17 Burst results for "Ted salons"

"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

04:58 min | Last month

"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Hey I'm elise. Hewa. Ted Talks, daily storyteller and writer Hannah Brent Scher grew up in our screen dominated paperless world. So when she was twenty two, she did something radical she wrote dozens and dozens of handwritten letters to strangers and left them across New York Bush's and benches. In today's archive talk from Ted Salon and Twenty Twelve, she recount this effort of hers and the moving impacted made on others. If you're at all like me you might find it will inspire you to return to letter writing. I was one of the only kids in college who had a reason to go to the Po box at the end of the day, and that was mainly because my mother has never believed in email in facebook in texting or cell phones in general and so all other kids. Their parents I was literally waiting by the mailbox to get a letter from home to see how the weekend had gone, which was a little frustrating when grandma was in the hospital but. I was just looking for some sort of scribble some unkempt cursive from my mother. and. So when I moved to New York City after college and got completely sucker punched in the face by depression I did the only thing I could think of at the time I wrote those same kinds of letters that my mother had written me for strangers and Tuck them all throughout the city dozens and dozens of them. I left them everywhere in cafes and in libraries at the UN everywhere. I blog about those letters and the days when they were necessary and I posed a kind of crazy promise to the Internet that if you asked me for a handwritten letter, I would write you one. No questions asked. Night my inbox morphed into this harbor of heartbreak a single mother in Sacramento girl being bullied in rural. Kansas. All asking me a twenty, two year old girl who barely even knew her own coffee order to write them better and give them a reason to wait by the mailbox. Today I fuel a global organization that is fueled by those trips to the mailbox fueled by the ways in which we can harness social media like never before to write and male strangers letters when they need the most. But most of all fueled by crates of male filled with the scripting of ordinary people, strangers, writing letters to other strangers not because they're ever going to meet and laugh over a cup of coffee but because they have found one another by way of letter writing. But you know the thing that always gets me about these letters. Is that most of them have been written. By people that have never known themselves loved on a piece of paper. It could not tell you about the ink of their own love letters they're the ones from my generation. The ones of us that have grown up into a world where everything is paperless and where some of our best conversations have happened upon a screen. We have learned to diary our pain onto facebook and we speak swiftly and one hundred, forty characters or less. But what if it's not about efficiency this time you know I was on the subway yesterday. With this mail crate, which is a conversation starter. Let me tell you and. Amanda stared at me and he was like, well, why don't you use the Internet and I thought well Sir I am not a strategist nor am I specialist I am merely a storyteller. And so I could tell you about a woman whose husband has just come home from Afghanistan and she is having a hard time on earth this thing called conversation and so she tucks love letters throughout the house as a way to say come back to me find me when you can. Or A girl who decides that she is going to leave love letters around her campus in Dubuque. Iowa only to find her efforts ripple effected the next day when she walks out onto the quad and finds love letters hanging from the trees tucked in the bushes and the benches I or the man who decide that he's going to take his life uses facebook as a way to say goodbye to friends and family. Well, tonight, he sleeps safely stack of letters tucked beneath his pillow scripted by strangers who were there for him when? You know these are the kinds of stories that convinced me that letter writing will never again need to flip back her hair and talk about efficiency because she is an art form. Now, all the parts of her the signing scripting the mailing the doodles in the margins. The mere fact that somebody would even just sit down, pull out a piece of paper and think about someone the whole way through with an intention that is so much harder to unearth when the browsers up and the iphone is being. We've got six conversations rolling in at once that is an art form. That does not fall down to the Goliath of get faster. No matter how many social networks we might join. We still clutch close these letters to our chest to the words speak louder than loud when we turn pages into Palettes to stay the things that we have needed to say, the words we have needed to write to sisters and brothers and even to strangers for far too long. Thank you..

Hannah Brent Scher facebook Ted Talks UN New York City Ted Salon writer Sacramento New York Bush Dubuque Iowa Kansas Afghanistan Amanda
"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

06:36 min | 8 months ago

"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Features travel photographer and writer Erin. Sullivan recorded live at Ted Salon. Crossover Twenty nineteen. What is the most beautiful place you have ever been and when you were there? Did you take a picture of it. Here's a place that tops that list for me. This is Mesa Arch in Kenya Lands National Park in Utah at Sunrise. It's the traditional the homeland of the Pueblo. Ute and Navajo people and when you are there. It is absolutely stunning. The sunrise illuminates the bottom of the arch arch orange and then behind it. You see these boots and clouds and cliffs but while you might not see is the thirty people behind me who are also taking photos and these these are just the committed people the sunrise people right so when you think about that there must be hundreds if not thousands of photos of Mesa arch taken every week. I've been sharing my photography on instagram. For years and it started to become really interesting and funny even just how many similar photos of the same places I started to see online and I was participating in it so this made me wonder. Why are we taking photos in the first place? Sometimes I visit a popular landmark and I see all the people with their phones and cameras out who snap a photo just to turn and get back in the car walked back to the trail head and sometimes it seems like we are missing the point of you know going to this place to experience it for ourselves or to see it with our own is when I'm behind the camera. I notice the smallest details. The layers of light in the mountains as the light fades at the the end of the day the shapes that nature so expertly makes abstract and yet completely perfect. I could go on and on here musing about the intricacies intricacies of this planet and the way that it makes me feel photographing the beauty and complexity of this world for me is like making a portrait of someone that I love and when I make photograph I have to think about what I wanted to say. I have to ask myself what I wanted to feel. Like when you're communicating through an image every creative choice matters sometimes I plan to share my images and other times I take them just for myself. I currently host a video series on the future of the outdoors adores and from one of the episodes we wanted to explore the relationship between photography and outdoor spaces learned about the research of Kristen deal and her colleagues at. USC See who studied photo taking effect on enjoyment levels. They found that when we were behind the camera. And we're the ones taking the picture. We enjoy our experiences. More not less less. But it wasn't true all the time if the person took the photo solely with the intention of sharing it there is no increase enjoyment. Because they didn't do it for themselves so this points to an important distinction photography can enhance your experience. If it's done intentionally. The intention piece is what matters as a photographer. I've really had to check myself on this. When does it help me to have my camera out? And when do I just need to put it away on a trip to Alaska. I had the opportunity to photograph autograph. Alaskan brown bears. I was on a boat with four other photographers and We were all having our minds blown at the same time in such close proximity to these is animals. And it's an emotional experience. Being eye to eye with these bears gave me a feeling of connection that transcends words and having my camera with me in this case enhanced that we were all creating independently but also all completely in the moment both with nature with each other I so clearly remember capturing capturing the water droplets and the motion as the bear swam and the cute cubs following their mothers that group and I will have that experience together and these images to look back on time and time again and photography is what enabled us to share this in the first place. Other Times I choose to leave the camera behind and and I think that choice ultimately improves both my experience and my work. I recently flew to the South Pacific Island of Tonga swim with Humpback whales us. I noticed myself feeling pressure and a certain obligation to take the camera with me when sometimes I just wanted the pure experience itself and the experience variance is seriously amazing. You're talking about being in the water with a curious baby. Animal the size of a station wagon while you are surrounded by particles that float around you like glitter glitter and the MOMS swims gracefully below you. There were times obviously when I did take my camera with me and those were really amazing to capture as well but the setup if is pretty big. It's like this big box in so this is between me and the whales and at times that feels like a block between you and reality. Is there a difference when it's just your phone own last year. I went to Earl and central Australia. Which is this massive rock that towers over the desert? This is sacred land to on when you are the aboriginal people from this area and the traditional owners of the land there are particular spots in That you cannot photograph professionally because because they are culturally sensitive equivalent to secret scripture to on you so because of this most of my photographs are from either far away or from specific diffic- angles in the park. You could say that some of the most interesting and beautiful visuals in are located in these sensitive areas. But they're not to photograph them is an explicit and direct invitation to learn more about the land its importance and its people. Isn't that what we should be doing thing anyway. So my visit to quickly became not about me but about connecting with the place ironically unsurprisingly. I have found that presence and also happens to make for more compelling images we can probably all point to social media as being a good place to share the images from our travels and from our lives we not only share pieces of the world that we have seen but also parts of our day to day experiences. And if we're applying intentionally ready to the photos we take then hopefully. We're sharing intentionally to for me allowing people to see pieces of my story and my perspective online has reminded me that I'm not alone. It's helped me build support and community to do the same for others..

Mesa arch Mesa Arch writer Ted Salon Sullivan Erin Navajo USC Utah Alaska South Pacific Island of Tonga Kristen Kenya Lands National Park Australia Earl
"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

01:49 min | 11 months ago

"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"This ted talk features educators Sydney Jensen recorded live at Ted Salon. MASTERCLASS 2019 like many teachers every year on the first day of school I lead us sort of ice breaker activity with my students. Let's at Lincoln High School in Lincoln Nebraska and we are one of the oldest and most diverse high schools in our state also to our knowledge. We're only high school in the world whose mascot is the links like a chain and with that being our mascot we have a statue out front of our building of four links connected like a chain. Any each link means somethin' in our links stand for tradition excellence unity and diversity so on the first day of school I teach. My new ninth graders about the meaning behind those links and I give them to slip a paper on that paper. I asked him to write something about themselves sells it can be something that they love something that they hope for anything that describes their identity. And then I go around the room with with a stapler and I staple into those slips together to make a chain and we hang up in our classroom as decoration shore but also as a reminder minder that we are all connected we are all links so what happens when one of those links feels weak and what happens happens when that weakness is in the person holding the stapler. The person who's supposed to make those connections the teacher.

"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

09:39 min | 11 months ago

"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"This ted talk features fashion designer Beckham McCarron Tran recorded live at Ted Salon Trail Blazers Twenty nineteen The happiness lab is a new show hosted by Yale psychologist Dr Lori Santos she takes the latest science and translates it into practice Michael Effective happiness strategies lorries class psychology and the good life is the most popular class ever offered at Yale now you can get the class to by listening to the podcast science tells us that there's no biological barrier to being happier we can all get their subscribed to the happiness lab or ever you get your podcasts they starting your business was no small feat imminent late nights early mornings and of course all nighters our friends at fresh folks can make it easier fresh books accounting software is designed for small business owners. It's easy to use and keeps you very organized with fresh books you can automate voicing accept online payments Organiz expenses and much more get sixty percents off a light plus or premium plan for six months when you buy today hurry. this limited time offer ends October twenty third good a fresh books dot com slash by now to get started as fashion designers are decisions have the power to change our culture we choose who's cast runway shows and campaigns ultimately who is celebrated and consider beautiful and who's not having this platform irresponsibility one that can be utilized to exclude people or to empower others growing up I was obsessed fashion. I poured all different types of fashion magazine and my local Barnes and noble to be fashionable was to be tall any with long shiny hair that's what I saw is the ideal and it was reinforced everywhere I looked to be honest still this I wanted to be like the models so I stopped eating it was a dark time in my life my eating disorder consume me all I could think about this counting every single calorie and waking up early before school every day so I could run a few miles it took me years to finally released the grip that the eating disorder had over life but when it did if read of so much brain space to think about what I was truly passionate about for so long fashion industry has worked hard to center The beauty that celebrates thin young white SIS gender able bodied models as the ideal is impossible not to be bombarded with images of models that have been photoshop to where there's not a single poor federal or stretch mark incite you don't need to look hard to find examples this Phoenician beauty is damaging dangerous and destructive and we need to exploded immediately the agree one of the worst things I've realized over the years is that my experience with disordered eating is not an anomaly early in fact it's par for the course I think there's a study that says ninety one percent of women and likely those of all gender identities are unhappy with the way they look unforgivable that we live in a society where it's normal or expected for teenagers to grow up hating themselves we've been fighting for fat acceptance and women's body autonomy since the sixties and there has been headway plus size models like Ashley Graham and musicians would be positive messages like Lizardo breaking into the mainstream thank God there's brands like area that have released campaigns without any sharp retouching but we're still inundated with unrealistic expectations I love this quote by Liz who said body positively only exist his body negatively is the norm so how do we change the stigma around looking different or not fitting into this narrow finishes beauty I believe it's by celebrating beauty and all different forms bold an unapologetically but many fashion designers continue to reinforce narrow definition of beauty from the way they're taught in school and into the real world they drape on mannequins that are only four or sketch on bodies that are super stretched out and not anatomically proportion different sized bodies aren't taking into account during the design process they're not thought of so who are these designers designing mm for but the conversation around exclusivity and fashion doesn't begin and end with size it's about seeing people of all different gender expression since different ability levels different ages different races and ethnicities celebrated for their own unique beauty my own work as a fashion designer I started a brand called matt and we're committed to empowering women fans and non binary chroma Babes of all shapes and sizes through perfectly fit garments for every body somewhere has become a huge focus for me because of the power that this single garment can have over the way people feel about themselves we wanted to take our focus on celebrating body types to a garment that's fraught with insecurity on our runways UC curves cellulite and scars worn proudly where runway show yes it's also a celebration I didn't start designing ten years ago with a mission to change the entire industry however inclusivity means nothing if it's only surface level behind the scenes from the photographer to the housing director to the interns who's making the decisions behind the scenes is just as important as imperative to include diverse decision occurs in the process and it's always better to collaborate with different communities rather than trying to speak for them and this is an important black makeup artists Hey Fatuma Thomas who intimately understands how important it is to be able to work with all skin tones it's essential to reading a holistic inclusive output as fashion designers that do a lot of swim we wanted to rewrite the rules around having a bikini body so he has team of Babe Guards to enforce guidelines around inclusion and acceptance at the pool instead of no diving and no running how about celebrate cellulite body policing prohibited and intolerance not tolerated and this was enforced by guards Mama Cox Denise bidault gene Rosero Erica heart an emmy all activists in their own right I've always felt it was important to show a range of different bodies in our runway shows and campaign means but it actually wasn't until recently that we were able to expand our size range in a major way we first launched our curve collection five years ago when we were so excited but when launched it fell flat nobody was interested none of our department store stocked above a size large and if they did it was somewhere else in the building entirely cricket they WANNA be sold a dream they want to see something that they aspire to be implying that are models weren't that but I've realized so much more important to open up this dream to more people I want the consumer to know that it's not your body that needs to change is the close needs to be more options at all sizes and then all retailers there's so finally in two thousand eighteen norstrom actually place to order up to three x and this was a huge game changer for us to have major retailer invest in adding these units so we could go to the factory and really go now we go up to four acts which is about size thirty thirty two having that investment helped us to change and realign our entire design process we now have different sized bodies to sketch and drape on the studio and if more fashion schools top the skills more designers would have the ability to design for all bodies so as fashion designers is our job to utilize our platform to explode this narrow restrictive definition of beauty Michael is that Sunday teenagers growing up don't feel the same pressure that I did conform and I hope that our work contributes to the fashion industry's opening up to celebrate many different identities thank you for more ted talks to Ted dot com uh.

fashion magazine Ted Salon Trail Blazers Beckham McCarron Tran Yale Organiz Dr Lori Santos Michael Barnes ninety one percent five years six months ten years
"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"This Ted Talk Features Entrepreneur and justice reform advocate Marcus bullock recorded live at Ted Salon Trailblazers Twenty nine eighteen high that it's Chris Anderson host of the Ted Interview podcast on next episode neuroscientists and you'll see it only has the meaning that it has because it impacts and is manifest through conscious experiences that exist for somebody for something subscribe to the Ted Interview on Apple Podcasts spotify or wherever you listen one evening after watching the nightly news with my then five year old son he me a question I thought I would have a ton of time to answer I thought the complicated questions typically came eight or nine years old us on look me in the is talking him in and with a very straight face he asks me daddy why would you go to jail my wife and I often thought about this moment we knew this question was coming and we wanted to handle it well but that night I had a question to answer so I decided to tell my son how I ended up going to prison when I was just a fifteen year old kid a friend of mine and I we approach demand sleeping in his car.

Marcus bullock Chris Anderson Apple fifteen year nine years five year
"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

11:11 min | 1 year ago

"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"This Ted Talk Features podcast her and actress Shannon Lee recorded live at Ted Salon Rethink Twenty nineteen Bruce Lee is my father and his best well known as a martial artist and action film star as I'm sure most of you know he died when I was four years old but I have a really deep memory of him I don't have those long form story memories that you do when you're older but the memory that I do have is of the feeling of him I remember his energy his presence his love the safety of the power of the radiance of it and to me that memory is is very deep and personal and it is the memory of the quality of his essential nature the people don't know about my father said he was also a philosopher he had a very ever evolving philosophy that he lived and it is that distinction that he lived his philosophy in didn't just a spouse his philosophy that made him the force of nature that he was and still engages us today his wisdom has salvaged me many times in my life when my brother died when my heart's been broken whenever I have faced a challenge to my mind my body or my spirit the way that he expressed himself has lifted me up and so I come to you today not as a researcher or an educator or guru or in a life coach but as a student of Bruce Lee as the starter and also as a student of my own life so my big burning question that I want you all to consider today is how are you let me whenever anyone would ask my mom what my father was like she would say how he was in front of the camera how you saw him in his film uh-huh how you saw him in his interviews was in fact exactly how he was there were not multiple Bruce Lee's there was not Bruce Lee in private Bruce Lee or teacher Bruce Lee and actor Bruce Lee and Family Man Bruce Lee there was just one unified total Bruce Lee and that Bruce Lee at a very deep philosophical life practice called self actualization you've probably heard that term before it's also known as how to be yourself in the best way possible and that Bruce Lee said this when I look around I always is learn something in that is to be always yourself and to express yourself and have faith in yourself don't go out and find a successful person the duplicative but rather start from the very root of your being which is how can I be me many of us have done some soul-searching thing or at least some incessant thinking and worrying about things like our purpose our passion our impacts are our values and our reason for being and that is sometimes considered sort of our why why am I here why this life why what am I meant to be doing if we can grab a little piece of that information it can help to ground us and route us and can also point us in a direction and typically what it points us to is our what what we manifest in the world what we have so our job our her home our hobbies and the like but there's this little space in between the why and the what that often doesn't get our full attention and that is our how how we get there and the quality of that doing and I want to offer her that this is actually the most important part of the equation when it comes to our personal growth our sense of wholeness and and even the long term impact that we make how is the action that bridges the gap from the journal to the external and bridging the gap is a very important concept for martial artists like my father it's how you get from point a to point be it's how you get from here to your target under the most vital of circumstance says and so it makes all the difference there's an amateur are you sloppy. Are you a wild chaotic. Sometimes you get lucky sometimes you're not lucky or are you a warrior. Harry confidence are you focused are you skilled are you intuitive are you expressive creative aware so i WanNa talk to you you today about your how in your life so we do a little bit of spend a little time in existential crisis over why am I here what I meant to be doing and we put a ton of effort into our what our job our career are partner that we have the hobbies we pursue but I want us to consider that our house how is the expression of our Y in every what whether we're aware of it or not and so so let's take an example let's say that I have a value of kindness I'm all about kindness I feel really natural being signed I want to see more kindness in the world is that kindness is that value in the result or is it in the doing are you trying to be kind when it's hard to be kind can you do something you don't Wanna do kindly like fire someone can you leave a relationship with kindness if kindness is the value then are you trying to express it in the whole spectrum from your doing where and trying to do that or are you just doing it when it's easy so I want think about that for a moment and consider you know if we come home and we're kind and generous and loving with our kids but then go to work and we are dismissive and rude to our assistant and we treat them like a subhuman then there is fragmentation in the being of our value and so I want us to consider that how we are in our lives gives is in fact how we are meaning if I am the kind of person that walks down the street and smiles at people and I as I walked past them on the sidewalk and that is how I am but if I'm also the kind of person who makes fun of my brother every chance that I get behind his back that is also the kind of person that I am and ultimately how we are up the totality of the picture of who we are and so I wanNA talk about how do we unite these pieces we haven't defragmentation to understand how we embody ourselves as our one and only self how do we actualize the whole self my father said all goals apart from the means aren't illusion there will never be means to ends only means and I am mm-hmm means I am what I started with and when it is over I will be all that is left so you can employ a systematic approach to training and practicing but you can't employs systematic approach to actually living because life is a process not a goal it is a means and not an end so to obtain enlightenment and I'm going to say a self actualize to be self actualized or to obtain wholeness emphasis should fall not on the cultivation of the particular departments all of our what's which then merges into the totality of who we are as a total human being but rather on the total human being that then enters into an unites those particular departments. you are your how you if you have some consciousness and you wanna bring some practice if you want to step into that warriors space around your how how you express in every aspect of your life then you get to be the best of that expression you get to step into that and claim it an exercise it and bring that being nece through you're doing this into your having this and they're you will find the most profound of your growth you will find a sense of wholeness and ultimately you will leave a lasting the impact on your environment my father was his how he applied the execution of who he was to every aspect of his life he was way more than that kung-fu guy from the seventies he was someone who worked very hard at actualising his inner self and expressing it out into the world and that laid the foundation for what continues to inspire US engage US excite us and attract us to him he was the embodied example of living fully he said I am means and their only means so I'm GonNa ask you one more time thank you fred listening and please consider for you that's the spectrum of you're doing how are you thank you Mortada Dot com.

Shannon Lee Ted Salon Harry four years
"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

12:01 min | 1 year ago

"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"This Ted talk features social psychologist. Heidi grant recorded live at Ted salon rethink twenty nineteen. Hello. It's Chris Anderson here. Those of the Ted interview podcast on the next episode MIT research, scientist, Andrew, McAfee and the scary. But exciting future of our work lives driven by the coming off official intelligence revelation. I kind of believe that in the rest of my lifetime. I am going to live to see peak jobs or peak labor. Subscribe to the Ted interview wherever you listen. So asking for help is basically the worst. Right. I don't I don't have actually never seen it on one of those top ten lists of things people fear, like public, speaking, and death. But I'm pretty sure it actually belongs there, even though in many ways, it's foolish for us to be afraid to admit that we need help. Whether it's from a loved one or a friend or from a co worker, or even from a stranger, somehow, it always feels just a little bit uncomfortable and embarrassing to actually ask for help, which is, of course, why most of us try to avoid asking for help whenever humanly possible. My father was one of those legions of fathers who I swear would rather drive through an alligator infested swamp than actually asked someone for help getting back to the road when I was a kid. We took a family vacation, we drove from our home. South jersey to colonial Williamsburg. And I remember, we got really badly lost, and my mother and I pleaded with him to please just pullover and ask for directions. Back to the highway, and he absolutely refused. And in fact, assured us that we were not lost. He had just always wanted to know what was over here. So if we're going to ask for help, and we have to we all do practically every day, the only way we're going to even begin to get comfortable with it is to get good at it to actually increase the chances that when you ask for help from someone they're actually going to say, yes, and not only that, but they're going to find it actually satisfying, and rewarding to help you because that way, they'll be motivated to continue to help you into the future. So research that I and some of my colleagues have done has shed a lot of light on why it is that sometimes people say yes to our requests for help, and why sometimes they say, no, no. Let me just start by saying right now. If you need help you are going to have to ask for it out loud. Okay, we all to some extent suffer from something that's like holidays. Call the allusion of transparency basically the mistaken belief that our thoughts and our feelings and. Our needs are really obvious to other people. This is not true, but we believe it. And so we mostly stand around waiting for someone to notice our needs and then spontaneously offered to help us with it. This is a really really bad assumption. In fact, not only is it very difficult to tell what your needs are. But even the people close to you often struggle to understand how they can support you. My partner has actually had to adopt the habit of asking me multiple times a day, are you, okay? Do you need anything because I am so so bad at signaling when I need someone's help? Now he is more patient than I deserve, and much more proactive much more about helping than any of us have any right to expect other people to be. So if you need help you're going to have to ask for it. And by the way, even when someone can tell that you need help, how do they know that you want it? Did you ever try to give unsolicited help to someone who had turns out? It did not actually want your help in the first place. They get nasty real quick. Don't they the other day? True story. My teenage daughter was getting dressed for school. And I decided to give her some unsolicited help about that. I haven't think she looks amazing in brighter colors. She tends to prefer sort of darker, more neutral, tones. And so I said very helpfully that I thought media, she could go back upstairs and try to find something a little less somber. So if looks could kill I would not be standing here right now. We really can't blame other people for not just spontaneously offering to help us when we don't actually know that. That's what is wanted. In fact, actually research shows that ninety percent of the help that co-workers give one another in the workplace is in response to explicit requests for health. So you're gonna have to say the words I need your help. There's no getting around it now to be good at it to make sure that people actually do help you. When you ask for it. There are a few other things that are very helpful to keep in mind. First thing when you ask, for help, be very, very specific about the help you want, and why they sort of indirect requests for help actually aren't very helpful to the helper. Right. We don't actually know what it is you want from us and just as important. We don't know. Whether or not, we can be successful in giving you the help. Nobody wants to give bad help lake me. You probably get some of these requests from perfectly pleasant strangers on Lincoln who wanna do things like get together over coffee and connect, or pick your brain. I nor these requests, literally every time and it's nothing. I'm not a nice Verson. It's just that when I don't know what it is. You want from me, like the kind of help. You're hoping that I can provide I'm not interested. Nobody is, I'd have been much more interested, if they had just come out and said, whatever it was they were hoping to get from me, because I'm pretty sure they had something specific in mind. So go ahead and say, I'm hoping to discuss opportunities to work in your company or I'd like to propose a joint research project in an area. I know you're interested in or I'd like your advice on getting into medical school, technically. I can't help you with that last one because I'm not that kind of Dr. But I could point you in the direction of someone who could. Okay, so second. This is really important. Please avoid disclaimers apologies. And bribes really, really important. So do any of these sound familiar? I'm so, so sorry that I have to ask you for this. I, I really hate bothering you with this. If I had any way of doing this without your help. I would sometimes it feels like people are so eager to prove that they're not weak and greedy when they ask you for help, they're completely missing out on how uncomfortable their making you feel. And by the way, how am I supposed to find it satisfying to help you? If you really hated having to ask me for help, and while it's perfectly perfectly acceptable to pay strangers to do things for you. You need to be very, very careful when it comes to incentivizing your friends and coworkers when you have a relationship with someone helping one another is actually a natural part of that relationship. It's how we show one another that we care if you introduce incentives or payments into that, what can happen. Is it starts to feel like it isn't a relationship? It's a transaction and that actually is experienced as distancing, which I Rana cly makes people less likely to help you, so a spontaneous gift after someone gives you some help to show, your appreciation and gratitude, perfectly fine and offer to pay your best friend to help you move into your new apartment is not. Okay. Third rule. And I really mean this one, please do not ask for help over Email or text. Really seriously? Please don't Email in text are impersonal. And I realize sometimes there's no alternative. But mostly what happens is we like to ask for help over Email and text because it feels less awkward for us to do, so, what else feels less awkward over Email in text telling, you know, and it turns out there's research to support this in person requ. Wests for help are thirty times more likely to get a yes, then a request made by Email. So when something is really important, you really need. Someone's help make FaceTime to make the request or use your phone as a phone. To ask for the health that you need ok. Last one. And this is actually a really really important one in probably the one that is most overlooked, when it comes to ask them for help when you ask someone for their help, and they say, yes, follow up with them afterward. There's a common misconception that what's rewarding about helping is the act of helping itself. This is not true. What is rewarding about helping is knowing that your help landed that it had impact that you were affective, if I have no idea how my help affected you. How am I supposed to feel about it? This happened. I was a university professor for many years. I wrote lots and lots of letters of recommendation for people to get jobs or to go into graduate school, and probably about ninety five percent of them. I have no idea what happened. Now. How do I feel about sort of the time and effort, I took to do that, when I really have no idea? If I helped you, if it actually helps you get the thing that you wanted. In fact, this idea of feeling effective is part of why. Certain kinds of donor appeals are so, so persuasive because they allow you to really vividly imagined the effect that your health is going to have so take something like donors. Choose you go online. You can choose the individual teacher by name, who's classroom that you're going to be able to help by by literally buying the specific items, they've requested like microscopes, or laugh, tops or flexible, seating, an appeal like that makes it so easy for me to imagine the good that my money will do that. I actually get an immediate sense of affective nece the minute, I commit to giving. But you know what else they do? They follow up. So donors actually, get letters from the kids in the classroom, they get pictures. They get to know that they made a difference. And this is something we need to all be doing in our everyday lives, especially if we want people to continue to give us help over the long term take time to tell your colleague that the help that they gave you really helped you land that big sale. Or helped you get that interview that you were really hoping to get take time to tell your partner that the support they gave you really made it possible for you to get through a tough time. Take time to tell your cat sitter that you're super happy that for some reason this time they can't didn't break anything while you were away. And so they must have done a really good job. The bottom line is, I know, believe me, I know that it is not easy task for help. We are all a little bit afraid to do it. It makes us feel vulnerable. But the reality of modern work and modern life is that nobody does it alone. Nobody succeeds in a vacuum more than ever. We actually do have to rely on other people on their support and collaboration in order to be successful. So.

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"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

11:37 min | 1 year ago

"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"This Ted talk features writer, producer and journalist. Renisha Allen recorded live at Ted salon up for debate. Twenty nineteen. So on the surface, the kind of millennial thing pieces are made of he's arrogant self centered in convinced that he is smarter than people give him credit for his favorite topics of conversation are girls sneakers and cars freight notice of prize for someone who's a teenager, just a few years ago, but Choi's mannerisms, they feel the patterns of someone who is scared troubled, and then the future now Troy, also embodies many positive, qualities. His generation is known for an entrepreneurial spirit and independence streak and dedication to his parents. He believes in hard work, and his tried gigs, and both the licit and underground economy. But he hasn't had any luck. And it's just trying to find his way and still dances, between both worlds when I met Troy a few years ago, he'd been -ployed as Gulf cat. The at a local country club carrying bags for rich men and women who often never even acknowledged his existence before that he sold sneakers on Facebook. He even tried selling candy bars and water bottles. But he wasn't making enough money to help his parents out, or save up for a car anytime soon to Troy saw how hard his immigrant mother from Jamaica work and how little she got back in return. And he vowed Troy valid to take a different path. So we ended up selling drugs, and then he got caught. And right now, he's trying to figure out his next steps in a country where money equals power quick money at least for a while gives young men and women like him a sense of control over their lives. Though he said he mainly did it because he wanted stability, I wanted to good life. He told me I got greedy. And I got caught the mazing thing about Troy as it. He still believes in the American dream, he still believes. Hard work, despite being arrested that he can move on. Now, I don't know if toys dreams came true he disappeared from the program for trouble youth that he was involved in, in slip through the cracks. But on that day that we spoke, I could tell that more than anything more than anything. Troy was happy that someone listened to his dreams and asked him about his future. So we think about China's optimism when I think, in the reality that so many young black millennials face when it comes to realizing their dreams, I think about all the challenges that so many black millennials have to endure in the world that tells them, they can be anything. They wanna be if they work hard, but actually doesn't sit down to listen to their streams or hear stories about their struggle, and we really we really need to listen to this generation, if we hope to have a healthy and civil society going forward because millennials of color, they make a they make up a fair chunk of the US and the world population. No one we've talked. About millennials a group that is often labelled as entitled lazy over educated, noncommittal and narcissistic. The conversations often swirl around Nava, KADO toasts overpriced Latinos in fancy Johnson, broad, you probably heard all these things before, but millennials are non monolith. Actress Lena Dunham may be the media's representation of this generation, but Troy and other voices. Like his are also part of the story. In fact, millennials are the largest and most diverse adult population in this country forty four percent of all American millennials are non white, but often you wouldn't even know it at all. No. Sure, there are similarities within this population born between one thousand nine hundred eighty one and nineteen Ninety-six, perhaps many of us, do love KADO toast, and law tastes. I know I right? But there are also extreme differences often between millennials of color in white millennials. In fact, all too often it seems as though we're. Virtually living in different worlds. Now black millennials group of a group that I have researched for a book. I recently wrote are the perfect example of the blind spot that we have when it comes to this group, for example, we have lower rates of homeownership. We have higher student debt. We get idea more voter registration booths. We are incarcerated at higher rates. We make less money. We have higher numbers of employment, even when we do go to college, I should say, and we get married it lower rates. And honestly that's really just the beginning. Now. None of these struggles are particularly new right, young black people in America have been fighting really fighting hard to get their stories told for centuries after the civil war, and the eighteen hundreds reconstruction failed to deliver the equality that the industry should have heralded. So young people move to the north and the west to escape discriminatory. Jim crow policies, then as segregation raged in much of the country. Young black people have spare civil rights campaigns in the nineteen fifties and nineteen sixties after that some people embrace black power and then became Black Panthers. And then the next generation, they turn to hip hop to make sure their voices were heard, and then Barack Obama hopeful that he too, may bring about change. And when that failed when we realized we were still boom is and battered, we had to let the world know that are. Lives still matter. Now, as now, when technology allows more video of our pain and struggle to be broadcast to the world. We wonder by what is next our country. Feels more polarized than ever yet. We are still being told to pull up our pants be respectable be less angry smile more in work harder. Right. Even the Milan, even the attitudes of millennials themselves are overdue for an update research done by the Washington Post in two thousand fifteen about this supposedly woke group found that thirty one percent of white millennials. Think that, that blacks are Lazier than whites in twenty three percent say they're not as intelligent. But these are like surprising things to me and shocking, and these responses are not that much different than generations in the past, and it shows that unfortunately, this generation is repeating the same old stereotype type central to the pass now. So he can -ducted by David binder visa. An MTV in two thousand fourteen if found that eighty four percent of young millennials were taught by their families that everyone should be equal. This is a really great thing. Really positive step, but only thirty seven percent in that group actually talked about race with their families. So I can understand why things may be confusing to some. There are definitely black millennials who are succeeding. Marvel's Black Panther directed by black millennial Ryan. Kugler and showcasing many others. Brooke all sorts of records. There's a crop of television shows by creative, like Donald. Glover Lino, waif and ISA. Ray beyond say like the Queen, right? She is like everything young black authors and winning awards. Serena Williams still dominating on the tennis, courts, despite all her haters, and there's a crop of new politicians and activists running for office. So don't kill these moments of black joy that I to revel in, but I wanna make it clear that these winds are too few and far. Between for people that's been here for over four hundred years like that's insane. Right. And most people still don't really understand the full pitcher, right? Our stories are still misunderstood our bodies are still taking advantage of and our voices are voices are silenced in a world that still shows little concern for everyday struggles source stories need to be told in a multitude of ways by a range of voices talking about diverse in nuanced topics, and they really need to be listened to and it's not just here in America. Right. It's all around the world. Millennials makeup twenty seven percent of the world's population. That's a round two billion people, and with countries like, India, China, Indonesia, and Brazil, along with United States accounting for fifty percent of the world's millennials, it's clear that the white often male heterosexual, narrow of the millennial as only telling half the story now there's many people trying to broaden the pallet they're fighting to get there. Stories told him busts a millennial stereotype, whether it's students in South Africa protesting statues a C so rose Michaela coal making us laugh from the UK or who is framing views about Nigerian life online, but they wanna make it clear. I wanna make it really clear to everyone that just because things look more equal than they did in the twentieth century doesn't mean that things are equitable. It all it doesn't mean experiences equable, and it certainly doesn't mean that a post racial society that thing that we talked about so much ever became close to being a reality. I think of Joel a middle-class twenty-something, who did everything the right way. But she couldn't go to her dream school because it was simply too expensive, or Julia. Who knows she can't be mediocre at her job, the same, where her white the same way that her white peers can or Trina who knows that people judge her unconventional family choices in a different way than if she were a white woman, or actor. A B. Who knows that the roles he takes and gets in Hollywood are different because of his skin color him in there, Simon. Right. So Simon by all means would be an example of someone who's made it. He's a CFO at a tech company and San Francisco, he has a degree from MIT. And he's worked at some of the hottest tech companies in the world. But when they asked Simon when they ask Simon if he had achieved the American dream, it took him a while to respond. While acknowledging that he had a really comfortable life. He admitted that under different circumstances. He might have chosen a different path Simon really loves photography. But that was never a real option for him. My parents weren't able to subsidize me through that sort of thing. Simon said, maybe that's something might children could do. So it's these kind of stories, the quieter more subtle ones revealed the often unique and untold stories of black millennials that show how even dreaming may differ between communities. So we really need to listen and hear the stories of this generation now more than ever is the baby boomers, age and millennials come to prominence. We can talk all we want to about pickling pickling businesses and Bush in Brooklyn, or avocado toast, but leaving out the stories and the voices of black millennial large swaths of the population, it will only increase divisions. So stories a blackmail. Feels Brown millennials and all millennials of color really need to be told, and they also need to be listened to. We'd be far better off country and world think you. For more, TED talks at Ted dot com. Ex-..

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"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

09:38 min | 1 year ago

"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"This. Ted talk features journalist e Perlman recorded live at Ted salon up for debate. Twenty nineteen. Ever want to twenty fifth hour in the day on before breakfast. Laura Vander camp can help you get a little more out of each day. Learn things like how to find more time to read or why planning your week on Friday is better every weekday morning. It'll help you feel like you're ready for the day one productivity tip at a time. Find before breakfast on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you listen. So in the run-up to the two thousand sixteen election. I was like most of us watching the rise in discord, and vitriol and nastiness in our public spaces. It was as crazy uptick in polarization. It was both disheartening and distressing. And so I started thinking with a fellow journalist. Jeremy, hey about how we might practice our craft differently. How we might go to the heart of divides to places of conflict like journalists always have. But then once they're do something, really different. We knew we wanted to take the core tools of our craft careful vetting of information diligent research curiosity a commitment to serving the public good to serving our democracy and do something new. And so we mapped out this process what we call dialogue journalism for going to the heart of social and political divides. And then once they are building journalism supported conversations between people on opposite side of opposite sides of polarizing issues. But how actually to do this in in a world that we that so divided? So deeply divided when we live in a world in which we cousins and aunts and uncles can't talk to one another when we often live in separate and distinct news ecosystems, and when we reflexively and habitually malign and dismiss those with whom we disagree. But we wanted to try. And so right after the two thousand sixteen election in that in that time between the election and the inauguration. We partnered with the Alabama media group to do something really different. We brought twenty-five Trump supporters from Alabama together in conversation with twenty-five Clinton supporters from California, and we brought them together in a closed. Moderated Facebook group that we kept open for a month. What we wanted to do was to give them a place to engage with genuine curiosity and openness, and we wanted to support them in building relationships not just with each other. But with us as journalists, and then we wanted to supply facts and information facts and information that they could actually receive and process and use to undergird their conversations. And so as a prelude to this conversation conversation the first step in what we call dialogue journalism. We asked what they thought the other side thought of them. So we asked. The Trump supporters from Alabama what they thought the Clinton supporters in California thought of them this some of what they said. Do you think we are religious bible thumpers that were backwards and hick and stupid? They think that we all have confederate flags in our yards that we're racist, and sexist and uneducated they think we're barefoot and pregnant with dirt driveways, and then think we're all Prissy butts, and we walk around and hoop skirts with cotton fields in the background. And then we asked that same questions of question of the Californians. What do you think the alabamians think about you? And they said this that we're crazy liberal Californians that were not patriotic or snobby, and we're elitist or godless and more permissive with our children, and we're focused on our career is not our family, and there were lead est pie in the sky intellectuals. Re rich people wholefood eating very out of touch. So by asking questions like this at the start of every conversation, and by dente firing and sharing stereotypes, we find that people people on all sides begin to see the simplistic and often mean-spirited caricatures they carry and in that after that, we can move into a process of genuine conversation. So in the two years since that launch California, Alabama project, we've gone onto host dialogues and partnerships with media organizations across the country and they've been about some of our most contentious issues guns immigration race education. And what we found remarkably is that real dialogue is in fact possible, and that we given a chance and structure around doing so many not all but many of our fellow citizens are eager to engage with the other. Too often. Journalists have sharpened divides in the name of drama or readership or and service to our own views, and too often we've gone to each side, quoting partisan voice on one side and a partisan voice on the other with telling anecdotal lead in a pithy. Final quote, all of which readers are keen to mind for bias. But our dialogue based process has a slower pace and a different center. And our work is guided by the principle that dialogue across difference is essential to a functioning democracy and the journalism and journalists have a multifaceted real role to play in supporting that. So how do we work at every stage where as transparent as possible about our methods and our motives at every stage. We take time to answer people's questions. Explain why we're doing what we're doing. We tell people it's not a trap. No one's there to tell you. You're stupid. No one's there to tell your experience doesn't matter. And we always ask for really different sort of behavior a repack turning away from the reflexive name calling so entrenched in our discourse that most of us on all sides, don't even notice it anymore. So people often come into our conversations of angrily. And they they say things like how can you believe acts, and how can you read y and and you believe that this happened? But generally in this miracle that the delights us every time people begin to introduce themselves, and they begin to explain who they are. And where they come from. And they begin to ask questions of one another and slowly over time people circle back again and again to difficult topics each time with a little more empathy a little more nuance. A little more curiosity. And are journalists moderators work really hard to support this because it's not a debate. It's not a battle. It's not a Sunday morning talk show. It's not the flinging of talking points. It's not the stacking of memes and gifts articles with headlines that prove a point. And it's not about scoring political victories with question traps. So what we've learned. Is that our state of discord is bad for everyone. It is a deeply unhappy state of being and people tell us again. And again, they said they appreciate to chance to engage. Respectfully with curiosity with openness, and that they're glad and relieved for chance to put down their arms. And so we do our work in direct challenge to the political climate in our country right now. And we do it knowing that it is difficult challenging work to hold and support people in opposing backgrounds and conversation, and we do it. Knowing democracy depends on our ability to address our shared problems together. And we do this by putting community at the heart of our journalistic process by putting our egos to the side to listen, I to listen deeply to listen around through our own biases. Our own habits of thought and to support others in doing the same. And we do this work knowing that journalism is an institution is struggling and that it has always had a role to play. And can we'll continue to have a role to play in supporting the exchange of ideas, and views. So for many of the participants in our groups, there are lasting reverberations. Many people have become Facebook friends, and in real life friends to across political lines after we closed that first Trump Clinton project. About two thirds of the women went on to form their own Facebook group, and they chose a moderator from each state, and they continue to talk about difficult and challenging issues and people tell us again. And again that they are grateful for the opportunity to be a part of this work grateful to know, the people on the other side aren't crazy grateful that they've had a chance to connect with people. They wouldn't have otherwise talk to. And a lot of what we've seen in learn despite the fact that we call ourselves spaceship media is not at all rocket science. If you call people names if you label them if you insult them. They're not inclined to listen to you. Snark doesn't help. Shame doesn't help. Condescension doesn't help. Genuine communication takes practice and effort and restraint and self awareness. There isn't an algorithm to solve where we are. Because real human connection is in fact, real human connection. So lead with curiosity emphasized discussion, not debate get out of your silo. Because real connection across difference. This is a Sav that our democracy sorely needs. Thank you. For more, TED talks. But at Ted dot com.

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"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"This. Ted talk features worked philosopher ROY behind in conversation with Ted institute. Curator Bryn Friedman recorded live at Ted salons zebra twenty eighteen. You're a guy whose company funds these programs and invests. So why should we trust you to not have a bias? And tell us something really useful for the rest of us about the future of work. So yes, I am. And you know, when you wake up in the morning, and you read the newspaper, and it says the robots are coming. They may take all our jobs as a startup investor focused on the future of work are fund was the first one to say artificial intelligence should be a focus for us. And so I woke up one morning and read that and said, oh my gosh. They're talking about me. That's me who's the one who's doing that. And and then I thought wait a minute. If things continue then maybe not only will the startups in which we invest struggle because there won't be people to have jobs to pay for the things that they make and by them, but our economy and society. He might struggle to and look I should be the guy who sits here and tells you everything is going to be fine. You know, it's all gonna work out. Great. Hey, when they introduced the machine years later, there's more tellers in banks. It's true. And yet when I looked at it I thought this is going to accelerate. And if it does exceleron there's a chance the center doesn't hold I figured somebody must know the answer to this. There are so many ideas out there, and I read all the books, and I went to the conferences. And at one point we counted more than one hundred efforts to study the future of work. And it was a frustrating experience because I'd hear the same back and forth over and over. Again, the robots are coming. And then somebody else would say, oh, don't worry about that. They've always said that and it turns out. Okay. And then somebody else would say, well, you know, it's really about the meaning of your job anyway. And then everybody's sort of shrug and golf and drink. And it felt like there was this kind of kabuki theatre of this discussion where nobody was talking to each other and many of the people that I knew and worked with in the technology world. We're not speaking to policymakers the policymakers were not speaking to them. And so we partnered with a non-partisan think tank NGO called new America to study this issue, and we brought together a group of people, including an AI czar technology company and a video game designer and heartland conservative and a Wall Street investor in a socialist magazine editor I mean, literally all in the same room. It was occasionally awkward and try to figure out. What is it that will happen here? The question we asked was simple. It was what is the effect of technology on work going to be? And we looked out ten to twenty years because we wanted to look out far enough that there could be real change. But soon enough that we weren't talking about teleportation or anything like that. And we recognized and I think every year we're reminded of this in the world that predicting what's going to happen is hard. So instead of predicting there are other things you can do which is you can try to imagine alternate possible futures. Which is what we did. We did a scenario planning exercise. Is. And we imagined cases where no job is safe. We imagine cases where every job is safe. And we imagined every distinct possibility we could and the result, which really surprised us was when you think through those futures. And you think what should we do the answers about what we should do actually turn out to be the same? No matter what happens and the irony of looking out ten to twenty years into the future is you realized that the things we want to act on are actually already happening right now, the automation is right now the future is right now. So what does that mean? And what does that tell us? So if the future is now, what is it that we should be doing? And what should we be thinking about after understand the problem? I and so the data are that as the economy becomes more productive and individual workers. Become more productive their wages haven't risen if you look at the proportion of prime working age men in the United States, at least who work now versus in nineteen sixty we. Have three times as many men not working. And then you hear the stories I sat down with a group of WalMart workers. And I said, what do you think about this cashier, this futuristic self-checkout thing? And they said, well, that's nice. But have you heard about the cash recycler because that is a machine that's being installed right now and eliminating two jobs at every WalMart right now. And so we just geez. We don't understand the problem. And so what did we do? We looked at the voices that were the ones that were excluded, which is all of the people affected by this change. And we decided to listen to them sort of automation and its discontents. And I've spent the last couple of years doing that I've been to Flint Michigan and Youngstown Ohio talking about entrepreneurs trying to make it work in a very different environment from New York or San Francisco or London or Tokyo, I've been to prisons twice to talk to inmates about their jobs after they leave. I've sat down with truck drivers to ask them about the self-driving truck with people who in addition to their fulltime job care for an aging relative. And when you talk to people there were two themes

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"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"This. Ted talk features organizational ethnographer Matt being recorded live at Ted salon. The NextWave twenty eighteen. Here's a quick and freeway to finally stick to your New Year's resolutions. Start listening to podcasts on Spotify with more than one hundred and fifty thousand podcasts, including many of the world's most popular self improvement shows, you can learn just about anything even how to get better. At listening to podcasts about getting better at things. So start the year off right with podcasts on Spotify. And stay after this episode to listen to a bonus talk on making the most of the new year brought to you by Spotify. It's six thirty in the morning and Kristen is wheeling her prostate patient into the OR. She's a resident a surgeon in training. It's her job to learn today. She's really hoping to do some of the nerve sparing extremely delicate dissection that can preserve erectile function. That'll be up to the attending surgeon though. But he's not there yet. She and the team put the patient under and she leads the initial eight inch incision in the lower abdomen. Once she's got that clamped back. She tells the nurse to call the attending he arrives couns up and from there on in therefore hands are mostly in that patient with him guiding but Kristen leading the way when the prostates out, and yes, he let Kristin do a little nerve sparing. He rips off his scrubs. He starts to do paperwork. Kristen. Kristen closes the patient by eight fifteen with a junior resident looking over her shoulder and she lets him do the final line of sutures. Kristen feels great patients going to be fine. And no doubt she's a better surgeon than she was at six thirty. Now, this is extreme work, but Kristen's learning to do her job the way that most of us do watching an expert for a bit getting involved in easy, safe parts of the work and progressing to riskier and harder tasks as they guide and decide she's ready my whole life. I've been fascinated by this kind of learning it feels elemental part of what makes us human. It has different names apprenticeship coaching mentorship on the job training in surgery. It's called see one do one teach one. But the process is the same. And it's been the main path to skill around the globe. For thousands of years. Right now, we're handling a I in a way that blocks that path we're sacrificing learning in our quest for productivity, I found this. I in surgery while I was at MIT. But now, I've got evidence it's happening all over in very different industries and with very different kinds of AI. If we do nothing about this. Millions of us are going to hit a brick wall. As we try to learn to deal with. Let's go back to surgery to see how. Festival or six months. It's six thirty AM again, and Kristen is willing another prostate patient in. But this time to the robotic OR. The attending leads attaching a forearmed thousand pound robot to the patient. They both rip off their scrubs head to control consoles ten or fifteen feet away. And Kristen just watches. The robot allows the attending to do the whole procedure himself. So he basically does he knows she needs practice. He wants to give her control. But he also knows she'd be slower and make more mistakes and his patient comes first so Kristen has no hope of getting anywhere near those nerves during this rotation. She'll be lucky if she operates more than fifteen minutes during a four hour procedure. And she knows that when she slips up he'll tap a touchscreen. And she'll be watching again feeling like a kid in the corner with a dunce cap. Like all the studies of robots and work. I've done in the last eight years. I started this one with a big open question. How do we learn to work with intelligent machines to find out? I spent two and a half years observing dozens of residents and surgeons doing traditional and robotic surgery interviewing them, and in general hanging out with the residents as they tried to learn I covered eighteen of the top US, teaching hospitals. And the story was the same. Most residents were in Kristen's shoes. They got to see one plenty. But the do one was barely available. So they couldn't struggle and they weren't learning. This was important news for surgeons, but I needed to know how widespread it was where else was using AI blocking learning on the job. To find out. I've connected with the small, but growing group of young researchers who've done boots on the ground. Studies of work involving a I in very diverse settings like startups policing investment banking and online education like me, they spent at least a year and many hundreds of hours observing interviewing an often working side by side with the people they studied we share data. And I look for patterns, no matter the industry, the work. The I the story was the same organizations were trying harder and harder to get results from and they were peeling learners away from expert work as they did it start up managers. We're outsourcing their customer contact cops had to learn to deal with crime. Forecasts without expert support junior bankers were getting cut out of complex analysis and professors

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"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"This. Ted talk features social activist ruby sales recorded live at Ted salon humanizing, our future twenty eighteen. Like, TED talks. You should check out the Ted radio hour with NPR. Stay tuned after this talk to hear sneak peek of this week's episode. I want to share with you. A moment in my life. When the hurt and moons of racism were both deadly. And paralyzing for me. And I think what I've learned. Can be a source of healing. But all of us. When I was seventeen. Years old. I was a college student at Tuskegee university. And I was a worker in the southern freedom movement, which we call the civil rights move. During this time. I met. Another young twenty six zero white seminary and college student named Jonathan Daniels from Cambridge Massachusetts. He and I. We're both part of a generation of delisting young people. Whose life has been knighted? By the freedom fire. There are Inari black people were spreading around the nation and throughout the south. We had come to lounge county to work in the movement, and it was a non violent movement to redeem the souls of America. We believe that everyone both black and white people in the south. Could find a redemptive path way? L of the stranglehold of racism that had gripped them for more than four hundred years. In the hot summer day in August. John, listen, I joined a demonstration of local young black people who were protesting the exploitatation. By their fit sharecroppers black sharecroppers by richly landholders who chooses them out of their money. We decided to demonstrate alongside them and on the morning that we showed up for the demonstration we were met with a mob of how white men was baseball, bats, shotguns. Any weapon that you could imagine. And they were threatening to kill us in the sheriff. Seeing the danger that we face arrested us and put us on a garbage truck and took us to the local jail. Where we were put in sales with the most inhumane conditions, you can imagine. And we were threatened by the jail is. With drinking water that came from toilets. We were finally released on a six day without our without any knowledge without any forewarning just out of the clear blue sky, we were made to leave. And we knew that this was a dangerous sign because Goodman, swore an end Cheney had also been forced to leave jail and were murdered. Because no one knew what had happened to them. And so despite fervent resistance, the sheriff made us leaves the jail in. Of course, nobody was waiting for us. It was hot. One of those seven days where you can literally feel the payment. Seeping developer seeping out of the pavement. And the group of about fourteen of us. Selected Jonathan Daniels. Father Marshall who has recently come to the county. Joyous belly? A local seventeen year old girl, and I to go and get drinks. Will we got to the door? A white man was standing in the doorway meal. Shotgun and he said bitch blow, your brains out. And before I could even react before. I could even process what was going on Jonathan intentionally pulled my blouse, and I feel back thinking that I was dead. And then that instant when I looked up Johnson Daniels has was standing in the line of fire. And he took the blast. And he saved my life. I

Jonathan Daniels Johnson Daniels TED America Tuskegee university NPR Massachusetts Cambridge Father Marshall developer John Goodman Cheney four hundred years seventeen year seven days six day
"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"This. Ted talk features authored Casey Gerald recorded live at Ted salon belonging, twenty eighteen. This talk contains mature language. My mother called this some. Stage in an invention. She'd come across a few snippets of my memoir, which one even out yet. And she was concerned. It wasn't the sex. It was the language that disturbed her for example. I have been so many things along my curious journey a poor boy, a nigga Yale man, a Harvard man, a faggot a Christian a crack baby alleged the spawn of Satan the second coming Casey. That's just page six. So you may understand my mother's worry. But she wanted only to make one small change. So she called and she began. Hey. You are a man not a faggot you not a pumpkin. Let me tell you the difference. You are prominent you are intelligent you dress. Well, you know, how to speak people like you. You don't walk around doing a hand like a punk? You're not a vagabond on the street. You are an upstanding person who just happens to be gay. Don't put yourself over there. When you or over here. She thought she'd done me, a favour. And in a way, she had her call clarified. What am trying to do with my life? And in my work as a writer, which is to send one simple message way. We're taught to live has got to change. I learned this the hard way I was born not on the wrong side of the tracks. But on the wrong side of a whole river, the trinity down in Oakland, Texas was raised there in part by my grandmother who worked as domestic. And by my sister who adopted me a few years after our mother who struggled with mental illness disappeared. There was that disappearance there began when I was thirteen and lasted for five years that shaped the person, I became the personnel laid ahead to unbecoming. Before she left. My mother had been my human hiding place. She was the only other person who seemed estranges me beautifully. Strange some mix of blanche do blah from a streetcar named desire and in one thousand nine hundred eighty s Whitney Houston. I'm not saying she was perfect. Just sure benefited from her imperfections. And maybe that's what magic is. After all useful mistake. So when she began to disappear for days at a time, I turned to some magic of my own struck me as from both the DACA conjure up. My mother just by walking perfectly from my elementary school at the top of a steep hill. All the way down to my grandmother's house placing one foot in one foot only in each sidewalk square. I couldn't that any part of any foot touch the line between the square I couldn't skip square. All the way to the last where at last blade of grass that separated our lawn from our driveway, and our bullshit, you not it worked just wants to. But if my perfect walk could not bring my mother back I found that this approach had other uses found that everyone else in charge around me love nothing more than perfection obedience submission, or at least. If I submit it. They wouldn't bother me too much. So. Took a bargain that I'd like to see in a prison stodgy prison in Berlin on a sign that read key who adapts can live tolerably. It was a bargain that helped ensure head a place to stay in food to eat. Bargain that warned me praise of teachers and can strangers a bargain the paid off big time it saying when one day at seventeen and a man from Yale showed up at my high school to recruit me for yells football team felt is out of the blue to me, then as it made you now the Yale man say it everybody saying that this was the best thing that could ever happen to me. Best thing that can happen to the whole community take this ticket. Boy, they told me. I was not. So sure. L Samed another world entire cold foreign hostile place on the first day of my recruiting. Visit I text my sister and excuse for not going these people are so weird. She replied you'll fit right in.

Whitney Houston Casey Gerald Yale writer Oakland Texas Berlin football one foot five years one day
"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"This. Ted talk features writer. Gabby were There'a recorded live at Ted salon radical craft twenty eighteen. I'm Chris Anderson. The guy who gets to run Ted. We've just launched a new podcast called the Ted interview where I get to sit down with Connick Ted speakers to dive deeper into their ideas in on next episode. I speak with Mellody Hobson. She argues that we need to stop being colorblind and stop being color. Brave. Not seeing race is not working it just not working for our society. So those people are holding onto that as a badge of honor. I want them to actually purposefully see race is join me for the Ted interview. Wherever you listen. At no point that I think superheroes would become such a huge part of my life. As a kid. I looked at them. And I saw everything I wasn't. They had big muscles, supermodel. Good. Looks and phenomenal. Cosmic powers and me. I kind of look like this except shorter and with frizzy hair, and I never felt powerful. I was always just one big ball of nervous soft energy and superheroes much like the bullies. That school didn't seem to have a lot of room for that for me. So I stayed away. And besides who needs superheroes? When you're surrounded by Puerto Rican women from the Bronx. Mighty as we're cops. And paramedics my well as we're seamstresses and sold jewelry up the street and my mom got her master's degree in education and taught kindergarten in New York City public schools for over thirty years. So my superheroes were sitting around the dinner table with me. And I don't know how much time you've spent with Puerto Rican women from the Bronx. But we're also some of the world's greatest storytellers. And I'd sit there at my grandmother's dining room table. And I listened to the women in my family tell these wild rambunctious tales about their about navigating their lives in the Bronx. And I wanted to be them so bad, but I wasn't tough like them either the mostly I listened, and I soaked it in and I found myself gravitating to the soft threads in their stories. And I wrote those down the funny the goofy. The gentle those were my in storytelling. So much. So that I wrote a young adult novel called Juliet takes the breath about it. So be queer Puerto Rican girl from the Bronx, navigating sexuality, family and identity. And on the strength of Juliet, marvel comics taps me to write the solos series for their first ever Latina, lesbian superhero America challenges. Listen. Okay. Created by Joe, Casey. And Nick gotta for the marvel miniseries. Vengeance. America Chavez has been in the marvel universe for over seven years. She's tough Latina, and she so strong that she can punch portals into other dimensions. No, right and people were so excited because finally someone who shared her identities queer and Latina would be writing her story. And I saw that. Right. And we'll also when I looked at America, I saw a young Latina in survival mode. See because her mom's had sacrificed themselves to the universe when she was a kid, and she'd been on her own ever since no wonder she had to be tough and that link that link of having the beat tough that rested. Heavy with me like I said, I'm from the Bronx. The Bronx is tough tough like walking past sidewalk memorials and dodging cop towers on your way to the train type tough with stuff happens. That's bad. People are like yo you gotta keep it moving. You gotta keep trucking don't cry. Don't let it gets you. And my mom, and my and my Wella's I never saw them take a moment to rest or to invest in self care, and they're soft it never left the house. And so that was the first thing that I wanted to give to America the thing that I wished I'd been able to give tomorrow Wella's. And my the thing that I'm trying to give to my mom now permission to be soft. Like, it's okay. To sit in silence. And go on a journey. Just the discover yourself, and you're paying will make you crumble, and you will fall and you'll need to ask people for help. And I thought okay and that being vulnerable as good for us. But see I didn't come to like all this, compassionate and healing stuff. Like, you know out of nowhere. And so when it came to America story, I wanted to give her the space to be human to mess up and to find soft on her own. So she kind of had to quit her day job. You know what I'm saying? I had to give her a superhero sabbatical. And the first thing I did was enrolled her in Justice Sonia Sotomayor university.

America Ted America Chavez Mellody Hobson Puerto Rican Juliet Chris Anderson Gabby features writer Justice Sonia Sotomayor univer New York City Nick Joe Casey thirty years seven years
"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

05:27 min | 2 years ago

"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"This Ted talk features political theorist and author. Theresa Beijing recorded live at Ted salon bright line initiative. Twenty eighteen. I'm Chris Anderson. The guy who gets to run Ted. We've just launched a new podcast called the Ted interview where I get to sit down with icon conic, Ted speakers to dive deeper into their ideas in on next episode a conversation with author Steven pinker about whether shock horror the world might actually be getting better. It's not seeing the glass half full or being optimistic to say that global poverty has declined from ninety percent ten percent. That's a fact, and it's the fact that people aren't aware of is join me. So the Ted interview wherever you listen. Let's get this out of the way I'm here because I wrote a book about civility, and because that book came out right around the two thousand sixteen American presidential election. I started getting lots of invitations to come and talk about civility. And why we need more of it in American politics. So great the only problem was that I'd written that book about civility because I was convinced that civility is. Bullshit. Now that may sound like a highly uncivil thing to say and lucky for you. And for my publisher. I did eventually come to change my mind in the course of writing that book and studying the long history of civility and religious tolerance in the seventeenth century. I came to discover that there is a virtue of civility and far from being bullshit. It's actually absolutely essential. Especially for tolerance societies so societies. Like this one that promised not only to protect diversity. But also the heated in sometimes even hateful disagreements that that diversity inspires. You see the thing about disagreement is that there is a reason that disagreeable is a synonym for unpleasant as the English philosopher Thomas Hobbes pointed out all the way back in sixteen forty two. That's because the mere act of disagreement is offensive and hops is still right. It works like this. So if you and I disagree, and I'm right because I always am how am I to make sense of the fact that you are so very very wrong. It couldn't possibly be that. You've just come to a different conclusion in good faith. No, you must be up to something. You must be stupid bigoted interested. Maybe you're insane and up the same goes the other way. Right. So the mere fact of your disagreeing with me is implicitly an insult not only to my views, but to my intelligence to and things only get. At worse when the disagreements at stake are the ones that we somehow consider to be fundamental whether to our world views or to our identities, you know, the kinds of disagreement. I mean, one doesn't discuss religion or politics or increasingly the politics of popular culture at the dinner table because these are the disagreements these are the things that people really seriously disagree about and they define themselves against their opponents in the controversy. But of course, those disagreements those fundamental disagreements are precisely the ones that tolerant societies like the United States proposed to tolerate which perhaps explains why historically at least tolerant societies haven't been the happy Clapper communities of difference that you sometimes hear about no they tend to be places where people have to hold their noses in rub along together despite their mutual contempt. That's what I learned from studying religion. Tolerance in early modern England and America, and I also learned that the virtue that makes that unmerciful coexistence if you will possible is the virtue of civility because civility makes our disagreements tolerable. So that we can share a life together. Even if we don't share a face religious, political or otherwise. Still I couldn't help. But notice that when most people talk about civility today, and boy, do they talk about civility allot, they seem to something else in mind. So if civility is the virtue that makes it possible to tolerate disagreement. So that we can actually engage with our opponents talking about civility seems to be mainly a strategy of disengagement. It's a little bit like threatening to take your ball and go home when the game isn't going your way because the funny thing about incivility is that it's always the sin of our opponents. It's funny when it comes to our own bad behaviour. Well, we seem to develop sudden onset usua- or we can always justify it as an appropriate response to the latest outrage from our opponents..

Ted Ted salon Thomas Hobbes Chris Anderson Theresa Beijing Steven pinker publisher United States England America ninety percent ten percent
"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

12:49 min | 2 years ago

"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"This Ted talk features, hospitals, entrepreneur, and author chip Conley recorded live at Ted salon, Verizon twenty eighteen. This TED talks daily episode is brought to you by Mariot hotels. Discover what happens when ideas have a place to grow together Mary at hotels and Ted are inspiring new perspectives through curated. TED talks available at Mariot hotels around the world stream talks and other original Ted content on your favorite devices and spark your next big idea while on the road. It was my third day on the job at a hot Silicon Valley startup. In early two thousand thirteen. I was twice the age of the dozen engineers in the room. I've been brought into the company because I was a seasoned expert in my field. But in this particular room, I felt like a newbie amongst the tech geniuses. I was listening to them talk and thinking, the best thing I could do was be invisible. And then suddenly the twenty five year old wizard leading the meeting stared at me and asked if you ship to feature and no one used it, did it really ship. Ship a feature in that moment. Chip knew he was in deep ship. I had no idea what he was talking about. I just sat there awkwardly and Mercifully. He moved onto someone else. I slid down in my chair and I couldn't wait for that meeting to end. That was my introduction to Airbnb. I was asked and invited by the three millennial co-founders to join their company to help them take their fast growing tech startup and turn it into a global hospitality brand as well as to be the in house mentor for CEO Brian chessy. Now I'd spent from age twenty six to fifty to being a boutique hotel entrepreneur. And so I guess I learned a few things along the way and accumulated some hospitality knowledge. But after my first week I realized that the brave new home sharing world didn't need much of my old school bricks and mortar hotel insights. A stark reality rocked me. What do I have to offer. I don't. I never been in tech company before five and a half years ago. I had never heard of the sharing economy, nor did I have an Uber or lift app on my phone. This was not my natural habitat. So I decided at that moment that I could either run for the hills or cast judgment on these young geniuses, or instead turn the judgment into curiosity and actually see if I could match my wise is with their fresh eyes. I fancied myself a modern Margaret need amongst them Eleni ELS. And I quickly learned that I had as much to offer them as they did to me the more I have seen and learned about our respective generations. The more I realize that we often don't trust each other Nuff to actually share our respective wisdom. We may share a border, but we don't necessarily trust each other enough to share that respective wisdom. I believe looking at the modern workplace, the. That trade agreement of our time is opening up these intergenerational pipelines of wisdom so that we can all learn from each other forty percent of us. Almost forty percent of us in this in the United States have a boss that's younger than us. And that number is growing quickly. Power is cascading to the young like never before because of our increasing reliance on d q. digital intelligence. We're seeing young founders of companies in their early twenties scale them up to global giants. By the time they get to thirty. And yet we expect these young digital leaders to somehow miraculously embody the relationship was Dems. We older workers have had decades to learn. It's hard to microwave, your emotional intelligence. There's ample evidence that gender an f.. Ethnically diverse companies are more effective, but what about age? This is a very important question because for the first time ever we have five generations in the workplace at the same time unintentionally, maybe it's time we got a little bit more intentional about how we worked collectively. There have been a number of European studies that have shown that age, diverse teams are more effective and successful. So why is it that only eight percent of the companies that have that have a diversity and inclusion program have actually expanded that strategy to include age as just as important of a demographic as gender or race. Maybe they didn't get the memo. The world is getting older. One of the pair of paradoxes are times as baby boomers are more vibrant and healthy longer into life. We're actually working later into life, and yet we're feeling less and less relevant. Some of us feel like a carton of milk and old carton of milk with an expiration date stamped on our wrinkled foreheads for many of us. In midlife, this isn't just a feeling. It is a harsh reality when we suddenly lose our job and the phone stops ringing for. Many of us justifiably. We worry that people see our experience as a liability, not an asset. You've heard of the old phrase or maybe the relatively new phrase sixty is the new forty physically right? When it comes to power in the workplace. Today. Thirty is the new fifty. All right. Well, this is pretty exciting, right? Truthfully power is moving ten years younger. We're all gonna live ten years longer do the math society has created a new twenty year irrelevancy gap midlife used to be forty five to sixty five. But I would suggest that now stretches into a midlife marathon forty years long from thirty five to seventy five. But wait, there is a bright spot. Why is it that we actually get smarter and wiser about our humanity? As we age our physical pique, maybe our twenties, our financial and salary peak, maybe age fifty, but are emotional. A peak is in midlife and beyond because we have developed pattern recognition about ourselves and others. So how can we get companies to tap into that wisdom of the midlife folks just as they nurture their digital. A young geniuses as well. The most successful companies today and in the future will actually learn how to create a powerful alchemy of the two. Here's how the outcome worked for me at Airbnb. I was assigned a young smart partner who helped me develop a hospitality department early on Laura Hughes could see that I was a little lost in this habitat. So she often sat right next to me in meetings so she could be my tech translator, and I could write her notes and she could tell me that's what that means. Laura was twenty seven years old. She works for Google for four years, and then for a year and a half at Airbnb, when I met her like many millennial of her cohorts, she had actually grown into a managerial role before she'd gotten any formal leadership training. I don't care if you're in the BBC world. The beat a SeaWorld SeaWorld are the eight zero world businesses fundamentally h. two h.. Human to human. And yet Laura's approach to leadership was really formed in the technocratic world, and it was purely metric driven. One of the things you said to me in the first few months is I love the fact that your approach to leadership is to create a compelling vision. The becomes a northstar for us. Now my fact knowledge as in how many rooms made cleans in an eight hour shift might not be all that important in a home sharing world, my process knowledge of how do you get things done based upon understanding the underlying motivations of everybody in the room was incredibly valuable in a company where most people didn't have a lot of organizational experience. As I spent more time at Airbnb, I realized it's possible a new kind of elder was emerging in the workplace. Not the elder of the past who actually was regarded with reverence. No. What is striking. About the modern elder. Is there relevance their ability to use timeless wisdom and apply it to modern day problems? Maybe it's time we actually valued wisdom as much as we do disruption, and maybe it's time not just maybe it is time for us to definitely reclaim the word elder and give it a modern twist. The modern elder is as much an intern as they are a mentor because they realize in a world that is changing so quickly there beginner's mind and their catalytic curiosity is a life-affirming. Alexa, not just for themselves, but for everyone around them. Intergenerational improv has been known in music and the arts think Tony Bennett and lady Gaga or Winton Marcellus and the young stars of jazz, this kind of business. This kind of riffing in the business world is often called mutual mentorship, millennial de cue for gen-x and boomer e q. I got to experience that kind of intergenerational reciprocity with Laura and our stellar data science team when we were actually remaking and evolving the Airbnb, peer to peer review system, using Laura's analytical mind and my human centered intuition with that perfect alchemy of algorithm and people wisdom, we were able to create an instantaneous feedback feedback loop that helped our hosts better understand the needs of our guests. High-tech meets high touch at Airbnb. I also learned as a modern elder that my role was to intern publicly and mentor. Privately search engines are brilliant giving you an answer, but a wise sage guide can act off you just the right question. Google does not understand at least not yet nuance like a finely attuned human heart and mind over time to my surprise. Dozens and dozens of young employees at Airbnb sought me out for private mentoring sessions. But in reality, we were offering often just mentoring each other in some CEO. Brian chessy brought me in for my industry knowledge. But what I really offered was my well earned wisdom. Maybe it's time we retire the term knowledge worker and replaced it with wisdom orcre. We have five generations in the workplace today, and we can operate like separate isolationist countries or we can actually start to find a way to bridge these generational borders. And it's time for us to actually look at how to change up the physics of wisdom. So. It actually flows in both directions from old to young and from young to old, how can you apply this in your own life personally? Who can you reach out to to create a mutual mentorship relationship and organizationally? How can you create the conditions to foster an intergenerational flow of wisdom? This is the new sharing economy. Thank you. For more TED talks go to Ted dot com.

Airbnb Ted Laura Hughes midlife chip Conley TED Brian chessy CEO Ted salon Google Mariot Verizon United States intern Nuff BBC Alexa Dems
"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"ted salons" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Tracy, Kaz e recorded live at Ted salon, bright line initiative, twenty eighteen. Friends. I look at this photograph and I have to ask myself, you know, I think I've seen this somewhere before people marching in the street for Justice, but I know it's not the same photograph that I would have seen because I wouldn't take my oaks to be a police officer until nineteen Eighty-nine. And I've been in the business for over twenty five years and identifying as African American woman. I know things have gotten better, but even as I learned about public safety, I wondered if what I was doing on the street was hurting are harming the community. And I often wondered if you know how did they perceive me this woman in uniform. But there's one thing that I knew I knew there was a way that we could do this probably difference or better a way that preserved dignity and guarantee Justice, but I also knew that police could not do it alone. It's the co-production pub. Safety. There's a lot of history with us. You know, we know. Loss. The relationship between the African American community and the police is painful. One often filled with mistrust is been studied by social scientists. It has been studied by government all both promising hopeful new ways, long-term fixes. But all we want is to be safe and our safety is intertwined and that we know in order to have great relationships and relationships built on trust that we're going to have to have communication. And in this advent in this text of the world that we've got going on trying to do this with social media, it's very difficult thing to do. We also have to examine our current policing practices and we have to set those things aside at no longer service. So in New York, that meant stop question frisk that meant really holding up the numbers as opposed to relationships. And it really didn't allow the officers the opportunity to get to know the community in which they serve. But you see there is a better way and we know it's called co production. So in the nineteen seventies Elinor Ostrom came up with the theory really called co production in this is how it works. He bring people into the space that come with separate expertise, and you also come with new ideas, lived experience, and you produce a new knowledge. And when you produce that new knowledge and you.

African American community Tracy Elinor Ostrom New York officer Kaz e twenty five years