18 Burst results for "Ted dot"

Transforming Healthcare With Rebecca Love

Outcomes Rocket

05:55 min | 2 weeks ago

Transforming Healthcare With Rebecca Love

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Everyone saw marquez here. Today i have the privilege of hosting rebecca love. She is a nurse. Entrepreneur inventor author. Tech's speaker and i nurse featured on ted dot com and part of the inaugural nursing panel featured at south by south two thousand eighteen. Rebecca was the first director of nurses innovation and entrepreneurship in the united states at northeastern school of nursing the funding initiative in the country designed to empower nurses as innovators and entrepreneurs where she founded the nurse hackathon the movement as lead to transformational change in the nursing profession in two thousand nineteen rebecca with a group of leading nurses the world founded and is president of sand sale the society of nurse scientists innovators entrepreneurs and leaders a nonprofit that quickly attained recognition by the united nations as an affiliate member to the on. Rebecca is an experienced nurse entrepreneur founding hire nurses dot com and twenty thirteen which was acquired in two thousand eighteen by realto in the uk where she served as the managing director of us markets until its acquisition and twenty nineteen currently rebecca serves as the principal of clinical innovation at optimize rx. She's passionate about empowering nurses and creating communities to help nurses innovate create and collaborate start businesses and inventions to transform healthcare. Such a privilege to have you here. Rebecca i'm really excited to touch on this very important topic of nurses going to be with you. Thank you for having me absolutely. And so rebecca. You've done some really neat things in your healthcare career and you know before we jump into the actual details of what we're gonna talk about. I love to hear more about you than and what what keeps you inspired in in your healthcare career. I think that being a background and being a nurse And washing with the front lines going for and doing on a daily basis especially in the face of i think every day i wake up. I'm inspired by those nurses to go out selflessly to transform and take care of individuals that most of I would wonder if we would cross that. Threshold and nursing was a second career choice for me in life and it was inspired because my mom really encouraged me to pursue nursing. Because she said that. Although there's a whole bunch of great leaders in other areas we needed really strong nursing leadership to sort of transform the future of the profession. And i took it very seriously after becoming immersed in watching certain challenges that was basically in the profession. I don't know if you know. Some of the statistics but percents of nursing graduates leave the bedside within two years of practice which is nearly the largest exodus of any profession out there and we are facing potential nursing shortage of vermillion nurses in the united states. And i think what motivates me is. How can we stop that accident. And how can we secure this profession at the future of healthcare And i think. I'm still motivated by both that here that there may not be nurses by the bedside in the future as much as i am inspired to transform. What a career for nursing. Looks like that me inspire the best to choose that profession debt. And you know. I wasn't aware that's a. That's a pretty big number of of nurses leaving and also want to say thanks to all the nurses listening or if you have somebody in your family your friends that are nurses at the front line. As as rebecca mentioned it's tough and especially during this pandemic The importance of what you do is critical so so yeah let's kick things off with a thank you and yes a rebecca. Why why so many people like white white is so many people eat nursing. Yeah there's there's some interesting study that are being collaborated on this entire thing. Why thirty to fifty percent of them are leaving the bedside within cheers of practice and my dad asked me this question. He that he the. Cfo honey when you graduated with your finance degree. Were you expecting to carry the same level of responsibility as cfo laughed and he instead. Of course not. And i said well welcomes the world of nursing where you graduate you enter the profession and not only. Are you carrying an incredible boat and patience upon you. But you're expected to carry the same kind of patient and responsibility as nurses with thirty or fifty years of experience. So i think one is incredible dichotomy of being put into a world. Where even if you have little training you're going to deal with those two patients. And then secondly i think one of the biggest factors is that the profession of nursing if you call it a profession has not been cultivated along a career progression and think younger nurses that are entering the profession realized. I don't know if you've noticed. But over course a twenty year career the average increase of salary of nurses only one point five percents a year which is half the cost of the increase in wages or salaries on the average american But more importantly there is no career development. So it's not as though when you start out as financial assistance and you progress ups eventual pointed the being the cfo and nursing. The first day of your career can very much look like the last day of your career thirty years later and i think that because healthcare has focused a very long time that the roles of nurses are to be by the bedside and that that job that has driven position is not in and of itself that they've never focused on. What are the career and the ambitions of the nurse by the bedside new ford so suddenly two years into a nurse his career. They're working in day night holiday weekend rotation they've had an increase of salary of about three percent and of them are patients that are constantly dying or sick and being called to work in and they don't know where their career is going in comparison to the friends that they have chosen other careers. Who are working monday through friday. Have five weeks of vacation and are steaming. The world where these nurses aren't sure what's going on. I think there's a couple downwards playing trends. But i think those are two of the largest.

Rebecca Rebecca Love Northeastern School Of Nursing Society Of Nurse Scientists In Realto Marquez United States United Nations Tech UK Ford
"ted dot" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

03:54 min | 8 months ago

"ted dot" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"It ignores the depletion of resources like groundwater. And Topsoil and the web of living species and ignores the distribution of incomes and net worth so that we have when GDP goes up. People Cheer Tooth, two percent three percent. Wow, four percent, and they think great, but it's accompanied by vast increases in pollution, chronic under-investment in public goods. The depletion of irreplaceable natural resources and the worst inequality crisis we've we've seen in more than one hundred years. That is threatening the future of both capitalism and democracy, so we have to change it. We have to reform it so reform capitalism, but don't throw it out. We're going to need it as a tool as we go forward if it's solve this. Yeah I think that's right and just one other point. The worst environmental abuses in the last hundred years have been in jurisdictions that experimented during the twentieth century with the alternatives to capitalism on the left and right. Interesting all right. Let's have one more question here. You encouraged by the ability of people to quickly adapt to the new normal due to covid nineteen as evidence that people can and will change their habits to respond to climate change. Yes, but I think we have to keep in mind. That there is a crisis within this crisis. The impact on the African American community which I mentioned before. On the lack, the next skin community indigenous peoples, the highest infection rate is in the nomination right now, so some of these questions. Appear different late to those who who are really getting the brunt of this crisis and It is unacceptable that we allow this. To continue, it feels one way to you and me, and perhaps too many our audience today, but for low income communities of color. It's an entirely different crisis, and we owe it to them and to all of us. To get busy and start using the best science and solve this. The you know the the phrase pandemic economic somebody said the first principle. Pandemic economics take care of the van Democ, and we're not doing that yet. We're seeing. The president tried to boost the economy for his reelection. Never mind the prediction of tens of thousands of additional American deaths and that is just unforgivable in my opinion, so I'll you along with others in the community played a key role in encouraging Ted to. Launch this initiative called countdown. Thank you for that and I guess this conversation will is continuing among many of us if you're interested in climate watching this. Check out the countdown website. At countdown not Ted Dot Com and Be Part of ten ten, twenty twenty. When we're trying to put out an alert the world, the climate can't wait that that it really matters and that there's going to be some amazing content free to the world on that day. Just that. Thank you feel inspiration and support in doing that I. Wonder whether you could end today's session just by just painting us a picture. Like how might things roll out over the next decade or so? Just tell it tell us whether there is still a story of hope here. I'll be glad to forgive. I gotta get one plug in I'll make it brief July eighteen through July twenty six..

Ted Dot Com president
"ted dot" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:16 min | 10 months ago

"ted dot" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Doctors found out when she was fifteen but they didn't tell her they lied and said that she had cancer because that seemed like an easier option than finding out. She wasn't fully a woman. Kind of thing happens a lot where intersex people are lied to or kept in the dark about our bodies. It's rare to me and intersex person that hasn't been operated on and oftentimes these surgeries are done to improve intersex. Kids lives but they usually end up doing the opposite of causing more harm. Both physical and emotional. I'm not saying that doctors are bad. It's just that we live in a society that causes some doctors to fix those of us who don't fit their definition of normal. We're not problems that need to be fixed. We just live in a society that needs to be enlightened. Emily if you could go back in time what do you wish had been different about the way you were treated as an intersex person? What I really wanted was somebody saying. Hey like this is going to be okay. Like that's not a big deal and it's not my that life changing because that's the thing if they hadn't had all these societal experiences it wouldn't be that big of a deal even with small things like learning at an early age so most people are boys or girls but some people are in between and kind of learning that would have been life changing because it would meant. I belonged somewhere and as a kid. I never really belonged anywhere because I didn't belong with the girls and I didn't belong with the boys because that's all we knew. And so if I had somewhere that I fit in and then I belonged and I didn't just constantly feel like an impostor that would have been huge. You know I was actually there when you gave your tedtalk and I have to say your tone right now is just so different like you were so. Sassy and funny and you were like Yam ballsy and like you know. You can't help but laugh because what you're talking about and there's this moment in the Ted Talk. I remember it so vividly. Your Voice broke and you looked so surprised and you even said I think I didn't think I was going to get emotional and I feel like at that moment. I remember thinking like Oh there's a crack there and I hear it in your voice now and I wonder if that's what's happening as you're exploring that crack and that if that's the case that's sounds like a lot of work you're making me cry now. It's okay yeah I think that's the issue. Is that when you take humans out of the equation especially in a medical capacity leaves a lot of trauma? Unfortunately it's been within the last month that I've started really trying to dive deeper into that trauma and I didn't realize how much I held in my body. It's a lot but I also think like you said the fact that we can sit here and laugh about it. That's massive because for so long I couldn't talk to anyone about it and I'm aware of how much like how awful and how much that hurt and I don't feel that her anymore. Which is really good. And I think that's part of what has come from being able to laugh and talk and be very open. Is You know I was able to go from not tying anyone to shouting on the rooftops and you know like it was just so freeing. Quinn you can find her full talk at Ted Dot Com on the show today ideas on the biology of sex. I'm a new summer ODI and you're listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR..

Ted Dot Com Quinn cancer Emily NPR
"ted dot" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"ted dot" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"Conley of the American vaping association says he agrees kids should not be using these products to where we diverge is this idea that prohibition of ninety percent plus of the paper for baby products on the market is actually going to solve this issue he says this will make it harder for adults to quit smoking jul in a statement says it doesn't market the kids and it supports more stringent age rules in Hudson square Steve Byrnes WCBS newsradio eight eight police have arrested a thirty three year old Brooklyn man in connection with a hate crime attack at the church Avenue subway station in Prospect Park last November Alexis serve Leila's who is white has been charged with attempted murder in multiple hate crimes the victim is black police say civilis shouted racial slurs at fifty seven year old Ameri Washington before punching and stabbing her multiple times investigators say the attack was random reprehensible that is what mayor de Blasio calls the leaders of the NYPD's top union the arguing in the fall out the result of the firing of N. Y. P. D. officer Daniel Pantaleo John Adams with more from city hall bitter war of words between the mayor and the PBA justice serves as mayor de Blasio Daniel Pantaleo stripped of his badge for the chokehold death of Eric garner you saw an NYPD trial of full open public trial where evidence was presented but there were no criminal charges there was no federal prosecution PBA president Pat Lynch says the mayor and the police commissioner have turned their backs on police officers and created a dangerous environment on the streets he says the mayor now has called this street said this respect our uniform and the women and men wearing it Ted dot buckets of water over their head to throw bricks and concrete from the room and then to take out their weapons and fire on police this mare needs to be removed in response to concerns that the police might engage in a work slowdown the mayor says I believe the men and women the NYPD do not think that way I think they're here to do their job at city hall Shawn Adams WCBS newsradio eighty police are looking for three package thieves who attacked an apartment worker in park slope this happens in the middle of the day back on August seventh and apart and worker spotted three men.

de Blasio Daniel Pantaleo Shawn Adams Ted dot officer N. Y. P. D. Brooklyn Steve Byrnes Pat Lynch president PBA Eric garner Conley city hall Daniel Pantaleo John Adams NYPD de Blasio Ameri Washington civilis
"ted dot" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"ted dot" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"All right. I mean, that's the so much to like in this idea. There's there's one there's one piece of. Branding around it that I worry about which is just the right now. Trust fund kids have a really bad rap. You know, this sort of eyeball rolling posted children for how money kind of takes away motivation. So these trust the different. So how do you show people in this proposal? It's not going to do that. If you know, you have limited resources or you're going to face discrimination. There's a narrative debt well the economic returns to investing myself or lower than that of someone else. So I might might as well enjoy my leisure. Of course, there's another narrative as well. So we shouldn't get caught on code up on that, you know, somebody who's poor and going to face discrimination. They also might pursue a resume building strategy the old adage I have to be twice as good as someone else. Now when we say that we never asked at what cost are their health cost associated with that. Now, I haven't answered your question, but coming back to your question if you know you're going to receive. Leave a transfer at a later point in life that only increases the incentive for you to invest in yourself. So that you can better use that trust. Yeah. You're giving people possibilities of lives that they currently cannot imagine having and therefore the motivation to do that I could talk with about. Thank you so much I'm writing now, you're working on this. Thank you. For more TED talks to Ted dot com. Or?

Ted dot
"ted dot" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"ted dot" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hear here's full talk to Ted dot com. On the show today ideas about growth and consumption, and how we can rethink both to create a more circular system. Even when it comes to what we're wearing. Can you can you describe your style? Like like what what might you wear on a typical day. Well, I don't like to go out the door unless I can look in the mirror, and it makes me chuckle just a little bit. This is Jesse Arrington. She's a graphic designer so something unexpected like pattern clashing is one thing. I like to do. So maybe I'll put a stripe with a plaid or, you know, a floral with a polka-dot or something like that. That's always fun. And then I think that color has a big impact on not only how you're feeling, but how people respond to you. So like as a way to stand out. It's really fun to where really bright colors. I hope that my epitaph one day as she was not afraid of color. So tell me about your your clothes shopping habits like where do you get your stuff? Well, you know, I like to go to a lot of thrift stores secondhand stores or clothing resale shops, those are really the primary places where I find things to you're not going to like fast fashion stores. Now, I mean, I haven't set foot in one of those in a very long time. And really I'd say about ninety percent of my wardrobe. I it's strictly in some former fashion secondhand has been worn by somebody else are owned by somebody else before it came to my closet. Just he took this idea to the extreme when she went to a weeklong Ted conference in nothing in her suitcase, except for seven pairs of underwear. Jesse Jackson picks up her story from the Ted stage. Exactly one week's worth of unease is all I put in my suitcase. I was betting that I'd be able to find everything else I could possibly want to wear once. I got here to Palm Springs, and since you don't know me as the woman walking around Ted in her underwear. That means I found a few things, and I really loved his show. You my week's worth of outfits right now. Does that sound?.

Ted dot Jesse Arrington Jesse Jackson Palm Springs ninety percent one week one day
"ted dot" Discussed on Women at Work

Women at Work

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"ted dot" Discussed on Women at Work

"They're they're very aware that they fit this nontraditional model, and I think it's important for women to start understanding that as well that if they're going to be in this kind of dynamic are they willing to to go that route into sort of maybe loosened the reins on the identity pieces that might be really critical to them. And so some of the research on maternal gate keeping comes to mind where women are often hesitant to relinquish responsibility for family matters. You know, they they want to set the schedules. They don't want to let their husbands or the fathers take as much responsibility in terms of how the fairly dynamics works. And so I think that you know for. Women who are gonna be primary breadwinners or sold breadwinners that that relinquishing of the maternal 'gate-keeping needs to be something that they're aware of they need to be you know, mindful that they're doing that. If that's something that's important to them. I think they also have to understand that they're not immune to the socialization pressure. So in my research with Julian borrowing on status leakage, the women that we studied were incredibly educated. They were highly successful. I mean, these were high status professional women, and even they were not immune to the traditional norm. So they still reported a higher level of status leakage when they out earned their husbands so feeling resentful that their partner made less than they did, you know feeling embarrassed or wishing that he had a similar level of status, so despite their all of their complements and their achievements in their education. They still can feel the pressures of the social norms that are in place. And so I think women just need to be really self reflective about that challenge. And just be mindful that they have to deal with those pressures. So. Let's talk a little bit about kids. And and what they think of all this. We did us Jillian Andy's older two boys who are seven and Ted dot ask baby. Winslow what they think about their mom going to the office and their dads staying at home. What you hear in in the boys answers?.

Jillian Andy Ted dot Winslow Julian partner
"ted dot" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"ted dot" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"Three change someone's life significantly. So be there for somebody throughout their career mentor or sponsor them, give them opera -tunities as they grow volunteer volunteer for a stem program serving underserved, youth, transform your team to be more diverse in. Looses and make real commitments to creating change here. Hold yourself and your team accountable for creating change. And lastly, help advocate for change across your company. When companies teach their people to be allies. Diversity and inclusion programs are stronger. You and I can be allies for each other, whether we're inside or outside of work. So I realized recently. That I still have lingering shame and fear from that moment in my career when I felt utterly alone shutout and unsupported. There are millions of people out there like me right now feeling that way, and it doesn't take much for us to be there for each other and when we're there for each other, when we support one another, we thrive together. And when we thrive, we build better teams better products and better companies. Ally ship is powerful, try it. Thank you. For more TED talks to Ted dot com. Or. Ex.

Ted dot
"ted dot" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"ted dot" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"So be there for somebody throughout their career mentor or sponsor them, give them opera -tunities as they grow volunteer volunteer for a stem program serving underserved, youth, transform your team to be more diverse in. Looses and make real commitments to creating change here. Hold yourself and your team accountable for creating change. And lastly, help advocate for change across your company. When companies teach their people to be allies. Diversity and inclusion programs are stronger. You and I can be allies for each other, whether we're inside or outside of work. So I realized recently. That I still have lingering shame and fear from that moment in my career when I felt utterly alone shutout and unsupported. There are millions of people out there like me right now feeling that way, and it doesn't take much for us to be there for each other and when we're there for each other, when we support one another, we thrive together. And when we thrive, we build better teams better products and better companies. Ally ship is powerful, try it. Thank you. For more TED talks to Ted dot com. Or. Ex..

Ted dot
"ted dot" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"ted dot" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Mental health services. We make sure all of those things that are in place because without it, it's a critical component to the co-production of public safety. Equally is important is that we also have social issues that are often laid at the feet of law enforcement. So for example, mental health and education. Historically, we've been pulled into those spaces where we have not. Necessarily provided public safety, but have enforced Wong, historical, legislative racial desegregation. We have to own our part in history, but we also have to have those folks at the table when we're talking about how do we move forward with co production, but understanding this, we also have to understand that we need to have voices come to us in a different way. We also have to recognize that the community may not be willing or ready to come to the table, have the conversation, and that's okay. We have to be able to accept that by knowledge. It also means that we care for the community's health and for their resilience. He is well, that's another key component. We also have to acknowledge that those folks that are in our community there here do wanted to do us harm. We also have to recognize that we have community members who did not get the benefits of a long ago dream. We also have to acknowledge that we have put faith in a system that sometimes is broken, hoping that it would give us solutions for better. But we cannot walk away because there is a better way. And we know this because the NYPD's neighborhood policing philosophy is grounded in the co-production of public safety. In order for us to move forward together, our family, our friends and for health. We have to make sure that we focus this way and in order to do that, there are three fundamental ideologies that we must all agree to you. Are you ready? I'm sorry, one more time. Are you ready? That's better. All right. The first one, there's no more wallowing in the why. We know why. We must move forward together. There's no more us versus them. Number two. We must embrace the lived experience and our histories and we must make sure we never go back to a place where we cannot move forward. And number three, we must also make sure that truth and telling facts is painful, but we also know that no action is no longer acceptable in agree. I'm sorry. I can't hear you. Do you agree? All right. So we do know that there is a better way and the better way is the production of public safety. Thank you. For more TED talks to Ted dot com. Our ex.

Wong Ted dot NYPD
"ted dot" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"ted dot" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"Randstad an organization that works with companies to find survivors who had need good jobs has an excellent program called higher hope. We've used this program, we know that it works in addition to training their flight attendants, and they're airline crew. Delta Airlines also offers sky miles through a program called sky wish to survivors to help them escape their traffickers and reunite with their families. Their of things that businesses can do. They just have to decide what to do. Join the fight. No one can justify slavery today, but I believe it remains one of the greatest civil rights atrocities of our time. Fortunately, the business community is uniquely positioned to help train their employees to enforce policies and to help us their special resources to fight human trafficking. And what about you? What if you decided to learn the red flags? What if you decided to look at the signs that are all around you and make a call? There is no penalty for calling law enforcement when you see something that doesn't sit right. Together, we can all protect our children. We can educate the workforce is around us and improve society where we all live and work. With john. Thank you. For more TED talks Ted dot com.

Ted dot Randstad Delta Airlines john
"ted dot" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"ted dot" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Randstad an organization that works with companies to find survivors who had need good jobs has an excellent program called higher hope. We've used this program, we know that it works in addition to training their flight attendants, and they're airline crew. Delta Airlines also offers sky miles through a program called sky wish to survivors to help them escape their traffickers and reunite with their families. Their of things that businesses can do. They just have to decide what to do. Join the fight. No one can justify slavery today, but I believe it remains one of the greatest civil rights atrocities of our time. Fortunately, the business community is uniquely positioned to help train their employees to enforce policies and to help us their special resources to fight human trafficking. And what about you? What if you decided to learn the red flags? What if you decided to look at the signs that are all around you and make a call? There is no penalty for calling law enforcement when you see something that doesn't sit right. Together, we can all protect our children. We can educate the workforce is around us and improve society where we all live and work. With john. Thank you. For more TED talks Ted dot com.

Ted dot Randstad Delta Airlines john
"ted dot" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"ted dot" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"So researchers opinion is divided as to whether the parasite is truly influ. Behavior, but given the widespread nature of such manipulations it will be completely implausible for humans to be the only species that weren't similarly affected. You hear about how all of these parasites manipulate behavior in creatures, and then it does kind of make you question free will. Right? I mean, surely among us. Yeah, I think I think the husband really interesting philosophical implications, right? Like how much we aren't trains are under your own control. I would say most, but what we can say, I think is that it's entirely plausible that our behavior could be affected by parasites. But identity we should freak out the concept that we might sometimes make decisions not entirely of our own bullish. I'm freaking out. Hey, forget. Yeah. Because I made you, yeah, you did. This capacity to constantly subvert a way of thinking about the world makes parasites amazing. They constantly inviting us to look at natural world sideways until ask if the behaviors we're seeing, whether the simple and obvious or baffling and positing all the results of individuals acting through their own accord. But because there being bent to the control of something else and while that may be disquieting and while parasites habits may be very grisly. I think that ability to surprise us makes them as wonderful and as charismatic as any pando butterfly old dolphin, but perhaps dot to parasite talking. Thank you. Science journalist, Ed young, he's got a new book coming out soon called, I contain multitudes, it's all about microbes watches, full talk, Ted dot com..

Ed young Ted dot
"ted dot" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"ted dot" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Here's what we learned from talking to some of the case workers. When a family has a history with the department, many of us hold that history against them even if they're trying to do things differently. When I see a case from a certain apartment building neighborhood or zip code, I just automatically think the worst. Child welfare is very subjective because it's an emotional field. There's no one who doesn't have emotions around this work, and it's very hard to leave all your stuff at the door when you do this work. So let's take the subjectivity of race and neighborhood out of it. And you might get different outcomes. Blind removals seem to be bringing us closer to solving the problem of implicit bias in foster care decisions. My next step is figuring out how to use artificial intelligence and machine learning to bring this project to scale and make it more accessible to other states. I know we can transform child welfare. We can hold organizations accountable to developing the social consciousness of their employees. We can hold ourselves accountable to making sure our decisions are driven by ethics and safety. Let's imagine a child welfare system that focuses on partnering with parents, empowering families and no longer see poverty s failure. Let's work together to build a system that wants to make families stronger instead of pulling them apart. Thank you. For more TED talks to Ted dot com. G. r. x..

Ted dot
"ted dot" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"ted dot" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"Here's what we learned from talking to some of the case workers. When a family has a history with the department, many of us hold that history against them even if they're trying to do things differently. When I see a case from a certain apartment building neighborhood or zip code, I just automatically think the worst. Child welfare is very subjective because it's an emotional field. There's no one who doesn't have emotions around this work, and it's very hard to leave all your stuff at the door when you do this work. So let's take the subjectivity of race and neighborhood out of it. And you might get different outcomes. Blind removals seem to be bringing us closer to solving the problem of implicit bias in foster care decisions. My next step is figuring out how to use artificial intelligence and machine learning to bring this project to scale and make it more accessible to other states. I know we can transform child welfare. We can hold organizations accountable to developing the social consciousness of their employees. We can hold ourselves accountable to making sure our decisions are driven by ethics and safety. Let's imagine a child welfare system that focuses on partnering with parents, empowering families and no longer see poverty s failure. Let's work together to build a system that wants to make families stronger instead of pulling them apart. Thank you. For more TED talks to Ted dot com. G. r. x..

Ted dot
"ted dot" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"ted dot" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"Grow. It's the same for humans in the garden of hardship in this garden when the Caterpillar transforms into a Christmas, this involves some struggle, but it's a challenge with the purpose without this painful fight to break free from the confines of the cocoon, the newly formed butterfly can't strengthen its wings without the battle the butterfly dies without ever taking flight. My life's work is to illustrate how to integrate human connective into the garden gardens are full of magical wisdom. For this transformation. Mother nature is creative energy waiting to be born. Gardens are a mirror that cast their own reflection to our waking lives. So nurture your talents and strengths while you appreciate all you've been given. Remain humble to healing and maintain compassion for others. Cultivate your garden, forgiving, and plant those seeds for the future. The garden is the world living deep inside of you. Thank you. For more TED talks to Ted dot com. Or. Ex.

Ted dot
"ted dot" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"ted dot" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Grow. It's the same for humans in the garden of hardship in this garden when the Caterpillar transforms into a Christmas, this involves some struggle, but it's a challenge with the purpose without this painful fight to break free from the confines of the cocoon, the newly formed butterfly can't strengthen its wings without the battle the butterfly dies without ever taking flight. My life's work is to illustrate how to integrate human connective into the garden gardens are full of magical wisdom. For this transformation. Mother nature is creative energy waiting to be born. Gardens are a mirror that cast their own reflection to our waking lives. So nurture your talents and strengths while you appreciate all you've been given. Remain humble to healing and maintain compassion for others. Cultivate your garden, forgiving, and plant those seeds for the future. The garden is the world living deep inside of you. Thank you. For more TED talks to Ted dot com. Or. Ex.

Ted dot
"ted dot" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"ted dot" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"At the watershed ted dot com more reaction to president trump's decision to replace the veterans affairs secretary with his own physician with the military analysts take here's usa's chris barnes retired general barry mccaffrey says he has mixed feelings at the choice of admiral ronnie jackson to head the va mccaffrey says on one hand jackson a combat veteran himself is a superb physician who's worked at the white house for over a decade and he's got the confidence of the united states i must admit though it's unusual to have someone of that background who's been running for twelve years now we've been running a couple of hundred people in the white house the now be in charge of one hundred and eighty billion dollar budget and three hundred and eighty thousand employees mccaffrey was speaking on msnbc for usa radio news i'm chris barnes us taxpayers won't be forced to continue to pay more than a quarter of the funding for peacekeeping efforts by the united nations john clements reports us taxpayers make the largest financial contribution the un's peacekeeping operations dishing out roughly twenty eight percent of its eight billion dollars in costs nikki haley the us ambassador to the un made the announcement during a meeting of the security council united states will not pay more than twenty five percent of the peacekeeping budget this is a cap required by us law president trump has long been a critic of the un claiming many allies take advantage of america i'm john clemens for usa radio news i'm wendy king if you're one of the millions of americans who can't work because of a serious injury orioles you may be eligible for disability benefits from social security receiving benefits is your right it doesn't matter if you've applied before in the.

trump secretary chris barnes barry mccaffrey ronnie jackson white house united states msnbc united nations un nikki haley john clemens wendy king president john clements eight billion dollars eighty billion dollar twenty eight percent twenty five percent