that what it is? My friend gave a Ted talk wants. Cool..

Ted ten minute four days
"tedtalk" Discussed on Leadership Biz Café

Leadership Biz Café

03:41 min | 3 years ago

"tedtalk" Discussed on Leadership Biz Café

"And there's certainly apple information out there about how we can use our we can improve our body language as well as reading the byline, which of others, but this idea of being intentional of when we're going to make this effort gives us back that sense of being in control over those external factors, and I think that really helps with the process of moving outside or comfort zone. Yeah. I I agree just to sort of flesh that out to I have spoken with people who are interpreted uncomfortable in awkward networking events. In if played with timing in terms of trying to increase the odds of feeling more comfortable in they they've done as one way is to choose a time of day that where they feel that their best in another in other words, choosing networking events either that or breakfast or or nighttime cocktail dinner, whatever in the second one is to go early. Like literally at the event go early because if you were uncomfortable in intimidated at a big noisy networking event. I believe me. I am in have been you know, you walk in, and there's just this buzz in every it you sort of feel like if showed up at the party way too late. If you go at the beginning, it's always less noisy. It's always less intimidating. It's always less crowded in so on. So that's the way of customizing both the timing of the of the during the day and also the event. Seltzer just a flesh that out in. I absolutely agree. So this leads us added to the last creek resource, you write about in your book that is of gaining a sense of clarity about what we're doing especially about the challenges will face now. I'm sure for those consider making leap, this might seem odd that having a sense of clarity is vital since you to sume at the very reason, you're making this booze because you have a clear idea of what the target or the goal these efforts is, but as you write in your book, the importance of clarity in this process is how it helps us overcome those moments where our thoughts and perceptions about ourselves and about the situation become distorted so Andy could you elaborate on what this distorted thinking is? And how do we gain clarity? When we're not necessarily aware of what's really going on. Yeah. Clarity is is is about sort of like. The fear in the emotion. Taking hold in sort of wrestling away, your perspective from the rational side of you. So if you're worried about let's say public speaking might be your situation you're talking about in outside your comfort zone, you might start to fear in fixate on the worst case scenario is I know I do sometimes like I'm gonna be utter failure. I'm gonna you know, I'm gonna think on stage or whatever it might be. That's or by the way, you might your motions might bring you to the opposite extreme to sort of like, the unrealistic best case scenario, and you might fixate on that that I'm I'm not gonna do this in less. Unlike the bed best Ted tedtalk ever, and I get millions of hits on my videos, and so you're sort of lost. You're you lose perspective in in in in the way that your emotions drive you to these extremes, and what clarity is someone claiming that middle ground. I always every time. I think of clarity for some reason in my mind, I guess, I'm I'm very visual. I think of like a ship. At sea in an anchor going down to the ground and anchoring that ship in the waves and the storm or your emotions, but the anchor keeps you grounded, and so I feel that. That's that's what it is. And so the I literally use this exercise with people that I'm that. I'm teaching them coaching that I'm training. I have the right down with their worst case scenario is absolute worst case. And then put a likelihood on it zero to one hundred. I then have the right down. Their absolute best dream scenario..

apple Seltzer Ted tedtalk Andy