35 Burst results for "Teddy Roosevelt"

Doug Mastriano: Thank You, Liz Cheney

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

00:38 sec | 2 months ago

Doug Mastriano: Thank You, Liz Cheney

"Cheney, the outgoing Republican congresswoman from Wyoming says that she would campaign against and she singled out two people carry Lake in Arizona and and you, and I'd like to get your reaction to that. Teddy Roosevelt said you could judge a man's character based off of who his enemies are. So thank you, Liz. Liz has been on the wrong side of history C and her dad. I happen to fight in two of her three of her daddy's wars and we watched the Cheney family get rich off these wars here. So consider the source. Well, well said, and it's a great point.

Cheney Wyoming LIZ Teddy Roosevelt Arizona
"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

07:24 min | 2 months ago

"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on Bear Grease

"His house. And one of the Medicare is asking we get a resolution he needed to be had to have that new roof on his where'd you get all the money for that he said I went down to your bank bar that money. Your bank loaned me the money. And I think it was asked how much was still owed on that roof and hope probably told him and he asked him to bring one of those shingles in there and he did and he wrote on that jingle with his knife paid in full and signed it. You should take this down to the bank and I got a roof base essentially a check. The Metcalf family were significant players in holt's life. If you could pick 90 years to be alive on Planet Earth, it would be hard to argue that the 90 that holt was here that he probably didn't see more change than any human generation ever. It's really interesting to me when you think about the span of human life in that we're all put on earth for like a certain time period from this date to this date. Being born in 1846 and passing away in 1936 is an incredible span in terms of social development, technology, all the things that happened. I mean, going from pre Civil War all the way to the 1930s here in America. I mean, it's a pretty incredible. I mean, you go back and say from 1736 to 1846, I mean, life was about the same. And then, you know, even past that, but like that period of time was pretty wild. I make the poor in the very end of the book that that very point that Ho was born and raised in a time when horsepower was the only power that was and in 1936 when he died, you know, Hitler was in charge and Germany and World War II World War II and nuclear age was right around the corner. He lived in an amazing and he put a lot of life in his 90 years. I'll give you that. You know, it's amazing he lived 90 years. So as I started this book, know nothing about hulk Collier other than just his small amounts about his reputation. You know, I'm reading and he's 20 years old. And then he's 34 years old. And then he's 56 years old. And I'm kind of looking at the amount of pages left in the book. And I'm thinking, this guy, there's no way that he's going to be an old man. He's going to die at age 60. And man, I was shocked and thrilled when you see that he lived to be 90, which is such an incredible thing. Daniel Boone, one of my favorite characters in American history, lived to be 86. And part of the reason he was so famous was he just most of his contemporaries died when they were 50. Right. You know, he just had a long span of life and I mean I see that and hold. He covered a lot of ground. I want to move to an interesting part of holt's legacy and it has to do with the famed American author William Faulkner, who was a Nobel Prize laureate and widely considered the greatest southern writer of all top. He was born in 1897 and died in 1962, which would have been prime time for holt's regional legacy to be known. And faulkner was from and spent most of his life in Mississippi. Faulkner is known for his, quote, characterization of southern characters, including fiercely intelligent people who are dwelling behind the facades of good old boys and simpletons. Minor has something to say about this. You know, his immediate legacy that I think about is the William Faulkner story, but there's no question that the Sam father's character in several of the faulkner books, particularly the bear, go down Moses, hokai was the inspiration for Sam Potter. No question in my mind about it. Faulkner's second home was Greenville Mississippi. Here's the excerpt from William Faulkner's the bear. Let's see if you can make the connection. The old man of 70 who had been a Negro for two generations now, but whose face and bearing were still those of the chickasaw chief who had been his father. And he was glad. He was old. He had no children, no people, none of his blood anywhere above earth that he would ever meet again. And even if he were to, he could not have touched it, spoken to it because for 70 years now, he had to be a Negro. It was almost over now and he was glad, but still the Woods would be his mistress and his wife. This is for minors book Collier. Quote, Pete Johnson, one of the neighborhood children who knew Collier for many years and who often drove him when the old man was too feeble to walk, described holt's complexion as dark olive, similar to that of a Native American Indian, and similarly, Harris Dixon referred to call your as a yellow man. Johnson strongly believed that hulk call your head Native American blood and that his lineage would be obvious to a careful observer. The reader can draw his or her own conclusions by studying the Vaughn dresser portrait rendered in 1935. Collier's bloodline, of course, can not be confirmed and it seems of little consequence and the research of Collier's life until a reference is found in the regimental history of the 9th Texas cavalry of an Indian boy riding with captain Perry Evans company who raced horses in the company's popular equestrian contests. It's clear to see where minor is getting that the Sam father's character of faulkner's is based upon hulk caller. I now want to read another excerpt from minor's book and it's about the latter years of holt's life and it's pretty sad. Quote, in 1928, largely because of the flood and the economic disruptions it caused many African Americans began leaving Washington county for better opportunities in the north. Call yourself many of his people leave the area from the effects of the flood, the storm, and the loss of his friends. Call your fell into a state of despair from which he never completely recovered. His wife, Francis earned a meager income as a housekeeper, but holt was too feeble to provide any income other than his pension of $200 annually. He had for years collected corn shucks from the area plantations, which he sold to a stable. He also collected dried bones which he sold as fertilizer and on occasion. He would train and sell a hunting dog. One dog he sold to John and Nathan Adams for $30 and it would not hunt. When the boys returned the dog, hold explained that his ears had to be twisted with pliers, and he would then take to the briers. Call your also made a little money during prohibition by supplying Arkansas corn whisky to his white friends who did not want to deal with bootleggers across the river. Hulk callers confederate servants, pension, was successfully renewed in 1916 in a 1928 Collier was approved for a pension from the state of Mississippi, not as a servant, but as

holt William Faulkner Sam father hulk Collier Collier Nobel Prize laureate Faulkner Metcalf hokai Sam Potter Mississippi faulkner Medicare Daniel Boone Ho Harris Dixon Hitler Vaughn dresser Germany Pete Johnson
"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

07:57 min | 2 months ago

"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on Bear Grease

"Teddy Roosevelt. No doubt he calculated the press and not killing the Todd bear. But Roosevelt played a vital role in articulating the ideas of fair chase, developed by his boon and Crockett club. Here's their definition of fair chase, quote, fair chase is the ethical sportsmanlike and lawful pursuit in taking of any free ranging wild game animal in a manner that does not give the hunter an improper or unfair advantage over the game animal. Shooting a Todd bear is not fair chase. Now on the other hand, using dogs, however, is emphatically fair chase. It's hard to kill game using dogs. I'm just saying, don't be knocking hunting with hounds. Hunting with dogs is so foundational to the human experience that saying it's ethically wrong is like knocking the legs off the chair that you're sitting in. My uma. I'm now climbing off my soapbox and walking back over to our store. Here's minor. John Parker was on this hunt. Now, John is an interesting fella. He was from Louisiana. He born and raised in Mississippi, but he later became governor of Louisiana, was Theodore Roosevelt's vice presidential candidate when he ran the second time as bull moose candidate. And he was a scrappy fellow. He didn't stay on the stand. He rode behind holt the whole time. So mister president killed his bear and he refused to do it, just absolutely refused to do it. John Parkinson up says he'd volunteer. And he wanted to kill a bear in the old fashioned way, the old hunter's way where you last the bear with a knife to have the bear of the knife and the way it's described and everything I've read is you stand on one side of the bear and you stab the bear in the chest or in the heart cavity from the other side. The opposite side of the opposite side because the bear is going to, if he has an opportunity to strike or bite, he's going to bite where from the direction of the pain. So you need to be standing on the opposite side of the bear. Well, Roosevelt happens to be carrying this dagger. It was more like an Arkansas toothpick. Toss it down to John park and said, here you use this. Well, Parker hit a rib or something, just made the bare mad. This is hotel in the story. And he really resented it because not bear was mad enough, not as mad or even better in that whole one who's going to have to dispatch the bear, which he does. And that's pretty much the end of it. Hope puts the bear on the back of his horse, rising to camp, Roosevelt, and park in the rest I'm going now they don't have the dogs and they're not hunt, but not at hunting anything. And boys in the Woods, so to speak, but holt goes back into camp. And when he arrived in the camp, he's got this bare ties in the back of his horse. He said, did the president kill that bear and he says, no, but if he had followed my instructions, he would have. He says this to the press. He says this to the press. And he didn't realize what he was saying. It's pretty bold statement. Well, I know in the press ran with it, and it was on the front page of every newspaper coast coast that not only had the presence failed to get his trophy bear. He had done it by failing to follow the instructions of his lonely guy. He doesn't even know how to read right. So the whole career in 1902, as I say, becomes the first man of sportsman of African descent to have national recognition, and as before Jack Johnson. Holt didn't know what he'd done, but he'd leaked the details that would forever etch him into history because the press ran with the story of the Todd bear. Well, it got so much news coverage that it wasn't just the news coverage. Clifford bearman, who was a well-known cartoonist, picks up this event. And he does a cartoon about it. And it's called drawing the line in Mississippi and it's drawn up in The Washington Post on November 16th, 1902. I've talked to a lot of historians I've read a lot of articles about this. Nobody can come up with definite with explanation for this title. But at this point in time, there's been a debate every year in the United States of Congress for an anti lynching legislation. And it never passes. Now, look at that cartoon and tell me if you can see how that would be material to an anti lynching. So the picture is a man with a bear roped around the neck. Looks like black. White man with a black bear and a rope ran his neck. And then the president draws it a lion in Mississippi. And president has his back turned to that with his handout. So is that saying that Roosevelt never passed the law? What would that be saying? I'm not saying there's some misconceptions here. First of all, the man with a rope around the bear's neck is white. This would have been whole Collier. It should have been a black man. That wouldn't have fit the narrative of anti lynching, which and then basically Theodore Roosevelt said, I'm drawing the line in Mississippi. I tend to think that this is anti lynching connotations around. Be that as it may. Claire bearman continues to use the teddy bear in his anytime he has something about Roosevelt. He puts a bear in there. He puts a little bear as a comic relief in a political cartoon. Before the teddy bear, the comic relief in any theater Roosevelt cartoon would have been a raccoon. A raccoon. Bam and started the teddy bear. When did he actually call it the teddy bear? The teddy bear didn't pick up the name until it became a toy. So it was later. So well, it was very soon after. So Barry man made the bear comic relief in political cartoons about Roosevelt and later. It would be commercialized and turned into a children's toy called the table. Well, there are multiple things happening at this point in time. So you got bearman doing it. You got other cartoonists start doing it, but soon after this happened, a toy maker in New York decides he wants to make a toy and he wants to call it the teddy bear. Well, the legend is that he contacted Roosevelt and said, we want to call it teddy's bear and it Roosevelt gave him permission to do that. None of that correspondence has ever been found. That's the story of the teddy bear, and a 120 years later, the name for a small stuffed bear is as strong as ever. And what do you get down to its roots? The grit nerve and ingenuity of holt Collier created it. Here's how the 1902 hunt ended because they kept hunting. And again, they hunt all over the place. They ride and range for long distances, and they kill three bear on this hunt, none of which rose up, but in the community hunt like this would have been considered anybody that gets the big game. It's considered a success for everybody. But Roosevelt didn't pick up on. And so he resented it, but he says, I'm coming back to the south. Next year and we're going to get us a trophy Bay Area. Well, it ended up being 5 years. Roosevelt would return a 1907. However, a lot happened on this 5 day hunt, halt confessed to killing James A. king, and he told Roosevelt how many kids he had. Remember I was gonna surprise you with the details of this. Here it is. And Roosevelt actually wrote this in a letter to a buddy about hulk caller. But Roosevelt asked, Collier, if he had any children. And halt started counting on his fingers and said, I've got 14 children. Roosevelt acted astonished and holt said, no, sir, no, sir. All of them ain't my wives. She had two and the balance I got just frolicking around. Here's

Roosevelt Teddy Roosevelt Crockett club Todd bear Mississippi John Parkinson holt Louisiana coast coast John Parker Clifford bearman John park Claire bearman Jack Johnson Arkansas Parker Holt John The Washington Post Collier
"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

05:05 min | 3 months ago

"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Up.

"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

05:41 min | 3 months ago

"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"The midnight forest story. That was with an agricultural Bill. Yeah, it was an agricultural. That was hilarious. Well, I like a lot of this bill. I don't like that part of the bill. Looks like I have ten days for the constitution. I guess we'll, I guess we'll burn the midnight oil. You can't make anyone make another pot of coffee. Here we go. You can't make any new forests in these states. Well, I'm going to make some new forests in those states before this takes away. And I do think that this is an interesting thing to bring up. When we think about some of these really impactful big presidents. In my mind, there's a distinction in life between to not sound too much like I'm given a TED Talk now, but there are managers and their leaders. Managers in my mind, they keep the machine moving. They understand what the rules are what their role is. And leader will have an actual vision and take things in a certain direction. Now, wartime presidents, we see more of that, partly because of the war brings urgency that just that's kind of. Yeah, there's no choice. So Lincoln, FDR. Teddy is one of those, frankly, rare er, presidents that brings that sort of urgency that I have ideas and I'm going to pursue them outside of a war situation. That's just what I see playing out here, you know? I mean, he is less constitutional in his approach. Much less. Maybe putting that money. But generous. The quote Mark Twain. Oh, okay, the Mark Twain quote. That was even the one I was going for, but that was great. What's your favorite doesn't care about the constitution quote? Well, I share yours. That feels like I'll show you my language, but how do I care? Yes, that he does that. The 1902 coal strike, where he's being confronted by a congressman who is worried about property rights with the coal strike in Pennsylvania. And he's saying, well, you know, what about the constitution and teddy's response? The constitution was written for the people, not the people. People are the constitution. Yeah. Those are some strong words. It tells you where he stands. And for me, I found myself kind of contrasting that in my head with the far more legal mind of the lawyer turned president Abraham Lincoln, where you see him very methodically carefully, like with the Thirteenth Amendment. He's not willing to leave something at an executive order. He's always thinking about, okay, this can be undone if it isn't done in this way. He says bad laws need to be followed to expose that they're bad laws. For me, it was interesting to think about the two very strong but very different presidents. You did refer to Lincoln as the lawyer who became a president. I will say Teddy Roosevelt did go to law school and it was like and it was bored. Right. He's like, well. I could do this or I could write a book about the war of 1812. I could. I'm bored here. I don't want to learn about rules all day when I could go climb the Matterhorn. And that right there, again, kind of sums up. Yeah, that speaks to teddy. I think that

TED Talk Mark Twain Lincoln Teddy president Abraham Lincoln teddy Pennsylvania Teddy Roosevelt
"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

08:17 min | 3 months ago

"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Policy is anti civil service reform, or pro civil service reform, because this is an important policy. No, I don't like bullies. And as teddy says in one of his speeches, as with nations, so with people that the nation needs to be run on a basis of, well, dishonesty is wrong. If I tell you a lie, so why should we allow corporations or other countries or anyone to act dishonestly? So yeah. I mean, should we just hit stop? I think you just hit it on the head, man. That really does sum up TR and I think that's what sets them apart so much, not to be smirch. Benjamin. Which one did you reference? William Henry. Not that they didn't bring their life experiences or what have you. But teddy, he only becomes president initially, as we know, because will McKinley's assassinated, he is not the type of person that wins with the party. We know that. He would piss off the party bosses. Mark Hanna calls him that damned cowboy. Exactly. Yeah, right? So this is a guy who is, I don't mean this in a cynical way, 'cause I really try to not be cynical, but he's frankly too honest to get into some spaces in life. And if it weren't for that occurrence of certainly he's too honest for Gilded Age politics. Yes. Which is notorious. And I don't mean that as like a knock on teddy. I mean that as a virtue that you wouldn't expect someone who is that honest to be able to as you're pointing out to be able to succeed and Gilded Age politics. And it's difficult to imagine in the same historians don't do well with counterfactuals. But it is, it is difficult to imagine an America without TR. In the same way it's difficult to imagine in America without a Lincoln or a Frederick Douglas or George Washington, some of the or Benjamin Harris and or William Henry Harris and we kind of do have an America without. Wow. William. There's a National Park Service employee assigned at something to do with his former house right now. It's going to be a big month. Big WHH fan out there. Makes me think of that parks and rec episode. There's one where they're trying to find historical artifacts or something that links William Henry Harrison. To this part that they want to make a national park or something. And they're just grasping at all the straws. See everything. I'm glad we got parks and rack in there. Me. But get it back on teddy. You're right. He doesn't like bullies. He hates bullies. The way that he overcomes his own physical condition, right? He's scrawny. He's asthmatic and he turns himself into this jacked boxer by the time he gets to Harvard, the dude, as you know, I appreciate, climbs the freaking Matterhorn. That is an incredible feat for anyone. The fact that he comes from being someone who is not physically gifted. I'll be honest, one thought I had a few times. I'm glad this worked out for teddy. I would be mildly afraid. Oh, right, so I just will my way out of some of my medical conditions. I don't know that that works. I don't know that you should always take your health advice from Theodore Roosevelt. I mean, to some degree, sure, perhaps just we'll just avoid getting into this space. But I mean, I was just absolutely impressed with them. And that sort of, I will do attitude. It follows him in the politics. And his personal life, jeez, having his mother and his wife die. I couldn't listen to that part. I had to like stop part of the way through and go and actually watch something happy. Yeah. And then come back and finish listening because I was like, nope, I can't. Yeah. A listener let me know that was a playful message saying thanks for making me almost crash as I tried to drive through my tears. Yeah. Thanks for that. If that was a book that we had written and had tried to submit to a publisher, I think they would have rejected it for being too obvious. For being too obvious because that can happen. His mother and wife die on the day that his wife gives birth on Valentine's Day, which is the fourth anniversary of when they got engaged. And he gets the news while everyone's cheering for him because he's such a great guy. Like storybooks. That would have been rejected. Teddy Roosevelt. He really is. I mean, I don't say that in a romanticizing sort of way as though he doesn't have his flaws in his imperfections like everyone does, but the life that this man lives is lips. He is larger than all overcome it. I'm suffering with grief. I will go to the badlands and reinvent myself. And go from elite New Yorker to rugged cowboy to damned cowboy. And there we have a repeat of the boxer that we met in Harvard, right? These were many episodes that didn't make it into the main feed, but we covered his let me go ahead, Zach and his boxing episode. Yeah. There's this story with his future wife watching him box at Harvard and TD, then turning into teddy. Starting to become teddy. If you have the opportunity, dear listener, to look up the picture of him in the Harvard boxing club, he is a handsome young man. Those TR mutton chops. Oh, he's pulling them off. They're old. Totally unbiased opinion. In my unbiased opinion, TR is very handsome historical figure. Second only to William Jennings Bryan. Kelsey, check your timer. No, the dude looks like he's an underwear model. So you're talking a 100% sitting there shirt off. His hands kind of crossed. He's got this cool look. He's got the smoldering. Like too cool and for this all the way. He's doing blue steel. Oh, 100%. Yeah. And he's not even trying. That's when the camera exploded. And you would think that this young asthmatic boy has turned himself into a good boxer by that picture. And then he gets into the ring. He gets cracked across the face. The other guy whose boxing is just punching the heck out of him. And there's this one part where right after the round ends. His opponent punches TR. And the crowd starts to boo his opponent and teddy black eye, blood just streaming down, raises his hand to the crowd and is like, no, he didn't know the round was over yet. Don't boo him. It's all right, it's fine. And then goes back to his corner. It again, this is teddy's sense of fair play, right? Yeah. He's not gonna let somebody take crap. Exactly. For something that wasn't their fault. Even if the person who just cracked him in the face. Who's beating the hell out of him? Yes. That was supposed to happen. Yeah, 'cause it is what's supposed to happen. So again, we're seeing the pain that this man can withstand. I mean, that's the sort of guy who reinvents his body. It's like, yeah, I have asthma. Well, Matterhorn anyway. And goes out to the badlands and in that space, he's in a bar, and a drunken bully comes up, calls him four eyes, tells teddy, he is going to buy him a drink. The dude pulls his revolvers on Roosevelt. I mean, I just, I try to put myself in his situation, imagine if you're out by yourself, Friends doesn't matter. There you are. Chilies.

teddy Mark Hanna Frederick Douglas Benjamin Harris William Henry Harris America Theodore Roosevelt William Henry Harvard McKinley William Henry Harrison Benjamin National Park Service elite New Yorker George Washington Harvard boxing club Lincoln jeez William
"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

05:05 min | 3 months ago

"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Up.

"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

05:05 min | 3 months ago

"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"That was with an agricultural Bill. Yeah, it was an agricultural. That was hilarious. Well, I like a lot of this bill. I don't like that part of the bill. Looks like I have ten days for the constitution. I guess we'll, I guess we'll burn the midnight oil. You can't make everyone make another pot of coffee. Here we go. You can't make any new forests in these states. Well, I'm going to make some new forests in those states before this takes away. And I do think that this is an interesting thing to bring up. When we think about some of these really impactful big presidents. In my mind, there's a distinction in life between to not sound too much like I'm given a TED Talk now, but there are managers in their leaders. Managers in my mind, they keep the machine moving. They understand what the rules are, what their role is. And leader will have an actual vision and take things in a certain direction. Now, wartime presidents, we see more of that, partly because of the war brings urgency that you kind of have to. Yeah, there's no choice. So Lincoln, FDR. Teddy is one of those, frankly, rare er, presidents that brings that sort of urgency that I have ideas and I'm going to pursue them outside of a war situation. That's just what I see playing out here, you know? I mean, he is less constitutional in his approach. Much less. Maybe putting that much. But generous. The quote Mark Twain. Oh, okay, the Mark Twain quote. That was even the one I was going for, but that was great, right, yeah. What's your favorite? Doesn't care about the constitution quote. Well, I share yours. That feels like a show in your mind. But how do I say doesn't care? Yes. That he does. And the 1902 call strike, right, where he's being confronted by a congressman who is worried about property rights with the coal strike in Pennsylvania. And he's saying, well, you know, what about the constitution and teddy's response? The constitution was written for the people, not the people. People are for the constitution. are some strong words. It tells you where he stands. And for me, I found myself kind of contrasting that in my head with the far more legal mind of the lawyer turned president Abraham Lincoln, where you see him very methodically carefully. Like with the Thirteenth Amendment, he's not willing to leave something out an executive order. He's always thinking about, okay, this can be undone if it isn't done in this way. He says bad laws need to be followed to expose that they're bad laws. For me, it was interesting to think about the two very strong but very different presidents. You did refer to Lincoln as the lawyer who became a president. I will say Teddy Roosevelt did go to law school and it was like. Right. He's like, well. I could do this, or write a book about the war of 18 12. I could. I'm bored here. I don't want to learn about rules all day when I could go climb the Matterhorn. And that right there, again, kind of sums up. Yeah, that speaks to teddy. I think that

TED Talk Mark Twain Lincoln Teddy teddy Pennsylvania Abraham Lincoln Teddy Roosevelt
"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

03:03 min | 3 months ago

"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Beer in front of you. What have you? Someone walks up to you, pulls a gun out and says you're gonna buy me a drink. While insulting you. I'd probably buy the drink. How many? And there's teddy. Cool he says. Well, if I got it, I got it. Boom. Cracks him in the face. The dude's guns go off as he's falling. I mean, yeah, this is not the safest place, right? But yeah, he just totally knocks out his bully. Someone called me four eyes? I'd walk away.

"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

07:36 min | 3 months ago

"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Which one did you reference? William Henry. And not that they didn't bring their life experiences or what have you. But teddy, he only becomes president initially, as we know, because will McKinley's assassinate it. He is not the type of person that wins with the party we know that. He would piss off the party bosses. Mark Hanna calls him that damned cowboy. Exactly, right? So this is a guy who is, I don't mean this in a cynical way 'cause I really try to not be cynical, but he's frankly too honest to get into some spaces in life. And if it weren't for that occurrence of certainly he's too honest for Gilded Age politics. Yes. Which is notorious. I don't mean that as like a knock on teddy. I mean that as a virtue that you wouldn't expect someone who is that honest to be able to, as you're pointing out, to be able to succeed and Gilded Age politics. And it's difficult to imagine in the same historians don't do well with counterfactuals. But it is, it is difficult to imagine an America without TR. In the same way it's difficult to imagine in America without a Lincoln or a Frederick Douglass or George Washington, some of the or Benjamin Harris and or William Henry Harris and we kind of do have an America without fears. William. There's a national park service employee assigned at something to do with his former house right now. It's going to be a big month. Big WHH fan out there. Makes me think of that parks and rec episode. Sure. There's one where they're trying to find historical artifacts or something that links William Henry Harrison. To this part that they want to make a national park or something. And they're just grasping at all the straws. See everything. I'm glad we got parks and rack in there. Me. But get it back on teddy. You're right. He doesn't like bullies. He hates bullies. The way that he overcomes his own physical condition, right? He's scrawny. He's asthmatic and he turns himself into this jacked boxer by the time he gets to Harvard, the dude, as you know, I appreciate climbs the freaking Matterhorn. That is an incredible feat for anyone. The fact that he comes from being someone who is not physically gifted will that into existence. I'll be honest, one thought I had a few times. I'm glad this worked out for teddy. I would be mildly afraid. Oh, right, so I just will my way out of some of my medical conditions. I don't know that that works. I don't know that you should always take your health advice from Theodore Roosevelt. I mean, to some degree, sure, perhaps just we'll just avoid getting into this space. But I mean, I was just absolutely impressed with them. And that sort of, I will do attitude. It follows him in the politics. And his personal life, jeez, having his mother and his wife die. I couldn't listen to that part. I had to like stop part of the way through and go and actually watch something happy. Yeah. And then come back and finish listening because I was like, nope, I can't. Yeah. A listener, let me know. That was, it was a playful message saying, thanks for making me almost crashed as I tried to drive through my tears. Yeah. Thanks for that. If that was a book that we had written and had tried to submit to a publisher, I think they would have rejected it for being too obvious. For being too obvious, because that can't happen. His mother and wife die on the day that his wife gives birth on Valentine's Day, which is the fourth anniversary of when they got engaged. And he gets the news while everyone's cheering for him because he's such a great guy. That would have been Teddy Roosevelt. He really is. I mean, I don't say that in a romanticizing sort of way as though he doesn't have his flaws in his imperfections like everyone does, but the life that this man lives lives. He is larger than all overcome it. I'm suffering with grief. I will go to the badlands and reinvent myself. And go from elite New Yorker to rugged cowboy to damned cowboy. And there we have a repeat of the boxer that we met in the Harvard. These were many episodes that didn't make it into the main feed, but we covered his go ahead, Zach and his his boxing episode. There's this story with his future wife watching him box at Harvard and TD, then turning into teddy. Starting to become teddy. If you have the opportunity, dear listener, to look up the picture of him in the Harvard boxing club, he is a handsome young man. Those TR mutton chops. Oh, he's pulling them off. They're a sight. Totally unbiased opinion. In my unbiased opinion, TR is very handsome historical figure, second only to William Jennings Bryan. Kelsey, check your timer. No, the dude looks like he's an underwear model. I know you're talking a 100% sitting there shirt off. His hands kind of crossed. He's got this cool look. He's got the smoldering. Like too cool and for this all the way. He's doing blue steel. Oh, a 100%. Yeah. And he's not even trying. That's when the camera exploded. And you would think that this young asthmatic boy has turned himself into a good boxer by that picture. And then he gets into the ring. He gets cracked across the face. The other guy whose boxing is just punching the heck out of him. And there's this one part where right after the round ends, his opponent punches TR. And the crowd starts to boo his opponent and teddy black eye, blood just streaming down, raises his hand to the crowd and is like, no, he didn't know the round was over yet. Don't boo him. It's all right. It's fine. And then goes back to his corner. And again, this is teddy's sense of fair play, right? Yeah. He's not gonna let somebody take crap. Exactly. For something that wasn't their fault. Even if the person who just cracked him in the face. Who's beating the hell out of him? Yes. That was supposed to happen. Yeah, 'cause it is what's supposed to happen. So again, we're seeing the pain that this man can withstand. I mean, that's the sort of guy who reinvents his body. It's like, yeah, I have asthma. Well, Matterhorn anyway. And goes out to the badlands, and in that space, he's in a bar and a drunken bully comes up, calls him four eyes, tells teddy he is going to buy him a drink. The dude pulls his revolvers on Roosevelt. I mean, I just, I try to put myself in his situation, imagine if you're out by yourself, Friends doesn't matter. There you are. Chilies.

Mark Hanna Benjamin Harris William Henry Harris America Teddy Roosevelt William Henry Harvard teddy McKinley William Henry Harrison Frederick Douglass elite New Yorker George Washington Harvard boxing club Lincoln jeez William boxing Valentine
Ben's Take on the Biden-Zelenksy Breakdown

The Ben Shapiro Show

00:44 sec | 4 months ago

Ben's Take on the Biden-Zelenksy Breakdown

"I think that it's fascinating to watch, for example. That rift breakout between zelensky and Joe Biden, what needs to happen, by the way, in Ukraine, is that Joe Biden actually needs to do the thing that any politician with stones would do. He needs to say to Vladimir zelensky, we are going to give you enough material to make a big push before the winter. And then you're making a settlement. And I will take the blame if you can. I understand that 80% of your public wants to keep fighting. I can't let you do that. The reason I can't let you do that is because we have other interests on the globe aside from what is happening alone in Ukraine. So sort of a fascinating breakdown of what's going on in terms of foreign policy where a lot of chaos is breaking out. The United States has to stop its habit of big talk and it's the opposite of Teddy Roosevelt. Speak softly and carry a big stick. It's the opposite. We now speak loudly and carry a very, very small stick as it turns out, all too often.

Zelensky Joe Biden Vladimir Zelensky Ukraine Teddy Roosevelt United States
"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

05:25 min | 4 months ago

"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Teddy walks enthusiastically around the site. But it isn't long before the hands on rough rider insists on experiencing the work itself. He climbs into the cockpit of the tin man operated 95 ton you Cyrus steam shovel. It's an incredible sight. Yet tomati has immaculate white hat and suit. Teddy is so conspicuous sitting at the controls of this rivet covered behemoth of a machine whose toothy bucket can tear 8 tons of dirt from the ground in a single scoop. Yet, the rough rider, cowboy president, looks at ease. With his balled up left hand firmly planted at his waist, he exudes confidence. Presidential power. And we know this because a photographer captures the image. It is perhaps one of the most iconic photos of this larger than life president. But this is no mere photo op for the energetic, strenuous life living commander in chief. He's got much to do before the day is done. TR inspects everything. He wants to see the powerful locomotives hauling dirt. Then watch as the steam powered plows clear the train several flat cars have detritus in a matter of minutes. He watches dynamite blast through rock in the culebra cut. Purposely coming when the weather would be worse, he marvels at the water flowing down the cuts clay, landslide prone walls, and thinks his lucky stars that John Stevens convinced Congress to use locks rather than build a sea level canal. And he talks to everyone. Teddy later reports, during the day I talked with scores of different men, superintendents, and heads of departments, divisions, and bureaus, steam shovel men, machinists, conductors, engineers, clerks, wives of the American employees, health officers, colored laborers, colored attendants. TR has concerns about food quality, compensation, and the health of black workers. Yet, he's nonetheless impressed with what John Stevens and doctor William gorges are doing. And very positive as he boards the Louisiana a few days later. Spirits are up among the workers and the press sounds more upbeat with headlines like a strenuous exhibition on the isthmus. But no one can better capture TR's realistic enthusiasm than himself as he reports the following to Congress a few weeks later. Of the success of the enterprise, I am as well convinced as one can be of any enterprise that is human. It is a stupendous work upon which our fellow countrymen are engaged down there on the isthmus. And while we should hold them to a strict accountability for the way in which they perform it, we should yet recognize with Frank generosity, the epic nature of the task on which they are engaged, and its worldwide importance. They are doing something which will redound immeasurably to the credit of America, which will benefit all the world, and which will last for ages to come. Yet, just as everything appears on track, as this digging army removes a record breaking 500,000 cubic yards from the culebra cut in January 1907, John Stevens decides he's done. The logistical mastermind chief engineer resigns. Once again, teddy needs a new chief engineer. Someone not only is capable of John, but who will see through the years of digging and lock system building ahead. Someone

Teddy John Stevens William gorges Congress Louisiana Frank America army teddy John
"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

08:08 min | 4 months ago

"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"What if he is? That night, the bespectacled mustachioed ambassador braves a snowstorm and makes his way to the train station. He's traveling all the way to New York City to consult with the German consul general there. Carl bunts. Carl and the president are friends. Surely, if anyone knows if the American leader is serious, it's Carl. Once a Manhattan, Theodore finds no comfort in his colleague. The New York based diplomat informs him that teddy doesn't bluff. Dear God. The German ambassador realizes he hasn't a moment to lose. He sends word on December 16th of tomorrow's deadline and urges arbitration. With only 24 hours to go before admiral George Dewey and the Caribbean fleet moves south toward Venezuela. Teddy and his White House advisers are preparing for the worst. The British advised the president that they agree to arbitration and principle, meaning the Germans stand alone if the Americans intervene. But then, right at the wire, Germany acquiesces. Two days later, December 19th, both the British and German governments invite teddy to arbitrate their claims in Venezuela. A great war has been avoided, at least for now. Both sides of the Atlantic breathe a massive sigh of relief. As I mentioned earlier, some historians doubt the narrative I just relayed to you, which is TR's narrative. There are no official records of certain visits or messages transmitted. But as teddy's biographer Edmund Morris points out, these sorts of omissions make sense in the delicate realm of international diplomacy. To quote him on the German ambassador's December 14th visit to The White House. It suited everybody concerned that blank paper should obliterate the diplomatic record. Wilhelm was still free to end the crisis without evidence of being coerced. And surely, teddy's good with that. He understands the need to let national leaders save face. After all, his goal isn't to use the big stick, which, in this case, is George Dewey and his fleet. Taze approach is to keep that metaphorical club in hand while being such a straight shooter that, when he softly says he'll swing it under a given condition, his opponents know it isn't a bluff. As the German ambassador now clearly understands. Of course, this philosophy also means that the United States stick better be big enough to strike fear. And we know teddy's already thought that way for a long time. He's pushed for a stronger, more modern navy, a bigger stick, if you will. Ever since his days as assistant secretary of the navy. But the Venezuela crisis isn't just an example of TR living by his beloved West African proverb. It's just after this experience that TR expands on the 80 year old Monroe doctrine. In brief, teddy says that while the Monroe doctrine stated that the United States has the right to manage foreign relations in the western hemisphere by preventing European powers from further colonization in the Americas, it's time to go a step further. The U.S. is now claiming the right to intervene in the domestic affairs of its American neighbors, which it will do as needed to tamp down on bad actors or again prevent European colonization. This add on is known as the Roosevelt corollary, and Teddy Roosevelt will share this new twist on the Monroe doctrine next year in his 1904 address to Congress. Here's an excerpt. It is not true that the United States feels any land hunger, or entertains any projects as regards the other nations of the western hemisphere. Save such as are for their welfare. All that this country desires is to see the neighboring countries stable, orderly, and prosperous. Any country whose people conduct themselves well can count upon our hearty friendship. If a nation shows they didn't know how to act with reasonable, efficiency and decency and social and political matters, if it keeps order and pays its obligations, it need fear no interference from the United States. Chronic wrongdoing, or an impotence which results in a general loosening of the ties of civilized society, may in America, as elsewhere, ultimately require intervention by some civilized nation, and in the western hemisphere, the adherence of the United States to the Monroe doctrine may force the United States, however reluctantly. In flagrant cases of such wrongdoing or impotence to the exercise of an international police power. Our interests and those of our southern neighbors are in reality identical. They have great natural riches, and if within their borders, the reign of law and justice obtains prosperity is sure to come to them. While they thus obey the primary laws of civilized society, they may rest assured that they will be treated by us in a spirit of cordial and helpful sympathy. We would interfere with them only in the last resort, and then only if it became evident that their inability or unwillingness to do justice at home and abroad had violated the rights of the United States or had invited foreign aggression to the detriment of the entire body of American nations. It is a mere truism to say that every nation, whether in America or anywhere else, which desires to maintain its freedom. Its independence must ultimately realize that the right of such independence can not be separated from the responsibility of making good use of it. And so, it's with this line of thought that the old NYPD commissioner turned U.S. president will soon anoint the United States, the western hemisphere's police force. But it raises questions with his critics. Who is the United States to decide when a nation has crossed the line? She decide which South American nations are righteous in which they're not. And even before these words are uttered, the Roosevelt administration will act on this ideology, bringing the big stick to bear in Colombia's domestic affairs. Specifically, in that nation's northern region, known as the isthmus of panel. American scandal is a podcast from wandering that takes you deep into the most infamous scandals in American history to see what drives someone to break the rules. I love the show. It's hosted by my dear friend and collaborator, or given the subject, should I say my partner in crime? The podcaster, not senator, Lindsey Graham. You know the background music in HTTPS? Yeah, that's Lindsey's work. So if you enjoy my storytelling and style, it's hard to imagine you won't enjoy Lindsay's too. This upcoming season explores the unique, polarizing global impact of Edward Snowden. When this young NSA contractor leaked thousands of documents outlining secret mass government surveillance, did that make him a hero on patriot or a traitor? Who was he? What made him tick and how did he get caught? Explore all of this with my good friend, Lindsey Graham, on American scandal. Listen to American scandal, Snowden, on Apple podcasts, Amazon music, or you can listen ad free by joining wondery plus in the wondery app. Bombas mission is simple. Make the most comfortable clothes ever and match every item sold with an equal item donated. So when you buy bombas, you're also giving to someone in need. And it feels good to give. Just ask bombas. They've done it over 50 million times, but when you do so by buying bombas, it also feels good, literally. With their soft fabric and invisible seams, bombs t-shirts are peak comfort. They're my go to perfect fitting t-shirts, and they're famous socks for every bit as comfortable too, especially when I'm going for a run. 5 miles into pounding the pavement on a hot summer's day, there's just no substitute for bombes sweat wicking yarns. Trust me. So do yourself and someone in need a favor. Go to bombas dot com slash HTTPS and use code HTTPS for 20% off your first purchase. That's BOMB AS dot com slash HTTPS and use code HTTPS to check out. Bombas dot com slash HTV S code HT

United States teddy Venezuela Carl bunts admiral George Dewey Edmund Morris Carl George Dewey Taze Roosevelt administration navy Theodore Wilhelm Teddy Manhattan New York City White House Caribbean Atlantic
"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

08:06 min | 4 months ago

"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Speak softly and carry a big stick. You will go far. Theodore Roosevelt loves this West African proverb, and it comes to play in his foreign policy, which is exactly what we'll cover today with the stories of teddy's big stick diplomacy and dealings with the world abroad. Having seen his gift for logic and delicacy in helping to end the Russo Japanese war, will now observe how he uses a powerful combination of death negotiation backed by military might in the arena foreign policy. I'll give you all the highlights. Including the Al Jazeera's conference and the great white fleet. But we'll focus on two stories above all. First, the spat between Monroe, doctrine, upholding TR and the German Empire over Venezuela, and second, a project that far outlasts teddy's presidency. The Panama Canal. The first of these is classic big stick diplomacy. Meanwhile, the Panama Canal, which is an epic tale in and of itself. Will prove world changing. We'll see how teddy justifies actions his critics call straight up imperialism as he picks up this costly, deadly project from the defeated French. And can the Americans do it? If so, it will be an engineering marvel that'll change world trade. It'll also greatly strengthen the United States big stick. So ready to avoid a few wars and split two continents asunder over the next hour, sounds doable to me. Let's back up a few years then and tackle the Venezuela crisis. Rewind. Ah, Venezuela. A land of natural beauty with a long, Caribbean coastline, it has nonetheless had a rough go of late. Corruption, Civil War as a result, this verdant South American nation has accrued serious debt in the United Kingdom and Germany by late 1902. Around 62 million bolivars, or several millions of dollars to express that in U.S. currency. But now, Venezuela's sharp bearded, dark haired president. Okay, dictator cipriano Castro is neither paying up nor willing to discuss the matter with his two powerful creditors. But both the UK and Germany intend to collect what's theirs. At gunpoint, if necessary. President Theodore Roosevelt is good with that. While we saw in episodes one O four and one O 5, that teddy is a fierce advocate of the Monroe doctrine, which I'll remind you is the assertion that the United States will not tolerate further European colonization or other unsavory shenanigans in the western hemisphere. We also know from our recent square deal episodes that he's all about treating people fairly. That goes for nations too. Therefore, teddy doesn't see the Monroe doctrine as a free pass for Latin America to thumb its nose at European powers. So, in teddy's view, if Venezuela took the loans, it needs to honor that and pay up. If it's president won't pay or even discuss the matter, he understands Germany and Britain, sending warships to blockade the coastal nation. Fair enough. But can he trust Germany not to go further? Now, teddy loves Germany. He's got German blood, briefly lived in Dresden as a child, and speaks the language, which along with his French makes him trilingual, but TR doesn't trust that the rapidly expanding second Reich will hold back in Venezuela. Kaiser Wilhelm the second has already spurned the open door policy in China by snatching up jiaozhou. So why wouldn't he do the same in Venezuela? If that happens, then TR will have to act as that would be a clear violation of the Monroe doctrine. That's why teddy has asked the two European empires for assurances that they won't seize any land while blockading Venezuela. Britain has obliged, but Germany isn't so forthcoming. Sounds like it's time for teddy to speak softly and carry a big stick. It's December 8th, 1902. The German ambassador, Theodore von halden, and his retinue have just arrived at The White House. The meeting is entirely ceremonial, but the similarly named president is happy to take advantage of this time to talk with the walrus mustache wearing German. Once the two of them are alone, TR speaks his mind about Germany's intentions in Venezuela. Tell the Kaiser that I have put George Dewey in charge of our fleet to maneuver in west Indian waters. That the world at large should know this merely as a maneuver, but I regret to say that I will be obliged to interfere by force if necessary if the Germans take any action which looks like the acquisition of territory in Venezuela or anywhere along the Caribbean. George Dewey. That name should ring a bell. We bonded with this living legend and admiral of the U.S. Navy in episode one O 5. When George essentially kicked off the Spanish-American War by demolishing the Spanish fleet in Philippine waters. Now teddy's got George down in the Caribbean on standby in case the Germans get up to no good. Conversation continues. The German Theodore assures our American Theodore that Germany has no intention of seizing Venezuelan territory. Aha. Well, with thoughts of Germany's track record in China, teddy doesn't buy it. He lays out an ultimatum. Kaiser Wilhelm the second must provide a full disclaimer stating that Germany will not take Venezuela and territory within the next ten days. If not, George Dewey and his nearby fleet will move in to observe Venezuela's coast closely. Far, far more closely. Teddy feels he's been polite yet clear. If we trust his singular telling of things, that is, some historians discount his ultimatum narrative. But will the ambassador relay this message and its serious implications of military muscle? The next day seems to indicate no. The UK and German blockade sees four Venezuelan gunboats. The Germans destroy three of them. President cipriano Castro then asks the American government to intervene on his behalf. And Secretary of State John hay forwards the request to the British and Germans, letting them both know that the U.S. is willing to step in and arbitrate peacefully. But the days are passing and TR's ultimatum deadline is drawing closer with nary a word of assurance from the Kaiser. Seems TR and his excellency Theodore von halden may need another chat to full on wars to be avoided. It's a good thing he's coming by. It's a dark and dreary Sunday morning. December 14th, 1902. In German ambassador, Theodore von halden is just arriving at The White House. He soon greets the rough riding president, likely in the executive office, and they begin to chat. His excellency starts with small talk. The cold gloomy weather. Tennis. And then, it feels like the ambassadors wrapping up. In fact, he's standing and starting to leave. But teddy stops him and follows up on the Venezuela situation. He first asks if Germany will accept the Secretary of State's offer to arbitrate. The German Theodore responds quickly and sharply. No. In the clearest of terms, TR answers that the Kaiser is risking war then. To drive the point home, he reminds his fellow Theodore of last week's ultimatum and tells him it's no longer ten days. Now it's 9, and with 6 days already passed, that puts the deadline 72 hours out on December 17th. That's right. TR spoken softly. But he still caring a big stick. The ambassador leaves, still insisting that the Kaiser will never arbitrate. He can't believe the president is serious. But dread sets in.

Venezuela teddy Germany George Dewey President Theodore Roosevelt Panama Canal Theodore von halden Caribbean coastline cipriano Castro U.S. Kaiser Wilhelm Al Jazeera Britain Dresden Caribbean Latin America Reich UK China White House
"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

08:08 min | 4 months ago

"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"What if he is? That night, the bespectacled mustachioed ambassador braves a snowstorm and makes his way to the train station. He's traveling all the way to New York City to consult with the German consul general there. Carl bunts. Carl and the president are friends. Surely, if anyone knows if the American leader is serious, it's Carl. Once a Manhattan, Theodore finds no comfort in his colleague. The New York based diplomat informs him that teddy doesn't bluff. Dear God. The German ambassador realizes he hasn't a moment to lose. He sends word on December 16th of tomorrow's deadline and urges arbitration. With only 24 hours to go before admiral George Dewey and the Caribbean fleet moves south toward Venezuela. Teddy and his White House advisers are preparing for the worst. The British advised the president that they agree to arbitration and principle, meaning the Germans stand alone if the Americans intervene. But then, right at the wire, Germany acquiesces. Two days later, December 19th, both the British and German governments invite teddy to arbitrate their claims in Venezuela. A great war has been avoided, at least for now. Both sides of the Atlantic breathe a massive sigh of relief. As I mentioned earlier, some historians doubt the narrative I just relayed to you, which is TR's narrative. There are no official records of certain visits or messages transmitted. But as teddy's biographer Edmund Morris points out, these sorts of omissions make sense in the delicate realm of international diplomacy. To quote him on the German ambassador's December 14th visit to The White House. It suited everybody concerned that blank paper should obliterate the diplomatic record. Wilhelm was still free to end the crisis without evidence of being coerced. And surely, teddy's good with that. He understands the need to let national leaders save face. After all, his goal isn't to use the big stick, which, in this case, is George Dewey and his fleet. Taze approach is to keep that metaphorical club in hand while being such a straight shooter that, when he softly says he'll swing it under a given condition, his opponents know it isn't a bluff. As the German ambassador now clearly understands. Of course, this philosophy also means that the United States stick better be big enough to strike fear. And we know teddy's already thought that way for a long time. He's pushed for a stronger, more modern navy, a bigger stick, if you will. Ever since his days as assistant secretary of the navy. But the Venezuela crisis isn't just an example of TR living by his beloved West African proverb. It's just after this experience that TR expands on the 80 year old Monroe doctrine. In brief, teddy says that while the Monroe doctrine stated that the United States has the right to manage foreign relations in the western hemisphere by preventing European powers from further colonization in the Americas, it's time to go a step further. The U.S. is now claiming the right to intervene in the domestic affairs of its American neighbors, which it will do as needed to tamp down on bad actors or again prevent European colonization. This add on is known as the Roosevelt corollary, and Teddy Roosevelt will share this new twist on the Monroe doctrine next year in his 1904 address to Congress. Here's an excerpt. It is not true that the United States feels any land hunger, or entertains any projects as regards the other nations of the western hemisphere. Save such as are for their welfare. All that this country desires is to see the neighboring countries stable, orderly, and prosperous. Any country whose people conduct themselves well can count upon our hearty friendship. If a nation shows they didn't know how to act with reasonable, efficiency and decency and social and political matters, if it keeps order and pays its obligations, it need fear no interference from the United States. Chronic wrongdoing, or an impotence which results in a general loosening of the ties of civilized society, may in America, as elsewhere, ultimately require intervention by some civilized nation, and in the western hemisphere, the adherence of the United States to the Monroe doctrine may force the United States, however reluctantly. In flagrant cases of such wrongdoing or impotence to the exercise of an international police power. Our interests and those of our southern neighbors are in reality identical. They have great natural riches, and if within their borders, the reign of law and justice obtains prosperity is sure to come to them. While they thus obey the primary laws of civilized society, they may rest assured that they will be treated by us in a spirit of cordial and helpful sympathy. We would interfere with them only in the last resort, and then only if it became evident that their inability or unwillingness to do justice at home and abroad had violated the rights of the United States or had invited foreign aggression to the detriment of the entire body of American nations. It is a mere truism to say that every nation, whether in America or anywhere else, which desires to maintain its freedom. Its independence must ultimately realize that the right of such independence can not be separated from the responsibility of making good use of it. And so, it's with this line of thought that the old NYPD commissioner turned U.S. president will soon anoint the United States, the western hemisphere's police force. But it raises questions with his critics. Who is the United States to decide when a nation has crossed the line? She decide which South American nations are righteous in which they're not. And even before these words are uttered, the Roosevelt administration will act on this ideology, bringing the big stick to bear in Colombia's domestic affairs. Specifically, in that nation's northern region, known as the isthmus of panel. American scandal is a podcast from wandering that takes you deep into the most infamous scandals in American history to see what drives someone to break the rules. I love the show. It's hosted by my dear friend and collaborator, or given the subject, should I say my partner in crime? The podcaster, not senator, Lindsey Graham. You know the background music in HTTPS? Yeah, that's Lindsey's work. So if you enjoy my storytelling and style, it's hard to imagine you won't enjoy Lindsay's too. This upcoming season explores the unique, polarizing global impact of Edward Snowden. When this young NSA contractor leaked thousands of documents outlining secret mass government surveillance, did that make him a hero on patriot or a traitor? Who was he? What made him tick and how did he get caught? Explore all of this with my good friend, Lindsey Graham, on American scandal. Listen to American scandal, Snowden, on Apple podcasts, Amazon music, or you can listen ad free by joining wondery plus in the wondery app. Bombas mission is simple. Make the most comfortable clothes ever and match every item sold with an equal item donated. So when you buy bombas, you're also giving to someone in need. And it feels good to give. Just ask bombas. They've done it over 50 million times, but when you do so by buying bombas, it also feels good, literally. With their soft fabric and invisible seams, bombs t-shirts are peak comfort. They're my go to perfect fitting t-shirts, and they're famous socks for every bit as comfortable too, especially when I'm going for a run. 5 miles into pounding the pavement on a hot summer's day, there's just no substitute for bombes sweat wicking yarns. Trust me. So do yourself and someone in need a favor. Go to bombas dot com slash HTTPS and use code HTTPS for 20% off your first purchase. That's BOMB AS dot com slash HTTPS and use code HTTPS to check out. Bombas dot com slash HTV S code HT

United States teddy Venezuela Carl bunts admiral George Dewey Edmund Morris Carl George Dewey Taze Roosevelt administration navy Theodore Wilhelm Teddy Manhattan New York City White House Caribbean Atlantic
"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

08:06 min | 4 months ago

"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Speak softly and carry a big stick. You will go far. Theodore Roosevelt loves this West African proverb, and it comes to play in his foreign policy, which is exactly what we'll cover today with the stories of teddy's big stick diplomacy and dealings with the world abroad. Having seen his gift for logic and delicacy in helping to end the Russo Japanese war, will now observe how he uses a powerful combination of death negotiation backed by military might in the arena foreign policy. I'll give you all the highlights. Including the Al Jazeera's conference and the great white fleet. But we'll focus on two stories above all. First, the spat between Monroe, doctrine, upholding TR and the German Empire over Venezuela, and second, a project that far outlasts teddy's presidency. The Panama Canal. The first of these is classic big stick diplomacy. Meanwhile, the Panama Canal, which is an epic tale in and of itself. Will prove world changing. We'll see how teddy justifies actions his critics call straight up imperialism as he picks up this costly, deadly project from the defeated French. And can the Americans do it? If so, it will be an engineering marvel that'll change world trade. It'll also greatly strengthen the United States big stick. So ready to avoid a few wars and split two continents asunder over the next hour, sounds doable to me. Let's back up a few years then and tackle the Venezuela crisis. Rewind. Ah, Venezuela. A land of natural beauty with a long, Caribbean coastline, it has nonetheless had a rough go of late. Corruption, Civil War as a result, this verdant South American nation has accrued serious debt in the United Kingdom and Germany by late 1902. Around 62 million bolivars, or several millions of dollars to express that in U.S. currency. But now, Venezuela's sharp bearded, dark haired president. Okay, dictator cipriano Castro is neither paying up nor willing to discuss the matter with his two powerful creditors. But both the UK and Germany intend to collect what's theirs. At gunpoint, if necessary. President Theodore Roosevelt is good with that. While we saw in episodes one O four and one O 5, that teddy is a fierce advocate of the Monroe doctrine, which I'll remind you is the assertion that the United States will not tolerate further European colonization or other unsavory shenanigans in the western hemisphere. We also know from our recent square deal episodes that he's all about treating people fairly. That goes for nations too. Therefore, teddy doesn't see the Monroe doctrine as a free pass for Latin America to thumb its nose at European powers. So, in teddy's view, if Venezuela took the loans, it needs to honor that and pay up. If it's president won't pay or even discuss the matter, he understands Germany and Britain, sending warships to blockade the coastal nation. Fair enough. But can he trust Germany not to go further? Now, teddy loves Germany. He's got German blood, briefly lived in Dresden as a child, and speaks the language, which along with his French makes him trilingual, but TR doesn't trust that the rapidly expanding second Reich will hold back in Venezuela. Kaiser Wilhelm the second has already spurned the open door policy in China by snatching up jiaozhou. So why wouldn't he do the same in Venezuela? If that happens, then TR will have to act as that would be a clear violation of the Monroe doctrine. That's why teddy has asked the two European empires for assurances that they won't seize any land while blockading Venezuela. Britain has obliged, but Germany isn't so forthcoming. Sounds like it's time for teddy to speak softly and carry a big stick. It's December 8th, 1902. The German ambassador, Theodore von halden, and his retinue have just arrived at The White House. The meeting is entirely ceremonial, but the similarly named president is happy to take advantage of this time to talk with the walrus mustache wearing German. Once the two of them are alone, TR speaks his mind about Germany's intentions in Venezuela. Tell the Kaiser that I have put George Dewey in charge of our fleet to maneuver in west Indian waters. That the world at large should know this merely as a maneuver, but I regret to say that I will be obliged to interfere by force if necessary if the Germans take any action which looks like the acquisition of territory in Venezuela or anywhere along the Caribbean. George Dewey. That name should ring a bell. We bonded with this living legend and admiral of the U.S. Navy in episode one O 5. When George essentially kicked off the Spanish-American War by demolishing the Spanish fleet in Philippine waters. Now teddy's got George down in the Caribbean on standby in case the Germans get up to no good. Conversation continues. The German Theodore assures our American Theodore that Germany has no intention of seizing Venezuelan territory. Aha. Well, with thoughts of Germany's track record in China, teddy doesn't buy it. He lays out an ultimatum. Kaiser Wilhelm the second must provide a full disclaimer stating that Germany will not take Venezuela and territory within the next ten days. If not, George Dewey and his nearby fleet will move in to observe Venezuela's coast closely. Far, far more closely. Teddy feels he's been polite yet clear. If we trust his singular telling of things, that is, some historians discount his ultimatum narrative. But will the ambassador relay this message and its serious implications of military muscle? The next day seems to indicate no. The UK and German blockade sees four Venezuelan gunboats. The Germans destroy three of them. President cipriano Castro then asks the American government to intervene on his behalf. And Secretary of State John hay forwards the request to the British and Germans, letting them both know that the U.S. is willing to step in and arbitrate peacefully. But the days are passing and TR's ultimatum deadline is drawing closer with nary a word of assurance from the Kaiser. Seems TR and his excellency Theodore von halden may need another chat to full on wars to be avoided. It's a good thing he's coming by. It's a dark and dreary Sunday morning. December 14th, 1902. In German ambassador, Theodore von halden is just arriving at The White House. He soon greets the rough riding president, likely in the executive office, and they begin to chat. His excellency starts with small talk. The cold gloomy weather. Tennis. And then, it feels like the ambassadors wrapping up. In fact, he's standing and starting to leave. But teddy stops him and follows up on the Venezuela situation. He first asks if Germany will accept the Secretary of State's offer to arbitrate. The German Theodore responds quickly and sharply. No. In the clearest of terms, TR answers that the Kaiser is risking war then. To drive the point home, he reminds his fellow Theodore of last week's ultimatum and tells him it's no longer ten days. Now it's 9, and with 6 days already passed, that puts the deadline 72 hours out on December 17th. That's right. TR spoken softly. But he still caring a big stick. The ambassador leaves, still insisting that the Kaiser will never arbitrate. He can't believe the president is serious. But dread sets in.

Venezuela teddy Germany George Dewey President Theodore Roosevelt Panama Canal Theodore von halden Caribbean coastline cipriano Castro U.S. Kaiser Wilhelm Al Jazeera Britain Dresden Caribbean Latin America Reich UK China White House
Ilya Shapiro on the Concepts of Libertarianism and Concentrated Power

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:33 min | 4 months ago

Ilya Shapiro on the Concepts of Libertarianism and Concentrated Power

"Is it fair to say that within kind of a libertarian point of view is they don't like concentrated power. And could you make the argument though that we have concentrated cultural cultural monopolies and we have financial monopolies and corporate ones. I'm not saying state power is necessarily the answer, but it seems as if the question of who is dominating our life is more than just the state. It's all these other instruments of influence. What are your thoughts? No, that's no doubt the case. And if private actors are oppressing you, the person feeling that oppression doesn't feel better that it's not being done under color of state law or what have you. The problem is the remedies are more difficult. You talk about concentrated power. Well, that sounds like antitrust or should we break up some of these places? Antitrust a very crude tool. By the time we went after Microsoft, it was no longer a monopoly or remember that netscape monopoly over browsers and things like that. I think we might want to learn, go back to the industrial revolution and there was kind of this conception, including among classical liberals, the modern libertarians, of a third space that are private entities that are affected with the public interest. And it wasn't about Teddy Roosevelt's progressive antitrust breaking up the trust, but it was thinking about this public private hybrid that's a, you know, it's a complicated sort of situation that we're not going to resolve during this conversation,

Netscape Microsoft Teddy Roosevelt
Charlie Kirk Goes Head-to-Head With Ben Carollo

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:28 min | 5 months ago

Charlie Kirk Goes Head-to-Head With Ben Carollo

"Then. Yeah. What was the biggest genocide that ever happened in world history? The biggest genocide in it depends how you define a genocide. I would say Stalin's intentional massacre or Mao's intentional massacre of 65 to 70 million people. I don't know. 70 million? Intentional debt. What about the 200 million people that used to live on this continent? Oh, you mean the people that died of natural causes? You think, holy moly? 200 million people you're talking about. It's indigenous. You think they were 100 million people before we came here? Yeah. All living at once. Yeah. Where on earth do you get that number? From anthropologists. So you think we killed them all? From anthropologists, of course, we killed them all. So we killed 200 million people intentionally. Yes. You think, so just to be very clear, right? You're sitting here, denying the genocide of indigenous folks. Teddy Roosevelt is. Oh, you think Teddy Roosevelt's a mass murderer? Yes, Teddy Roosevelt is a mass murderer. What do you think those rough riders did? Who do you think they were killing? They won the war. What war? What war? The war against the commies in Cuba. They don't want war against communist and cuboid. Who's in charge of Cuba right now? Well, the communists. So they didn't win the war then. Well, they won a battle. They won a battle. Wait, we've gone from World War II about the Spanish. They won the Spanish-American War. Okay, okay. So let me ask you a question. They're like, who else did he go to war again? Well, Teddy Roosevelt wanted to know about Peace Prize for brokering peace between the Russians. Care about the Nobel Peace Prize. You don't care about much, honestly, that's real.

Teddy Roosevelt Stalin MAO Cuba Nobel Peace Prize
Doug Mastriano: I Was Number One on the DNC's Hit List

The Dan Bongino Show

01:32 min | 5 months ago

Doug Mastriano: I Was Number One on the DNC's Hit List

"It was kind of hilarious to watch They were painting the Senate race which Doctor Oz why I support the Republican and you know in any race regardless of your feeling about doctor Rossi's far better than that Bernie Sanders lunatic running in that race But you remember everybody's like wow he's more of a moderate and mastery is no chance whatsoever but the odd thing is you're polling actually ahead of it I'm not asking you to go after him at all I'm just saying you're polling actually ahead of where he's falling which always goes to show you the media you can almost be guaranteed they're going to get the story wrong when evaluating a Republican every single time And it's funny I don't know if you were tracking this And thank you for your words of encouragement there over the past couple of months here when I've been so laid by the media You know you're doing the right thing I appreciate Teddy Roosevelt says you could judge a man's character by whose enemies are So thank you very much Media for that But last year the Democrats the DNC worked with the Democrat legislative campaign campaign YouTube blacklist 21 state legislators and I was number one on their hit list So this all came out in the salon of political article this past November And they viewed me as a threat to their plans in Pennsylvania and decided to attack me with talking points with all the mainstream media and their goal was to hit me so bad publicly that I'd resign and shame They did a poll in November and they are appalled at the results They saw my negatives or single digits and they said not only did it make him more popular in a state he's a lead candidate for governor like no kidding Thank you very much We watched this with Donald Trump We're not going to fall for it a second time

Bernie Sanders Rossi Senate Teddy Roosevelt DNC Youtube Pennsylvania Donald Trump
"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

07:10 min | 5 months ago

"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Glad handing and welcoming over, everyone sits down for dinner. And it's excellent. Mouth watering. TR biographer Edmund Morris sums up the menu perfectly. So I'll let him describe it. We have, quote, little neck clams on the half shell, coqui, a fresh Caviar, strained gumbo, cold salmon baader, squab Al as to fad, fillet, peak richly. Ice cream, praline, fancy cakes, and coffee. Truly, a feast fit for a king. Or rather for governors. No speeches, no toasts, not tonight. Teddy just wants his guests to enjoy good food, company, and conversation. That last bit aided by the free flowing sherry claret and so town. The meal finished, this group of about 70 men retired to the west terrace for drinks and cigars in the open night air. And it's at this point that teddy has a chat with his erstwhile political foe. William Jennings Bryan. Teddy and the cross of gold candidate sit together for over an hour lost in conversation. What all is said will never know. But a passerby are overhears teddy tell the former and future democratic presidential nominee. I confess to you confidentially. That I like my job. Is that a moment of honesty or a burn? Even if the latter, the fact is, the two gentlemen are cordial, warm, and kind. Teddy later calls W JB a wonderful man owing to their conversation tonight. They chat as governors and justices congressman and businessman. Senators and secretaries from different parties states and backgrounds all choose cigars and drink together. It's a great testament to the uniting force of nature and the American wilderness. Over the next several days, the attendees at this conference listen to leaders, professors, scientists, and others who have devoted their lives to the study of natural resources. Teddy himself compares the conference to the gathering of men who signed the constitution. He suggests that, as the founders forged the constitution in part to settle a dispute over water and land rights, so these men gathered at the governor's conference must join together to protect America's vast natural resources now. And teddy's successful in this regard, he scores enough points over the next three days to convince the members of the governor's conference to roll back their opposition to his conservation plans during the remainder of his term. They issue a declaration calling for the continuation and extension of teddy's policies toward natural resources and also proclaim that, quote, this conservation of our natural resources is a subject of transcendent importance, which should engage unremittingly the attention of the nation, the states and the people and earnest cooperation. Earnest cooperation that's what teddy wants, and that's what he's got. He successfully demonstrated that the country, though perhaps divided over other aspects of his square deal. Can nonetheless come together on the issue of natural resources. In the weeks to come, TR creates a national conservation commission, headed by dear old Gifford pinchot to compile a comprehensive list of present natural resources, as well as recommended plans for conservation, even after teddy's time in The White House draws to a close. It's difficult to overstate the immense impact Theodore Roosevelt had on the conservation movement in the United States. During his presidency, TR not only established 5 new national parks, thus doubling their numbers, he created 150 national forests, 51 federal bird reserves, four national game reserves, as well as 18 national monuments, adding up to roughly 230 million acres of protected land. And from Florida's pelican island to Arizona's Grand Canyon, is likely the case that teddy prevented several species from going extinct. But more than all that, he made conservation part of the American national ethos. Even a century later, we have plenty of public lands to enjoy in the United States largely because of Theodore Roosevelt's influence. Because he convinced a generation of Americans to see preserving the wilderness for everyone. To use his words on national parks, as essential democracy. And worth doing for their children, their children's children, and for all who come after. In brief, teddy wanted to preserve the nation's natural wonders for you and me. And all who come after us. And he did. Of the three seas of teddy square deal, conservation was nearest and dearest to his heart. He was indeed, as the poet and senator Amos Russell wells describes him. The Woodland president. If I may quote the last stands of the senator's poem entitled Theodore Roosevelt. Those stars direct our Woodland president, steady his course with quiet influence. Lead him right onward where the triumph is, draw him right upward where the blessing is. And ever through the crowding cares of state. Poor the serenity of hills and trees. And so we conclude our last sea of the square deal. But even as serenity, pours through teddy's national parks and forests, trouble is brewing abroad in the international arena, and the rough rider is eager to take it on. Next time, we'll listen as teddy speaks softly, but carries a big stick. History that doesn't suck is created and hosted by me right Jackson. Episode research and written by Greg Jackson Zachary beaver. Production by airship sound designed by Molly Bach, the music composed by Greg Jackson. Arrangement and additional composition by Lindsey Graham of airship. For bibliography of all primary secondary sources consulted right in the episode. Visit HTTPS podcast dot com. HTTPS is supported by fans at Patreon dot com slash history that doesn't suck. My gratitude to kind souls providing funding to help us keep going. Thank you. And a special thanks to our patrons whose monthly gift puts them at producer status. Roberto assini, and an Avril, Fox car Barrett Christopher Beckett, Victoria Bennett, boosh, Amanda and Kelsey Bragg, Henry brunch, Thomas bought will call while Beth and christianson, Christopher coddle, Jason Carson's Matthew corley, Charles devier. John frugal du will Kyle decker, bob drazek Joe Davis, Michael and Rachel ercole CF Nate Farr, Kyle gensler, Paul gorenger, Lee golden, Jennifer and Houston Mikey Lee Bradford Herman Noah hawk, Jeremy James Melanie Janet Dex Jones, John Keller, Kristen Kennedy, Todd, time amber clanger Sue Lang, park lane, Dave long line, Aaron lapels Kristen Doe's a rich Miller, Matthew Mitchell, Jenny mccreary, Elizabeth Neal, Michael mcwhorter, Donald Moore, Jeffrey moose, Nick devoted Fox Osborne, Amanda Parker, Christopher Pullman Sean Reagan, Samuel saddell. John schaefer David and Alexander sharp John savage Scott slay maker dorante Spencer Thomas Stewart Bill Thompson, Sarah tray with TJ walker and Jeffrey watts. Join me in two weeks where I'd like to tell you a story.

teddy Teddy Edmund Morris Theodore Roosevelt national conservation commissi William Jennings Bryan pelican island United States Gifford pinchot teddy square senator Amos Russell wells Greg Jackson Zachary beaver Molly Bach Grand Canyon White House Arizona Roberto assini Greg Jackson Barrett Christopher Beckett
"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

03:20 min | 5 months ago

"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Stepped into

'Top Gun: Maverick' Jets to New Box Office Record

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:54 sec | 6 months ago

'Top Gun: Maverick' Jets to New Box Office Record

"Top Gun: Maverick grabs a Memorial Day weekend box office record a 156 million in the United States bravo. I'll tell you now that my son in law is one of the pilots in the movie. And they had a blast supporting the production of that off the Teddy Roosevelt. Many years ago now. Many, many years ago. And they had a blast. And we had a blast watching it, and knowing a little bit of the inside story, by the way, Tom Cruise was very professional working with the pilots and their crews and the carrier crew and everybody else. All I heard was that that was a very professional operation on both sides. It's fighting that when you see Tom Cruise is an actor playing a real pilot when you know real real fighter pilots and the people who support them and you realize that pretend is pretend and real is real and people have 700 landings on a carrier are different from you and me.

Teddy Roosevelt Tom Cruise United States
 Fort Bragg to be renamed Fort Liberty among Army bases losing Confederate names

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 6 months ago

Fort Bragg to be renamed Fort Liberty among Army bases losing Confederate names

"In independent panel is recommending new names for 9 army pose that commemorate confederate officers It's part of a broader military effort to confront racial injustice it includes changing the name of North Carolina's fort Bragg to fort liberty Throughout our history liberty remains the greatest value retired Brigadier general Thai sigilla the commission's co chair says it's also recommending naming bases for the first time after women and black soldiers Virginia's fort AP hill would be named in honor of Mary Edwards walker The army's first female surgeon and Ford Polk in Louisiana after sergeant William Henry Johnson Teddy Roosevelt called him one of the 5 bravest soldiers of the great war The panel's final naming report is due to Congress in August Sagar Meghani Washington

Fort Liberty Throughout Our Hi Brigadier General Thai Sigilla Army Fort Bragg Fort Ap Mary Edwards Walker Ford Polk North Carolina William Henry Johnson Virginia Teddy Roosevelt Louisiana Congress Sagar Meghani Washington
How Did Ronald Reagan Wrestle Inflation?

The Dan Bongino Show

00:52 sec | 7 months ago

How Did Ronald Reagan Wrestle Inflation?

"So Chris talgo goes on Well how did Reagan fix this inflation era He says fortunately by the late 1980s Ronald Reagan's free market policies coupled with a hike in interest rates had wrestled inflation down to a more sustainable 4.6% Wow so they did fix it Those are called numbers lefties you may want to check that out Since the late 1980s inflation has remained off of Americans radar of things to worry about Until now So what happened Brandon happened Joe Biden happened That's what happened Single most destructive force the man has done more damage in close to two years than any president in modern American history Let's go Brandon and I agree Yeah I know you agree I'm serious I think this guy makes Barack Obama look like teddy Teddy Roosevelt

Chris Talgo Ronald Reagan Reagan Brandon Joe Biden Barack Obama Teddy Teddy Roosevelt
What Biden Could Do (But Won't) to Avoid WWIII

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:03 min | 9 months ago

What Biden Could Do (But Won't) to Avoid WWIII

"Brought to you by the loan experts I trust, Andrew and Todd at Sierra Pacific mortgage at Andrew and Todd dot com. We're going to dive into the continual coverage around Russia and Ukraine. That's not the only thing we're going to cover today. There's a lot of other news stories that I think that are being, let's say, covered up because of the fixation on Russian Ukraine and don't get me wrong. Russian Ukraine the story matters when a superpower invades a small country, that should be something that we talk about and that we dive into and especially the ramifications and the implications here domestically, but there's inflation, there's questions about domestic markets. There's questions about our porous southern border. There's a lot going on here. We're also going to dive deep into the preview of Biden's State of the Union address tonight as he gives his first State of the Union address. But I tried to find some commentary of what Joe Biden has been doing the last couple of days. Now we know he's not a leader. We know he's no Teddy Roosevelt trying to broker peace as Teddy Roosevelt did between the Russians and the Japanese in the early 1900s, which won him a Nobel Peace Prize, but where is Joe Biden exactly?

Sierra Pacific Mortgage Ukraine Todd Andrew Russia Biden Teddy Roosevelt Joe Biden Nobel Peace Prize
Larry Schweikart Discusses His New Book 'Dragonslayers'

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:30 min | 10 months ago

Larry Schweikart Discusses His New Book 'Dragonslayers'

"So you're the author of this new book, dragon slayers. So has Abraham Lincoln, Grover Cleveland, my man, Teddy Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy and Ronald Reagan and Donald Trump. So and thank you, police promote it. It's a very interesting take. It says, you basically 6 presidents and their war with the swamp. So the way we define the swamp on this program is the fourth branch of government, the deep state the unelected, right, kind of the German historicist model of infiltrating the constitutional order with the subversive suppressive group of people that are always trying to have their agenda implemented. How would you define it? Well, I like Bannon's definition, which is the administrative state. And it was started early on, it really starts with Martin Van Buren. One of the people in the president more than almost anybody else in history because a president that's right. He was the 8th president. Right. And as I said, he stepped on the stage just collapsed. Massive financial panic, the minute he became president. But he had created a spoil system to protect slavery. And this is why I try to insist to people, you know, the Democratic Party was created and founded and formed for one purpose only. And that was to protect and preserve slavery. That was the entire basis for which Van Buren and Andrew Jackson create the party. And to do so, they set up a system whereby loyalists to the party would be rewarded with jobs, but we called the spoil system or the administrative state because you got to put these guys somewhere. So you put them in bureaus and agencies and so on and so forth. And up until the time of the Civil War, this wasn't a very big deal because the Democrats more or less had total control of government for about 30 years. But then Lincoln gets elected and everything changes. Because now it's sort of like Trump, the wrong guys in charge of this giant apparatus that we built and could be a real threat with it. So I deal with Lincoln's war with the slave swamp, which was also known as the slave power conspiracy. And it was very real. It was a real group. And he was a genius in how he and the other Republicans of the day figured out, you know, slavery is not in a

Grover Cleveland Teddy Roosevelt Donald Trump John F. Kennedy Abraham Lincoln Ronald Reagan Martin Van Buren Bannon Andrew Jackson Van Buren Democratic Party Lincoln
In Order to Break Apart the Promise of Our Founders, It Takes an Event

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:36 min | 11 months ago

In Order to Break Apart the Promise of Our Founders, It Takes an Event

"Let's take one very simple example. Franklin Delano Roosevelt's new deal, which restructured the federal government, which empowered independent regulatory agencies that strengthened unelected bureaucrats that was almost the permanent implementation of what is known as the fourth branch of government. Started with Woodrow Wilson, started a little bit before that with Teddy Roosevelt, but it was really Franklin Delano Roosevelt that had the mandate to expand the federal government. What was it that gave him

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Federal Government Woodrow Wilson Teddy Roosevelt
The Teddy Roosevelt Speech That Makes Liberals Lose Their Minds

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:29 min | 1 year ago

The Teddy Roosevelt Speech That Makes Liberals Lose Their Minds

"Did you ever hear about the famous essay that Teddy Roosevelt wrote? Let me quote from it. He wrote it in 19, it was a speech. He gave in 1907. Listen to this. Here are Teddy Roosevelt's words. In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else. For it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed or birthplace or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet and American and nothing but an American. There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag. We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language. And we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people. That's why they hate Teddy Roosevelt. You imagine saying that in 2021, oh my gosh. But what Mike lindell has been through would be a walk in the park compared to anybody who dared say, we have one flag, we have one language, if you're an immigrant, assimilate. Oh my gosh, they'd lose their minds.

Teddy Roosevelt Mike Lindell
Theodore Roosevelt Statue in NYC Covered Ahead of Move to North Dakota Museum

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:22 min | 1 year ago

Theodore Roosevelt Statue in NYC Covered Ahead of Move to North Dakota Museum

"This Teddy Roosevelt statue thing is just so infuriating. I was just reading about the other night I was, I don't know why when I heard they're literally covering up the statue like idiots like little like we're a bunch of little babies. We don't want your eyes to be exposed to the Teddy Roosevelt statue because of George Floyd. Okay. So they've got it all covered up now with tarps and scaffolding and they're going to relocate it to North Dakota. You know how big that statue is? You know how many well, look what we're in the middle of the prison fellowship campaign. You know how many Christmas presents and works good things that would do for people? The cost of relocating a statue like the Teddy Roosevelt statue from New York to what North Dakota all that just cost a couple $100, right? Whether you use UPS or FedEx. Morons. Every last one of them. And I was reading about I mean, Teddy Roosevelt's father of the U.S. Navy. I mean, he came from a wealthy family, but shorta had a and of course he's the cousin. He was the cousin of Franklin Franklin Delano

Teddy Roosevelt George Floyd North Dakota Teddy Roosevelt Statue Fedex UPS New York Shorta U.S. Navy Franklin Franklin Delano
"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on Mike Gallagher Podcast

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"teddy roosevelt" Discussed on Mike Gallagher Podcast

"Wow, what a difference 80 years has made. This is December 7th, 2021. It is the 80 year anniversary of Pearl Harbor and of course, Franklin del nor Roosevelt shepherded the nation through that very difficult chapter and I see a headline with the name Roosevelt in it that just seems for me to sum it up just sums up how unfit so many of our leadership really, really is today. The American museum of natural history is a place I have visited many times in my life. One of the joys of living in New York part time is to visit the museums and the restaurants and the theater and the just all the cultural things that New York City has to offer for 80 years. Enormous statue of Theodore Roosevelt has stood on the front steps of the American museum of natural history. Well, the woke crowd decided. They don't like it. It's a glorified, I think they say, I think it's colonialism. And. So they're taking it down. They're going to remove it. But it's not enough to remove the statue, the tribute to Teddy Roosevelt. That started receiving mounting frenzied opposition, particularly after George Floyd's murder, and I'm just trying as the New York Post described it. I'm trying to kind of connect the dots. Let's see. George Floyd dies in Minneapolis, let's take down the statue of Teddy Roosevelt. I mean, honest to goodness, will you make an effort to connect those dots

George Floyd Teddy Roosevelt United States Steve Taliban Jim welcome American museum of natural his patriots Thomas Jefferson George Washington New York City Brandon Jim George gascon Florida Detroit Los Angeles Afghanistan Jacqueline avant
Woke Mob Wants to Cancel Teddy Roosevelt

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:10 min | 1 year ago

Woke Mob Wants to Cancel Teddy Roosevelt

"Wow, what a difference 80 years has made. This is December 7th, 2021. It is the 80 year anniversary of Pearl Harbor and of course, Franklin del nor Roosevelt shepherded the nation through that very difficult chapter and I see a headline with the name Roosevelt in it that just seems for me to sum it up just sums up how unfit so many of our leadership really, really is today. The American museum of natural history is a place I have visited many times in my life. One of the joys of living in New York part time is to visit the museums and the restaurants and the theater and the just all the cultural things that New York City has to offer for 80 years. Enormous statue of Theodore Roosevelt has stood on the front steps of the American museum of natural history. Well, the woke crowd decided. They don't like it. It's a glorified, I think they say, I think it's colonialism. And. So they're taking it down. They're going to remove it. But it's not enough to remove the statue, the tribute to Teddy Roosevelt. That started receiving mounting frenzied opposition, particularly after George Floyd's murder, and I'm just trying as the New York Post described it. I'm trying to kind of connect the dots. Let's see. George Floyd dies in Minneapolis, let's take down the statue of Teddy Roosevelt. I mean, honest to goodness, will you make an effort to connect those dots

Franklin Del Roosevelt American Museum Of Natural His George Floyd Theodore Roosevelt New York City Teddy Roosevelt New York New York Post Minneapolis
Terry Tempest Williams on Her New Book "The Hour of Land"

Travel with Rick Steves

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Terry Tempest Williams on Her New Book "The Hour of Land"

"Terry tempest williams invites us to celebrate the land and the people. You'll meet at a variety of national parks across the united states in her book. The hour of land. She describes the park. She's visited as breathing spaces each with a unique personality that deserve our patronage our respect and our protection by the way our conversation was recorded before the global pandemic. Terry it's good to have you with us. Thank you read your book. The our land takes us not to the obvious parks but it takes us to some of the less famous parks. You chose about a dozen parks to introduce to us why these parks why not win at the grand and famous ones. Would you believe me if i told you that i saw this as a dinner party. You know my mother was a great hostess and she always said you know. Pick your dinner parties very carefully because who knows what will come out of them so you know here. We have fifty nine national parks in our country. How to choose a dozen. So i really did envision it as dinner party i knew who the heads of the table would be my mother park which would be grand teton national park. The other end of the table. I knew it would be canyon. Lands national park where we live closely to. I could count on them then. I thought all right who's gonna be on the other end of the table holding the space that are reliable and for me. It was a canadian national park in maine and teddy roosevelt national park. In north dakota. I had been to the many times and they were trustworthy. Then i thought okay. Who are the dream guests that i would want that. I don't know. But i know other people who do and we can bring them to the table and i thought of big bend national park. I thought of gates of the arctic national park and effigy mounds. And i thought those were my dream guests

Terry Tempest Williams Lands National Park Terry United States Grand Teton National Park Teddy Roosevelt National Park North Dakota Maine Big Bend National Park Arctic National Park
Who Is the Heir Apparent of the MAGA Movement?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:43 min | 1 year ago

Who Is the Heir Apparent of the MAGA Movement?

"Now somebody asked me recently. You're who is the era parent in the maga- movement and obviously you know make sense down juniors heir-apparent then but if you look at the figures in american history i guess has the guys are bobbling up right of the history. Look lincoln look at teddy. Roosevelt look at fdr moved right and then and then you know in some ways lbj. Kennedy's stuff to say so short that lbj and reagan. There's never been really a a logical error parent if you look at all of them. There was nobody who grabbed the mantle. And that's fascinating. I'm next yeah. Each one of them was their own man very much represented their own think right and then what came after. Somebody's was was a redux to the future to the past otherwise was it was into the future but it was not. Oh i am now linking number two or teddy roosevelt number two or regular h.w. Bush one that idiot election off thousand percents Off the back of ronald reagan. Bush was not yet if it is jack kemp who who was up against h. w. for the mary she was the more logical heir-apparent totally toronto. Let's be honest. As far as i'm concerned he was a bureaucrat. There's no there's no. There's no senior bush brand you don't think bush's is not right and remember. That was a bitter primary and eighty between the tool very famous. Paid for this. Mike a so. That's very real so again. I think as we look at this time and we we are so lucky that president trump continues to be the leader of the republican party movement. In this country it is. We need to be appreciative of having this larger-than-life leader in our historic moment

LBJ Roosevelt Lincoln Reagan Kennedy Bush Teddy Roosevelt Jack Kemp Ronald Reagan Toronto President Trump Mike Republican Party
A highlight from Episode 49; Disrespecting Bread?

The Old Man's Podcast

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

A highlight from Episode 49; Disrespecting Bread?

"Pretty pumped about this week's episode. The old man's podcast. I'm going to have a tip for you on things that need to be cleaned around our houses but we probably don't clean them on. My mind is great inventions in using the phrase. It's the greatest thing sense fill in the blank. The dope build them with sliced bread. I've got a problem with that. I tell you all about it. Teddy roosevelt as a quote. That i want to go over with you on a pep talk out of the leaving ourselves and blue laws. Do you remember blue laws. Do you know what that means youngsters are gonna find this odd and you youngsters didn't know what blue laws mean. I think you're gonna be feeling the stout all this coming up on this episode of the old man's podcast

#Clean #Believeinyourself #Blu Teddy Roosevelt
Hubble Telescope: The Story of Edwin Hubble

The Past and the Curious

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Hubble Telescope: The Story of Edwin Hubble

"Dr james naismith is said to heaven. Dented the game of basketball in massachusetts in eighteen. Ninety one the next year not far away in connecticut. Another sport took a big leap forward. When a man named pudge heffelfinger became the first person to officially get paid actual money to play for an american football team. Soon after mr pudge heffelfinger somewhat stardom as the first professional athlete each of these sports grew in popularity on college campuses but while football grew in popularity it also grew violent by the early nineteen hundreds. There were so many gruesome injuries and worse that it was almost banned entirely president. Teddy roosevelt door. All right sir. Theodore roosevelt had to get involved schools. Were canceling their programs. And more importantly mothers would not let their kids play the game. One of these. Nay saying moms was virginia hubble. She pleaded with her son. Edwin powell hubble not to run basically helmet lewis at full speed and to also basically looks heads of other college students. He listened to his mom and when he graduated. He hung up his dinky non protective helmet. This is a good thing because he was carrying around. What would be one of the most brilliant minds of the twentieth century and has had. He didn't need to go smashing that incredible brain into the rock hard cranium. Curiously oh mama. Hubble didn't make him stop. Boxing apparently edwin was a really great boxer and he continued his pugilist pursuit through college but when edwin hubble enrolled in school at the university of chicago he was planning to honor his father's wishes and be a lawyer. Lawyering wasn't really what made his heart thing. What did make his heart sing. Or the stars in the sky

Dr James Naismith Pudge Heffelfinger Mr Pudge Heffelfinger Football Edwin Powell Teddy Roosevelt Connecticut Massachusetts Basketball Theodore Roosevelt Lewis Virginia Hubble Edwin Hubble Edwin Boxing University Of Chicago