36 Burst results for "Ted"

Fresh update on "ted" discussed on The News Junkie

The News Junkie

00:35 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ted" discussed on The News Junkie

"Where he said This is what's going to happen. And it was way before, and I'll happen to didn't bill. Gates to the Ted talk where let the mosquitos out onto the crowd which remember that Subaru. Just like Windows Ninety six before you let out mosquito. There was a Bill Gates Talk I believe. It was this where he was telling the audience about the dangers of something here it is Bill Gates wants released a swarm of mosquitoes on the crowd to make a point about malaria Microsoft Co founder Bill. Gates released a swarm does on an unsuspecting audience at a Ted Conference. Two thousand nine. The worst Ted talk ever yeah, like all of a sudden mosquitoes everywhere. They're biting us. He became a target and all this. And then there's just so much in terms of fake news in an accurate news that rolls around out there. So the CDC has a pretty good piece on this, which I think is is fairly helpful. So let's go through a couple of these things. The CDC is saying. Maybe we can combat some of the stuff you see on facebook from your friends, etc, etc.. Here's a big one that they're running with right now. Because I've seen this in a lot of articles, diseases can make anyone sick. Regardless of their race or ethnicity, there have been just a shipload, not even about shipload of articles that have convinced certain people that the color your skin may determine the impact that covid nineteen has on you as a human. Being covid nineteen doesn't know what color your skin is. It doesn't know where you're from. It doesn't know who you are. Are. It doesn't see people. It doesn't see color. They fear and anxiety about Cova one thousand nine hundred can cause people to avoid or reject others, even though they're not at risk for spreading the virus, this first started with people being scared of others from China and then in the United States. It became this thing where they were like you know. African Americans are debarring a heavier impact of covid nineteen. That's a black people are getting hit hard by Kobe. Nineteen and And they are, but not as some people think because the black. It's because there's a higher prevalence and you can get into a much longer nuanced discussion about this if you care to. Don't have the time for it necessarily right now, but it's because there's a higher prevalence of diabetes hypertension and other issues that are problematic when it comes into contact with covid nineteen, so anybody anybody out there can be impacted by this virus. It doesn't care where you come from or what? What color your skin is for most people, the immediate risk of becoming seriously ill from the virus. That Causes Kovic nineteen is thought to be low this according to the CDC here's an important one somebody who has completed quarantine I want everybody to listen to this. Because this is one of the biggest misnomers out there, and this is from CDC dot, Gov I'm not making this up and I've seen it everywhere. It's it's a little frustrating, honestly someone who has completed quarantine. Or who has been released from isolation does not pose a risk of infection to other people. If you had covid nineteen and you test negative, they usually want you to test negative twice to to get around a false negative. You do not pose a risk of infection to other people. It is no longer a problem. They say the simple things you can do. Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least twenty seconds. Do like we do keep hand sanitizer near you, and now it's become a thing. Where look right now. Ceiling does it goes around. It's like a wave. All of a sudden I'm GONNA. Do it to keep my hands clean. There you go Fritz in the studio giving it a squirt and cleaned his hands. It's good for you. Especially, this is important especially after you blow your nose, cough or sneeze BEF- after you go to the bathroom, and before you eat or prepare food. If you carry this stuff around with you and do that, it'll be a huge huge thing to keep you healthy. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands and stay at home when you're sick. These are the things that people need to know. It gets lost in the mix. You get all these weird stories. Pop it up. Oh, my God you can get covid nineteen twice and. There's so much fear out there in misinformation out there. That becomes fairly frustrating. And I hope that cooler heads prevail through this stuff, because it's what's going to help you navigate these waters. Don't think it's not stressful for me for anybody else. Everybody's going through through stress right now. But knowing what's going on and knowing how to best handle that I think is a helpful in times like these when we return California shutting down completely. and not a good time over there plies an email from one of you about something that's happening at a hospital. What is it? We'll find out in a moment news junkie on real radio. How? Good. Please rose seven, one one one real radio one point one..

Bill Gates CDC TED Ted Conference Subaru Facebook Founder Cova Microsoft Co Kobe California United States Kovic Fritz China
China announces retaliatory sanctions against Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz

Dave Ramsey

00:29 sec | 21 hrs ago

China announces retaliatory sanctions against Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz

"Is announcing sanctions against US officials They target US Congressional Executive Commission on China. Which includes Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz. The move was a response to U. S sanctions over changes treatment of religious and ethnic minorities in a Chinese province. The sanctions by the United States were imposed on Friday. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says the country could not stand idly by as the Communist Chinese party carries out human rights abuses. His words And the

United States Marco Rubio Communist Chinese Party Mike Pompeo Ted Cruz Executive China U. S
China Imposes Sanctions on Three American Lawmakers

Kevin McCullough Radio

00:37 sec | 1 d ago

China Imposes Sanctions on Three American Lawmakers

"Lawmakers who have openly criticized Beijing's human and religious rights record. The BBC Stephen McDonald in Beijing in the latest round of tit for tat recriminations between Beijing and Washington, Seeing a U. S politicians have been named as the targets of unspecified corresponding sanctions. Senators Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz, as well as Congressman Chris Smith and Ambassador at large international religious freedom. Sam Brownback. Rule identified as the subjects of China's retaliation to last week's US measures, the BBC Stephen

Beijing Stephen Mcdonald Sam Brownback BBC Marco Rubio Ted Cruz Chris Smith Congressman China United States Washington U. S
Miami mayor considering second coronavirus lockdown

Jim Bohannon

00:37 sec | 1 d ago

Miami mayor considering second coronavirus lockdown

"Says the rate of new Corona virus cases is spiraling out of control. And the state may have to consider imposing a new lock down something we're gonna have to consider. You know, I've never taken it off the table. I know the mayor and I also issued something similar. You know, we're looking at it every single day. We understand that. You know, there may not be federal help this time, which is something that's a concern. On. You know, we want to make sure that whatever we do we do it consistently because we want to make sure that people you know, abide by Suarez is telling Miami residents they should stay home for all but essential trips outside. Ted Rose had a non

Ted Rose Suarez Miami
Florida Records Nation's One-Day Peak for New Virus Cases

Steve and Ted

00:45 sec | 1 d ago

Florida Records Nation's One-Day Peak for New Virus Cases

"Corona. Virus cases are surge surging in states such as Florida, Texas and Arizona. Fox's Aisha Hosni with the latest Florida the southern half of the country, where that state has just shattered a national record for the number of daily a single day increase, in cases of the largest increased 15,300 cases in just one day, ending a record breaking week for deaths as well, with an average of 73 people dying every single day. Testing there has doubled over the last month. And despite the spikes in positive cases governor to Santa's believe schools can reopen next month. Florida has recorded more than 269,000 cases of Corona virus in more than 4200

Florida Aisha Hosni FOX Arizona Santa Texas
Poland’s Presidential Election Too Close to Call

TED Radio Hour

00:45 sec | 2 d ago

Poland’s Presidential Election Too Close to Call

"The second round of presidential elections has come to a close in Poland as me. Nicholson report's exit polls show the race is still too close to call. According to the exit poll, incumbent Andre Duda has secured 50.4% of the vote, while his rival Rafay Trickovski has come in less than 1% point below him at 49.6%. With a 2% margin of error is currently too close to call the winner of an election campaign, which proved divisive on almost every issue. Duda, who's backed by Poland's right wing government, led a campaign heavily dominated by homophobia rhetoric. Schakowsky, who led a pro European campaign has promised to bring back balance and tolerance to Polish

Andre Duda Poland Rafay Trickovski Nicholson Schakowsky
Polls show Trump is losing to Joe Biden

This Week with George Stephanopoulos

01:22 min | 2 d ago

Polls show Trump is losing to Joe Biden

"President trump, Joe Biden, spurring the economy, one of the areas where president trump still holds an advantage over Joe Biden. Let's talk about the race now on our roundtable joined by Chris Christie. RAHM Emanuel. Amanda Carpenter former top staffer for Republican Senators Ted Cruz and Jim Demint now congress at the Bulwark Anzor, Lena Maxwell senior director progressive programming for Sirius Xm author of the end of white politics. Welcome to all of you and Ramleh me begin with you Joe. Biden has about a nine point lead in national polls right now, leading in all the battleground states some Democrats. Now talking about going into George going into Texas, is that overconfidence. yes, and no I think on the straight point I always think. You have right now. Don't get confused with the national polls. They are very very good, but while he is the vice president is up in the battleground states. I would right now number one goal secure those top battleground states before you expand the field. Keep your eye on those opportunities that approach and I. Think Right now I wouldn't spiked the ball on the twenty yard line we. We know what happened. In Two thousand sixteen focus right now on securing Michigan Pennsylvania Wisconsin Arizona. Florida the in North Carolina. That's what I would do, and then look strategically about which of those opportunities right now you have an election. George were the American. People basically want a president who solves problems and not be the source of problems, and that's the Opportunity Democrats have right now.

Joe Biden President Trump Vice President Rahm Emanuel George Chris Christie Sirius Xm Amanda Carpenter Bulwark Anzor Lena Maxwell Ted Cruz Congress Jim Demint Senior Director Texas Florida Michigan Pennsylvania North Carolina Arizona
Naya Rivera presumed dead in "tragic accident" after disappearance

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:42 sec | 4 d ago

Naya Rivera presumed dead in "tragic accident" after disappearance

"The search for former glee star Nyah Rivera expected to continue today. Kevin Corke reports, officials believe she may have drowned in a Southern California lake, the former glee star. Rented a boat at Lake Pirro in California with her four year old son Wednesday afternoon. Three hours later, the boy was found alone on the pontoon, fast asleep and wearing a life jacket, he later told authorities in Ventura County He and his mom went swimming, but she never made it out of the water, leading investigators to believe she drowned. The water is extremely murky and heavy with vegetation, making the recovery mission particularly challenging Authorities say If the body is entangled underwater, it may never come back up.

Nyah Rivera Kevin Corke Lake Pirro Southern California Lake Ventura County California
Country musician Charlie Daniels honored at memorial service

Steve and Ted

00:58 sec | 4 d ago

Country musician Charlie Daniels honored at memorial service

"Country singer Charlie Daniels will be laid to rest today and there will be a virtual funeral starting late this morning. Fox's Carmen Roberts reports. If you can't make it to the church in Murfreesboro, Tennessee today for the funeral of country music Great Charlie Daniels, you can watch the memorial service as its live streamed on several sites. Including the band's Facebook page and YouTube channel. Daniels, who was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame four years ago, is best known for his master fiddle playing and the smash The Devil went down to Georgia might be saying, but I'll take your bet you're going to regret because I have the best has ever done has died Monday at 83. I'll be laid to rest during a private service and Mount Juliet, Tennessee, Carmen Roberts, Fox News and fellow country artist Travis Tritt, Vince Gill, Gretchen Wilson and Trace Adkins are scheduled to perform. At the

Charlie Daniels Carmen Roberts Country Music Hall Of Fame Funeral Of Country Tennessee Travis Tritt Mount Juliet FOX Trace Adkins Murfreesboro Vince Gill Gretchen Wilson Fox News Facebook Youtube Georgia
Turkey reconverts Istanbul's Hagia Sophia museum into a mosque

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:08 min | 4 d ago

Turkey reconverts Istanbul's Hagia Sophia museum into a mosque

"Eight acres court is expected to announce today that the conversion of Istanbul's world-famous argue severe into a museum almost ninety years ago, it was awful. The decision would pave the way for the building's Restoration Mosque and we'll represent a victory of sorts for president recipe type one, but it may cause anger elsewhere, including in the Kremlin and UNESCO HQ, joining us on the line now is Hannah Lucinda Smith is stumble correspondent of the. Times Hello Hannigan off new thanks for being with US I. Guess this was what we had perhaps predicted nevertheless. Oh, that's not gonNA. Stop a number of people being pretty disappointed with the outcome. Yeah well. Absolutely I mean affair is such a symbol, not just in Turkey or not just in the region in the whole world at points it was built in the sixth century. It was the biggest cathedral in the world. It was the seat of eastern Crescenzi for more than a Millennium and then it's really been kind of the symbol of the struggle for the soul of Istanbul. I guess when the autumns took control of the city in fourteen, fifty three, they converse into a mosque, and then when Kemal Ataturk the first president of the secular republic. Took over the country he then. Signed an order basically deconsecrated intending into museum in nine, hundred thirty four, and that's the status it. It's hard since then, but it is such a powerful symbol for Muslims. Christians and also for the Turks who are really bondage this idea of a second second they sit. It's kind of one of the ultimate symbols of their secular country. Just when you're out, and about as it sounds like you are indeed right now, is this one of these things where people are talking about it, and it's upsetting people, or is it one of these strange things? Actually seems to be much more stark much more controversial through the prism of I'm in London or etc. People looking on from Moscow which maybe we'll come to in a in a minute it does it excise people out in about. March she stood in the courtyard. Safia right now. It is a few Tori style. It's actually quite quite mean that's mostly because of the current virus pandemic coming normally at this time of year that would be crowded with tourists actually took his most visited tourist attraction, but I think the interesting thing. Is that inside Turkey this debate? That's not new. It's been going on for a couple. Couple, of decades, it's a question that sort of comes around quite six. In fact, you know I've I've been in Turkey for seven years. Now is the ton. This is come up in my time here and so there is this of feeling of fatigue I you know this is just the same policy policy again but I think it's undeniable, the for certain positive the Paul is. Very, much behind prison on the move is part of the society would be seen as. A big victory pick symbolic victory, but I think in terms of the kind of. The opposition to it. A lot of that comes from outside country. As you mentioned that the star obviously the Greek government's in holy. They still see Istanbul Constantinople. This is the as the center of Greek Orthodox also the Russian Orthodox Patriarch earlier this week, voiced his objection and of course UNESCO Ted. This is a world heritage sites listed by UNESCO. That's partly because of the The mosaics that were uncovered once this was ten years. In the nineteen th that is. On. The big questions is of course. If this is ten back into a mosque, what will happen to those mosaics depict Christ pizza version married picked him of the apostles. You know seen in, Islam, FIT Is is not allowed inside mosques. So this is the kind of places where the real objections are coming from, but it's quite interesting I'm you know it's? Really doesn't feel like much. Is happening at the moment here high? Sophie, let's see. We got the announcement in June a couple of hours. That's what we're expecting so. Possibly something will happen after that, but it's kind of. Yeah. It's still the same very peaceful, very unique. Is indeed sort of an eerie call just on some of those other international stakeholders. And he'll be watching on. We mentioned already you mentioned the Russian. Orthodox Patriarch of course. What about the relationship mean does this tell us anything about the relationship between assemble in Moscow more broadly, maybe more politically because there's various other sort of proxy disagreements agreements. There's other places Libya that seemed to sort of muddy. The waters is this. Does this need to be to be viewed in that context in your view? Show, I think the relationship with Russia is actually the one thing that might give president or pause for thought on this now what we see as I said before the Greeks are. Very opposed to this the US. State Department might POMPEII stems as well, but you know that's kind of old hat fred when he doesn't really care about. Stoking rows with Greece and with the US. Because he's got huge amounts of disagreements with those countries anyway, but when it comes to Russia, it's been quite an interesting situation in Russia. Turkey for the past five years on one level as you say in Libya also in Syria they're. Backing opposing forces, but at the same time, the personal relationship between two President Putin has gone incredibly close, and in other ways. Russia has been backing sick. I guess trying to woo. Tick to a certain extent away from its more traditional allies in the West, so we've seen for example side of the one hundred defense system. From Russia Turkey we've seen many many pets meetings in about trade and defense mutual security between. One impeach him now. The question is if this. Decision goes ahead and the conversion goes ahead then how much opposition will come from from the Kremlin? Clearly, the Patriarch Russian Orthodox Patriarch. Expressed his opposition. That's to be expected, but we also know that religion plays a big part in Russian. Politics today, so would it. Would it carry on further? The featured does it were? Would President Putin be the next person's kind of expresses displeasure, and how would that affect the relationship Tweeden's? I stopped really great to speak to you and thanks for reporting for us right from the scene of this Hannah Lucinda Smith In estan standard joining us on the briefing Monaco Twenty Four.

Turkey Russia President Trump President Putin Istanbul Hannah Lucinda Smith United States Patriarch Russian Orthodox Pat Russian Orthodox Patriarch Moscow Libya Restoration Mosque Kemal Ataturk Unesco Hq Crescenzi Istanbul Constantinople London Tori State Department Paul
Closing prices for crude oil, gold and other commodities

Fox News Rundown

01:27 min | 4 d ago

Closing prices for crude oil, gold and other commodities

"Good morning, Stephen Ted. Well Thursday live cattle cattle futures traded higher, but when ableto make new highs for the weak, the cattle complex closed from the positive side but well below the session. Highs. Live cattle, Peter Cattle need to train above the high that were made back in May to break to the upside. Here. Average carcass weighs £896 up six times from the previous week and £42 heavier than a year ago. The lean hogs closed mostly higher with the best drink in the nearby contract Yesterday on the close August Live cattle ward I'm hired 99 25. August Peters, up 47 cents at 1 34 52 In August. Doing hugs, $2.27 hired $50.22. There was a new highs for the week made yesterday in the wheat, corn and beans along with positive closes and the manage money is still price supportive, along with the weather concerns and the monthly yesterday supplied the main report will be released at 11 o'clock this morning. September Casey, We'd nail his opinion and flowed for 55 a quarter of record up a penny in 1/4 3 50 I know this story means three cents higher. 8 99 and 1/2 or just crude oil trading, 50 cents Lower. 39 12. August gold $8.20 hired $1812. September S and P nine. The quarter points Lower. 3132 Timber dollars Index, four cents lower. 96 63 in September. Legend features 96 point slower. 4 25,074

Peter Cattle August Peters Stephen Ted
Country band Lady A, formerly Lady Antebellum, sues blues singer Lady A

Dana Loesch

03:28 min | 5 d ago

Country band Lady A, formerly Lady Antebellum, sues blues singer Lady A

"Remember them? They changed their name to lady Aye. Ted. Then. They come across. This other artist, a black woman from New Orleans who has been going by the name of Lady a frank over 20 years. And she has a new album out this month. She's from Seattle, but she's down in New Orleans or something. So Lady antebellum. No one asked. No one said anything. They decided to virtue Signal and act as though they were so holy We are light e antebellum, and we love black people so much. We're going to change our slave name. Lady. Antebellum toe lady, eh? So they just like changed it. They changed their Twitter account and then Oh, look, here's a woman. Who says she's been using it for two decades. Ah problem like nobody with Lady antebellum. They spent all their time virtue, signaling and instead of actually spending money on a proper attorney to maybe look into some of these matters for them. So Lady Antebellum decided to talk with Lady A and see if they could, you know, maybe work out something. All she ended up Saying that OK, well, we can work out something I want what I am worth. I want what my name's worth, which I think it's perfectly reasonable to ask. I always tell people never, ever be afraid to ask your worth. Never So they decided to be aggressive. And they came out into the media yesterday, saying that they have filed lawsuit that lawsuit against her. For her name. They applied for the trademark of the name. And they were trying to say, Well, we applied for the trademark in 2010 and we got the trademark and nobody filed opposition. Yeah, OK, Well, maybe it's because That doesn't necessarily mean that your cause is proven. It just She's used hers and commerce clearly earlier than you have, and that's ultimately what could be contested. So now they said that they're suing her and they're they're like we were so master her like we were even going to write a song with her that that could have been released as a joint single. But you know, she That wanted millions of dollars in payment. And so we reluctantly filed a trademark lawsuit against her, which I think is nothing says I love black people, and I'm going to March You signal harder than Lady antebellum soon a black woman for using the name she has used for two decades. Wow. So that's what they're doing. And She's she's literally been releasing and selling music under her name for decades. And I don't know how long they were engaged in these negotiations, apparently one long, But they said we were we were even writing a song with her, and apparently, her people were like what Right? I mean, she's I mean, she's identified herself. Is this for a really long time? Oh, so there you have it. I

Lady Antebellum New Orleans Twitter TED Seattle Attorney
President Donald Trump REACTS to Kanye West's Presidential Run

Steve and Ted

00:43 sec | 5 d ago

President Donald Trump REACTS to Kanye West's Presidential Run

"Rapper Kanye West, taking off his Red Maga hat, announcing his 2020 presidential bid on Twitter. In an interview with Forbes, the national press secretary for the Trump 2020 presidential campaign. Hogan Gidley, discussing President Trump's reaction to the news on Fox and friends, the president said it would be interesting. We'll see. What happens. Of course, is the president likes to say I was actually in a lunch with the president, United States, Kanye West, Jim Brown, and just a couple of others. Hey, has a lot of interesting ideas. I'm sure will we Looking forward to finding out more about those ideas in the coming weeks and months as he continues this run for for president. Kanye West says he will model his administration on the fictional kingdom Wauconda from the movie Black

Kanye West President Trump Hogan Gidley Red Maga Twitter Press Secretary Jim Brown Forbes FOX United States
Miami Feds Seize $3.2 Million In Venezuela Vehicle Smuggling Ring At Port Everglades

Steve and Ted

00:38 sec | 5 d ago

Miami Feds Seize $3.2 Million In Venezuela Vehicle Smuggling Ring At Port Everglades

"Of vehicles are now in federal custody in Florida, where officials say the cars were about to be smuggled to South America. Homeland Security investigations say they have seized 81 vehicles valued at more than $3 million which were about to be shipped off to Venezuela in a smuggling ring that sought to evade US sanctions on the South American socialistic tape your ship The cars are Mercedes Benz, JAG, you our Land Rover and Lexus. Federal agents say the smuggling is traced to one of the world's largest money launderers. Venezuelan Broadcasting an insurance business magnate, Raoul Goran. Gordon's previously been charged with $1,000,000,000 bribery schemes

Raoul Goran Venezuela South America Homeland Security Land Rover Bribery Florida Lexus Gordon
Amazon removing Redskins merchandise from site

Steve and Ted

00:43 sec | 5 d ago

Amazon removing Redskins merchandise from site

"And even if we spill into the world of Of Ah, commerce and hear things like that. The world's largest on time online retailer is now getting into the boycott of the Washington Redskins. Amazon Wednesday became the latest company to announce it would be removing Washington Redskins merchandise for sale while the team considers changing its name. Cellars on Amazon were given 48 hours to remove Redskins merchandise. This has the retail giant joins the likes of Nike, WalMart and others in removing the gear for sale is the Redskins last week announced a thorough review into their monitor. After a long time criticism over it's racially charged nature. Redskins owner Dan Snyder has been adamant since taking over the franchise that he would not change the name but according to reports, the organization is likely to make a change and stray away from Native American imagery.

Washington Redskins Amazon Dan Snyder Nike Walmart
Today in sports history: Ted Williams hits game-winning home run in 1941 All-Star Game, Boston Red Sox Vs New York Yankees

John McGinness

00:35 sec | 6 d ago

Today in sports history: Ted Williams hits game-winning home run in 1941 All-Star Game, Boston Red Sox Vs New York Yankees

"Look back on this day in sports history July 8th Start today. Back in 1941 at the MLB All Star game. The game was notable for bringing the Yankees Joe DiMaggio and the Red Sox Ted Williams, together on the same team to Hall of Fame outfielders were each having legendary seasons, with Williams batting over 400 DiMaggio breaking the consecutive games hit record. Of course, the game ended with drama. Williams stepped to the plate with two outs and two on in the ninth and hit a towering three run home run to give the American League the wind. Williams later said that was one of his favorite moments of his

Ted Williams Joe Dimaggio Hall Of Fame MLB Red Sox Yankees American League
Cleveland Indians outfielder Franmil Reyes is currently not with the team

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:23 sec | 6 d ago

Cleveland Indians outfielder Franmil Reyes is currently not with the team

"We will begin this morning in baseball news and an old friend to the San Diego Padres, the Cleveland ings or keeping outfielder Fran Mill Reyes away from training camp after they spotted him on social media attending a weekend holiday party without wearing a mask manager Terry Francona. Said raises not in any trouble with the team. But by not practicing social distancing or wearing a mass. He exposed himself and his teammates to the virus.

San Diego Padres Fran Mill Reyes Terry Francona Cleveland
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The Indy Mogul Podcast

00:43 sec | 2 weeks ago

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"Filmmakers. My Name is Ted and welcome to the PODCAST, episode Fifty Three. Now on this episode we have production designers Sandler's Sankoh. Who is the designer behind film? such as uncut gems films like Francis Films like eighth grade, and the reason why I'm so excited about today's episode is that we are talking about production designing away that I think a lot of people don't recognize that is design where you're designing girl to look completely invisible so real that you don't even notice it or think about will and in the Actual conversation that we're having with SAM. We talk about not only how I became PRUSSIAN designer starting off in New York with one of the most absurd stories that I've ever heard of as far as people that he's run into in the way that worked together, but crossing talk a little bit, but has philosophy of filmmaking

Francis Films TED Sandler New York
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The Indy Mogul Podcast

00:31 sec | 2 weeks ago

Expand hoho- burst 01

"Filmmakers. My Name is Ted and welcome to the PODCAST, episode Fifty Three. Now on this episode we have production designers Sandler's Sankoh. Who is the designer behind film? such as uncut gems films like Francis Films like eighth grade, and the reason why I'm so excited about today's episode is that we are talking about production designing away that I think a lot of people don't recognize that is design where you're designing girl to look completely invisible so real that you don't even notice it or think about will and in the Actual conversation that we're having with SAM. We talk about not

Francis Films TED Sandler
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:36 min | 2 weeks ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Sometimes, simple act of kindness toward another person. A, thank you. Complement of vote of confidence can have a much bigger effect than we realize and can even change the way we look at ourselves. And for Jacobs that kind of appreciation turned into a journey of a thousand. Thank us all for just a cup of coffee. I decide to go backwards so started with the Barista at Joe Coffee, which is coffee chain in New York where I go? And I thanked her, and she thanked me for thanking her. Would you say to her? You said Hey I just WANNA extra. Thank you for making my cup of coffee this morning. That's it I just rest my gratitude and I think she was pleasantly surprised because he doesn't get thanked all that often. So you after thinking the Barista I, guess you decided to meet with a guy named Ed Kaufman, who who works for Joe Coffee, so yeah I met at Kaufman who is the guy who goes around the world testing the beans tasting them and I loved that because he was so passionate about this brown liquid, and he taught me how to differentiate the tastes, because he would take a sip, and his face would light up, and he would say sensing honey, Crisp Apple, and able syrup in pineapple, upside down cake, and I love that idea of of savoring and appreciating. It's so tied.

Joe Coffee Ed Kaufman Jacobs New York Apple
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:52 min | 2 weeks ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Writer professional lifestyle experimenter. self-described curmudgeon I talk about I think in every everyone has the two sides the Larry David side in the Mr Rogers side, so the grumpy pessimist and the optimistic grateful side so many people have helped me to come to this night and I believe. I was born with a very strong. Larry David Side I was very good at finding things to be annoyed about and I think a lot of us are, if you hear a hundred compliments and a single insult, what do you remember the insult? Would you just take along with me? Ten seconds to think of the people who have helped you. Become who you are I was. Aware here that I have this negative bias. This Larry David side, but I wanted to bulk up the Mr Rogers side. Ten seconds of silence. I'll watch the time. It's not something that comes naturally to me and to most people I don't think it comes naturally. You have to cultivate this idea of gratitude. Whomever you've been thinking about. How pleased they must speed to know the difference you feel they've made. What what happened to you to say? Wait a minute I'm not. Appreciate people not. Being grateful. was, a Piff Neil. What was it? Well I. Think it was partly intellectually I knew the power of gratitude. There are tons of studies about how good it is for you. How helps ward off depression? You recover more quickly. You sleep better better. You're more generous. So, intellectually I knew like I should be grateful. But how do you do that and that's when? I decided you know what I'm going to try? This ritual at home where I'm going to try to say thanks to all the people who helped make my meal a possibility so I would I would. Say you know I'd like to thank the farmer who grew the tomato? Cashier who rang the tomatoes up at the grocery store? And, that's when my son who is ten very perceptively said. You Know Dad that's fine, but it's also totally lame, because those people can't hear you. They're not in our apartment. So if you really are committed, then you should go and thank those people in person. Aj. Jacobs picks up the story. From the Ted Stage. Now I'm a writer and for my books. I like to go on adventures. Go on quests so I decided I'm going to take my son up on his challenge. It seems simple enough and to make it even simpler. I decided to focus on just one item my morning cup of coffee. Well, it turned out to be not so simple at all. This quest took me around the world. I discovered that my coffee would not be possible without hundreds of people I take for granted so I would thank the trucker who drove the coffee beans to the coffee shop, but he couldn't have done his job without the road, so I would think the people who pave the road. And then I would think the people who made the asphalt for the pavement. And he couldn't do his job without the folks who drew the yellow lines on the road because they kept my truck driver from smashing into oncoming traffic. Splitting an atom because you can think the people who mixed the paint for the lines on the road, and then the people who made the machines to enable the paints to be mixed and the people who mind the iron to make the machines to mix the paint then. You can. There's lots of people think. Oh, it's never incident. I could have spent the next fifty years of my life, thanking people and I could have given a Ted talk that was about four hundred hours long, because yeah, that's what it made me realize how interconnected! Everything is how many people it takes. It doesn't take a village to make a cup of coffee and takes.

Larry David Side Mr Rogers writer Ted Stage Piff Neil Jacobs
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

08:10 min | 2 weeks ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"The show today ideas for curious thinkers of all ages and our guide on this hour is my predecessor Guy Ross. Hello, okay, so we just heard Suzanne Simard to tell us about how trees cooperate with one another, and it really gets you thinking about how all kinds of other beings may be communicating, which brings us to the next topic that you brought us. Dolphins Oh man. KINK around with Dolphin. Can't go wrong dolphins. I I learned about and dolphins like communicate through clicks right learn about this from the prisoner about to hear denise hosing. She has spent her entire life studying a very specific pod of dolphins in the Bahamas, and I, remember Malaysia remember seeing this Ted Talk in person and twenty thirteen. And I was totally blown away at the idea that one day we might be able to talk to communicate with not just with dolphins, but with animals like Dr Doolittle. Right I was. Fascinated by that story as a kid never that. And we are closer to that possibility today than ever before. I've seen lots of pictures of if you under water holding a camera. When you're down there. Does it feel like. It's almost like A. Just a better place to I, don't I don't do you get that feeling while you know. It's an immersion into a three dimensional world. The tides and the currents and the salt and the waves, and I mean. It all feeds into your understanding of what their world is like. Usually when I'm down there I'm like trying to follow behavior in make cameras on. It's actually mostly work really right. Denise hosing has been doing that work every summer. With this same group of Dolphins in the Bahamas see is just calculated recently for thirty five years. Breath thousand encounters in the water with the dolphins. Each of those a counters is about twenty minutes long so over one thousand hours of footage and. Data so yeah, it's a lot of data certainly for dolphins and the point of all that data of all that work is to help denise answer one question. Do they have a language. And if so, what are they talking about? A here's denise hurting on the Ted. Stage, now I'm interested in dolphins because of their large brains, and we know they use of that brainpower for just living complicated lives. But what do we really know about Dolphin Intelligence? We know that their brain to body ratio, which is a physical measure of intelligence, is second only to humans. cognitively they can understand artificially created languages. And they pass self awareness tests in mirrors and some parts of the world. They use tools like sponges to hunt fish. Now Dolphins are natural acoustics. They make sounds ten times as high and here's sounds ten times as high as do, but they have other communications signals they use. They have good vision, so these body postures to communicate. They have taste, smell, and touch and sound can actually be felt in the water, because the acoustic impedance of tissue and water's about the same, so dolphins can buzz and tickle each other at a distance. So decades ago, not years ago. I set out to find a place in the world where I could observe dolphins underwater to try to crack the code of their communication system. I will how? How do dolphins communicate to each other? Well, you know we can actually hear fairmount Their whistles are fairly audible to us. They have plex. They have burst pulses which are also. Packets of clicks. So. They have all these different cues, and they use body postures in combination with sounds that will basically communicate certain things to each other. This is total anthropomorphic station, but When you think of like when you see a dolphin animated or drawn and a kids book. They seem be smiling, but we should not interpolate that that means that they're happy all the time. Right Oh definitely. No, yeah, that is just a physical. Physical Cigna they have, going How do you respond? When other researchers say you know? Push back and say hey, like let's not do that. Let's not. anthropomorphized these creatures. You know you just keep doing your work, I think I. don't even think it's a discussion anymore. Honestly most of us that work with social mammals I think kind of move beyond that and just say well. It's a valuable tool for thinking about how they might think. Let's do the work, is it? Is it even we're to talk about Dolphin language, or or is, is it? Should we be talking about Dolphin Communication Yeah. We don't really usually talk about language because we don't have it yet. but thinking out of the boxes. Boxes you know it's like intelligence are other different kinds and types of intelligence. Are there different kinds and types of language I mean? We know there's tons of kinds of language with humans right, but one of the big things about language is that you can communicate about a different time and space right? Are they talking about the food? They're chasing. Are the eating, or are they talking about? Hey, let's go to the reef and a couple of days and meet up with this other group. You know we don't know and that's where. ANTHROPOMORPHIC can be a tool for thinking about how animals might be thinking. which brings us back to the Bahamas and a pivotal moment in Denise Hers Ings Years of work with Atlantic spotted dolphins there. It happened one summer because in the mid nineties. The dolphins did something they had never done with denise before. We just started noticing the dolphins were just start doing things. This is completely a wild right but we knew the individuals and they would start doing things like. Our Body posture in some cases mimicking rhythm of our sounds in the water. We were doing anything vocally. And we just Kinda thought. Would it be cool to see what we empower them? To communicate back to us. In the key to unlocking that communication. Turned out to be, play. Dolphins just like humans love to play games. Mostly with toys, piece of Robe, a bit of seaweed, anything can pull around in the water. Correct! So what kind of games do they like to play well, it's mostly called. Keep away. That is if they get the toy, then the ideas they like to be chased they like to let you get almost close enough to grab the toy, but then they speed off and that's the game. That's what they play with each other actually. The only question was had to use that play to crack the code. The code that would unlock the meaning behind the dolphins noises now one way to crack the code is to interpret these signals and figure out what they mean, but it's a difficult job, and we actually don't have a Rosetta stone yet, but a second way to crack the code is to develop some technology, an interface to due to a communication, and that's what we've been trying to do in the Bahamas and in real time. So we built a portable keyboard that we get pushed through the water and we labeled four objects. They like to play with the scarf ropes, guests them, and also had a bow ride, which is fun activity for open. And that's the scarf whistle, and these artificially created whistles. They're outside the Dolphin's normal repertoire. But. They're easily mimicked by the dolphins and I. Spent Four Years With my colleagues. Adam pack and Fabienne dealt four a working out in the field with this keyboard, using it with each other to do requests for toys while the dolphins were watching, and the dolphins get in on the game, they could point at the visual object, or they could mimic.

Bahamas Denise hosing denise Suzanne Simard Ted Talk Guy Ross Dr Doolittle Denise Hers Ings Malaysia Adam pack Fabienne
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:32 min | 2 weeks ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"I'm a new summer ODI, and for most kids around the country school is officially out of session, but unlike other summers, many kids and teens are stuck at home because of the coronavirus pandemic and so today. We've got an episode for everyone. Kids, adults, parents teens. You are all invited on this journey because we've invited a certain dad back on the show to share the coolest things he's learned over the years here on the Ted Radio Hour topics to blow the minds of young and old and. Mystery guest host. Can you please introduce yourself? It's the Ted. Radio NPR Guy Roz hello. Hello Guy, well back, thank you. Okay, so guy, not only were you the host of this show until you so graciously handed over the reins to me, but you are also the host of a rather popular podcast for kids right? Yeah, it's called. Wow, on the world. It's a journey through real scientific research, and it sounds a little weird, but it's like a cartoon for the ear where me and my co host. Mindy Thomas go on journeys into space and back in time and. Underwater and everywhere in between searching for incredible scientific discoveries, and it's this joyful wonderful experience for us, and hopefully for the kids who listen to the show. That includes my kids and we sorta figured since you and I are both home with our children this summer. Be The perfect person to come on and curate a special summer show for the entire Ted Radio. Hour family and you have so kindly brought for of your favorite segments that you did over the years. How did you even begin to choose which segments? We're going to bring us well. I think like you probably experience there lot of Ted talks that my kids love and on a really inspired by, and then there's some that you know of course are sort of over their heads right, but I really wanted to bring segments that spoke to curiosity and. The sort of all that kids naturally have about the world, and so that's how we kinda came up with this this collection and I will say I did feel that way about the first segment that you brought to us. This one is called. How do trees collaborate? Tell us about it. I love this segment so much So basically scientists basic forever thought that trees competed against each other for resources right for water and son, and nutrients, and they figured that the tallest trees in the forest where the strongest trees right it makes sense. But Suzanne Simard the scientists that were about to hear from she. Changed the way that scientists now think about trees because it turns out, they don't compete at all. In fact, trees collaborate. They work together through this mysterious. Superhighway, there is an entire communication network happening under our feet. Let's listen. Forest ecologist Suzanne. Simard had a hunch. Yes, that's right. She thought that trees. Could Talk. Imagine like when you're walking through the forest you, might you hear the crunching of the? Twigs under your feet in the rustling of the lease. But she thought. If there's more going on. Big Chattering going on that, we can't hear. That they're attuned to each other. Now at the time, a team of scientists in England were wrapping up an experiment where they'd grown in the laboratory. These pine seedlings together in little route boxes that you could see through. And the scientists took two of these pine seedlings, these baby trees that were in the same box in the same dirt, and then the exposed one of these ceilings to a radioactive carbon dioxide, gas, carbon, fourteen radioactive carbon, and what they found was that some of that radioactive gas, the carbon fourteen made its way into the second seedling. You can visualize you could see it, and so from this experiment. It seemed that somehow these two plants in the same dirt. Or connected and I thought wow. Maybe this is what's going on in my forests. Maybe Suzanne Samara thought maybe all the trees in a forest or connected. In a kind of network. Like our airport system or transportation system our social networks. And maybe she thought all of this was happening underground. When we walk through the forest, what we see is human beings. We just see these beautiful trees growing out of the ground, but we don't see that there are actually completely linked underground in this superhighway. Suzanne decided to prove this underground network existed. She devised an experiment using some of the same radioactive gas, a geiger counter to measure it and a patch of Birch and for trees. I figured the Burton. A for would be connected in a below ground web. Suzanne picks up the story from the Ted. Stage and I gathered my apparatus plastic bags and duct tape and shade cloth paper suit a respirator. And then I borrow some high-tech stuff from my university. The first day of the experiment we got out to our plot and I pulled on my weight paper suit. I put on my respirator. I put the plastic bags over my trees I got my giant Syringes and I injected carbon fourteen, the radioactive gas into the bag of Birch I waited an hour. I figured it would take this long for the trees to suck up the CO two through photosynthesis Senate down into their roots, and maybe shuttle that carbon below ground to their neighbors. I went to my first bag with the Birch I pulled the bag off. Iran my Geiger counter over its leaves. Perfect the Birch had taken up the radioactive gas then the moment of truth I went over to the for tree. I pulled off its bay. I ran the Geiger counter up its needles and I heard the most beautiful sound. It was the sound.

Suzanne Simard Suzanne Ted Radio Geiger Ted Suzanne Samara NPR Mindy Thomas Iran England
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:32 min | 2 weeks ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"I'm a new summer ODI and for most kids around the country school is officially out of session, but unlike other summers, many kids and teens are stuck at home because of the coronavirus pandemic and so today. We've got an episode for everyone kids, adults, parents teens. You are all invited on this journey because we've invited a certain dad back on the show to share the coolest things he's learned over the years here on the Ted Radio Hour topics to blow the minds of young and old and. Mystery guest host. Can you please introduce yourself? It's the Ted. Radio NPR Guy Roz hello. Hello guy well back, thank you. Okay so guy, not only were you the host of this show until you so graciously handed over the reins to me, but you are also the host of a rather popular podcast for kids right? Yeah, it's called. Wow, on the world. It's a journey through real scientific research, and it sounds a little weird, but it's like a cartoon for the ear where me and my co host Mindy Thomas go on journeys into space and back in time and. Underwater and everywhere in between searching for incredible scientific discoveries, and it's this joyful wonderful experience for us, and hopefully for the kids who listen to the show. That includes my kids and we sorta figured since you and I are both home with our children this summer. Be The perfect person to come on and curate a special summer show for the entire Ted Radio Hour family and you have so kindly brought for of your favorite segments that you did over the years. How did you even begin to choose which segments we're going to bring us well I think like you probably experience there lot of Ted talks that my kids love and on a really inspired by, and then there's some that you know of course are sort of over their heads right, but I really wanted to bring segments that spoke to curiosity and. The sort of all that kids naturally have about the world, and so that's how we kinda came up with this. This collection and I will say I did feel that way about the first segment that you brought to us. This one is called. How do trees collaborate? Tell us about it I love this segment so much So basically, scientists basic forever thought that trees competed against each other for resources right for water and son, and nutrients, and they figured that the tallest trees in the forest where the strongest trees right it makes sense. But Suzanne Simard the scientists that were about to hear from she. Changed the way that scientists now think about trees because it turns out, they don't compete at all. In fact, trees collaborate. They work together through this mysterious. Superhighway, there is an entire communication network happening under our feet. Let's listen. Forest ecologist Suzanne Simard had a hunch. Yes, that's right. She thought that trees. Could Talk. Imagine like when you're walking through the forest, you, might you hear the crunching of the? Twigs under your feet in the rustling of the lease. But she thought. If, there's more going on. Big Chattering going on that. We can't hear. That, they're attuned to each other. Now at the time, a team of scientists in England were wrapping up an experiment where they'd grown in the laboratory. These pine seedlings together in little route boxes that you could see through. And the scientists took two of these pine seedlings, these baby trees that were in the same box in the same dirt, and then the exposed one of these ceilings to a radioactive carbon dioxide, gas, carbon, fourteen radioactive carbon, and what they found was that some of that radioactive gas, the carbon fourteen made its way into the second seedling. You can visualize you could see it, and so from this experiment. It seemed that somehow these two plants in the same dirt. Or connected and I thought wow. Maybe this is what's going on in my. Maybe Suzanne. Samara thought maybe all the trees in a forest or connected. In a kind of network. Like our airport system or transportation system our social networks. And maybe she thought all of this was happening underground. When we walk through the forest, what we see as human beings, we just see these beautiful trees growing out of the ground, but we don't see that there are actually completely linked underground in this superhighway. Suzanne decided to prove this underground network existed. She devised an experiment using some of the same radioactive gas, a geiger counter to measure it and a patch of Birch and for trees. I figured the Burton a for would be connected in a below ground web. Suzanne picks up the story from the Ted Stage, and I gathered my apparatus plastic bags and duct tape and shade cloth paper suit a respirator. And then I borrow some high-tech stuff from my university. The first day of the experiment we got out to our plot, and I pulled on my weight paper suit I. Put on my respirator. I put the plastic bags over my trees I got my giant Syringes, and I injected carbon fourteen, the radioactive gas into the bag of Birch. I waited an hour I figured. It would take this long for the trees to suck up the CO two through photosynthesis Senate down into their roots, and maybe shuttle that carbon below ground to their neighbors I went to my first bag with the Birch I pulled the bag off Iran. My Geiger counter over its leaves. Perfect. The Birch had taken up the radioactive gas. Then the moment of truth I went over to the for tree. I pulled off its bay. I ran the Geiger counter up its needles, and I heard the most beautiful sound. It was the sound.

Suzanne Simard Birch Geiger Ted NPR Mindy Thomas Samara England Iran Burton
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

05:56 min | 2 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Crescendo. Of all the other top right. It's all leading up to this moment. Where she's going to bring us home because she's talking about how we don't value things like domestic work work. That happens in the home like John. Cusack discussing she's She's really like pudding. Keep rewards ideas into action. She saying we need to measure all these different things inside and outside the donut. Yup She's creating the metrics that Hamdi was really focus on but on a country wide scale and she's also using the leadership tools of Lorna which is to work together with people food. You know man. The surface seem like a competitor in some ways And instead of being competitive and winning on this sort of global scale. She's collaborating with them. The what we're doing here in Scotland is I think significant but we have much much to learn from other countries. I mentioned a moment ago. Our partner nations in the well-being Network Iceland and New Zealand. North thing. And I will leave it to you to decide whether this is relevant or not. The all three of these countries are currently laid by women great. What New Zealand in two thousand? Nineteen publishing its varsity wellbeing budget at with mental health at its Heart Iceland leading the way on equal pay childcare and paternity rights and not policies that we immediately think of when we talk about creating a wealthy economy but policies policies that are fundamental to a healthy economy and a happy society. Yeah I think those those things like equal pay childcare and paternity rights. They get mentioned a lot in countries shuttling here in the United States but But they don't we think of them as like something that would be bad for the economy. Right we want to do it but she sang like no. This is these are. These policies are fundamental to a healthy economy and to a society. You know never mind is just happy but if functions at this point I have to say though I there's a little part of me that's like okay. Well you know. Scotland Iceland New Zealand tiny countries tiny economies very homogeneous populations. But I guess we've got to start somewhere. Yeah I mean I think I think that's true. I think that if you look at the United States it seems like a much more complicated kind of base to work off of right. It's bigger. It's more diverse. It has some you know historical challenges but the point is we can see where it's happening in other places and so yeah maybe those are the prototypes that test cases. We know how to scale things. So why can't we look at that and say okay first of all we should ask them like? How are you doing it Take the metrics that they've come up with and try to put them in place. It's not going to be perfect in the beginning but but why not. Just get it going like why not. Do you think that this is a flash in the PAN this moment of questioning what we value in our communities as countries as Connie's or is there is this GonNa be profound shift? Look like you know I. There's no way of of prophesyzing this clearly but but I do recognize that you do talk to a lot of business leaders and I think a lot of them are being truly shaken to the core and I I guess. I wonder if we're going to see that down the road right. I mean I. I think there's a reckoning here. I think it will somewhat depend on how long it lasts. It depends on what people decide matters. I think a lot of it's coming the surface but I also do believe that a lot of these trends were in play. Were happening shifts. Were being made demands. Were being made by employees and consumers and investors to make changes and I think we had momentum and I actually believe this will give us more momentum. I mean like this is a moment of truth and we should stare at it and we should look at it and we should decide how we want to come back to it. That's Corey Hey Jim. Ted's business curator Corey. Thank you so much thank you. This is great and you for tuning in today for ideas about what we value. You can see all of the toxic corey mentioned at Ted got. Npr Dot Org and to see hundreds more. Ted Talks. Checkout Ted Dot Com or the Ted our production staff at NPR includes Jeff Rodgers Sanaa's Michigan Poor Rachel Faulkner Diba Mohtashami James Lucy Hussey JC Howard. Katie Monteleone Maria Paz Gutierrez Christina Kala Kierra Brown and Matthew Clue Ta with help from Daniel Shchukin. Our theme music was written by Rahm Teen Arab. Louis our partners at Ted Chris Anderson Colin Helms Anna Phelan and Michelle quint. I'm a news summary. And you've been listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR..

Cusack Ted Iceland United States Ted Dot Com Ted Talks Scotland Katie Monteleone Maria Paz Gut corey New Zealand NPR Ted Chris Anderson Hamdi partner Jeff Rodgers Sanaa Connie Rachel Faulkner Diba Michigan Daniel Shchukin Colin Helms Anna Phelan
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

08:40 min | 3 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Pleasure and avoiding pain the ability to approach things. That are good for you and avoid things that are bad for you is fundamental to survival and in our modern day society trouble telling. The difference can be labeled as a mental illness. If I was having car trouble and I took my car mechanic. The first thing they do is look under the hood but with Mental Health Research. You can't just pop the hood with the press of a button. So this is why we do experiments on animals specifically in my lab mice to understand the brain. Well we need to study brains okay. So how does she do this? And and where does she do? The she has a lab so she is working out in California using a technique called upto genetics So in every ted talk like there to be a tab of vocabulary. Words will be tested on this late. We'll be the vocabulary word here. So algae have this light sensing Gene Right Gene tells them when to migrate up and down in the oceans remember the oceans and so the light hits it and the algae now oh let's go get more light so we can make more food. You can put this gene into other cells and one of the cells that they put it in is neurons. Those are the core cells of your brain. So when you shine a light on the neuron it either turns on or off and by controlling the neuron you can then control the mind the way. I think of optics. Genetics Is that. It's almost like building a remote control so my understanding is with Kay. It's it's a way to manipulate mices brains to turn certain areas on or off and then see if you if you mess with them physically those little mice brains. Has it change their behavior? Is that a really simplified but simplification of what works good. So she's she's working with mice. She's working with light and she studies. How our brain gives rise to emotion related behavior like people who struggle with anxiety that some of the things that she's trying to figure out how nice help us figure that out. Pretty anxious don't you think so? Mice have this behavior where they kind of you know generally stick to the corners And kind of hide themselves from that big bad world of of predators. But if you shine a light into their brain in a certain way they default to a more kind of exploratory behavior where they go out into the open a bit more now. Obviously a mouse life requires a bit of both But just by shining a light on these neurons. You're able to flip the switch of that behavior and drive the mice either out into the open or allow it to kind of follow. Its natural behavior and can hide in the corner. This is the elevated plus maze. It's a widely used anxiety test that measures the amount of time that the mouse spends in the safety of the closed arms relative to exploring the open arms. Mice have evolved to prefer enclosed spaces like the safety of their burrows but to find food water mates. They need to go out into the open. Where they're more vulnerable to predatory threats. So I'm sitting in the background here and unbought the flip the switch and now when I flip the switch and turn the light on you can see. The mouse begins to explore the open arms of as more and in contrast to drug treatments for anxiety. There's no sedation. No locomotor impairment just coordinated natural looking exploration so not only is the fact almost immediate but there are no detectable side effects. Now when I flip the switch off you can see. The mouse goes back to its normal brain function and back to. It's corner when I was in the lab and I was taking these data. I was all that myself and I was so excited so excited when these quiet screams how why was I so excited. I mean yeah. Theoretically I knew that the brain controlled the mind but flip the switch my hand and see the mouth changes behavioral state so rapidly and so reverse ably. It was really the first time that I truly believed it. You know as a scientist. This is the moment the moment where you get. It's uncharted and then you just heard it right there. That's right. What is the significance of her being able to turn on and off these behaviors? Well it starts to tease apart. What is kind of inherent inborn behaviour? What and what is Conscious behavior and where those borderlines are. Now obviously this is just mice and we're not shining lights to control people's brains as of yet But this is helping us understand how the kind of physical architecture of a brain then gives rise to these behaviors that we look at as evidence of a mind so when you call someone like Kaitai. She seems like someone who you know. She's thinking about humans. She wants to change the way that they're treated. She wants to help them. Essentially so is when she gets the call from you. Is she ready to go to explain this in Layman's terms or is that something that Wo- you know these papers that are published and reviewed by their colleagues and peers turning that into something that is not only educational but also entertaining is? It's a real. It's a journey. It's a slog I would even say having given a Tedtalk it's hard. Well it depends on the person. Sometimes you get to work with the Real Jim K. was a real gem. Your Real Jim It's part of the reason I have a job or sometimes I feel like my job is translation in large part. Taking a scientific jargon a word like up to genetics and translate that into something that everybody can understand. And it's super important that everybody understand these things because science is kind of building the world around us these Endless frontiers of discovery. That's what gave us the IPHONE. That's what gave us all the things that were coping with in our in our day to day lives and science will determine the world we live in in the future so understanding this and translating this for for everyone I think is crucial super important and I think just even walking around in your day to day life. I mean just after our conversation I'm made of Stardust Rocks Camille live What else there's a part of my brain that makes me want to have chocolate at four. Pm Or is it my mind. We're not sure yet. And there are species living at the bottom of the earth that that my imagination cannot fathom what they look like. And I think you know as we're bombarded minute after minute hour after hour with the headlines and we're we're thinking about running around as humans on earth it's important to reconnect with the wonder of the planet that we live on. That's right and the wonder of the universe that we find ourselves and it is these minds of ours that enable us to kind of look out there and be curious and find answers. David Yellow Ted's science curator. Thank you so so much thank you. That's David Yellow. He is Ted's science curator. Thanks so much to him for sharing his favorite talks and taking us into uncharted territory. You can see all the toxic David mentioned at Ted Dot. Npr Dot Org. You can see hundreds more. Ted Talks at Ted DOT COM or on the ten our production staff at NPR includes Jeff Rodgers Sanaa's Mesh comport Rachel Faulkner Deeb Motor Sham. James Delo Hussey JC Howard Katie. Monteleone ON RIA Gutierrez Christina. Kala here Brown end. Hannibal on IOS with help from Brent Bachman and Daniel Shchukin. Our INTERN IS MATTHEW. Klay and our theme music was written by Rahm Teen Arab. Louis our partners at Ted Chris Anderson Colin Helms Anna Phelan and Michelle Quinn. I'm newsom Roti and you've been listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR..

David Yellow Ted Jim It Ted Talks Mental Health Research Ted Chris Anderson Gene NPR Ted Dot RIA Gutierrez Christina California James Delo Hussey Klay INTERN Hannibal David Yellow scientist Kay
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:59 min | 4 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Stage. I started talking to neuro scientists and cognitive psychologists and what they told me was fascinating it turns out that when you get bored you ignite a network in your brain called the default mode so our body. It goes on autopilot while we're folding the laundry or we're walking to work actually. That is when our brain gets really busy. Here's boredom researcher. Dr Sandy man wants to start daydreaming and allow you to really wonder you start thinking a little bit beyond the conscious a little bit into the subconscious which allows sort of different connections to take place. It's really awesome. Actually totally awesome right. So this is my brain and FM Ri. And I learned that in the default mode that is when we connect disparate ideas. We saw some of our most nagging problems and we do something called autobiographical planning. This is when we look back at our lives. We take note of the big moments. We create a personal narrative and then we set goals and we figure out what steps we need to take to reach them but now we chill out on the couch also while updating a Google doc. Who are replying to email. The average person checks email seventy four times a day and switches tasks on their computer. Five hundred and sixty six times a day. I discovered all this talking to professor of Informatics Dr Gloria Mark. So we find that when people are stressed. They tend to shift their attention. More rapidly We also found strangely enough. We find that the shorter amount of sleep that a person gets the more likely they are to check facebook. Were in this vicious habitual cycle. What could this cycle be broken like? What would happen? If we broke this vicious cycle what if we reclaim those cracks in our day? Could it help us? Jumpstart our creativity. Maybe my listeners could help me find out we call the project board and Brilliance and Within Forty eight hours twenty thousand people signed by. Yeah I was like. Oh not a special snowflake. This is a thing. People are feeling this so one day. Take the APP that your thumb always seems to gravitate towards take it off your phone and observe what it feels like and then decide. Do you want it back on your phone? Cool go forward if you do. But do not let the tech companies decide as their decision making. Don't let that be the default which it very much has become. I think for consumers so how tens of thousands of people who signed up for the challenge. Some of them called her up because they started to realize that their relationship with their phone had kind of become co dependent the relationship between a baby and teddy bear or a baby. Banke or a baby that wants its mother's cradle when its done being held by stranger that's the relationship between me and my I think of my phone leg power tool useful but dangerous if I'm not handling it properly if I don't pay close attention I'll suddenly realize that I've lost an hour of time. Doing something totally mindless okay. But to really measure any improvement we needed data right. Because that's what we do these days so we partnered with some APPs that would measure how much time we were spending every day on our phone. And if you're thinking it's ironic that I ask people to download another APP so that they would spend less time on their phones. Yeah you gotTa meet people where they are but when the data came in it turned out that we had cut down on average just six minutes from one hundred and twenty minutes a day on our phones to one hundred and fourteen look amazing that you you got so many people involved and then looks at the data and turned out. The people just saved six minutes a day. Don't just sort of like like deflating right. I mean after all this effort people are only sixty six minutes a day. Which tells US something about ourselves? Yeah I mean well first of all it tells me that I have been trained to expect. Tax Returns Right. You know. We expecting huge numbers. And I I thought six minutes was nothing but when I went back to the scientists and researchers were who were advising me on this they I'm not joking. They laughed in my face. They were like who says six minutes isn't significant. And frankly like you know the fact that you got people to change their behavior at all over a week is extraordinary and listen to the stories because the stories will tell you so much more than any data can And that's what people told me. They told me stories about how they realize. They used to relax by playing their guitar and then they suddenly understood that they they hadn't played it in years or things bigger than that That people had sat down this thought. About what the family dynamics were and get to a better place in their relationship there were all these amazing stories that people told us and I thought you know what you're right. F The six minutes right. Get totally or like. Let's stop giving boredom such a bad rap. It actually is an extremely important human function that we are starting to just sort of breed out of our daily lives. And I I sort of look around and I see. There's lots of things like that Downtime eye contact conversations out loud where people stutter or make mistakes or take more than a quick. You know one hundred forty characters to figure out what they want to say. We've lost the capacity in many ways. I think for patients if we want to have excellent ideas the best ideas we need to let them take the time to take root and then blossom and that does not happen in a tap of a of an APP. We're humans we need. I'm and that's the one thing that our phones and it was more of that was me minutia. The new host of Ted Radio Hour talking to guy. Ross the old host Ted Radio Hour back in two thousand eighteen. You can see my full Ted talk on Ted Dot Com and we've got a new episode of the Ted Radio Hour for you coming this Friday..

Ted Dot Com Ted Dr Sandy man Ri researcher facebook Google US Dr Gloria Mark professor of Informatics Banke Ross
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

10:01 min | 4 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Kyla came up to me and said Miss Vow. One reason we won was because you address the elephant in the room the scandal and she said in doing so it liberated all of my memories and the truth and she said I literally felt myself. Walk Taller as the season went on and when I walked onto that championship floor I felt invincible simply because I had been heard. Topa over when I talk about developing a champion in life through sport gymnastics is what gave all of those women. The confidence and the poise to look their sexual abuser in the eye and tell their story without losing their cool. Do you think that if you had not changed your coaching style? That Kyle would have come to you and told you about her experience with Larry Nassar No. There's no way because they had zero trust in me at that point and in order to really have a relationship with someone you have got to build trust and it takes a long time. But it's so important I mean it does feel like we're at this moment when it comes to listening to women and girls and that listening is starting in some ways you know. It's not just in gymnastics. It's in other words it's in Hollywood. It's in politics but so much of what you're also talking about is reinventing the overall culture of what's success even means. How do we begin to do that? It starts in the home with the parents. It starts when your child is young. It starts when your child has a teacher or a coach. That is bullish and that you allow it to happen because you want your child to get the edge to get onto that team or to get that scholarship to a d. One school right if you want to help your child development a whole human being into a champion in life. You're not just care about the end result you're going to care about the process and the experience and you'll ask different questions than so when your child gets in the car instead of saying? Did you win? You'll say what you learn today you say. Did you help or teammate out? And my favorite question is did you figure out how to have fun at working. Really really hard at something and then the key is to be quiet and listen to their response so making sure that you get to know your child and realize what makes them tick and unique and beautiful and brilliant and defining success for them. So I've got a young daughter and she's in gymnastics and I'm helping her redefine success and she's not gifted as a gymnast but she loves the sport. Let's define it. Let's look at all the different avenues that she can be in in this wonderful sport of gymnastic not along national team training. What are the other paths? What are the other options for her? Unless to find success that way we have to redefine success in every single walk of life sports businesses politics in the home and we have to keep believing that way you can achieve greatness without being bullish without throwing other people under the bus without compromising the human spirit. That's Valerie Konduz field the former head coach of Ucla's women's gymnastics team. You can see her full talk at Ted Dot Com on the show today stories of reinvention reinventing the ways that we think create and interact with each other. But what does reinvention Look Lake for an entire city? Those you know I've been saying reinvent. Stock the reinvent Stockton for the past eight years so this is something we talk about every day. This is Michael Tubs. I'm the mayor of the city of Stockton California. And before then he served on the city council starting when he was just twenty two years old. It's hilarious now because people are still saying who is this. Kid wisely thick We do things this way because Michael like a lot of Stockton residents felt that his city needed a big transformation. It's like every American city has challenges but our challenges were much more acute often times the worst So for example when I ran for city council we were the largest city at the time to declare bankruptcy at the same year. We had more murders per capita. This Chicago We were rain by fourth magazine. The most miserable city in the United States most miserable most miserable city in this entire country two years in a row and and that's kind of backdrop which I with other members came back. Settlers fixes that what we have been doing is not working. And that's play on the path onto a brighter future reinventing. Stockton would mean taking on issues that Michael had experienced when he was growing up there so many discussions around the dinner table. Were really around sort of bread and butter issues. How we're GONNA pay the light bill next week doing to borrow money for someone. What are you GONNA eat tomorrow? How was working etcetera? And that's because my mom. She had me when she's a teenager. And my father still incarcerated and it's been incarcerated for almost twenty nine years. I'm so growing up a lot of the issues that I care about. I'm passionate about where things I lived. I so we talking about poverty when we talk about the school to prison pipeline and being kicked out of the class for things like willful defiance. That was my elementary and high school career. But luckily for me my mom my aunts and my grandmother Foreign when I call triple while the mothers and they did everything in their power to make sure I was a firm and I knew that my voice mattered. And I and that expectation for me was always. You are supposed to be great. You're supposed to be excellent. You are going to be somebody and we don't have a lot but we'll do everything in our power to ensure that you at least have a small foundation on which to build on that support system. They gave Michael the confidence to study hard which got him into Stamford and an internship at the White House. He thought he was on the right. Track the perfect track and just felt like I had turned the corner and that that something was changing in that life's GonNa be optimism in rainbows. But then I I think it was late two thousand ten that you actually got some difficult news. That changed everything for you. Yes I remember November. I being at the White House and my mom. She's very respectful of the job so she wouldn't call after work but she called and I picked up the phone her voice muffled by Mamas and cry that often in fact I count my hand the amount of times. I've seen her cry in my life so knew something was wrong. If you think it's called after work but I couldn't so I'm going to take it in the call. She informed me that my cousin donal James the second have been murdered and that was tragic of itself even more tragic because that year there was fifty five homicides in the city and the year after they were seventy one and that was a real tough moment particularly as a as a twenty year old. I'm and then I remember being very angry being really upset. In almost having a fillings of nihilism creep up in terms of how futile everything was ams in the midst of that pain and that grief that a thought came that that that may be all the individuals. Success have the opportunities in their rooms. I was able to walk into given from the unlikely placing which we started that. Maybe it wasn't just for me to be successful spiritual person that maybe there was a bigger plan for fraudsters and it was to kind of put that pain to purpose so the next year after struggling last soul searching and thinking. I decided that I would run for city council. Big Decision Incision respond to that. Like did they think like who is this kid or was it like people were like. Oh finally someone who gets what we the citizens actually need. Absolutely both by but I I saw a joke. I'm I'm still a student at the time. I was commuting from home to Stafford on every day. I was getting my masters and Bachelors at the same time in campaigning full-time on but I was just driven by so much kind of passion. In the sense that this is what I'm supposed to be doing if I can't guarantee the outcome so in two thousand twelve. Michael became one of the youngest city council members in the country and then four years later win Stockton's mayoral race in a landslide. And the twenty. Six year-old becomes one of the youngest mayors in the country. People were watching Michael Chubs as its first African American mayor. How would this young Mayer take on? All of Stockton's problems is hometown is struggling with one of the highest crime and unemployment rates in the states is taking a bold approach to address these problems. We'll find out in just a minute on the show. Today ideas about reinvention summary and you're listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR..

Michael Stockton gymnastics Kyla Stockton California White House Miss Vow Kyle Larry Nassar Ted Dot Com Michael Chubs Michael Tubs NPR United States Look Lake Chicago Hollywood Valerie Konduz
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

02:29 min | 6 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Check out our daily crash course in economics the the indicator in less than ten minutes tackle important topics like unemployment the housing crisis and how Justin Bieber saves the Icelandic economy. NPR's the the indicator from planet money. Listen now Ted radio hour from NPR. I'm Guy Roz and on on the show today shifting time ideas about how we perceive and think about time. And do you remember when you were a kid. How how day at school felt like forever and then at a certain point in your life as you get older? The days in the months just seemed to move faster sir. Yes they do. This is Dan Gilbert Harvard psychologist and that's because older and younger people don't actually experience time all that differently they just remember member it very differently when old people say time goes by so fast. They're talking about the time that's already gone by. There's also just a whole hell of a lot more recording. According in the brain of an eighty six year old person. When they're thinking about life they're thinking Across much greater expanses of time and so to traverse reverse that many years in five seconds versus traversing five or six years in five seconds. You get the sense that you're going a lot faster which it makes sense when you think about it but it still doesn't explain why we tend to think of ourselves as fixed in time depending on where we are in life. I I turned twenty one. I thought I'm finally grown up and then when I turned thirty I thought no now. I'm grown up. Boy was crazy about that when I was twenty one. Yeah I repeated that when I was forty and then when I was fifty in the amazing thing is that each time it happens. I'm pretty sure I'm right this time. Despite the fact that I was wrong every every other time so a thirty year old would say yeah. I'm different from the person I wasn't. I was twenty but I'm now the person I am a forty year old would say different from WHO. I was thirty but I finally figured out who I am and go on and so on and so forth not only that but the same person says that thing over and over again look we all know we you will change. We know that we're going to gain a few pounds and get a few wrinkles. But we think that fundamentally the people we've become our personalities our values our preferences his likes and dislikes will remain relatively stable in the future and in that we are wrong..

NPR Justin Bieber Dan Gilbert Harvard Guy Roz Ted
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

02:42 min | 6 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Why does time feel so differently this very special moment in the day? Do we know well first of all I. I think it feels special because for most people. It's a foreign land so it feels special. The way that Paris feel special you only go every once in a while or the flip side of white feels threatening dire or or weird or uncanny but if you're in the mood there's no better time to read a book and there's no better time to work on that novel and it's a little bit lonely sometimes but I know four in the morning so it feels like something very similar to me. I'm awake now so I don't think back to sleep and I think you can start today. Thanks for the visit to the to the four hundred. Yeah thanks thank you did I the morning reeves. He's a poet and the curator of the Museum of four in the morning. Which is actually the website you can find it at four in the morning dot com and you can see several more talks by reeves at Ted Dot Com in our show today shifting time stay with US guy rows and you're listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR this message comes from NPR sponsor capital one Carlos? Bedrick Husky Director of conversational relational. Ai Products explains the new free trial. Alert experience with Iino the intelligent assistant your capital one card holder and you've just signed up for a subscription and what are eligible merchants. We'll send you an email saying hey you sign up for the Subscription Diatta remind you a day before and it's not just a helpful reminder under but you know gives you a path to resolve and if you so choose to to meet you know the intelligent assistant from capital one capital one dot com slash. Thanks also to salesforce. Have you ever wanted to know what salesforce does salesforce is a customer relationship management solution to give your employees A three hundred sixty degree view of your customers that makes it possible for every department in your company to work together as one to deliver. The seamless personalized analyzed experiences. That customers want salesforce. Bringing companies customers together visit salesforce dot com slash.

salesforce Ted Dot Com US NPR reeves Paris Museum of four Ai Products Director Iino Carlos
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

03:44 min | 6 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Finally this hour that idea from Galileo. That math is a language. Well it doesn't really matter whether you're a mathematician or a musician knowing the language which now I feel like I might vocabulary increased and so therefore able to communicate my ideas. Even Better Drummer Clayton Cameron and says studying math actually gave him a new confidence in how he played music. I'm going to share a story about by confidence and sitting down knowing that if I do a certain thing it's gonna be motor certain feeling. Yeah if done right so I'm playing at the Hollywood bowl with James Brown and I've been told that By the musical director Cranston bride. He said look. You Know Clayton James Drummer. You know Mr Brown's drummer and you know he's he created this genre of music. So chances are he may not like anything you play and I said well you know I'm a professional. I've been around and I you know I understand that. So I talked to a couple of drummers friends of mine that played with James Cystic. Get some inside. Listen to the record that James Brown. I've done it was a jazz record. Soul on top nineteen sixty nine but he never performed any of them so I there's one song called September song that had a a booby. Oh It's Oh no to get back to UH. That was kind of like what was happening at the time when she has gotta sit down so I said well I'm Gonna I'm GonNa bring up a little bit. I'm going to kind of do a little different beat on it. And I had put a special snare up and and then I've worked on this little groove to do more on since that was the grew so we get to the rehearsal where playing and in crystallography calls off the song and James Brown has the pickup and the the lyric is. Oh it's into the group. I'm into my now remember. It's been told to an embedded in my head that James Brown is not going to like anything you play. Yeah after we played that group James Brown turned around and said now that was Falke so anyway so that kind of stuff you know once you get into the numbers and you understand that gave me the confidence to sit down and go. Oh I know what that is. The numbers are there in Cameron. You can watch his talk. Ted Dot COM for model they Hey thanks for listening to our show this week solving for x numbers shape the world production staff. NPR includes Jeff Rodgers. Bachman Megan Kane Neva. Grant Chris Bender Rev with help from Daniel Shchukin. Pardoned Goodwood is our intern in the front office. Eric Newsham in Porsche Robertson. Magus partners Ted Chris Anderson Jude Cohen Intern trip and Janet Leigh Guy Roz. And you've been listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR. The forecast from the trauma and trauma..

James Brown Clayton Cameron Clayton James James Cystic Ted Chris Anderson Jude Cohen Bachman Megan Kane Neva intern NPR Chris Bender Hollywood Eric Newsham Janet Leigh Falke Daniel Shchukin Porsche director Jeff Rodgers
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

11:50 min | 6 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Earlier in the show. We met Randall. Munroe he's a physics expecting but he now. Mainly writes illustrates a really popular web comic. It's called what yes and the way it works every week. People write in questions for Randall Randall. To answer in the form of a comic so for example. What if you were playing baseball right and you were the better? What would happen? If the pitcher through the baseball impossibly fast like ninety percent the speed of light. Here's Randall's answer. So I did some calculations on the Ted Stage which normally when an object flies through the air the air will flow around the object but in this case the ball going so fast that the air molecules wouldn't have time to move out of the way the ball would smash into and through them and the collisions with these air molecules would knock away the nitrogen carbon and hydrogen from the ball fragmenting it off into tiny particles goals triggering waves of thermonuclear fusion in the air around it this would result in a flood of x rays that would spread out in a bubble along with exotic particles Senate on the pitcher's mound now at this point about thirty nanoseconds in the home plate is far enough away that late has the time to reach it which means the batter still sees the pitcher about throw and has no idea that anything is wrong now now after seventy seconds the ball reach home plate or at least the cloud of expanding plasma that used to be the ball and it will engulfed the bad and the batter and the place and the catcher and the empire and start disintegrating them all followed by a blast wave spreading out shredding trees and houses as it moves away from the stadium and then eventually actually a mushroom cloud rising over the ruined city so the major league baseball rules are a little bit hazy but under under rule six point zero two and five point Oh nine I think that in this situation the better would be considered hit by pitch and it would be eligible to take first base if it still existed. This is the kind of question Randall answers every week peak in his web comic. What if questions like? How fast could you visit all fifty states? or how long would a staircase to space take to climb or what would happen if all the rain and a thunderstorm dropped at once in the form of a single raindrop short answer there. Nothing good in the case of the raindrop. That's this big and falling this fast when the bottom hits there's so much more water coming and it's coming so quickly that there isn't enough time for the first part of the splash to get out of the way before the next part of the raindrop already there and this this causes a thin jet to shoot outward along the ground away from the point of contact and In sort of in all directions you'll get these jets that's of water moving at you know Much higher than the speed of sound. Yeah you would wanNA watch this from a from a safe distance away like from a Yeah make sure to have a mountaintop and even if you've got a mountain between you and the raindrop you WanNa make sure you are not downstream of that raindrop How do you think how do you think you approach something unknown differently than other people do well I? I have always had a little bit of trouble. Managing my Time and just clicking random wikipedia links or reading random papers and then before I know it I spent like three hours trying to solve a question that I'm not even GonNa read an article about and I I once drew a comic about how you could use this maliciously this tendency. Science people have where I had a comic about someone who sat outside an engineering in building by the side of the road and when the physics professor was halfway across the road they would hold up a sign with an interesting problem on it and this would stop immediately to like start thinking about. Okay how do I saw this. Take the square root of and then when they buy a car and and so they invented this sport That I called nerd sniping but part of what I did with deal with what is that. I'm I'm nerd sniping myself. I'm getting all these questions sent to me. Then I will have no choice but to try to answer a got a couple of years ago when he got the following question. Say All the world's known data were stored on punched cards. You know those paper cards with holes that used to be fed into computers are card punch translates words and numbers into the same information in the form of holes in cards a typist with very little extra training. Operate the Card Punch anyway. The question was if we still store data that way. How much physical space would google Google need to store? All the data that Google has Google of course wasn't gonNA tell Randall. How much data they do have so randall came up with an answer? He thought was plausible. I came up with my estimate which I felt pretty good about that was about about ten exa bytes of data across all of Google's operations and and and another maybe five x bites or so of offline storage in tape drives which it turns out. Google is about the world's largest consumer of so I came up with this estimate and this this is a staggering amount of data. It's quite a bit more than any other organization in the world has as far as we know. There's there's a couple of other contenders especially everyone always thinks of the. NSA adding all of this up. I came up with the other thing that we can answer. which is how many punchcards would this take? And and so a punch card can hold about eighty characters and you can fit about two thousand or so cards into a box and you put them and say my Whom region of New England it would cover the entire region up to a depth of a little less than five kilometers which is about three times deeper than the glacier? There is during the last Ice Age about twenty thousand years ago so this is this is impractical. But I didn't expect to get an answer from Google because of course they've been so secretive they didn't answer any questions and so I just put it up and said well I guess we'll never know but then a little while later I got a message a couple of weeks later from Google saying hey someone here has an envelope for you so I go and get it. Open it up and it's punchcards. Google branded punch cards cards and on these punch cards. They're a bunch of holes. I said thank you thank you okay. So what's on here. So I got some software and star reading it and scan them and it turns out. It's a puzzle. There is a bunch of code and I had friends to help and we cracked the code and inside that is another code and then there's some equations and then we solve those equations and then finally and out pops a message from Google. which is their official answer to my article and it said no comment so and I love calculating these kinds of things I just I and it's not not that I love doing the math? I do a lot of math but I don't really like math for its own sake What I love is the? Let's take some things that you know and just by doing being these moving symbols around on a piece of paper find out something you. You didn't know that it's very surprising. And I have a lot of stupid questions and I love that. Math gives the power to answer them sometimes and sometimes not. This is a question. I got from reader an anonymous reader and the subject trek line just said urgent and this was the entire email if people had wheels and could fly. How would we differentiate them from airplanes? Urgent and I think there are some questions that math just cannot answer. Thank you the Monroe. His talk is Ted Dot Com and its web comic is X. K.. CD DOT com back on the show. Today we're solving for x numbers shape. The world's next up how one equation might help you find true love. Don't we use T.. Plus one one eight whose little. W Plus W W T class. I H M brackets. Hd but this only maximizes. Your chances dances of finding the Pathak. Pacify it doesn't guarantee it. I'm Guy Roz and this is the Ted Radio hour from NPR. Everyone just a quick. Thanks thanks to one of our sponsors who helps make this podcast possible salesforce. Have you ever wanted to know what salesforce does salesforce is a customer relationship management solution. They give your employees a three hundred sixty degree view of your customers that makes it possible for every department in your company to work together as one to deliver the seamless the personalized experiences that customers want salesforce bringing companies and customers together visit salesforce dot com slash learn more and the world is complicated but knowing the past can help us understand it so much better. That's where we come in. I'M RUN THE UNREMITTING AT UP Louis and we're the host of through line. NPR's history podcast every week. We'll dig into forgotten. Stories is from the moments that shaped our world through line from NPR. Listen and subscribe. Now it's the Ted Radio hour from NPR. I'm Guy Roz and on the show today we're solving for x stories and ideas about how numbers shape Abbar world. You Remember Clayton Cameron Ello. Hello Hello Clayton. Big Time Jazz drummer popping in and out of the show today to explain the ideas from his Ted talk. About how math and rhythm intersect. Yeah it seems you know from the surface if you said you know math. The music that I'll we'll that wouldn't swing or groove. Yeah math is not groove. Your swing a you know when I listened to other musicians sick man. He really sounds good when he does that. And now I can listen to Phil Collins Max Roach. I can listen to Tony Williams. These are all drummers famous. Drummer Elvin Jones All these in each of their styles of playing they're gonNA play different threes threes absolutely You know like the Classic Classic Rock beat Iraq failed to do to ban. So that's a group of three. That Phil wanted people not people through the well Max Roach father of bebop drumming along with another drummer by the name of Kenny Clarke. They introduced syncopation into the music. Like it never had been used before in so max used to do these this thing where he would between his his left hand and his Bass Ace trauma and assemble it will go to the debt dot dot dot dot dot dot and so what you're hearing is want to. You want to be due to the door..

Randall Randall Google. baseball NPR Ted Dot Com salesforce Guy Roz Phil Collins Max Roach Munroe Senate New England Tony Williams Elvin Jones Max Roach professor Kenny Clarke Ted NSA Monroe
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

03:20 min | 6 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Do you like Algebra yes. I love. L. Dot why. Because it's beautiful how I keep hearing here mathematician so it's beautiful and then you like CD's movies but these crazy scrawling on a chalkboard. It is kind of Nice actually but but I still don't get it. I think that's a matter of temperament. There's some people to whom mathematical proof appears as a thing of beauty. It speaks of a higher truth. It speaks of a harmony to to knowledge the fact that it works at all let alone that we can understand. It speaks to a larger category of existence and knowledge Terry Moore you can see his full talk. Y is x the unknown at Ted Dot. NPR DOT ORG kinked tax. So we're going to be hearing a lot of these drumbeats throughout the show. Today they are the work of Clayton. Cameron I'm a provocateur of rhythm. Planes drummed for a few musicians. You might have heard of including Frank Sinatra Dean Martin. Sammy Davis Junior and here with Tony Bennett uncover anyway. We asked Clayton to do some of the music on the show today and to talk about an idea from his Ted talk doc an idea. He calls a rhythmic Arithmetic basically it's a way to understand how numbers and rhythm intersect and idea. That had never really occurred Clayton until he moved next door to a mathematician and we were talking and I'm no mathematician okay by any stretch of the imagination however He said something to me that I never forgot. He's he he said. You know. Those are really some beautiful numbers like so. Were you just talking talking. Like a beat or song or something. And he's like there's a beautiful numbers absolutely And I said wow. I said if you're at a certain level with math I guess guests they could be beautiful numbers and Then I had a conversation. One day with a friend of mine is incredible drummer musician named Marvin Smitty Smith. I said Marvin is a track you do. I said there's no way you could be thinking about this music way. I'm thinking about it because you make it seem so simple hot and some Marvin set will i. I just think in cycles. And then he didn't have to say another word I knew exactly what he meant. And so Between numbers are beautiful. Oh and you know I just think in cycles from my friend Marvin. All these things started coming together. He started noticing like these cycles of numbers in the rhythms. That you've even playing for years absolutely not watch this. I'M GONNA I'm GonNa play something Two different even Lee spaced Beats One will be three. Rian won't be too so we have one two three one two one two three one two so I'm going to give you a different sound. Only my left hand. I'm a little play. Just two beats in within the same space of time so we have one.

Marvin Smitty Smith Ted Dot Clayton Sammy Davis DOT ORG Frank Sinatra Tony Bennett Marvin Terry Moore Rian Cameron Dean Martin NPR
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

07:37 min | 7 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Win. Occasionally I come back to this country and I play my English archrival. The only thing I notice is whether I've won lost if you ask me. How has your game today? I won't say I had found no. It was a great game or whatever I might say it was a close game but usually I'll just say Oh beat me eight to three. Oh I B nine two four. Yeah and somehow just by saying that I'm taking all the joy out of it. It's much better to say it was a wonderful game. Wait you you have an English Ping Pong archrival. I'm sad to say yes and we've been prosecuting. This furious income rivalry we even Once played in front of six hundred people in San Francisco Not Delight. I didn't think they want to see to aging English guys flail around on a ping pong table but we enjoyed it. But I would say that my friend friend is fiercely competitive and so it brings out the competitive instinct in myself and that really means that after a game with him. I'm very rarely happy because even if I defeat him all I'm thinking about is next time he's going to get revenge or there's only one thing way to go from here and that's down and of course if I lose to him I'm literally really up all night. replaying how did I miss that forehand slam in the game or whatever. It's radically different in Japan because at least in the context of a club or a community community the most important thing is everybody to be working together and feeling and thinking together and unlinked. And there's a sense in which to think about winning. And losing is to impose a binary system on a world and lives not binary and if I were to ask ask you guy. Have you won or lost in your life. You would probably think of certain things you've achieved in certain things you haven't but you couldn't say I've one or I've lost. Life is full of unexpected moments. THAT SHAPE US and change us from a game of ping-pong to life altering events that can change our narrative and our identity. And if we're lucky we might pick up some wisdom along the way so today on the show. So we're GONNA explore wisdom in hindsight how we often learn the most important lessons about life in ways. We never expected and just quick personal personal note after seven years of being your guide on the Ted Radio. Hour this episode will be my last new one and as you might imagine over these past ask seven years interviewing hundreds of incredible Ted Speakers. I have received a lot of wisdom which will get a little bit later but for now back to the Pico Ir and finding meaning in Ping Pong. I mean I I love this idea that that winning and losing are on these Binary things that. It's just. This is so much gray right. Life is a series of. Let's say win the losses and draws And it's the kind of collective experience of those wins losses draws that defines our life. I love that idea to so much a exactly. I think it really liberates you because I think trying very very hard to win is not a winning strategy and is not the way you come upon happiness. I remember when I was a kid. I was determined hanging to conquer the world. I'm going to achieve this and this and this and this As most people in their twenties are and then at some point I notice will this is like Xenos Arrow which never reaches its target in other words. Let's say I won the Nobel Prize for I'd be thinking why haven't I won the Pulitzer Prize. Why haven't I got mccown and it never ends? And of course that's a recipe for disatisfaction. And the other thing I noticed which speaks to what you were saying so wonderfully just now as I get older is that it's really hard to assess what the victory is and what the losses in our lives off. The bad news is rarely as bad as we imagine. And good news is not as good as we hope. And Life is rarely as simple as our ideas of UTAH. Playing Ping Pong in Japan reminds me why choirs regularly enjoy a more fun than soloists in acquire. Your only job is to play your small part perfectly to hit your your notes with feeling and by so doing to help to create a beautiful harmony. That's much greater than the sum of its parts. Yes every choir does need a conductor but I think a choir releases you from a child's simple sense of either offers you come to see that the opposite of winning isn't losing failing to see the larger picture. I once lost everything I earn in the world every last thing in a wildfire but in time time I came to see it was that seeming loss. That allowed me to live on the earth. More gently to write without nodes and actually to move to Japan and the Inner Health Club known as the Ping Pong table conversely I want stumbled into the perfect job and I came to see that seeming happiness can stand in the way of joy even more than misery he does. I mean it's such a simple idea. It's this simple game. And like through that prism you were sort of able to to gain this profound insight exactly as I get older I notice. It's the tiny things in life. The Trivia stuff that we overlook that really brings illumination nation. I think when I was in my teens and when I was a college again I thought I have to read this way deeper philosophy and I have to think about the meaning of life and have to grapple with all these existential questions Russians to to bring to the floor to come to terms with it and delight in the fact that is the the most ephemeral silly seeming aspects aspects of life. That are often instructing me. I would say that Ping-pong has has taught me these life lessons more than all the solemn seeming bookstore ideas. I've entertained over the years and I like it because of course it's also experiential when I'm talking to you now about winning and losing in the Ping Pong Club. I'm really talking about how I feel when I go home every day and does no arguing with speculating about that. I know that I come out every day regardless of the school. Radi pretty refreshed and invigorated and eager for the next day and of course applies to everything whether it's being being a radio host or playing tennis or being a parent or this is what content is to be freed from the sense of me against the world that's writer Pico. Ir His most recent book is called a beginner's guide to Japan observations and provocations. You can find all of Pecos talks at Ted Dot Com on the show today wisdom in hindsight stay with us. I'm Guy Rise in you're listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR..

Japan Ping Pong Ping Pong Club Ted Radio Ted Speakers Pico Ir Nobel Prize Ted Dot Com Pulitzer Prize San Francisco Xenos Arrow NPR tennis mccown UTAH Pecos writer Inner Health Club
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:36 min | 8 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Ted Stage in the summer of one thousand nine hundred sixty three two hundred and fifty thousand people showed up on the mall in Washington to hear. Dr King's speak. They sent out no invitations and there was no website to check the date. How do you do that so well? Dr King Wasn't the only man in America who suffered in a pre civil rights America America in fact some of his ideas were bad but he had a gift. He didn't go around telling people what needed to change in America. He you know he went around and told people what he believed. I believe I believe I believe he told people and people who believed what he believed took his cause and they made it their own and they told people and some of those people created structures to get the word out even more people and Lo and behold two hundred and fifty thousand people showed up on the right day on the the right time to hear him speak how many of them showed up for him zero. They should for themselves It's what they believed about. America that got them to travel on a bus for eight hours to stand in the sun in Washington in the middle of August. It's what they believed and it wasn't about about black versus white twenty. Five percent of the audience was white. Dr King believed that there are two types of laws in this world. Those that are made by a higher authority and those was that are made by man and not all the laws that are made by men are consistent with the laws that are made by the Higher Authority. Will we live in a just world. It just so happens. Is that the civil rights movement was the perfect thing to help him bring his cause to life. We followed him not for him but for ourselves and by the way he gave the I have a dream speech. Not The I have a plan speech. What is it about like human nature that motivates us to action? Is it do. We need to be inspired. We're tribal animals. And one of the things that ensures the success us of the tribe and indeed the species is our sense of belonging and belonging comes from a common sense of values and beliefs. And sometimes those things things are understood but they start to have scale the ability to scale when when they're directed. And when someone does actually lead us and and can articulate where we're going and so when we think of a great movements like the civil rights movement or the anti-apartheid Movement in South Africa right or even movement like the the the the Russian Revolution Right. I mean there were leaders who inspired people to take action. How like what is a leader have like? Why do some people have that ability to inspire what is it that they have will first of all? They have deep undying belief in something bigger than themselves and the best leaders are actually the best followers because they don't see themselves as the thing to be followed they actually see themselves as following a cause is bigger than themselves they actually see themselves in service to something else. it's the rest of us who choose to follow them in just a moment why the world could use more of those kinds of leaders and what it takes to become one on the show today inspire fire to action on garage. And you're listening to the TED radio hour from NPR Hey everyone just a quick thanks to two of our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to target red card. Save five percent and get more every day more young for your weekly Grocery List more fun with the perfect stocking stuffers more. Wow for decorating the tree from kids wishlist to the hottest tech gifts red card. Gets you more learn. More in store or online restrictions apply see target dot com slash red card for details. Thanks it's also to Google fi a phone plan by google switch to Google Fi. Get data abroad for no extra charges so you never have to worry about calling up your provider divider to let them know. You'll be traveling. Google is made with features that people actually want like three networks included in. What would let's tap into multiple networks for the best signal nearby? Learn more at five dot. Google.

Dr King Google America Washington Ted Stage Higher Authority Lo South Africa NPR
"ted" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"ted" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Ted nobody uhhuh nobody oh.

Ted