35 Burst results for "Ted Talks"

The Brain-Boosting Benefits of Exercise with Ryan Glatt

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

07:19 min | 3 weeks ago

The Brain-Boosting Benefits of Exercise with Ryan Glatt

"Welcome to the broken brain podcast I'm your host. Droop ruin and each week by team, and I bring on a new guest who rethink can help you improve your brain help feel better and most importantly live more. This week's guest is Ryan. Ryan is a personal trainer and brain health coach with over a decade of experience in the health and fitness industries. He currently works alongside clinicians and researchers to study the facts of cognitively. Enhanced and comprehensive exercise plants at the Pacific Brain Health Center, here in Lovely Santa Monica California Ryan constantly seeks to learn about the health neuroscience, research and Practical Strategies both health coaching and personal training in context, which is why we brought him here, Ryan has pursued education from aiming clinks the brain I training institute, the Neuroscience Academy that Kaddoumi for brain, health and performance and many other places. He's currently enrolled in. In a Master's applied neuroscience program at King's College of London, he actively consults with companies who leverage exercise for brain health and educates and fitness professionals with the first course to comprehensively address exercise and brain health called the brain health trainer, course talk more about that later on in which he's educated over a thousand health and fitness Professionals Ryan welcome to the brain podcasts. Thanks for having me drew and you also. And people really loved it. That's we've set the intention. We did a documentary by the way. If anybody hasn't hasn't watched that documentary before a broken bring to. Click on the show notes. We'll make it available for anybody who hasn't seen, and you can sign up and check it out and see some of Ryan's recommendations. rebuilt on today's conversation so. We set out the intention when we first did that interview that we wanted to do an interview for the podcast. I'm glad it happened at the first interview that I'm doing in person in the world of. Semi Corentin and social distancing so Thank you for coming into the office. It's an honor. Thanks for having me so I wanNA start off with something which is I want to talk about dance? DANCE REVOLUTION So tell US anybody who doesn't know what it is. Tell us what it is, and why he became passionate about. Yeah, so dance dance. Revolution is a video game. It's an extra game. Extra Games are things that incorporate. And Gaming And or active video games it was followed by the success of like Nintendo. We for instance that became very popular dance dance. Revolution's interesting because it was popularized when I was a kid. Probably before that I think in the eighties and nineties, and it's essentially a game where you're controller is a pad that you stand on in the middle is you're standing place? You have an Arrow pointing forward pointing backwards to left and went to the right. There's arrows coming up from the bottom of the screen, and you have this answer key at the top. Top with those different directionally facing arrows, and it's to music, and it was a Japanese video game developed by Nami, and it was super popular in Arcades at home on the playstation, two and I grew up as a very overweight sedentary kid I had a pretty severe concussion in preschool, and so that created some concussion induced adhd so I was addicted to video games, and I think I would then have met the criteria for video game addiction now, which is like it wasn't every day, but it was like four hours a day of video gaming. into early call of duty before it was like an e sports thing so if I kept on it, I could probably been pretty well right now. Playing golf duty but I actually came across the home version of dance dance revolution when I was a kid in high school, actually no middle school early middle school and I lost a lot of weight playing that in my living room and it got me into. That got me to lose weight and it was motivating had all the elements we might talk about being important for an exercise program that is sensitive to brain health. And then it got me into the gym, and when I was in high school I joined a gym across from my high school, started weightlifting, watching personal trainers, we can go into that later, but essentially kick-started my personal health, an interest in fitness, and with that fitness that is cognitively enhanced meaning that I wasn't on an exercise bike, watching the news or staring into space I was cognitively engaged in that program since then dance dance revolution has been present. Among a lot of research context and neuro rehabilitation in older adults. It's not really that accessible anymore. You can't just get it off the shelf as much as you could. Previously, but it's really paved the way for a whole industry of active video gaming extra gaming. And it has spun off also clinical or serious extra gaming games that are used for health and clinical contexts such as some of the solutions. We use it the Pacific Brain Health Center. For the listeners who are like way, why are we starting the conversation video game? This all make sense so you know in reading about your story and getting a chance to get to know you over the last year, or so as we've been introduced by our mutual friend, Dr Shawn Patel who's a regenerative medicine doctor here in Los Angeles who's been on the podcasts before linked to that. I got a chance to see how your struggle as child especially with weight fitness and being sedentary. You found something you found something that created joy inside of you, and that's actually really related to a big part of what you teach right now we'll start off with the basics and we'll talk about what brain health coaches and some of the science of it, but you found something passionate that you that got you excited to move. Move something that you enjoyed and I. think that such an important thing as simple as it sounds. This video game was the thing that got started. That was ultimately the thing that starting your journey down this pathway of understanding the power of really what exercise can do for the brain, so let's start there. Let's start off with the basics you know. We've done so many episodes on the power of exercise, but as a refresher. Tell US why exercise is so important and what it does for the brain. Yeah, and there's been an explosion of research and media coverage about this I. Like to say that the mainstream popularity around exercise. The brain was really kick started by the book spark by Dr John Radi ever grateful for the work. He's done in popularizing that and twenty eighteen, the second most popular Ted Talk. In that year was Dr Wendy Suzuki talking about exercise in the brain and a lot of mainstream coverage, and you know in New, York Times and medium covering on boosting these posts on exercising, the brain has become very popular, and that's amazing, because it's also jumping on the kind of. The coattails of neural plasticity research showing that the brain can change. I think this audience has been very well presented that information right we to our brains were fixed. We were taught in high school. They have a certain amount of brain cells. Will Never. It's all downhill from there and it turns out. That's not true exactly. Neuro plasticity, so the brain's ability to functionally or structurally change. In response to experiences,

Pacific Brain Health Center Ryan Nintendo Neuroscience Academy Golf Lovely Santa Monica King's College Of London Adhd Ted Talk Dr Shawn Patel Dr John Radi Nami Los Angeles Dr Wendy Suzuki York Times
Cultivate Calm During Chaos With Neil Pasricha

The LEADx Show

04:58 min | 3 weeks ago

Cultivate Calm During Chaos With Neil Pasricha

"Welcome everyone to this lead x Webinar with Neil Pastor Rita. Thank you so much for joining Neil. Past reach is the author of seven bucks including the book of Awesome. The happiness equation Awesome is everywhere, and you are awesome. His Books Are New York. Times and number one international bestseller's and have spent over two hundred weeks on bestseller lists and sold millions of copies. Neal is one of the world's top brings speakers and his first Ted Talk. The three days of awesome is wearing to one of the ten most inspiring all time. He thinks rights to an speaks about intentional living, and all of his work focuses on the themes of gratitude, happiness, failure, resiliency, and trust welcome Neil. Well. Thank you so much for having me guys. On this cold slash hot sunny slash cloudy Friday afternoon slash morning. I am in Toronto Canada. And it is cold and cloudy and the afternoon here, but I can already see people chiming in on the side Jason's. That's good morning from. Kansas, happy Friday everyone. Guys, please. Let's the chat open that box open on my screen the whole time. I would love to be reinvented time. Why because right now? During coronavirus, one of the biggest sort of needs I feel that I need and I feel like you probably feel it too, is community. Connection. betsy, high from Boulder, Sonya Hi, from California. This is wonderful for Michigan Los Angeles anyone not a not from America it'd be great to hear as well. I don't know. Who I'm talking to the other thing that would be great to salvage front before we get into our exciting conversation. Cuban a love all the texts coming in, thank you is who knows me so when I ended up. Speaking to groups of people, hundreds of people like I'm doing right now. What I don't know is who have you have read the book on some or Oj Geek from India I'm hearing these great ones Calgary. High highly shot cloudy Gog always touting car, isn't it now I'm just kidding but I almost called love. coury loved the Chart Cut Restaurant downtown props to independent restaurants bookstores. Guys got to bring him back. So I. Don't know who's read any books book Balsam the happiness equation you are. Does anybody listened to my podcast three bucks? Maybe some of you were when you get to hear me other places has anyone ever heard me give a speech a Tedtalk? Have you seen like dislike me? Know where you touched my stuff, if at all, or maybe you're like I have no idea who Zappa at me so? You quit your Yapper, but let me know so I'm seeing a seeing I'm seeing some Yeah, Berta, I've never heard of you until now. Diane says you are not unique to me, but I'm already intrigued. The says I've read the happiness equation. oh, I watched you on. Ted Ted or lead Ex. Yeah, so there's lots of I like the newest Story never heard before. Guys don't be sorry. There's eight billion of us in the world right now. I'm one person My community, which I'd like to welcome you into. Is You know one hundred thousand people? These are people that want to live a deeply intentional life. The reason I want to do that is because about ten years ago. My wife left me. My best friend took his own life. These two things happened in the span of a few weeks. I was devastated I stopped. Eating I stopped sleeping. I! Was a skeleton of myself mentally physically psychologically, and then I started a blog called one thousand awesome things, dot com, and for thousand straight weekdays I wrote an entry. Cheer myself up like old dangerous playground equipment like the smell of bakery, air or wearing warm underwear from out of the dryer. The blog took off one best log on the world two years in a row one hundred million hits. It turned into a book called the Book of Awesome so that book here the black. One came out sold. A million copies was a big bestseller I thought that's my fifteen minutes of fame. I kept my job at Walmart the whole time. I got my blog went by. Everyone gets like one viral fleet in their life and their life, but it kept going, and it turns up. I needed to when I got remarried five years later I ended up writing a guidebook to my unborn child than how to live happy life that became my book called the happiness equation more recently. Now I have three boys, five three and one very happily married my wife, lastly on lucky say, and ever in a brand new book all about Resilience Okay so you are also came out last November. On Book Two right now, but of course everything shut down that about resilience. The subtitles had navigate change, wrestle failure and live in attentional

New York Neil Pastor Rita Ted Talk Ted Ted Neal Kansas Toronto Walmart Chart Cut Restaurant Canada Michigan Jason Calgary Diane Berta Sonya Hi Betsy Zappa
Haka and cultural appropriation

Native America Calling

07:00 min | Last month

Haka and cultural appropriation

"The Haka is a part of Mari Culture. It's a type of movement that involves the whole body invoice New Zealand's rugby team. The all blacks performed a version of it at competitions around the globe here they are performing it in Japan during a match last year's Rugby World Cup. Many team members are Maury. What you'll hear is they're stomping their hands beating on their chests entice. On how. It's impressive to watch a Haka. Traditionally, it's not for entertainment. It's ceremonial has deep roots in multiculture. Of course, some people don't understand that and mimic anyway. A handful of Brazilian companies use the Haka in their corporate retreats. The Non Murray owner of Hakka training said he learned hawk. By watching videos of the all blacks rugby team. Another company huck Brazil performed the Haka at a Ted talks event such displays. Displays are drawing criticism from Murray people, and they're calling it cultural appropriation. We'll get more and what Hawk is and represents today. We are going to start off in new. Zealand joining us today by skype from Christ Church in South Island is cut Edina. Tell you to, and he is a cultural adviser, and he is Maori. Welcome to native America calling cut of please feel free to further. Introduce Yourself. He, he he he. He made keenum on Athena. Royal Amiga Kotel Kartal Teen Aquileia Lhasa. Choir here Julio or Tiki nor Knighthood Huda. Moon. Killer. Angry to have you here and so we say Haka in before we go any further. How do you like to describe it? A DESCRIBE IT AS A. Traditional ceremony that was formed traditionally by. Warriors before going to war. A Sierra Monitor trump. Please the. He of. War TOMATO INA. was also a former cy cop. The warriors before battle. at performed in. The different areas such as funerals as a way to express emotions. And it was also used as a way to. Win Strangers, come visit. It was a white make sure they were friendly. visit hasn't not enemies. That in probably pre colonization, the has changed a little bit and Would we do use it for? Entertainment purposes now. But the also that buried deep spiritual connection in traditional values associated with the Hutto. In when you're teaching, young people or young people are taught about this in a traditional sense What are they told what is happening because you're using your breath, you're using your body. You're using your your own personal sound What is taught to young people about why you do this in what it is, you're actually giving. So I think this probably two different forms of teaching now this the form of Hakka where you taught to try and intimidate the the opposition and Chevy Hafeez. Scary became. The. The the the other way where some people are taught. For entertainment purposes for competitions against other. Maori people. but as ways. To Euro has taught. That is very serious It's a very serious epsom is. you must take everything seriously you have to. Respect the the different deities that are involved. You You can't make fun of the hacker. You've got to respect your sisters who? Pass on the knowledge of the hookup. And at different tribes have different roles. whereas brought up, you can only do the hacker. With be a fate. And you hit Utah To. Slap you chased You're McCain. Make as much noise as you possibly came. In, so what does it translate to hookup? So these. Years. Does the Hukou as? Some people call it a pretty bored aunts were. A Warrior's dance, but then it depends on. The HAKKA! This is quite a few different Hukou. Hukou has its own unique. meaning. The I think the mice. Common Hacker around the world seems to be the one the all blacks. The. New Zealand rugby team. Comedy. So they'd say. was dedicated to. A woman, who headed, Chafe and a in the ground and a criminal put. And it expresses have the chief. was fearing death. And how? He didn't he had the sense of being of life again and in hell wants the live. The criminal was removed. He saw the the lady setting on top any saw the light. So this multiple different meanings different hugger. In so when you see it being performed by non-indigenous people, what are you witnessing? More often than not I see. non-indigenous people who think that it's funny. They they mock at culture by doing it. why see? Recently an in London. a lot of Kiwis are over there doing the Haka when the drunk which is quite offensive. It's. I'd say total lack of understanding. Tuttle of respect to air eight sisters in God's into a customs.

Maori New Zealand Rugby World Cup Rugby Mari Culture Maury Multiculture Japan Hukou Murray Huck Brazil Chevy Hafeez America South Island Tuttle TED Julio Mccain Chafe
How Does Stress Trigger Physiological Conditions?

Not Another Anxiety Show

06:17 min | Last month

How Does Stress Trigger Physiological Conditions?

"Hey guys welcome to not another anxiety show I'm your host Kelly Walker and joining me today as my co-host Erica late them. My, Darling. Good sweating just existing. It went from the dead of winter in a like distortion. What was that show that I never watch game of thrones like the white walkers are coming to the Sahara chocolates too Humid Sahara. If the Amazon. My hair is huge right now I've got some curly hair, so my friend was like. Why is your hair so curly? Did you check the humidity? It's like a thousand percent. That's what. Science! Science it can become a thousand I am drinking the air so. In such rated we'll. However you tell me everything. All besides that, you know just. Just hitting up the Instagram, where I saw an interesting, a really great question. Right like we have a great question. We got a great questions, but this one was. And I will read it to you any second now, but this one was something that we both went. Okay okay, we can talk about this like it's even beyond. Anxiety bites because it's sort of getting back to the basics of song. Yes, so. and. I think there's like you know I WANNA make sure. We sort of answering a no read it in a second here but I wanNA. Make sure we sort of answer the question, but there's a little more to it underneath the surface that I, also WanNa touch on, which is why it's not just like a simple anxiety bites because it was like sort of an evocative question for us and I definitely thought it was worth probably something we've touched on here and there, but never like dedicated an entire episode to so Yeah I think it's. It's definitely worth taking some time. Okay Ready. I understand that things like heart palpitations may lead one to think that they have a heart condition, which is not actually present. I'd like you to do a segment about how stress can trigger actual physiological conditions. Love. This thing I mean you remember this coaching? air-cooled heart palpitations, but I was like yeah, okay, thanks a lot for the vice. Mine's real. And, it's no less real, but. Yes. Yep Yep and so I WanNa make sure I answer this listeners question about stress, and how it, how it impacts our bodies, so I'll take a second to sorta like dive into a biology lesson, which is my favorite thing. Ever sorry Erica bear with me. There's going to be I listen. I love. The biology I just don't understand sixty two percent of it. To Hey. That's passing right on. Oh. Yes, that's passing. That's a New York it is. That's passing. So yeah, I do WANNA speak to to how stress can trigger actual physiological conditions I don't want to share them here, but she she sort of shared a few things that have arisen for her as the result of anxiety so. It is it is well researched documented that chronic stress is one factor keyword one factor of so many others that can contribute to the development or exasperation of physiological conditions. Right stress makes chronic pain worse. It makes gastric issues worse. It makes cardiovascular issues worse. It makes it really exacerbates everything because. Stress touches every single one of our system, so I mean it really does make sense since chronically elevated stress, hormones like cortisol disrupt so many of our body's metabolic functions, but let's hear Mon. that's the one I can remember cortisol. I. Bet you know more than you, thank. For years later. Okay so! I wish it was as simple. This a little more nuanced I wish it was a simple saying. Anxiety and stress caused sickness right, but. We've sort of touched on this or mentioned it in a few previous episodes Dr Kelly mcgonagall. She's a psychologist from Stanford and go watch Ted Talk She's. She's very. He has a Tedtalk But to like basically some up her ted talk on and her and her research She's focused on how. Our understanding, of. Stress. And how it affects the body so. Finding was that when we change our relationship distress, or whatever are currently ship is, we can change how stress affects our body. More, specifically yet right like it always feels like an end. She says this in her Ted Talk. She's like you know I came into practices as a psychologist demonizing stress, eliminate stress managed stress, control, stress, right, but so many of us in the anxiety. Psycho are well. Of how trying to control stress or anxiety goes tension rises, anxiety rises. It's not very effective and Her major finding was that when we change our relationship to stress, right, we change how stress affects our body more specifically when we relate to stress as a natural response that exists to prepare, motivate and protect us than we don't suffer the same negative health outcomes is someone who relates to trust to stress as something to be entirely. Avoid it when we relate to stress as the former, a completely different physiological response occurs different ratio of stress hormones in addition to protective hormones are released mitigating the effects of stress on our body.

Anxiety Erica Bear Dr Kelly Mcgonagall Ted Talk Amazon Kelly Walker Cortisol Darling New York Stanford
Suzanne Simard: How Do Trees Collaborate?

Environment: NPR

05:19 min | Last month

Suzanne Simard: How Do Trees Collaborate?

"The Ted Radio hour from NPR. I'm a new. And for most kids around the country school is officially out of session, but unlike other summers, many kids and teens are stuck at home because of the coronavirus pandemic and so today. We've got an episode for everyone kids, adults, parents teams. You are all invited on this journey because we've invited a certain dad back on the show to share the coolest things. He's learned over the years here on the Ted. Radio Hour topics blow the minds of young and old and A. Mystery guest host. Can you please introduce yourself? It's the Ted Radio Segment. Is Hello. allthough guy well back, thank you. Okay, so guy, not only were you the host of this show until you so graciously handed over the reins to me, but you are also the host of rather popular podcast for kids right? Yeah, it's called. Wow, on the world. It's a journey through real scientific research sounds a little weird, but it's like a cartoon for the ear where me and my co host Mindy Thomas go on journeys into space and back in time and underwater and everywhere in between searching for incredible scientific discoveries, and it's this awful wonderful experience for us, and hopefully for the kids who listen to the show well, that includes my kids and we figured since. Since you and I are both home with our children this summer. We thought it'd be the perfect person to come on and curate a special summer show for the entire. Ted Radio Hour family and you have so kindly brought four of your favorite segments that you did the years. How did you even begin to choose which segments you were going to bring us? Well? I think like you probably experienced MINU, their lot of Ted talks that my kids love, and on a really inspired by, and there are some that you know of course are sort of over their heads right but I really want to bring segments that spoke to curiosity and. The sort of off that kids naturally have about the world, and so that's how we kind of came up with this. This collection and I will say I did feel that way about the first segment that you brought to us? This one is called. How do trees collaborate? Tell us about it. I love the segment so much So, basically, scientists for basically forever thought the trees competed against each other for resources right for for water and son. And nutrients and they figured that the tallest trees in the forest were the strongest trees right and make sense might but Suzanne Simard. The scientists that were about to hear from she totally changed the way that scientists now think about trees because it turns out, they don't compete at all. In fact, trees collaborate. They work together through this this mysterious underground superhighway there is an entire communication network happening under our feet. Let's listen. Forest. Ecologist Suzanne Simard had a hunch. Yes, that's right. That trees. Could Talk. Imagine like when you're walking through the forest you. Might you hear the crunching of the? Twigs under your feet in the rustling of the. But she thought. What if there's more going on because big chattering? Going on that we can't hear. that. They're attuned to each other. Now at the time. A team of scientists in England were wrapping up an experiment where they'd grown in the laboratory. These pine seedlings together in little route boxes that you could see through. And the scientists took two of these pine seedlings, these baby trees that were in the same box in the same dirt, and then they exposed one of these seedlings to a radioactive carbon dioxide, gas Kurban fourteen radioactive carbon, and what they found was that some of that radioactive gas, the carbon fourteen made its way into the second ceiling. You can visualize you could see. And so from this experiment it seemed that somehow these two plants in the same dirt. Or connected and I thought. Wow, maybe this is what's going on in my forest. Maybe Suzanne, smart thought, maybe all the trees in a forest or connected. In a kind of network. Lake are. or transportation system our social networks, and maybe she thought all of this was happening underground. When we walked through the forest. What we see as human beings, we just see these beautiful trees growing out of the ground, but we don't see that they're actually completely linked underground in this superhighway. So Suzanne decided to prove this underground network existed. She devised an experiment using some of the same radioactive gas. Geiger counter to measure it and a patch of Birch and for trees.

Suzanne Simard TED NPR A. Mystery Mindy Thomas Minu England
"ted talks" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

02:44 min | Last month

"ted talks" Discussed on Radiolab

"Enhancing public <Speech_Male> understanding of science <Speech_Male> technology <Speech_Male> in the modern world <Speech_Male> more information about <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Sloan at <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> www <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> dot sloan dot org. <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Hey <Speech_Male> It's Chad again. <Speech_Male> This is radio <Speech_Male> lab so okay. <Speech_Male> What you just heard was my <Silence> story. <Speech_Male> <Silence> about my journalism. <Speech_Male> and. <Speech_Male> In many ways, it <Speech_Male> is the of how <Speech_Male> radio lab has evolved <Speech_Male> over the years. You <Speech_Male> guys have heard <SpeakerChange> the show <Speech_Male> of all. 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We hope you'll make a donation. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> That is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> directly <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> how we pay <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for the work that we do here. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Please visit Radio <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Lab, Dot Org, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or text, the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Word Radio Lab, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> no spaces <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to the number seven. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Oh, one a one. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> That's radio <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> lab two seven. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Oh, one one <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> will text right back <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> with a link <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> where you can make a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> very fast <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> very easy donation <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in support of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this show. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank you so much. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We'll be back <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> next week <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with a new episode. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> Jab Rod citing. <Music>

"ted talks" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

06:22 min | Last month

"ted talks" Discussed on Radiolab

"INNOC-? Tennessee Mountain Home Tennessee Mountain. Memories now grew up in Tennessee. And I felt no nostalgia for that place I was. The scrawny Arab kid who came from the place that invented suicide bombing i. Spent a lot of time in my when I left Nashville I. Left I remember being a dollywood standing in front of a replica replica of her Tennessee Mountain home people all around me were crying. This is a this is a set. Why are you crying? I couldn't understand why they were so emotional. Especially given my relationship to the south. And I started to honestly have panic attacks about the right person for this project. But then. Twist of fate we meet. This Guy Brian. seaver Dolly's nephew and bodyguard, and on a whim he drives producer only nine out of dollywood round the back side of the mountains. Up The mountains twenty minutes down a narrow dirt road through giant wooden gates to look right out of game of thrones, and into the actual Tennessee mountain home. But the real place, Val, the Real Tennessee Mountain and I'm going to score this part with Wagner and because. You understand in Tennessee Lor. This is hallowed ground the Tennessee mountain home so I remember standing there on the grass next to the Pigeon River. Butterflies doing loop de loops in the air and I had my own moment of wonder. Dali's Tennessee Mountain home. Looks exactly like my dad's home in the mountains of Lebanon. Her House looks just like the place that he left. And that simple layering led me to have a conversation with him that I'd never had before about the pain. He felt leaving his home and how he hears that Dali's music. Then I had a conversation with Dali where she described her songs as migration music. Even that Classic Song, Tennessee Mountain home. If you listen to it. Sidney. From Peugeot Jonas some. Afternoon. In a straight back chair on to. Leaned gins the wall. It's about. Trying to capture a moment that you know is already gone, but if you can paint it vividly, maybe you can freeze it in place almost like resin. Trapped between past and present. That is the immigrant experience. And that simple fought led me to a million conversation, started talking to musicologists about country music as a whole this genre that I've always felt so having nothing to do with where I came from is actually made up of instruments and musical styles that came directly from the Middle East. In fact, there were trade routes that ran from. What is now Lebanon right up into the mountains of East Tennessee. I can honestly say standing there looking at her home. Was the first time I felt like I'm Tennessee and That is honestly true. And, this wasn't a one time. Thing I mean over and over again she would force me beyond the simple categories. I had constructed for the world. I remember talking with her about her seven year partnership with Puerto Wagner Nineteen, sixty seven. She joins his band. He is the biggest thing country music. She is a backup singer. A nobody within short time she gets huge. He gets too jealous. He then sues her for three million dollars. When she tries to leave. Now it would be really easy to see Puerto Wagner as like a tight classic Patriarchal Jackass trying to hold her back, but anytime I would suggest that tour like come on. This is a guy you see it in the videos to. He's got his arm around you. There's A. There's a power thing happening for sure well. It's more complicated than that. It's just I mean just think about it. He had this show for years he had. He didn't need me to have his hit show. He wasn't expected me to be all that I was either. I was a serious entertainer. He didn't know that he he didn't know how many dreams I had in effect. She kept telling me. Don't bring your stupid way of seeing the world and the my story, because that's not what it was. Yeah, there was power, but that's not all there was. You can't summarize this. All right, just zoom out. What do I make of this well I? Think there's something in a year that clue a way forward as journalists. We love difference we love to. Fetish is difference, but increasingly in this confusing world. We need to be the bridge between those differences. But how do you do that? I. Think for me now. The answer is simple. You interrogate those differences. You hold them for as long as you can until like up on that mountain. Something happens. Something reveals itself. Story cannot end indifference. It's got to end in revelation coming back from that trip on the mountain. Friend of mine gave me a book that gave this whole idea name. In psychotherapy there's this idea called the third which essentially goes like this a typically we think of ourselves as these autonomous units I do something to you. You do something to me, but according to this theory when two people come together and really commit to seeing each other. In that Mutual Act of recognition. They actually make something new. A new entity that is their relationship. You can think of Dolly's concerts. As sort of a cultural third space the way she sees all the different parts of her audience, the way they see her creates the spiritual architecture of that space. And I think now that is my calling. It a journalist. As storyteller. Just an American living in a country struggling to hold. Every story I tell has got to find the third. That place where the things we hold is different. Resolve themselves.

Tennessee Mountain Tennessee Mountain Home Tennes Tennessee Real Tennessee Mountain Tennessee Lor Brian. seaver Dolly Dali East Tennessee Puerto Wagner Nineteen INNOC Nashville dollywood Lebanon Middle East Puerto Wagner Peugeot Wagner Sidney
"ted talks" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

05:26 min | Last month

"ted talks" Discussed on Radiolab

"All in sync..

"ted talks" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

02:22 min | Last month

"ted talks" Discussed on Radiolab

"Lab jaboomer. Today a little something different I was invited to give a tedtalk a few months ago. it's out today. And? It's sort of a personal talk for me. It's about my life as a journalist. And I also think it helps explain a little bit of the journey. That radio lab has been on for the last decade or so so play the audio of that talk here in the podcast I mean obviously it is a video. In its native format and you should definitely check out the video. Because you know with over. There was no Ted Conference this year, which actually meant for me? I got to work with this amazing video artists, a friend of mine MAC premo. And we sort of reimagined the entire form of a talk in that video soup. He is incredible. See She. You should watch the talk. In the meantime. Listened to it here because. I think it says something about how I personally and how we as the show. are trying to kind of approach this complicated moment. So here it is. I want to tell you about? For purposes journalist, and how Dolly Parton helped me figure it out. So I've been telling audio stories for about twenty years I on the radio, and then in podcast, and when when I started the radio show radio lab in two thousand and two here was the quintessential story move we would do we bring on somebody. It's one of the most hypnotic and spellbinding spectacles in nature, because have to keep in mind, it is absolutely silent like this guy, mathematicians chief struggles, and he would paint a picture picture. There's a riverbank in Thailand in the remote part of the jungle. You're in a canoe slipping down the river. There's no sound of anything. Maybe the occasional you know exotic jungle, bird or something so you're in this imaginary canoe with Steve, and in the air all around your millions of fireflies, and what you see is sort of a randomized starry night effect because all the firefly's or blinking at different rates. which is what you'd expect? But according to Steve in this one place for reasons know scientists can fully explain route. With thousands of lights on and then off.

Dolly Parton Steve Thailand
Is This the End of Facial Recognition?

Slate's If Then

06:34 min | 2 months ago

Is This the End of Facial Recognition?

"Back in the summer of two thousand seventeen before she her research on Algorithm. Bias, Deborah she was working at a company called, clarify a computer vision startup, and that's where I got introduced till machine learning, and Ai, and I kind of entered the research world, and I remember the first time I saw my first face data set. Noticing right away that there was a lack of diversity in representation in the data sets, and I was trying to have this conversation with people in my office, but also just more broadly. I was trying to say like. Hey, I think this is the problem, but the response is always like it's so hard to collect data. Why would we think about this extra dimension of representations like this is so hard to do what you're asking for is something that? Is so difficult and like this is the way it's done in. Everyone's accepted. That was sort of the response. I was getting. At the same time, the dead was noticing this lack of representation in the data set. Another computer scientists had noticed it, too. Hello I'm joy. Appoint of Code on a mission to stop an unseen force that's rising a force that I called the coded gays. My term for Algorithm make bias joy. Polin Weenie is a researcher at the MIT Media Lab. And back in two thousand sixteen. She gave a Ted talk about her work. Algorithm MIC bias like human bias results in unfairness. How? Are you like viruses can spread bias on a massive scale at a rapid pace, so yeah finding Joyce Ted Talk. Was this important moment of like all my gosh. There's another person that cares about this I reached out to her sort of exactly. Not Moment and ended up working with her after it's the project they worked on along with Timmy Gebru. is called gender shades. And we talk about how it's probably not a coincidence that her me to make a brute where like all black women were like I, don't think. We're we're all the people that notice this. At the time. The researchers knew that these facial recognition programs with limited data sets were being used by law enforcement agencies around the country. So inaccurate results could have real world consequences. Can you describe? The work you did and what it showed. JANNASCHII is a blocks audit of commercial AI products, so these are tools that companies today, so and clients currently use so nothing that was audited. Experimental everything was in the wild in us. This is mass market stuff. Yeah, exactly what if he just tested these products on a benchmark that was representative with respect to gender and race? What would happen? What would we discover and what we discovered was that when you test these products on darker females, it performs thirty percent worse than it did on on ladder males. And that was the really big discovery was that these products were not actually things that worked well for everybody that they were saying it to, and that coupled with the reality that they were selling this technology or pitching this technology to ice at the time on two different intelligence agencies to local police departments was really alarming. It was something that demonstrated the fact that. Facial recognition at this point is disproportionately being used to sort of monitor and severe minority communities. That's part of this law enforcement pitch, but also not performing as well on those two meetings, which is obviously scary, alarming safety risk. What do these companies do with the police? What are these contracts for? In some cases, it's something reasonable such as attempting to shortlist a group of suspects for crime, so they might have security footage, and a budget faces in the security footage and try to identify who was in their mugshot. Database fits or lines with the faces that they see in the video, so that's a lot of what they do. Is this idea of face verification? Verification or matching a base that I have in my data set to face I know is from a suspect in a crime, and if I have a huge data, said how do I do that quickly and efficiently, so in the case of shortlisting suspects, it feels not as bad, but in a lot of cases they might also use it on sketch photos where. Think don't have a picture of the suspect. They'll ask you know victims to describe it to someone that will sketch it out, and then they'll. They'll put in the sketched photo and use that to search through the list of their database of mugshots. Yeah, and you can imagine just how many false arrest happened as a result of that. Even though there was research from people like deb that showed major flaws with the technology. All the big players in the field kept their products on the market the continued until Monday. When IBM announced, they were stopping their program entirely. So this week. IBM says they're no longer are going to offer or developed facial recognition technology, and I wonder as someone who is immersed in this and studies it. If you look at this announcement differently than a regular person reading the headlines. So since we've been watching these companies effectively for a while, I know a lot more of the backstory leading up to that announcement. It's not a spontaneous decision. I don't think it's as bold as IBM. said out to work right now so right now it's Berber. Are just kind of like wow IBM abandoned all of these important big contracts, and just spontaneously made his decision, and because it's happening at a moment of high racial tension, the mistakes, but also just a lot of reckoning with respect to the racial history of states, it seems as if like Oh, ibm you know, had this realization in light of protests and everything that's happening but the reality is about you've been working towards this position for a long time, and this is the most financially beneficial position for them to take at this moment. How so so IBM was called in gender shades, and they were quick to respond within four. Four months they had released a new product in response to the the revelation that there was this huge disparity in the performance on different demographics. Some tried this idea of. Let's build a big data set to fix it. Following that exposed because they had to use flicker images without any consent in order to collect that many faces, and ended up sort of being this embarrassing situation where the conversation around privacy consent was completely neglected

IBM Joyce Ted Talk Researcher Deborah AI Mit Media Lab Timmy Gebru. Representative Ibm. DEB
Identify and Overcome Hidden Bias With Tiffany Jana

The LEADx Show

06:38 min | 2 months ago

Identify and Overcome Hidden Bias With Tiffany Jana

"What are your unconscious biases? And how can you overcome them? Hello everyone. Kevin crews here in just a minute. We're GONNA talk about building authentic relationships across differences but I congratulations on being a lifelong learner and being proactive with your career. You're listening to the lead X. Show as your tie up your sneakers and going for that morning. Jog or maybe turn it on lead x when you turn on your car for that morning commute. However you're doing it when you listen, you know that lead x is helping you to stand out and get ahead. So I hope you'll tell your friends at work. Lead X is the smartest way to start your day and today's one minute career tip is. Master linked in. It's quite simple if you're not already on the platform. Lincoln is the Social Network for business people. There are four hundred sixty seven million users on linked in one, hundred, twenty, eight, million in the United States alone, which is actually the same number of working adults. It's the number one tool used by recruiters and hiring managers, and it should be your home base for your personal brand few years ago, I had my entire board of directors huddled up, and about a third of them said they hated linked in. They don't like it. They don't like the social media stuff. They don't want spam well A. A lot of those people ended up reaching out to me over the last year or so they've been laid off. They were starting from scratch, and unfortunately they didn't dig there well before they were thirsty. They didn't have their linked in Mojo going on. So that's it. The tip of the day is make sure you're on linked in with an updated profile and have it ready to go before. Introduce our guest big. Thanks to all of you. Who Left a review on Itunes last week? It only takes a minute to do, but it means the world to me. Our guest today is the CO founder and CEO of. Of TMI, consulting a diversity and inclusion firm based out of Richmond Virginia. She's been named diversity journals, women worth watching list Metropolitan, business, Leagues Entrepreneur of the year, because best for the world and enterprising women's enterprising women of the year twenty seventeen award. She's the author of overcoming bias building authentic relationships across differences. Our guest is tiffany Jonah Tiffany. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me Kevin So. We're GONNA. Talk about overcoming bias in just a minute, but I always ask our guest the same first question and it was interesting to me because you've got an amazing Ted. Talk out there I encourage everyone. Everyone to go google it and in it. You say this is really great. You say that your many failures are part of your invisible diversity. So will you share a time when you failed maybe earlier career? And what did you learn from it? Because we all WANNA learn from it, too? Absolutely absolutely. Yes, so early on the first iteration of my company, it was I I. Consider Becoming An entrepreneur, the best decision that I made in my twenties but early on in my career I was focusing on marketing and I essentially built a virtual company before I knew it was actually a thing, so this was. Way Back in the early two thousands I was. Single mom trying to make it work, and I sort of piece together the different components of marketing strategy by working with with different teams of people. And that was the first time that I learned the lesson of over commitment over promising, so I was a competent twenty-something. States and did to supplement. My own capacity was like I said I had strategic partners who did did different things, and I was pretty sure of myself about what I could do, and I was not able to anticipate the demand I focused on people who were artists trying to get their their products out to market and a lot of nonprofit work, so I ended up doing a lot of work with nonprofits, and it did not anticipate the demand for for the work, and I got myself into A. A position where I simply could not meet the demand, and it's one of those kind of great problems to have but it is really important strategically as an entrepreneur as a business person to know what you can handle and to have a plan in place for success, frankly but it did that that between the over demand based on what I had capacity. I was not able to keep that afloat. And then the economy crashed and that was all. She wrote so my first business. Venture failed kind of ethically, and it was really disappointing, but. I'm now st with growth. Yeah, that's that's great. Great Advice I mean like you said. It's a quality problem to have, but it really is a real problem you. Yes, you can suffer from lack of of business or clients, but if you over commit and can't deliver than that that goes in the wrong direction, really fast, too, so tiffany. Your book is Overcoming Bias Building Authentic. Relationships across differences and I have a feeling that when it comes to the topic of diversity and bias I've probably got a lot of listeners out there who are thinking like. Yeah, there's a lot of other people out there. They have a real problem in this area. Or they're squirming in their chair. Like Oh, this is such an uncomfortable topic to talk about and I thought the way you. Your book is very interesting that you say look everyone is biased. Everyone is biased in some ways, so what is bias? And why is it so important so by itself? Just the preference of one thing over another, let's. Hope that it's not getting a bad rap like diversity did once upon a time, because if those scare people, but it really is just a function of the human condition, if we were not able to make shortcuts. and quickly make decisions and form opinions about things. It would take us too long to deliberate. We really wouldn't survive as a species, you need to be able to look at an orange and no from your previous experience. That is not going to kill you. So bias is just you know preferring one thing over another now it's not a problem when we're talking about your favorite food, your favorite color, your favorite flavor but it does get challenging when we start having preferences about people particularly in the spaces where we're talking about things that they can't control when we get into things like protected categories engenders things like that. Gender race, religion, age having a preference for or against any anything in that territory is is definitely sketchy territory and in the workplace. That's protected, so you can't simply choose to promote somebody because they happen to share a religion with you. You if that's the reason that you promote them over someone else, that's illegal. So that's the the dangerous

Kevin Crews Tiffany Jonah Tiffany United States Leagues Entrepreneur TMI Google Mojo Lincoln Richmond Virginia Co Founder CEO
Whats the next disaster we need to prepare for now?

The Big Story

04:03 min | 2 months ago

Whats the next disaster we need to prepare for now?

"This came out of nowhere. You may not in fact be shocked when I tell you that. Lots of people predicted this from scientists to doctors to past presidents who even prepared for it to billionaire philanthropists who gave Ted talks and science fiction writers who wrote books a lot of people predicted a pandemic but the United States. And if we're being fair about a lot of countries including US still weren't ready the pandemic we're living through right. New is one of a number of scenarios that worry analysts and scientists. It's a low probability high consequence event that means it probably won't happen in any given year but over years and decades it gets far more likely and if we're not ready just like we weren't ready for this one. It can be devastating. So what exactly are the threats that we should be preparing for now as we deal with the pandemic what worries the giant intelligence apparatus to the south of US and other intelligence agencies around the world? I mean look. It's been a few months of nonstop virus anxiety so we figured we should maybe find you something new to worry about your welcome. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story. Garrett graff is a writer with politico who put together a very interesting list hi Garrett I think for having me no problem we uh we. We realized that had been a while since we checked in with our neighbors to the south and a as soon as we did we say you guys are fretting about a lot of things but just first of all I mean. How are you guys doing these days? I think the mood in the nation is darkening. I think there is both a sense of. This is not going to be a short crisis. Either in terms of the public health aspect or the economic aspect and that the government is not rising to the occasion in the way that we are used to as Americans seeing our government rise to the occasion that Such as we have found bright lights and hope in leadership here it has been largely at the local level and at the state level and that the federal government still seems dramatically outclass by the scale of handle. That's unfolding right now. I mean I will tell you. There is a ton of discussion amongst our political leaders up here To simply ask the federal government to please keep the border closed because I think that the general populace is is. Frankly worried about you folks. Yeah and Vermont is Where I live is actually in very good shape in that. We are one of just three states right now. That is actually has Qisas moving in the right direction and We are beginning to reopen But you know when you look at all of the states surrounding us. They they are still in the midst of really terrifying outbreaks. And the reason. We're calling you today because we wanted to kind of get a sense of what's going on the states and what you guys are thinking about. And what comes next and you put together A very interesting and somewhat depressing piece for politico about something called the domestic threat assessment. So why don't you tell me I what is it? And how did you make it ashore? So an annual tradition in the United States for the last dozen or so years is that each winter the director of national intelligence here the person who oversees the seventeen different intelligence agencies that make up the US intelligence community issues what they call basically a collective worldwide threat assessment It's twenty or thirty page.

United States Federal Government Politico Garrett Graff Jordan Heath Rawlings Vermont TED Qisas Director Writer
Raising Emotional Intelligence and Resilience for a Meaningful Life (with Susan David)

Janet Lansbury Podcast

07:01 min | 3 months ago

Raising Emotional Intelligence and Resilience for a Meaningful Life (with Susan David)

"Can you talk a little about emotional? Agility what it is and why it matters. Yeah absolutely so most of my work. All of my work infect is focused on one key question and that is what does it take internally in the way we deal with our thoughts motions and even the stories that we develop over time that help us to thrive in an increasingly complex world because we know that no matter what grades children have an no matter what they outward skills aw. Ultimate V. what's going to be the Nicholas of whether they all well and happy and thriving. Human beings is determined much more by what goes on inside of them their capacity to navigate difficult emotions thoughts experiences so that they can bring the best of themselves forward and semi work ready focuses on that you know one of these fundamental skills that critical for children and that also as it turns out are critical for us as parents and to be able to offer this to our children. Often it's important for us to have it ourselves and that's one of the reasons I refer so many people to your tedtalk and your book because I want to help parents be able to help their children by recognizing in themselves the importance of understanding and feeling okay with the discomfort of their feelings. Absolutely you know a lot of what I do in my Ted talks in my work in general is I ve very much come up against this idea that you know a lot of us have in society which is that. We want to be happy all the time. We want to chase happiness. Happiness needs to be a goal and often we have that same one to design with great intentions for children. We want our children to be happy. And sometimes what happens is that idea of happiness becomes then almost muddied with the other idea which is if they show unhappiness than it means that not happy. That's a that's a bad thing and so what has happened. I think in society in general when it comes tall more difficult emotions back sadness. Fear Grief Boredom anxiety stress. Is We have very much this narrative that these are bad emotions that the negative emotions and her decayed sounds like a good thing. You know that we have joy and happiness and that the other emotions go away because they are suppose if he'd negative or bad but not allowing children to experience difficulty motion's actually undermines the resilience their wellbeing and they happiness over time. Because the truth is that our children are growing up in a world to use the phrase that I use my tip. Talk in which lacks beauty is inseparable from it's virginity. I'll children will one day be rejected by some of the folded narberth. Oh they'll lose their jobs or bell flanker school test. They going to have difficult emotional experiences and says parents want about. Most important roles is to help. Our children develop a sense of comfort and competence with these difficulty emotions. So that no longer scary. But the actually has the resilience capability checks. She'd navigate effectively and these are these fundamentally emotional. Not Skills that I'm talking about this idea that it's not about positively unhappiness it's xp about developing capacity with the full range of emotional experience so the children are able to navigate the world as it is not as we wish to be. That reminds me of something. My Mentor. Magdi Governor used to always say which is if we can learn to struggle. We can learn to live. It's one of my favorite quotes from her love. That and what you say which is discomfort is the price of admission to a meaningful life. It's easy for us to feel fine when things are going well but it's when we can be comfortable with that discomfort then we're free we don't have to feel like we're just walking this tightrope by fall off. I'M NOT GONNA be able to handle it. I can handle all of it. I think that's EXEC because what happens so much and this is what a lot of my work has looked at how people if they experienced in difficulty actually been instead of just experiencing the difficulty. You know I've lost my job. I'm feeling unhappy here. Things aren't going well in this relationship. That's what we call a tough one experience but then what we ought to do as we start nehring on type two difficulties on the difficulties you know not only am. I am happy at my job but I'm unhappy about the fact that I'm unhappy because I should be happy or we become judgy with ourselves about a we get into this internal struggle with ourselves as to what emotions we should be allowed to feel what emotions we shouldn't get out of feel but our emotions even the most difficult ones guilt as a period for instance our emotions contain signposts to the things that we care about. And so if we move beyond this idea of trying to crush difficult emotions and we instead stock being curious and compassionate with them. Gee I feel guilty right now. Oh I feel I feel frustrated and instead of trying to push him aside we studied. Say What is it that venue? What is it that I care about that? This emotion is trying to sign post to me. So much guilt is apparent. That doesn't mean that guilt is a fact. It doesn't mean that I am a bad parent but what it might be helpful to do is for us to just slow down into solves and say what is this guilt. Kinnock me about what I care about. It might be telling me that I value prisons connected this with my children and I don't have enough of a crash now so what that does is it's liberating it. It opens up our capacity to make small meaningful changes Thomas and so. Yeah when I when I talk about this idea. That discomfort is the price of admission to meaningful less. It's ready this idea that you know. We don't get to have periods of growth without discomfort be apparent raise. A family started a new job. Boy You businesses leave the world a better place. We don't get to do those things without stress and discomfort and so if we can lean into an open assaults up to that discomfort and learn from it that is profoundly hopeful in terms of being able to move forward effectively

Nicholas TED Thomas Kinnock
Why We Didn't Prepare For The Pandemic

The Indicator from Planet Money

04:19 min | 4 months ago

Why We Didn't Prepare For The Pandemic

"Again and again the world was warned that it was not ready for a pandemic warned by the World Health Organization in the World Bank and a big study last year warned by research scholars and in Long magazine articles warned even by Bill Gates in a famous Ted. Talk in two thousand fifteen if anything kills over ten million people in the next few decades. It's most likely to be a highly infectious virus rather than a war. Also there have been numerous close calls. In the last couple of decades when epidemics in some parts of the world looked like they might become global. Pandemics SARS Moore's Ebola and yet even as corona virus started spreading across the globe earlier this year people and governments throughout the world were unprepared. There wasn't enough protective equipment. They were slow to produce enough tests for the virus. The took too long to implement social distancing. A big part of the problem. Is that when it comes to preparing for a global disaster like this one we? Humans are fighting an uphill battle against a powerful force. Our own brains. The mind is full of psychological biopsies. That can lead us not to take seriously enough. These warnings of impending doom economists Harford recently chronicled. Some of these biopsies in an article for the Financial Times magazine and Tim says for example that people seem to have what's called a normalcy bias. Normalcy bias is sometimes called negative panic. It's just this idea that when things are falling apart all around you. There's a total disaster. People very often don't seem to realize how bad things are often surprisingly calm even when actually they should be taking very prompt action in a pandemic the number of infected people grows exponentially so fast that it can be hard to understand how it's spreading at the rate it is but normalcy bias might prevent us from seeing just how bad things are getting until we are overwhelmed by the problem and this doesn't just apply to global pandemics and it's not new. Tim says for evidence of normalcy bias. You can even go all the way back to the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in the year. Eighty seventy nine. When people in the town of Pompeii watch the eruption for hours instead of evacuating the city? Up until the moment that they were buried under its ash clouds. So that is normalcy bias. There's also something called optimism bias. Which is the tendency to think that even if a disaster is to you know everyone around me I myself won't be affected so I don't need to take precautions. For example a study of what people expected as hurricane. Sandy was coming in to hit the coast to New Jersey. People actually expected that it would be worse than the meteorologists did but they thought that they themselves would be fine. They didn't really need to worry. So that's optimism bias and there's also the herd instinct which Tim says just reflect that we are all very social creatures. We take our cues from what other people do. So even as a pandemic is gathering momentum. Well if everyone else is acting like they're not worried we don't get worried. We don't start wearing masks. We don't start avoiding crowds. We don't get ready to work from home. Yeah there was just this general sense of there's a pandemic has a is this corona virus thing. It seems pretty bad. It looks pretty bad in Italy. Maybe I should do something. Maybe I should do something men. But nobody's really do and then there's not moment way like Oh and he'd get toilet paper and get food needs to get mosques and he's telling shares it's too late. Everyone's doing the same thing at the same time. It's the herd instinct and Tim reminds us that government leaders and people who work at the agencies that are in charge of preparing the world for a pandemic also have these same biases so even they might be slow to act until it's too late so these psychological biopsies can help explain why the world did not start preparing itself weeks or months earlier than it did. Once Corona virus started spreading within China which is where it originated but the biopsies do not fully explain why so many countries throughout the world ignored the warnings of the past and did not have a better plan in place for the next pandemic even before corona virus started in a big reason actually has to do with the ways we make economic decisions

TIM World Health Organization World Bank Bill Gates Mount Vesuvius Pompeii Long Magazine Financial Times Moore Harford New Jersey China Sandy Italy
Lung Cancer Screen Could Be Easy-pee-sy

60-Second Science

03:16 min | 4 months ago

Lung Cancer Screen Could Be Easy-pee-sy

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm wait gibbs. All imagine getting screened for early stage lung cancer simply by taking a deep breath from an inhaler and then peeing into a cup. Sangita Baccio a professor of Health Sciences and engineering at MIT described. How that might be possible in Ted Talk? She gave in two thousand sixteen. What if you had a detector that was so small that it could circulate in your body? Find the tumor all by itself and send a signal to the outside world. It sounds a little bit like science fiction but actually nanotechnology allows us to do. Just that his idea was to invent nontoxic nanno probes. That doctors could put inside your blood or lungs or guts to detect a tiny tumors. When they're easier to treat before they grow big enough to spread throughout the body and damaged vital organs. I dream that one day instead of going into an expensive screening facility to get a colonoscopy or a mammogram or a PAP smear that you could get a shot. Wait an hour and do a urine test on a paper strip in two thousand seventeen bought. His team reported a proof of concept experiment in nature. Biomedical Engineering that demonstrated Nanna probes like this working to detect early stage ovarian cancer in mice and now the group has refined this technology further to create a screening test for lung cancer. That is more sensitive than the C. T. Scans used today. The team of Harvard and MIT researchers described their work in the April first issue of science translational medicine lung cancer accounts for nearly a quarter of all cancer deaths in the US each year in large part because most cases of lung cancer are not caught until after the disease has already spread to other sites yet win lung. Cancer is caught and treated early the majority of patients survived the disease for at least five years but ct screening for lung. Cancer is not widely used around the world. Because it's expensive. And more than ninety percent of positive tests turn out to be benign growths not cancer. So this kind of screening leads to a lot of unnecessary and invasive biopsies in. Battista study which was done on mice genetically engineered to develop lung tumors very similar to those seen. In people the Nanna probes were able to detect tumors about fifty times smaller than other screening methods and it produced. No false positives. The NETA probes are designed to release reporter molecules when they come near certain kinds of lung tumors. Once released the reporters pass into the blood get filtered by the kidneys and then exit the body in the urine. The group is now working to repackage the nano probes into a form that could be inhaled as a powder or through a nebulizer if that succeeds then the technology will have to proceed through several years of clinical trials before it could be used to screen people for lung cancer. And I hope that what this means is that one day we can detect tumors in patients. Sooner than ten years after they've started growing and that this would lead to earlier treatments and that we could save more lives than we can today with early detection.

Lung Cancer Sangita Baccio MIT Nanna Biomedical Engineering TED Reporter Professor Of Health Sciences United States Battista Harvard
Coronavirus: Bill Gates predicted pandemic in 2015

Squawk Pod

02:09 min | 4 months ago

Coronavirus: Bill Gates predicted pandemic in 2015

"We're bringing you a special conversation with Bill Gates. The Microsoft Co founder and billionaire philanthropist on the world wide spread of Corona virus. I caught up with Becky. Quick all right becky. We're on zoom today. Talking about Bill Gates Bill Gates has been looking into viruses. I think it's just kind of one of his hobbies. He's got a lot of them but he's been looking at the viruses and potential epidemics for years. He's just a person who loves science. Studies tries to learn constantly and teach himself constantly and because of the Gates Foundation. They have such a huge network of other places that they're getting information from whether that be other countries whether that be other non-government organizations whether that be government organizations because their health initiatives have touched so many different places and have built up connections and so many different places. You know Steph learning about so quickly with this novel virus as recently as March fifth only eleven cases in the United States. This thing's only been around since the end of last year. Covert nineteen aimed for two thousand nineteen because it really came up. December twenty nineteen and Peop- learning as quickly as they can but it's hard to track all that information and I think the gates foundation is doing just about the best job that the gates foundation has worked so much index scenes in polio and malaria and a lot of these things in the developing world. Who would have thought that the work that they were doing in the developing world has come into handy here in the US? It probably Bill Gates. Let's go ahead and start now. Bill just want to thank you so much for being with us today to talk to back in two thousand and fifteen. You gave a Ted Talk. That was unfortunately pretty prophetic. If anything kills over ten million people in the next few decades it's most likely to be a highly infectious virus rather than a war not missiles but microbes. We've actually invested very little in a system to stop an epidemic. We're not ready for the next

Bill Gates Gates Foundation Becky United States Microsoft Co Founder Ted Talk Steph Polio Peop Malaria
Why Personal Video is Helping Sales Stay Human - Casey Hill

Daily Sales Tips

03:53 min | 4 months ago

Why Personal Video is Helping Sales Stay Human - Casey Hill

"Everyone. My name is Casey with Bond. Dro were personalized video messaging company and I wanted to talk today about power of building personal human authentic connections as part of the sales process so before kind of diving into that. I want to take you guys through a little thought example. That was talked about in in a Ted talk. Recent was Ju- so they asked people to think of a person whose name was bigger and then they said to think of the Profession Abakar and they actually they asked two separate groups than they they circle back in a few hours and they saw how good retention was between those two groups and they found a pretty stark contrast and the stark contrast was in favor of the people remembering the profession Baker. Now why was that? Why were people so much more likely to remember the profession Baker Bend Curse and the reason is context? When you just give someone a name they don't know in that case whether it's male whether it's female they don't have any context around it but in the case of the profession they you think of a baker. You think of the hat you might think of smells. You have all of these different associations so that same principle is true when it comes to video as well so in most people follow up. Say after-sales conversation. They send a standard email. The challenge with a standard email sender text email is. You're lacking those context pieces. There is no tone there is no body. Language facial expression there is not all of these components that contribute to relationship building to contribute to building familiarity. Right so one of the things that we're trying to do on Jaros working with sales teams and we're helping them trying to build more of those authentic connections to close more deals to build more traffic and also to get stronger refers with these relationships and with sending out. You're more people that are talking about it that are term spreading the word and so again. There's a lot of ways you can use video to help in your sales process a lot. I kind of US personally. So one is if you're a part of a sales process where you do meetings with people consultations Demos walk-throughs that type of thing a great applications to do an introduction before the with the MONDRO. Just reach out to them. Make a connection set some expectations. It's an awesome way to number one. Make sure that people show up so a lot of people we see on sales teams are using this initially to reduce no show rate because many businesses struggle with that someone books poignant but they don't Showa the second thing is to create a better context for the conversation by kind of setting that in advance so instead of sending an email that says. Hey we're gonNA talk about Xyz. You're able to housing. It's a little bit more personal than after someone has a meeting the next place that you can really insert video effectively is after the conversation has taken place so you send out something after proposal and for the competition flooding people with standard text emails. That person met with you might have met with five competitors and they're all GonNa follow up in the same way they're gonna hit him on. The phones are GonNa hit him inbox of the emails person's going to have a lot of messaging. That looks really similar. But if you use personal video that's the way that you really stand out. It's a concept. Famous market recalled. Seth Godin calls the Purple Cow. And basically what that means is if you were going on the street and you see a cow. You're not gonNA think anything of it because you see million cows but if you see a purple cow you're GonNa stop and you're going to check that out and you're going to tell people about it so it's the same thing is true with video if you follow up and you have a personal video. That's keener did up person. It really stands out me inbox. It's different it's powerful compelling and so that's my tip for today leverage personal video as part of yourselves process

United States Mondro Casey TED Jaros Seth Godin JU Bond
The Speaking Opportunity We Have Right Now

RED - The Marketing Podcast For Experts

09:30 min | 4 months ago

The Speaking Opportunity We Have Right Now

"Right after I released the last episode that is when Corona Virus. Hit the reason you haven't heard from me on this follow up episode was because I wanted to wait just a minute to get a feel for what was happening because it seems like what's happening changes daily. I can't give you a lot of accurate information. As far as how corona virus will affect your business other than sane. Things will come back around. They might be different but they will come back. Eventually we will start getting together again eventually. People are going to want that human connection they want it now. But we've got these substitutes. We've got podcast like this one. Like your podcast. Maybe blog post email newsletters but speaking at least in person that is not one of those things that we have now however because it is coming back. If you're ready for it you are going to be in great shape. So let's get you ready. I want you to think about the stock market in the nineties. Everybody was making money. But you had to have money in order to make money. If you weren't able to invest in the stock market in the nineties you couldn't take advantage of it and in order to invest. You had to do the work before the thing hit. They didn't know it was going to hit like it did. And that's what I'm trying to get you to do now. You can't remember the nineties. Maybe you weren't born yet thinking about real estate over the last few years the boom boom that we've seen in real estate over the last few years that same type of boom is going to happen for live events and speaking like. I said we're going to be ready to get out wherever you ready to see. People again and when that switch is flipped. You'RE GOING TO BE READY FOR IT. On the last episode grant covered a lot of ideas regarding speaking. And he's certainly done a lot more speaking than I have because speaking was his job for me speaking his way to spread a message. It's a way that I built my company. It is a way for me to get information out to people that I want them to know so I want to share some big ideas on speaking there from a little bit of a different perspective. This is from a guy who had a business has a business and uses speaking to grow that business built connection with people and to make money sometimes directly through the speaking sometimes. It's something related to the speech that I'm giving. Maybe I'm getting business directly from that speaking in. Sometimes it's just to expand my authority because when you come in like an expert you don't have to market as hard people come to you and you are able to charge more when you were seen as a celebrity in your business. So here's some big ideas on speaking from that perspective. Somebody who does speak a lot but does speak on a regular basis. By the way I had about four events cancel within a week after Corona virus hit a road warrior. But I'm doing this on a pretty regular basis and have been doing this for awhile and that brings me to my first big. Id Ah you need to jump in with speaking and the way that you may be able to do that now just to get that training be ready for when that switch flips and we're ready to go back to live. Speaking is doing it via online broadcast via live broadcast that could be via zoom. Something like spreaker. If you're more of an audio person that lets you distribute your message live just like a broadcast radio show. And here's the point of why you WanNa do that. The only way for you to get better in front of a live audience is to get in front of a live audience. I started doing radio in nineteen ninety one and when I started it wasn't live on the air. I wasn't a jock. I was a production guy. I was doing documentaries. I was doing stuff where I will go out. Do Research Comeback to the tape room and it was a tape room. It was literally magnetic tape that I had to slice with a razor blade. Taped back together with tape. I was doing much like I'm doing but the process took a lot longer. I will go out into the field with Marantz tape recorder like a cassette tape recorder and it was good but it was still on cassette comeback. Put It on a real. That's when I would chop it up. Get the edits in anyway. It took a while for me to get that content out the content wasn't live but it did get me used to speaking. So if you're doing a podcast even if it's not live while the best way for you to get used to speaking is live the skills you are developing by doing something you edit later. That's still going to help you. But it's not a replacement for getting out and doing it. Live the transition for me to doing live. Eventually I moved up. I guess it was move up to live on the air. Play music going in and out of tracks. Sometimes I would do interviews but not like. I'm doing now so that was a different skill. Had the live thing but it didn't have the long form content that I'm talking about now with either speech or doing something like a podcast and that transition continued with getting in front of a live audience like where I could actually see them was getting on various panels. I was flying around the country going to a lot of music marketing events. This is back in nineteen ninety-five in the late nineties tons of panels. Sometimes I moderate them. Sometimes I would just beyond them and I did dozens of these things from south by southwest in Austin Texas to see him Jay in New York to really anybody who would have me. I remember doing at least a couple of events in Athens Georgia Indianapolis. There's something to West. Virginia I was going anywhere and everywhere that would have me and for me. That was easy because I was able to bounce my message off of what somebody had previously said or more or less conversation with the people who are on stage with me. If you've got a podcast you might be able to relate to this because a lot of beginning podcasters what do you do you have a co host. Yeah people that you're interviewing you like to bounce your message off of other people and it's not all on you to have one hundred percent of that content and that'll help you for eventually getting in front of a live audience but if you WanNa get good doing something in front of a live audience one. You've got to do it. You're probably going to fail. It's going to at least be a little bit rough. It's got to be just you the very first speaking presentation that I had. I think it was the late nineties. Remember it was in. Philadelphia is an old theater on arch street again. I was used to doing panels but I had one of these independent music events. She said why. Don't you come on up here? We're not doing panels? But you can speak and I think the reason why she did that was because she didn't want to fly a bunch of panelist in imagine this. You've got five or six of these sessions. Each of them has three. Maybe five people. You've got to fly those people and you've got coordinate with them first of all you gotta find him. Even that can get complicated getting somebody to fly across the country just to sit on a panel for one hour so she wasn't doing panels and you'll see this with a lot of live event. It's much easier to fill in event with single speakers. Then it is panelist and I never done. Solis Behemoth Four. But I've been on panels before and I've been doing conference calls. We used to do this thing via the phone. I will get on speak much like it was a radio broadcast people who are calling in also via the phone. They would listen to me at a book. At the time I was very familiar with the content but on the other hand I had no idea what I was doing or what it was actually going to be like and this event. It wasn't really organized. She didn't walk me through the process. I was good at the skills that I had. The event promoter just assume that I was going to be able to get up there and speak by myself. I wasn't luckily a friend of mine. The air guy named Eric Sievers. You may have seen some of his. Ted Talks read some of his books. He was in the music business with me at the time. So he and I got in front. This group together heeded the heavy lifting and by that I mean he shared the stage with me. I was doing as much talk in his Derek. Was We're going back and forth with each other? It was a cool event. It wasn't like I was just hanging there in the sidecar but having him there enabled me mentally to organize my thoughts. It gave me more confidence because there was more or less like a panel. And tell you this story to say this if you are nervous about getting in front of a crowd. This may be an option for you since that time. I have organized and promoted a lot more events than I've spoken ad and I can tell you that this happens all the time. People want to come in as a package deal. They want business partner. Sometimes they'll won a spouse. They want somebody up there with them on stage. It also happens on radio. People are nervous about their voice going into the airways. The are nervous about people hearing them and sounding like an idiot. So they'll bring in a friend. Hey I can bring in a band with me. Hey could bring in this guy that I'm working with. He's got an interesting story does it lend me your option somewhat. You're going to a live event. People might not want to fly in the second person. You might be on your own for that but it is an option it will get you in the game and it may build your authority in a different way than you could do it on your own

Marantz Virginia Eric Sievers Athens Georgia Indianapolis Partner Austin Texas Philadelphia Ted Talks JAY New York
Before the coronavirus, Bill Gates sounded alarm on pandemic preparedness

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

10:21 min | 4 months ago

Before the coronavirus, Bill Gates sounded alarm on pandemic preparedness

"If anything kills over ten million people in the next few decades it's most likely to be a highly infectious virus rather than a war not missiles but microbes Microsoft founder Bill Gates five years ago. In two thousand fifteen. He gave a popular Ted talk where he warned that. The greatest risk of a global catastrophe wouldn't come from nuclear war it would come from a highly infectious virus. I spoke to Bill Gates on Thursday night during CNN. Townhall on the corona virus together with my friend and colleague Anderson Cooper Bill Gates and his wife. Melinda have already given hundred million dollars toward global efforts to control Kovic nineteen through their bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Today I wanNA share with you some of the highlights from our conversation. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent this is corona virus fact versus fiction. Bill Gates has called for more investment in epidemic preparedness around the world and he started on Thursday night by telling us that the United States has not done nearly enough to prepare for the situation. We're in now when you don't know the problem will come around. Sometimes people prepare like we prepare for war with war games and putting lots of money into that but sadly we'd gone long enough without a disease here in the United States that even though we had a bowl and Zeka SARS not much happened the countries that really were affected by SARS actually are the ones that have done the best in this epidemic because they acted when the number of cases were still very very small. So so bill when you when you give a talk like he didn't two thousand fifteen. You see what's happening now I mean. Could you have foreseen the rest of this sort of response? The lack of infrastructure the lack of resources no apparent strategy really out of the gate has that part of it. Surprise you given that. I mean you were sounding the alarm five years ago. One one of the things I call for. Isn't that the same way we do? War Games on a regular basis. And we say okay. We're not ready to deal with Surprises I called for us to do germ games and look at okay. Who would talk to the private sector? Who would make sure that testing capacity was raised? Who would make sure that the right people are being rested in or not somebody without symptoms getting tested daily rather medical personnel. Who have symptoms? Who really need to know. And so I wouldn't have predicted exactly how slow and how somewhat chaotic. The response has been. But if we'd done those simulations we would have seen some of these laws in the system and you know behaved a little bit like the countries that have have done the best on this one. What stage do you think? The pandemic is in right now in the United States and globally and I guess what people are Home WanNa know. How close are we to a peak here in the US? Well the good news. Is that China? Did there Shut down and they did it in a very serious way and after a six week period of a shutdown that it's more extreme than even the best states in the United States are likely to do they were able to start opening up again and the total number of cases there is very very small. So that's very good news. We're entering a tough period. That if we do it right will only have to do it once per six to ten weeks but we have to do it has to be the whole country we have to raise the level of testing the prioritization of that testing quite dramatically in order to make sure we go through one shutdown so that we take the medical problem and really stop it before. There's a large number of deaths. We do then get an economic problem. Which is why you want to minimize the amount of time and having states go at different things or thinking you can do it county by County. That will not work. The cases will be exponentially growing anywhere. You don't have a serious shutdown in many states there. There's less than than two hundred cases right now. You're saying even in those states the same kind of shutdown needs to occur. Well let's say you have one hundred cases and let's say you don't do a shutdown. Then it grows thirty three percent per day. If you take one hundred thousand and get ten thousand it's exponential growth. If you're not stopping the sooner you in engage in the shutdown the easier it is to get to that peak we have. We have not peaked. The parts of the country. That aren't shut down by the in late April. We should start to see the numbers peak. There they'll still be to hide. Open UP SEAL. Probably have to go another month to really get those numbers down but any part of the country that has cases and truthfully because of our problems with testing because we're not prioritizing testing the right way that a lot of those places actually do have cases but even if they have one hundred that will grow and people do. Cross county boundaries and so basically the whole country needs to do what was done in the part of China where they had these infections. I don't WANNA be political in any way but just in terms of for folks who are out there you know and looking forward. I always think it's better to know. Just factually what's coming down the Pike Than You know then. It's good to have hopes and aspirations. But it's good to know what's actually coming down the pike for people who are believing or imagining that in middle of April or early April people are able to gather together and churches for celebrate for Easter celebrations. Or go back to work in a regular way. It sounds like you're saying you don't believe that's realistic. No it's not realistic. The numbers are still going up. That only happens after the numbers have Pekan are going down a lot and getting down when absolute level. You know there are some good things happening. The work on a vaccine although that probably will take eighteen months out it's going full speed ahead. Our Foundation is funding. That we're looking at getting back scenes to everyone in the world so in the in the long run that is the key thing. We had a really positive result. That people were wondering. Did you have to have a medical person swab you in this way that they stuck it deep in your nose? We were able to prove which on on Monday the FDA made official that if you do a self test where you don't have to have the medical work with personal protection equipment. That self test is accurate as the one where the medical worker gift set. So that means that by self swabbing. We'll be able to get a lot more test on and only limited by the back end capacity. So there's you know there's good news coming one of the therapeutics although none of them are proven out. But they're quite a few. We have a things that foundation created called therapeutics accelerator to really look at thousands of compounds and make sure we focused the human trials on the ones that have the most promise so you know innovation which some of which we could have done in advance but innovation really is happening. But you know when you look at those numbers the US now. With the most cases there is state that has gotten to the point where their numbers are flat and are going down and the testing capacity is means. We're quite blind to a lot of these cases right now so it it. It can be done but we're not. The light is not at the end of the tunnel. In terms of a mid April reopening with this you know Dr Fouled. Things have been very clear that this is a year eighteen months. Whatever that it will take before people could actually get this vaccine are there are there and I and I and I I know that he's he's right about that. But I'm just wondering from a technological standpoint. Are there ways to speed this up using genetically modified virus or anything to to expedite the process? Well for the next pandemic we should be able to make diagnostics very quickly like hundreds of millions within two months we should be able to scale up antiviral drugs from a much bigger library within like six months and by beam ready with. This aren't a platform we should be able to make vaccines and more like a year than a year and a half and so we can and I think governments this time probably will pay attention. to Making those investments or the next one you know. The one of the biggest open questions is therapeutics. Can we very quickly Find antiviral drug. That really means number people. Go on the respirator is much lower and cuts that death rate. Quite a bit. It's tough enough in the US with the put a lot of money into our health system. If you think about this is you get to India. Nigeria and the the even poor countries in Africa. Just imagine what the overloads can look like. They're and yet they won't be able to do the that isolation and so you know we we is. We've gotten the disease down with a low infection rate. We'll have to be not letting people go to those countries or come from those countries hardly at all. It'll be very strict in terms of how that testing is done. So the sooner we solve this on a global basis the sooner we can go back to the world economy. That actually was very

United States Bill Gates China CNN Dr Sanjay Gupta Melinda Gates Foundation Microsoft Anderson Cooper Melinda TED Kovic Founder Nigeria India Africa FDA Dr Fouled Pekan
An Open Source Economy of Abundance with Marcin Jakubowski

Buddhist Geeks

11:07 min | 5 months ago

An Open Source Economy of Abundance with Marcin Jakubowski

"Hello everybody Vince Horn here for another episode of Buddhist Geeks and today I am very very delighted to be having a conversation with Martian Jukovski. Good to have you on the show Martin and thank you so much for taking the time to chat with the Buddhist geeks. I'm really excited about this conversation. Because so much of what you're doing. Feel a resonance with but it's also different from what we're doing here Buddhist excited Dick's where the intersections excellent. So let's dive right in. Okay I've got my bathing suit on and I'm ready to go seven Fahrenheit and sweet Maysville Missouri. But I'll join metaphorically awesome are you. Are you at the factory farm right now yes. That's the Kansas City area. Okay cool and I and I understand that. You have also google fiber out there. Oh and that's an addition since about a year now and that's why we can have this conversation hopefully seamlessly today. Yeah no mood. That's a big game changer fiber. We spent the money on a week. We got the pipes run here. Trenched bury them and the whole facility with Up to four GIG. Wow that's awesome. See if you're kind of you're living the dream for me. Which is you've got high-speed gig multi gigabit Internet and you're out on a farm building Chit Really Cool. I'm excited to talk about your work so so I saw. I saw your tedtalk a number of years ago. Odds probably about ten years or so ago now Something like that and and just immediately was like okay this person and your partner Katharina. Y'All are doing really interesting work with the open source ecology movement and In that talk you spoke about the global construction kit which you know. Last time I checked this is like a fifty fifty or so different items that you're looking to build open source that the kind of you would be necessary for human civilization to To to this global village construction set fifty industrial machines to create small-scale civilization with modern comforts essentially the critical machines from tractors bread ovens production equipment energy equipment and and Carson everything. You need to create infrastructure. That's the basis of thriving than so we can talk about then getting meditative but you have to provide some basic needs. I yeah you can't you can't just Meditate without without some basic needs Yogis the the people they had their comfortable caves and flame. That's right that's right. Yeah and some nettles to eat right and and and you're going to see the vision that you'll have is is going well beyond that. I mean you're talking about being able to replicate modern comforts without having to rely so much on the sort of centralized modern systems that we've all come kind of dependent on. Yeah exactly the idea is. Let's distribute the economy. So right now we're in a state of centralization but the fund that by fundamental design we have a distributed world and I think that comes from the first principle of energy energy is distributed. Solar Energy is distributed. That's pretty much where all the power for today's economy comes from. It's from the sun right so by nature. We have a distributed system but the way we created we kind of reformulated as humans isn't into a hugely centralized one so to get back to more in touch with those principles of distribution decentralisation that gives power to everybody literally and metaphorically to tell me more about like the journey that you've been on with the global village construction set because I saw you've you've made a tremendous amount of progress on that front. You know it's one thing to hear someone give a Ted talk about about something that's like an inspiring idea prototypes. It's another to see your ten years later. Like have made real progress on the stuff again to hear about that. Yeah definitely maybe you know you can say at the time of Ted Talk. Were a few percent down right now. I would quantify it as like one third done so we've got hundreds of prototypes Twenty or thirty unique prototypes everything from tractors to CNC machines. Three D. PRINTERS HOUSES. Akwa punit greenhouses. In fact we actually added the house as a critical machine since we kinda thought well. That's a living machine. Actually belongs in the global village construction set but the power is yet getting a comprehensive said along a construction setup route. So we're looking at it more as building blocks and to derive from how Lennox Open source. Software has there is one of the keys to success was large modular break down into very small parts can have thousands of people working on at the same time. And that's exactly what we do with hardware breaking down into modules and development steps for each module sewer inching along at the time of the Ted. Talk I kind of felt like I missed my great opportunity because I had so many people contact me. And all of that and we didn't have an organization. We hardly have an organization right now. We really don't yet. Were not at that level of having a business so to say like a real solid organism. But we do have a lot of foundational work. I think we are. I would call ourselves an exponential organizations laying a solid foundation with all the prototyping that we have done now ready to to convert that to economic impact so transitioning from the Playing prototyping to to the to the next step which a lot of open source Projects Forget and that is a product. So what what are the products that we can offer that anymore? Anyone can use okay. That's cool. I mean it's interesting. I'm thinking back to win. I got even more kind of interested in Y'all's work and I think at a certain point I started to really feel this kind of poll to be sort of subtract myself out ourselves out of the sort of capitalist system a bit more to be able to offer meditation teaching more freely. You know to be little less dependent on a pay for service model and you know one of the big questions that comes up is like okay. We'll around like housing costs. And how do you? How do you reduce your cost like housing is like one of the major costs and you all were some of the only people that were talking about being able to build an an ecologically sustainable you know house for like twenty five grand? Yeah and that's unheard of you not to be able to hit those kind of Knows numbers and that's what I think is really interesting about what what you're trying to do is you're really setting a goal of kind of price reduction that really competes with the capitalist markets on their own terms in a way. That's hard for them to be. It'd be hard if you're actually able to pull this off for companies to To to have any response to tenth the Price House or tractor or brick press or all the things that you're building. Yeah that's exactly right so let's dive into. There's actually a very interesting page like when I look at the WIKKI statistics. There's a page on our wicky open source ecology that org slash wicky which has cost of living. And you said it. The number one cost of living is housing on average. I have some stats here in. Its sixty eight hundred dollars a year. Then the second one is your car. Thirty four hundred dollars a year and then food twenty six hundred dollars a year and yet it adds up to about twenty thousand or so. Just let's see the the number actually is twenty thousand per year per person according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics for a household doesn't sound too bad but Ideas let's so let's go for example to the CDC home just to show you like a very tangible example so in a CD go home. You mentioned twenty five thousand dollars okay. But where's the Labor that's materials so the model there is a client? Pays probably like ten thousand dollars service fee. We host a workshop where we swarm on the build with about fifty or so people and build that in five days and I think that the more like a turnkey cost to the client. We more like seventy thousand. That's kind of what if we if you'd actually start full cost accounting like the twenty five thousand dollars as materials. Yes so you'd have to figure out how to do it but we did with a swarm based build the idea there is you are providing an immersion education. So basically you're selling inexperienced. People participate in get a lot of skills have a lot of fun shatter some of the limits in their mind about what's possible in terms of effective building using very collaborative learning rich learning environment. That's very supportive. So that's the product we're trying to develop and probably if you look at economics probably like seventy thousand dollars for a a house builder a basically the House. The person who wants to have the house before fourteen hundred square foot house so still about was Chris in the cost of industry standards. Right we actually roll this out. So there's a whole organization to behind it and sell. That's kind of how it looks right now. Now of course if you're a skilled guy and you've got a family that can build that while you're not gonna be able to do it in five days but over a month he can take our modular construction methods because everything in the system is designed to be handled by people not not example cranes or large machines the way we designed modular construction method lends itself to a swarm belt with normal people and really reducing the skill set by essentially trying to turn this into. Lagos as much as possible That's interesting and and from what I gathered like everything that you're doing the documentation around the processes like everything is part of the open source model like everything is shared shared. Absolutely everything. There's two levels so one is design seconds. Dente price design. And that's that this is where we talk about the concept of distributive enterprise. Yes the idea if we do it. And it's good for the world. Everyone can use it and and people in modern society. People think that you have to be proprietary or you have to have a competitive advantage based on Ip Order to win here are competitive. Advantage or collaborative advantage is the the opposite. Is the fact that we're collaborating? And if you think about it you're in kindergarten you'd understand because at that point we kinda were talked to to Cher but from High School Into College. Johnny were completely taught the opposite and right now. There's a huge cultural barrier that prevents people from comprehending that. Hey we can actually do. More together. Annihilate the AB- the material scarcity issues that are still central to life in the west end in the developing

Ted Talk Buddhist Geeks Google Kansas City Missouri Vince Horn Dick Martin Price House Cher Partner Trenched Bureau Of Labor Statistics Carson High School Into College Katharina Johnny
Making Time for Meditation With Ariel Gartner

Live Happy Now

08:42 min | 5 months ago

Making Time for Meditation With Ariel Gartner

"I'm your host and this week we're going to talk about something we all know about. We all know we should do but we might have trouble finding time for it in our busy lives. Meditation has incredible healing value for their mind and our body and today's guest is on a mission to get the whole world meditating. Reo Garden is a neuroscientist psychotherapist mom former fashion designer and the founder of Tech Company Muse created to make meditation easier. She has spoken about the benefits of meditation on stages around the world ranging from Ted talks to mit to south by South West. This week. She's here to talk about how we can. Master the art of meditating and find ways to fit it into our hectic wives are welcome to live happy now. It is a complete pleasure to be here. I mean what is better than living happy now? All exactly and you have so much to say about this. We have so many points that we can touch on with you. Because of what you've done and your interest in meditation and the things that you're doing to move meditation forward so I guess a great starting point is to find out how you personally got interested in meditation shirt so my own background is trained as a neuroscientist and I was working as psychotherapists promised a decade and I began working with an early brain computer interface device. So a little electrode that could track the changes in your brain activity and we recognize that the best thing we could do with this device was teach people to meditate. We had some insight into what was going on in people's brains and you know the brain is the seat of all of our experience. Anything youth think see smell talk about it as all mediated by your brain but we have so little access to it and when he recognized that we had way to help people reflect back on what was going on in their mind We realized that the best way to use this was to apply the tool to teach people to meditate so I was a psychotherapist in private practice. I'd be trying to teach my patients to meditate but frankly I sucked at it. I was somebody. Brain bounced all over the place. And I'm like I'm not good at meditation and I was teaching my patience and you know they would rarely really established the habit and we recognize that if we had a tool that could make meditation easier. We could fundamentally deploy broadscale a win. Did Meditation Become so accepted and embraced? You know when I was growing up I didn't hear about it. So when did it become accepted and also scientifically became something that they embrace as a practice? It's a good question so now there's over a thousand published studies documenting the scientifically validated impacted. Meditation on People's lives as a clinician as a therapist. The early two thousands like two thousand five thousand six it started to become part of our training and then towards the later to thousands. You heard about it more and more by twenty ten. It was one of the front line approaches for trauma and other obviously. There's lots of purchase trauma but meditation was something you were told to reteach patients from a general consumer perspective. It wasn't really until twenty fourteen. Twenty thirteen that you started to hear about it. In the general public at that point meditation was on the cover of Time magazine and it just cracked open that trend and you started to see a flood of articles of big. Ceo's were meditating athletes who are meditating and now only six or seven years later. Meditation is known as something that you should be doing along side brushing your teeth eating well and exercising. It's just understood among the educated populace that it's what you should be doing for your home. It's been a very fast ramp and we hear that you should do it but can you explain why because we here. It's good for you. It's going to help you be more calm. Be MORE PRESENT. But how does it really benefit us? What is it doing to our brains shirt? So meditation very simply is a practice or training that leads to healthy and positive mind states and there are many different forms of meditation. That you might have heard of a zen meditation walking meditation. Mindfulness the most common form that people learn. I is focused attention. Meditation so in focused attention meditation. What you're doing is you're putting your attention on your breath and when your mind eventually wanders away from her breath taller mountains. Do you then noticed that your mind has wandered and the new. Choose to come back to your breath. So it's actually incredibly simple exercise your attentions on your breath. Your mind wanders onto the grocery list or something else you say. Oh my mind wandered away. Okay backed my breath now. Well this might sound really simple. It's actually quite hard to do consistently and the simple thing leads to some tremendous benefits as I mentioned. There's over a thousand published studies demonstrating meditations ability to impact your brain your body your health. Your interpersonal relationships your productivity and more and so breaking down this very simple exercise most of us go through our lives with their minds. Just on autopilot you. We have thoughts in our head and we assume that those are supposed to be the thoughts that are there. That's just what happens and a lot of those thoughts are negative repetitive stressful when not particularly helpful. And they simply loop in our minds and we follow them and we think about them and then they make our experience of life somewhat negative stressful in repetitive. And Meditation. What you're doing when you notice that your mind has wandered and you choose instead of following. That thought like you normally would and now thinking about the grocery list or your upcoming basketball game or wherever. Your mind wanders. You're saying no I'M NOT GONNA follow that wandering thought. I'm going to choose to take my mind elsewhere onto something that is neutral like your breath and as soon as you do that you change your relationship to your thoughts see you now for the first time recognize that you have a choice about what you were thinking and so you can take your mind off of thoughts that are negative stressful repetitive. It's Nope I don't need to be there. Let me go back to something neutral and so as you do that over time you train your mind to stay in a place that is neutral. That is calmer that is not filled with thoughts. And that is actually in the present moment. And when you're in the present moment you're not thinking about the past or the future which is where your worries and concerns live the present moment you just have. What's Hyun in front of you? It's one thing to have that experience while you're meditating. How long does it take until you have that same experience when not meditating? You know even after you've stopped you're mad at the moment you have control over whether your mind is going so like anything. It's a practice. You can't just go to the gym once and then expect to be strong among later. You know you do it consistently as you do it consistently you built the practice so for some people you know. It takes a couple sittings of meditation to kind of get. What's going on and then it takes a couple of weeks maybe to start to notice that okay you feel a little bit calmer and then after a few months you recognize that you have more ability to really manage your mind. You feel less distracted throughout the day. You find yourself more focused you know. Maybe your relatives are noticing changes. How long does someone need to meditate in like daily because people say I don't have five minutes I don't have ten minutes? I don't know how long I'm supposed to meditate. How long do you need to meditate every day for it to be effective? So that's a good question and what you WanNa be doing is starting off with a small amount because the most important part about meditation is doing it regularly and building the habit. So if you start off with ten minutes Dan Meditation and that amount of time. It's frustrating to. You're probably not GONNA do it. So some people start with as little as three minutes or four minutes five minutes and then build their way up to ten. Most of the studies are done with twenty minutes per dave meditation. But it's also been shown that you can get benefit with ten minutes of meditation and that will give you an ice consistent practice us and is it something you necessarily have to do sitting in a corner quite a you know. Do you need to make space for it? Does it become something that you can do really anywhere. Ideally at something that you can do anywhere because what you're ultimately building is the skill of being able to be focused and attentive and in the moment wherever you are in a meeting in a crowded environment in times in real life where you're frustrated and you need those skills. So people find it useful to have a spot in their homeowners. Quiet because you can then spend that time really sitting with yourself and observing your thoughts but as you get better at it you want to be putting yourself in all sorts of situations where you practice your meditation so that you can draw on that scale when you need it anywhere

Time Magazine Brain Reo Garden Private Practice TED MIT South West Basketball Founder CEO Hyun
Ellen Parkin MS on Cannabis Testing, Trouble with Edibles, Working with Labs

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

08:00 min | 5 months ago

Ellen Parkin MS on Cannabis Testing, Trouble with Edibles, Working with Labs

"Everybody. This is Jason Wilson with the curious about canvas podcast. Thanks so much for tuning in once again Today I'm sitting down with a friend of mine and fellow Quality Nerd and Analytical Scientist Ellen. Parkyn Ellen thanks so much for being willing to sit down with me today yeah. I'm very excited about this. This is great. Yeah totally So for some of you. That might not know Ellen. Ellen's been working for the past. I don't know how many years now working in the canvas testing space like five years or four years or so four now yeah and We have somewhat similar experiences in the cannabis testing fields. In that. We've done a little bit of everything as far as we've been the the analytical technicians the analyst quality director we've done every every piece of it So we have a lot in common in that regard worn many Uma exactly Ellen de mind just to get US started here. Kinda describe a little bit about your background and Kind of how? You came to work in the canvas testing space specifically and then where some of your work is Kinda focused as of lately. Yeah of course I actually I started out In the beer industry I have my master's degree in doing science and I was seeing a lot of work on hot chemistry and Started working in the beer industry And just some life changes Hadn't he turned towards cannabis? I found myself working As a lab technician and a little startup laboratory here in Oregon and Ever since it's been a great Change in my career There's so much more opportunity for Research and Career Development and growth and the industry is just so fascinating until news that I think it's been really great Just as a part of my career I've we're kind of looking for what I wanted to do And as I worked my way up from being allowed tech And then doing more call you work and then into a bigger space of Laboratory director and Quality Assurance Officer. I kind of found my niche. I'm really enjoy doing. Also quality specialist where and Kind of helping people understand the regulations and helping people understand what is and what kind of computer people And so that's kind of been a really big part for me as well as trying to with the part of the community as well. The industry that I came from before that your industry had a lot of connections and a lot of Immunity ORIENTED EVENTS AND WITH CANVAS. That wasn't as prevalent and so with the nonprofit profit that I work with Cafe Canvas Association We do a lot of work to bring everybody together Both for like social events like we recently had Nfl where Several local breweries donated. Fear we got together there were trucks. It was super finds And then like next month. We're going to be having like an educational so I think that I think really been Been great for for the face. Yeah answer you doing Some Educational Work. Through that nonprofit. Yeah Yeah so We try to do at least one educational event year Just trying to get people are more interested in the aspect right now but I think as people who are not growers producers get involved in the kind of things They're gonNA want to know more about like. What is this plant? What do what are what is going to have to test for fifty nine pesticides? What are these things So in our attempts to you educational things We try to have like one event a year and Hugh It's Kinda like Ted talks to get different people me and we kinda talk about similar subjects And try to get people involved in that and Get people talking about it. Yeah that's cool trying to spark good conversations and drive The sort of consciousness industry a little further sounds great walkway. Yeah And in some and I know we're sort of taking attention from the camps testing stuff but I'm as an educator also really interested in this too In some of the educational work that you're doing now you said right now it's primarily a lot of industry folks that are involved so do they have was sort of questions are they kind of wanting answers to That you're kind of getting confronted with a lot of data about the regulatory face at Mike. What's allowed yeah? That's always like why do we have this regulation? Could we change it? And so yeah we're political aspects to it right now and I think With with him coming into play as much as it has in the past year I think a lot of people are going to be a lot more interested in Understanding US MINOR CANAVERAL. What we're seeing some and holiday interact with the body and how they can help people As well as You know a lot of people are still just really interested in like. How do I get into the industry and so I hear yeah? Yeah so We're taking with this. Next educational event were taking a deep dive and Talking about genetic. Wow Oh it should be really great. We're going to have a panel. We're GONNA have a couple of cool And actually one of the people that I'm most excited about. He's actually a lawyer here in town and she's GonNa talk about Intellectual Property and genetics. And how those interact but very cool. Yeah that's that's something that's been on my mind a lot lately especially with all the controversy around. Filo in all the different stuff that's been going on as a lot of people hit me with questions about that. That's just a realm of things. I just don't know much about as far as what you can patent which you can't what. The implications are for sharing genetics. All this sort of stuff and it's beyond me. Yeah this is GonNa be interesting to see how all of this plays out. Because I think people are going to try to patent for Internet exchange and then it's like how you as number one of state governing body kind of fat intake and then number like as the person who has that patent or a person who want those medic. How do you interact in that space without being like US remind? You can't have them And I think he's GonNa get a little wild. I think I don't know how to say but it's GONNA be Very different and especially with like how everything else with cannabis industry is Kinda come about. It's like it's a lot of trial and error of like right right. And if they don't then let's go back and figure out what's the next step so there's GonNa be a lot of that I just hope that you know people. Don't get hurt people on you know it's Kinda thing.

Parkyn Ellen Research And Career Developmen Cannabis Laboratory Director And Qualit United States Hugh It Jason Wilson Cafe Canvas Association Scientist Lab Technician Filo Oregon Mike Analyst NFL UMA Director TED
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

03:29 min | 7 months ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"And <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> so are my <Speech_Female> mentors <Speech_Female> champions <Speech_Female> my <Speech_Female> supporters <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> sponsors <Speech_Female> and all <Speech_Female> the ways that we <Speech_Female> can and do <Speech_Female> show up <Speech_Female> for each <Silence> other <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> we <Silence> can become <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> our sources <Speech_Female> of <Speech_Female> renewable <Speech_Female> power <Speech_Female> for each other <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> and along <Silence> the way <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> we need to take better okay <Speech_Female> ourselves <Speech_Female> and here I am not <Speech_Female> the best role <Speech_Female> model. <Speech_Female> I don't meditate. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I don't exercise <Speech_Female> regularly <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> but I do. You <Speech_Female> live <Speech_Female> aerobically. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Because I believe <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> we can't be <Speech_Female> dangerous <Speech_Female> from the sidelines <Silence> <Speech_Female> and there's <Speech_Female> just too <Speech_Female> much <Speech_Female> to be <SpeakerChange> done <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> so let's <Speech_Female> use all our <Speech_Female> power about <SpeakerChange> the power <Speech_Female> of money <Speech_Female> less <Speech_Female> allocate <Speech_Female> more of <Speech_Female> our philanthropic fake <Speech_Female> dollars. 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I'm <Speech_Female> holding <SpeakerChange> it <Speech_Female> higher <Silence> than ever <Speech_Female> boldly <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> brilliantly <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> inviting <Speech_Female> you <Silence> to join me me <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> it's dangerous <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> light. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for more. Ted Talks Cox <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> DOT COM <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Music> <Music> or.

Ted Talks Cox George Bernard
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

09:23 min | 8 months ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Do you ever wonder why we're surrounded with things things that help us do everything faster. And faster and faster communicate faster but also work faster. Bank faster travel the faster. Find a date faster. Cook faster clean faster into all of it all at the same time. How do you feel about cramming? Even even more into every waking hour to my generation of Americans speed feels like a birthright. Sometimes I think our minimum speed is mach three anything less and we fear losing our competitive edge but even my generation starting to question whether we're the masters of speed need or if speed is mastering us. I'm an anthropologist. At the Rand Corporation and while many anthropologists study ancient cultures I I focus on modern day cultures and how were adapting to all of this change happening in the world. Recently I teamed up with an Engineer Safe Chon Day way to study speed. We were interested both in how people are adapting to this age of acceleration and its security and policy implications. What kind of world look like in twenty five years of the current pace of change keeps accelerating? What would it mean for transportation or learning communication Manufacturing weaponry or even natural selection will have faster future make us more secure and productive over the make because more vulnerable in our research people accepted acceleration as inevitable both the thrills and the lack of control. They fear that if they were to slow down they might run the risk of becoming obsolete. They say they'd rather burn out than rust out yet. At the same time they worry. That speed could erode their cultural traditions and their sense of home but even people who are winning at the speed game admit to feeling a little uneasy they see acceleration. Nation is widening the gap between the haves. The jet setters were buzzing around and have nots. Were left in the digital dust. Yes we have good reason to forecast that the future will be faster. But what I've come to realize is that speed is paradoxical in like all good paradoxes. It teaches us about the human experience as absurd and complex as it is. The first paradox is that we love speed. And we're thrilled. Oh by its intensity but our prehistoric brains aren't really built for it. So we invent roller coasters. Race cars and supersonic planes but we get whiplash carsick jetlagged. We didn't evolve to multitask rather we evolved to do one thing with incredible people focus like hunt not necessarily with great speed but with endurance for great distance. But now there's a widening gap between our biology and and our lifestyles a mismatch between what our bodies are built for. And what we're making them do. It's a phenomenon. Mentors have called stone-age irs in the fast lane. A second paradox of speed is that it can be measured objectively right miles per hour gigabytes per second but how speed feels and whether we like. It is highly subjective so we can document that the pace at which we are. Adopting new technologies technologies is increasing for example. It took eighty five years from the introduction of the telephone to win. The majority of Americans had phones at home in contrast it only took thirteen years for most of us to have smartphones and how people act and react to speed varies by culture sure and among different people within the same culture interactions that could be seen as pleasantly brisk inconvenient in some cultures could be seen as horribly rude and others. I I mean you wouldn't go asking for a to go cup at a Japanese tea ceremony so you could get off to your next tourist. Stop when you a third paradox. redux is that speed begets speed. The faster I respond the more responses I get the faster I have to respond again. Having more communication an information at our fingertips at any given moment was supposed to make decision making easier more rational. But that doesn't really seem to be happening. Here's just one more paradox. If all of these faster technologies were supposed to free us from drudgery the jury why did we all feel so pressed for time why are we crashing our cars in record numbers because we think we have to answer that text right away. You shouldn't life in the fast lane field. Little more fun and a little less anxious German speakers even have a word for this. I'll con- kite right in English. That's hurry sickness when we have to make faster decisions autopilot brain kicks in and we rely on are learned. Learned behaviors are reflexive our cognitive biases to help us perceive and respond quickly. Sometimes that saves our lives lives right fight or flight but sometimes it leads us astray in the long run. oftentimes when our society has major failures they're not technological failures. They're failures that happened. When we made decisions too quickly on autopilot? We didn't do the creative or critical thinking required to connect the dots or weed out false information or make sense of complexity. That kind of thinking can't be done fast asked. That's slow. Thinking to psychologists Daniel Economy in Amos Jovanovski started pointing this out back in one thousand nine hundred seventy four and we're are still struggling to do something with their insights but all of modern history can be thought of as one spurt acceleration after another. It's as if we think if we we just speed up enough. We can outrun our problems. But we never do. We know this in our own. Lives policymakers no at two. So now we're turning to artificial intelligence to help us make faster and smarter decisions to process this ever expanding universe of data but machines jeans. Crunching data are no substitute for critical and sustained thinking by humans. Who stone-age brains need a little time to let their impulses subside to slow the mind and let the thoughts flow? If you're starting to think that we should just hit the brakes. That won't always always be the right solution. We all know that a train. That's going too fast around. A bend can derail but say. The engineer taught me that a train. That's going going to slowly around. The bend can also derail so managing this spurt of acceleration starts with the understanding that we have more control control over speed than we think. We do individually and as a society. Sometimes we'll need to engineer ourselves to go. Faster will want to solve of gridlock. Speed up disaster relief for hurricane victims or use three D. printing to produce what we need on the spot just when we need it sometimes though aw will want to make our surroundings feel slower to engineer the crash out of the speedy experience. And it's okay not to be stimulated all the time it's good for adults and for kids. Maybe it's boring but it gives us time to reflect. Slow time is not wasted time and we need to reconsider what it means to save time culture and rituals around the world built in slowness because slowness helps us reinforce our shared values and connect and connection is a critical part of being human. We need to master speed and that means thinking carefully about the trade offs of any given. Technology will help you reclaim time that you can use to express humanity. We'll give you hurry sickness. We'll give other people. Hurry sickness if you're lucky enough to decide the pace that you want to travel through life that's a privilege privilege use it. You might decide that you need both to speed up and to create slow time time to reflect. Uh To percolate at your own pace time to listen to empathize to rest your mind to linger at the dinner table so as resume into the future. Let's consider setting the technologies of speed the purpose of speed and our expectations of speed to a more human pace. Thank you for more. Ted Talks to Ted DOT COM.

engineer Rand Corporation Ted Talks Daniel Economy Amos Jovanovski
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

02:01 min | 9 months ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"And napped what the industry is waiting for. They're waiting for the chemist to design new smooth surfaces with increased inherent adhesion for some of those copper wires years. And when we solve this problem and we will solve the problem and we'll work with physicists and engineers to solve all of the challenges of five Jay. Well well then. The number of applications is going to skyrocket. So yeah we'll have things like self driving cars because now our data networks can handle the speeds the amount of information required to make that work. But let's start to use imagination. I could imagine going into a restaurant with a friend. That has a peanut allergy taking out my phone waving it over the food and having the food tell us a really important answer to a question deadly or safe to consume or maybe our devices will get so good at processing information about us that they'll become like our personal no trainers and they'll know the most efficient way for us to burn calories. I know come November when I'm trying to burn off some of these pregnancy pounds. I would love device ace. That could tell me how to do that. I really don't know another way of saying it. Except chemistry is just cool and it enables all of these electronic traffic devices so the next time you send a text or take a Selfie. Think about all of those atoms that are hard at work and the innovation that came before for them. Who knows? Maybe even some of you listening to this talk. Perhaps even on your mobile device will decide that you chew WanNa play sidekick to captain chemistry the true hero of electronic devices. Thank you for your attention and thank you chemistry for more. Ted Talks to Ted DOT COM..

Ted Talks Jay
"ted talks" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

14:39 min | 9 months ago

"ted talks" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

"He's cutting out the middleman. He's just want to walk away from a grocery store he we just bought cookie near high life beyond the door. Frightening wasn't GonNa do it. He was in a dinosaur onesie too. I should that sounds like an adventure. That's all right man. Six years of my life jokes on us the sugar like the crunch and then I was over huma. Suzy may ask to make them cookie. Yeah exactly married for over a decade. I can't imagine asked my wife just whimsically and you make me some cookies. uh-huh on Father's Day stretch. I do love to cook so it's not out. That's true. Content Sodas like I know you love Bacon Babe. How do you feel about peanut butter cookies? Like right now could be taken advantage. Oh could be we constantly. Do you think that there's like resentfully that window I think when people start smoking weed like my first time I think I was probably mm fifteen We Jack Shit about it. We just found a by friend's mom she had some Like nuggets sticks sticks in fucking seeds in. We got a post it note because we were like. Oh this is brilliant. The glue will self And we got up a like behind his chimney on the roof when you smoked share who was eighty percents sticks in seeds hosted. And I'm sure if we were high it was from blue a you know like you have that relationship with when you're younger and then you kind of figured out like dosing. You know what you prefer. Is there an earmark earmark. Point in someone's life your time to put it down you know is it. I think some people associated with parenthood. You know I think you make a very good case. You're like an excellent father. You know but you still have fun. Incredible story about Disneyland. Like wet. Wet points you think. That is someone's like you know like an alcoholic so you're like yeah you should go to a fucking total two cars. You Know Castilla nurses like listen you sixty dollars worth of fruit last night. You should probably put down the barn. I I've seen so many people start at different times life. Put an age on it in then like age-specific say in some people respond to it so differently like with the paranoid paranoia stuff. That's never really hit me. So I can't even relate to it except heard people go. I got high once West. Twenty one I got so paranoid. Can't down like well you might. You could good try again and be a little smarter about your smoking and doing the right people. May you do like it. Yeah but some people there whatever their body just is set to to work with marijuana you say a window I feel like I'm glad I didn't do it before. I don't think I was mature enough. I don't know why you wouldn't be doing in your twenties if you thought that that maybe the thing for you. That seemed like the perfect experiment. I don't like people driving on it and driving having while doing it. I see that all the time. It's like the you not wait home. I blow a huge bill out the window. Oh dude I'm I'm seventeen. Years old is Houston Texas. I'm in the car with some friends in the back seat in the middle and were passing around a joint my friend on wall we have a big bag of weed on US eighty hops. pull up behind us. My friend. WHO's windows down? Were all like. Don't let smoke out the window. Roll the fucking windows up rolling up. All the windows is like right behind his. My friend takes tobacco weed out the car window. All of US screamed. We're like oh might lure like push him out of the car to like he's fucking dead to us. Nothing happened. Didn't even know yourself fucking. I know all day. Yeah exactly jails sorry about in two weeks ago like the plywood was just sitting around you remember that Shit we should be in fucking jail right now but Speaking of paranoia I think my favorite like uh a story of that was that cough that smoked the weed from the evidence room with his wife and then he called nine one one because he thought they were dead on audio. You guys haven't looked at Listen to it because this is probably like eight years ago it came out it was all over the Internet. So fucking funny I think we die. Yeah I've I've been with that person several times that that has a problem with Thai. The problem thinking that they're in that way permanently. They've been in a permanent state. That's they never wear off like that for now on fucking get used to this. Is Your Life. Imagine having to go back back to the precinct fell after making that call like when you about the NBA player or days. Yeah didn't edible on the plane. It sounds was like he'd never before the Miami Heat player did at a ball and I think in the middle of the flight had a panic attack. Hung up up to Noah's who knows it's not being reported exactly what happened. He definitely had some kind of panic attack. Yeah and now. He's suspended for ten days. It's like it was terrible. Don't do edibles on planes can't escape a plane like know. No your dose like dosing is a big thing but it's so hard to know just say don't do it on a plane on a plane is it. It has walls up in the air. Ideology sowed you have no choice over where your body is has to be exactly in this one one spot right. Oh my God. That's an excellent point. You can't control really the temperature. You can't control how you're sitting next to you. Do you feel about -cational voice of God about every you know just giving you updates about the sky fuck is right here. Our people coming back from Amsterdam like yet took a big Brownie on the unlike Oma God cross country flight coming out of a foreign country which to me. It doesn't matter Canada any other country. I'm paranoid of being arrested or fucked with what I mean. So it's like I don't want to be out of control at all. Uh Up international incident. Yeah get back to America. If I'm going to act a fool embarrassed my family out there in the world it was an American captured and call with just a little bit of keeping that up in your Special Mama's the here's a crime small amount of marijuana. Yeah none of the other things at the senior mention. I just wonder how still do that. Not The pennies in the Dash not the TACO bell receipts. That's not the al Toy. Nothing how do you think like kids growing up in this age of legalization. I mean what they're gonNa do to stone her culture you think like is it. I think on a wiped out. It's definitely changing the way people talk about it the way Like some of these some release dispensaries The Batik dispensaries. Really turn me off. They won't call it. We'd for instance the only caught cannabis this day Medicaid or dosing. Instead of like smoking or like right and they don't say they might not even say sativa cynical mind body or stuff like that. Unlike I don't even I can't even on having been able to put a finger on. What hate it so much? I guess it's like back pitching but it's culture whiplash like I very much like you come from the Sort of anti authoritarianism towards we'd culture people turn their knows about it and sooner culture for such a long time and it's like oh now we're so cool with it commercialized. Now is like walking into to a department store and you have all these different brands and all these different and everyone's so knowledgeable in like they've changed the other thing. Yeah they pretend to be or not technology. Yeah they they're always like I think you know it's like Oh yeah you know this. This is a hybrid. That with you know what I think. Nearly I'd do does does it work. I put that in mind special. They say pretty sure and pretty sure it's the TV leaning already. Sure the pharmacist wouldn't say pretty share your bed about smelling medicine was set. fucking funny. Just have to listen to it at high high recommend could on my special but I I talk about sniffing a wine cork Nah I used to my longer version of that bit like Komo outside of Weed. I don't feel comfortable when they offer you the wine of a fancy restaurant and asked the judge it. I'm always is I. Yeah that's great I and do it quickly. I don't want to pretend second and the whole tonight. I don't like when people offer me something to smell quite honest inkjet all things you know what you say that being the person around our offices just walks up to me in the wild in the middle of like you smell taste it. I've never been like smell. Smell what is false. I have asked my audience many times in life. Are you asked smell our new smell to judge judge in the things. I've gotten our cheese and I say to that guy that means at the grocery store with your nose up as she as now I I don't want to buy G.. Yeah for sure and then another one. I've gotten his Candles and I'm like okay. It says the Senate on the candle in my my significant to double check that Ryan and are you Are Your skills honed enough to detect the difference between birds butter and brown sugar. Yeah exactly and even times when I do my smell like food. It is like Those doughnut smell good. Are the steak smells. Good it or whatever. It's not a discerning smell of like these donuts smell bad. It's always good when when I used to work At the customer service area of a grocery store people would want to return food. They clearly left on their car for like seven days or with member and knit first thing they do they shove it in my fucking face. It'd be like US mothers went. Why I believe you need to smell the Deli meat that you lost senior senior trump? While I wasn't going to issue her refund four dollars ninety five cents and then I smelled it all and I gave her a refund. Yeah no thanks Mike that in general about like a lost a tooth feel hear walking this or I'm always like got it trust. You understand. We you don't need to bring sensory into this. why New Dude? Who wouldn't put the cups out of the dishwasher? Wait till smelled inside them like. OCD thing right like he like to make sure they were clean. And sometimes you'd like small and he's like I don't believe this cleaner knows in all Ed knows very this what you have to do with the wind that you get your book knows it. I don't know what some point when you become coming adult like. That just happens if someone comes over to the table and they give you the gloss and they wind in front of you and everyone's fucking long and you're like what do i. This is. Fine no need to chase it to class. It's red wine we're having dinner. That's fine picked. It could pronounce it. I've been Taylor guy actually swirled and I and I said when I was like fuck you the world that God Damn Day today tilted on the side and I'm like oh good legs good legs not just like what are you talking about. Pike if you get the core. I think I've had that happen Mike twice. It's like this definitely smells like a cork with wine on it. Nailed it you. You wait a minute. It's the only way I'd return is if it smells like someone's Asshole oh listen I was like it's been you're the you're right sir. Good good good. That you're right sir. But they won bundle has not been and take it tonight's special Works smells like weed. I just got a drink. I can't remember the name of it. They taste like an Italian soda. But it's sorts. THC I don't like to drink drink. Sodas or any of that because it the facts the pretty minimal. I kind of have to sit there and be like I think I feel the dose. You know whatever tried that. Yeah Ah Yeah but this one is really nice bottle and give you like a measuring glass seeking like Joseph accordingly. It is fucking lovely. That's real mellow too bad. You don't know the fucking name of fucking sponsor so whatever it's a blue bottle you find a blue bottle. That's like a wheat Italian soda. The fucking get it. It's great. Are you doing a tour along with this special right now. A mini tour and I did. I was in Chicago in Saint Louis so I wanted to be in the middle all of the country into its but it's weird it's like our coast is so much different like legalization wise. It is such a different vibe. And I I do a lot of gigs in San Francisco Portland Seattle. But I don't it takes a little more effort to get the milk country. I was in Arkansas in the fall and CHICAGO SAINT LOSE A couple of weeks ago but is cool to get in the middle of the country every once in a while because things are so much different there does feel like two different Americas like me me being in Houston and coming back to La. I'm like oh it's just very different lives I wanna go to Houston. That's actually on my next list place back in town. So where can people get your special. Well you go to Matt. BESSER DOT COM All.

US marijuana Mike Suzy Texas NBA Chicago TACO bell Miami Castilla Houston America Noah panic Joseph San Francisco Amsterdam al Toy
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Com slash <Speech_Female> ted talks <Speech_Female> thanks <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> <Silence> of <Speech_Male> preparing for this <Speech_Male> talk has been <Speech_Male> scarier fermi <Speech_Male> then preparing <Speech_Male> for lsd therapy <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> psychedelic <Speech_Male> are to this study of <Speech_Male> the mind what <Speech_Male> the microscope <Speech_Male> is the <Speech_Male> biology <Speech_Male> and the telescope <Speech_Male> is to astronomy <Speech_Male> doctor <Speech_Male> stanislav groff <Speech_Male> spoke those words <Speech_Male> he's one <Speech_Male> of the leading psychedelic <Speech_Male> researchers <Speech_Male> in the world and he's <Speech_Male> also been my <Speech_Male> mentor <Silence> today <Speech_Male> i'd like to share with <Speech_Male> you how psychedelic <Speech_Male> when <Speech_Male> used wisely <Speech_Male> have the potential <Speech_Male> to help <Speech_Male> heal us <Speech_Male> help inspire <Speech_Male> us <Silence> and and perhaps <Speech_Male> even to help save <Speech_Male> us in <Speech_Male> the nineteen fifties <Speech_Male> and sixties psychedelic <Speech_Male> research flourished <Speech_Male> all over the world <Speech_Male> and showed <Speech_Male> great promise <Speech_Male> for the fields of psychiatry <Speech_Male> <Silence> psychology <Speech_Male> in psychotherapy <Speech_Male> neuro science <Speech_Male> and the study <Speech_Male> of mystical stickle experiences <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> but psychedelic leaked <Speech_Male> out of the <Speech_Male> research settings <Speech_Male> and began to <Speech_Male> be used by the counterculture <Speech_Male> invitee <Speech_Male> antifa vietnam <Speech_Male> war movement <Speech_Male> in there <Speech_Male> was unwise views <Speech_Male> <Silence> and so there was a backlash <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> nineteen seventy <Speech_Male> u s government <Speech_Male> criminalized <Speech_Male> all uses <Speech_Male> of psychedelic <Speech_Male> and they began <Speech_Male> shutting down all psychedelic <Speech_Male> research <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> this band spread <Speech_Male> all over the world and <Speech_Male> lasted for decades <Speech_Male> and it was tragic <Speech_Male> since <Speech_Male> alex are really <Speech_Male> just tools tools <Speech_Male> and whether their outcomes <Speech_Male> are beneficial <Speech_Male> or harmful <Speech_Male> depend <Speech_Male> on how they're <Speech_Male> used <SpeakerChange> <Silence> psychedelic <Speech_Male> means <Speech_Male> mind <Speech_Male> manifesting <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> and it <Speech_Male> relates <Speech_Male> to drugs it's like <Speech_Male> lsd suicide <Speech_Male> then <Speech_Male> mask glen <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Male> i boga <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Male> other drugs <Silence> when i was <Speech_Male> eighteen years old <Speech_Male> i was <Speech_Male> a college freshmen <Speech_Male> <Silence> i was experimenting <Speech_Male> with lsd sti <Speech_Male> and masculine <Speech_Male> and these experiences <Speech_Male> brought <Speech_Male> me in touch with my <Speech_Male> emotions <Silence> and they helped me <Speech_Male> have a spiritual <Speech_Male> connection that <Speech_Male> unfortunately <Speech_Male> my bar <Speech_Male> mitzvah did not <Speech_Male> produce <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> when i <Speech_Male> he's my parents <Speech_Male> i would tell them that they <Speech_Male> drove me just psychedelic <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> my bar mitzvah had <Speech_Male> failed at turn <Speech_Male> me into a man <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> but most importantly <Speech_Male> psychedelic <Speech_Male> gave me this feeling <Speech_Male> of are shared <Speech_Male> humanity a very <Speech_Male> unity with <Speech_Male> all life <Silence> and other <Speech_Male> people reported that <Speech_Male> same thing as well <Speech_Male> and i felt <Speech_Male> at these experiences <Speech_Male> had the potential <Speech_Male> <Silence> healthy an antidote <Speech_Male> <Silence> to <Speech_Male> tribalism <Speech_Male> fundamentalism <Speech_Male> the genocide side <Speech_Male> and environmental <Speech_Male> destruction <Speech_Male> and so i decided to <Speech_Male> focus my life <Speech_Male> <Silence> i'm changing <Speech_Male> the laws and <Speech_Male> becoming a legal <Speech_Male> psychedelic <Speech_Male> psychotherapist <Speech_Male>

stanislav groff ted lsd eighteen years
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"This ted talk features face environmentalist more a budget recordings live at ted twenty nineteen i am an astronomical is you know like that guy rich personnel in the movie the martian and it's my job to study in predict motion of objects in space currently we track about one percent of hazardous objects on orbit hazardous services like location agriculture banking television in communications in soon very soon even internet itself now these services are not protected from roughly half a million objects the size of a speck of paint all the way to a school bus in size speck of paint traveling traveling at the right speed impacting one of these objects could render it absolutely useless but we can't track things as small as a speck of paint weaken only trap things as smaller say say a smartphone so of this half million objects that we should be concerned about weaken only track about twenty six thousand of these objects in of these twenty six thousand only two thousand actually work everything else is garbage that's a lot of garbage to make things a little bit worse most of what we launched into orbit never comes back we send the satellite in orbit it stops working at runs out of fuel and we send something else up and then we send up something else and then something else in every once in a while two of these things will collide with each other or one of these things will explode or even worse somebody might just happen to destroy one of their satellites in orbit end this generates many many more pieces most of which also never come back now these things were not just randomly scattered in orbit it turns out that given the curvature of space time there i ideal locations occasions where we put some of these satellites think of these as space highways very much like highways on earth these space highways could only pick up a maximum capacity of traffic to sustain space safe operations unlike highways on earth they're actually no space traffic rules none whatsoever ten wow what could possibly go wrong with that now will be really nice is if we had something like a space traffic map like a ways first space but i could look up and see what the current traffic conditions are space maybe even predict these the problem with that however is that asks five different people what's going on in orbit where things going and you're probably gonna get ten different answers why is that is because information about things on orbit is not commonly shared either so what if we had at globally accessible open and transparent space traffic information system that could inform the public where everything's located catered to try to keep space safe unsustainable end what if the system could be used to form evidence based norms of behavior dispaced traffic rules so i developed asher graph the world's first crowd source based traffic monitoring system at the university of texas at austin asher graph combines multiple sources of information from around the globe government industry in academia and representatives in common framework work that anybody could access today but back to my problem of space traffic map what if you only had information from the us government what do the russians think that look significantly different sprint who's right who's wrong what should i believe what could i trust this is part of the issue in the absence of this framework to monitor space actor behavior to monitor activity in space where these objects are located to reconcile these in consistencies and make the snow is commonplace we actually risk losing the ability

one percent
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"This Ted talk features yogurt maker and humanitarian Hamdi ULA Kaya recorded live at Ted twenty nineteen. Ted talks daily is brought to you by the university of Maryland from companies founded by former students like Google Oculus and squarespace to the bleeding edge of machine. Learning artificial intelligence and computer vision. The university of Maryland is transforming life, as we know it to find out how we can transform your business, visit you, and you MD dot com. That's why oh you and you MD dot com. Cold January day of two thousand five I took my of my most important drive of my life. I was undestroyed in upstate New York trying to find this old factory. And they'd before I received a sliding demand and said, fully cooked yoga plan for sale. Throw it in the garbage can. And twenty minutes later, I picked it up and call the number. Plaque was eighty five years old, and it was closing. So I decided to go see it. At this time, I wasn't sure where this road or my life is going. I only smoked cheese shop but really hated business. But the hills and the roads in the smells is awesome. Also familiar. I grew up in Turkey, the similar environment near the Kurdish mountains, my family make cheese and yogurt. I grew up listening shepherds stories. We didn't have much, but we had the moon and the stars simple food, each other. Eventually I came to America. Live in New York had forms. I made it to upstate and I never left, Phnom lost. I passed the road sign said dead end. Then soon after that it was the factory. The smell hit me. I it was like a milk container left out in the sun. The wars were so tick. Pays what peeling the cracks everywhere. The fact that it was so old to almost thought it was worthless. I thought they left zero off because I couldn't believe the price. As they entered in. I stop focusing. I stop noticing things all I could see where the people. There were fifty five of them. Who's quiet? It only job was to break the plant apart and closet forever. I was met with a guy named Britsh production manager. You offer to take me around show out. He didn't say much, but on every corner, he would point out some stories. Rich worked for twenty years, his father made yogurt before him. And his grandfather made cream cheese before that. You could tell that rich felt guilty. That this factory was closing on his watch. What hit me the hardest at that time. That this wasn't just an old factory. This was a time machine. This is where people built lives, they left for wars. They brag about home runs and record cards. But now it was closing. And the company wasn't just giving up on yogurts. It was giving up on them. As if they were not good enough. And I was shocked how these people were behaving. There were no anger. There was no tears. Just silence. With grace, they were close in this factory. I was so angry. That the CEO far away. Taiwan or somewhere looking at the spreadsheets and closing the factory. Species are lazy. They don't tell you about people. They don't tell you about communities. But unfortunately, this is how to many business decisions are made today.

Ted New York university of Maryland Hamdi ULA Kaya Rich squarespace Google Turkey America CEO Taiwan production manager eighty five years twenty minutes twenty years milk
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"This. Ted talk features worked philosopher ROY behind in conversation with Ted institute. Curator Bryn Friedman recorded live at Ted salons zebra twenty eighteen. You're a guy whose company funds these programs and invests. So why should we trust you to not have a bias? And tell us something really useful for the rest of us about the future of work. So yes, I am. And you know, when you wake up in the morning, and you read the newspaper, and it says the robots are coming. They may take all our jobs as a startup investor focused on the future of work are fund was the first one to say artificial intelligence should be a focus for us. And so I woke up one morning and read that and said, oh my gosh. They're talking about me. That's me who's the one who's doing that. And and then I thought wait a minute. If things continue then maybe not only will the startups in which we invest struggle because there won't be people to have jobs to pay for the things that they make and by them, but our economy and society. He might struggle to and look I should be the guy who sits here and tells you everything is going to be fine. You know, it's all gonna work out. Great. Hey, when they introduced the machine years later, there's more tellers in banks. It's true. And yet when I looked at it I thought this is going to accelerate. And if it does exceleron there's a chance the center doesn't hold I figured somebody must know the answer to this. There are so many ideas out there, and I read all the books, and I went to the conferences. And at one point we counted more than one hundred efforts to study the future of work. And it was a frustrating experience because I'd hear the same back and forth over and over. Again, the robots are coming. And then somebody else would say, oh, don't worry about that. They've always said that and it turns out. Okay. And then somebody else would say, well, you know, it's really about the meaning of your job anyway. And then everybody's sort of shrug and golf and drink. And it felt like there was this kind of kabuki theatre of this discussion where nobody was talking to each other and many of the people that I knew and worked with in the technology world. We're not speaking to policymakers the policymakers were not speaking to them. And so we partnered with a non-partisan think tank NGO called new America to study this issue, and we brought together a group of people, including an AI czar technology company and a video game designer and heartland conservative and a Wall Street investor in a socialist magazine editor I mean, literally all in the same room. It was occasionally awkward and try to figure out. What is it that will happen here? The question we asked was simple. It was what is the effect of technology on work going to be? And we looked out ten to twenty years because we wanted to look out far enough that there could be real change. But soon enough that we weren't talking about teleportation or anything like that. And we recognized and I think every year we're reminded of this in the world that predicting what's going to happen is hard. So instead of predicting there are other things you can do which is you can try to imagine alternate possible futures. Which is what we did. We did a scenario planning exercise. Is. And we imagined cases where no job is safe. We imagine cases where every job is safe. And we imagined every distinct possibility we could and the result, which really surprised us was when you think through those futures. And you think what should we do the answers about what we should do actually turn out to be the same? No matter what happens and the irony of looking out ten to twenty years into the future is you realized that the things we want to act on are actually already happening right now, the automation is right now the future is right now. So what does that mean? And what does that tell us? So if the future is now, what is it that we should be doing? And what should we be thinking about after understand the problem? I and so the data are that as the economy becomes more productive and individual workers. Become more productive their wages haven't risen if you look at the proportion of prime working age men in the United States, at least who work now versus in nineteen sixty we. Have three times as many men not working. And then you hear the stories I sat down with a group of WalMart workers. And I said, what do you think about this cashier, this futuristic self-checkout thing? And they said, well, that's nice. But have you heard about the cash recycler because that is a machine that's being installed right now and eliminating two jobs at every WalMart right now. And so we just geez. We don't understand the problem. And so what did we do? We looked at the voices that were the ones that were excluded, which is all of the people affected by this change. And we decided to listen to them sort of automation and its discontents. And I've spent the last couple of years doing that I've been to Flint Michigan and Youngstown Ohio talking about entrepreneurs trying to make it work in a very different environment from New York or San Francisco or London or Tokyo, I've been to prisons twice to talk to inmates about their jobs after they leave. I've sat down with truck drivers to ask them about the self-driving truck with people who in addition to their fulltime job care for an aging relative. And when you talk to people there were two themes

WalMart Ted salons Ted institute Bryn Friedman ROY United States NGO Michigan Youngstown Ohio editor America AI San Francisco London New York Tokyo twenty years
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"For more TED talks go to Ted dot com. Here's an excerpt from Alan light men's new Ted book in praise of wasting time. Mental downtime is having the space and freedom to wander about the hallways of memory and contemplate who we are. Downtime is when we can ponder our past and imagine our future downtime is when we can repair ourselves and you don't have to go to a meditation center in rural Wisconsin to unplug. All you need is time away from the rush and heave of the world quiet time alone time, and you need a certain habit of mind. You need a regular pattern of thinking and approaching life a deeply rooted and constant manner of honoring your inner self affirming your values and arranging your life. So as to live by those values. In the business world, the technology world and the computer world. Downtime is a dirty word. It means period when the system is not working. When the computers have crashed when the machines have temporarily ground to a halt in these contexts, downtime is considered useless time emptied time. But for the lush and mysterious terrain of our minds, downtime is a chance to explore it is a time to renew. It's also a chance to restore and maintain our equillibrium. One of the definitions of a living organism at a primitive level involves the ability to separate itself from its surroundings, and create a stable and orderly environment within itself that's stable. Equilibrium is called homeo- stasis. An organism receives outside stimulation. Indeed, it must receive an a minimum energy from the external world, but it needs to regulate that stimulation and maintain a coherent and stable interior, though, organism separates itself from the outer world with some kind of outer membrane at less certain materials inside itself through that membrane, but not others, and it expel some materials through that membrane through all these processes. The organism must remain whole that organism cannot dissolve. It cannot merge with. It surroundings, it's interior parts must understand what they're supposed to do, at least at the biochemical level and proceed with their designated activities. Homeo- stasis can happen at the mindless level of an amoeba or at the more advanced level of human being. And at that more advanced level, I suggest that there was a kind of necessary homeo- stasis of the mind, not a static equillibrium, but dynamic echo Librium in which we are constantly examining testing and replenishing our mental system constantly securing the mental membrane between ourselves and the external world constantly reorganizing and affirming ourselves dynamic rather than static because the outside world is constantly changing and we ourselves constantly changed by it. And yet we must maintain. An echo Librium in the face of change, we cannot disintegrate. We cannot succumb to the random noise of the world. We must constantly examine who we are revised when revision is needed and bring coherency to all parts of our whole. PR axe.

TED Alan Wisconsin
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

06:53 min | 2 years ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"This TED Talks, heaters, Social Justice, activist Valery car recorded live at Ted women 2017. Why CT TED Talks, you should check out the Ted Radio Our with NPR Stay tuned after this. Talk to hear Sneak Peek of this week's episode. Bye. Did you go Costa vacated Ueki Fethi. There is a moment on the birdying table that feels like dying. The body in labour stretches to form an impossible circle. The contractions are less than a minute apart wave after wave here barely time to breathe the medical term transition. Because feels like dying is not scientific enough. I checked. During my transition, my husband was pressing down on my sacred to keep my body from breaking my father was waiting behind the hospital curtain, more like hiding. But my mother was at my side. The midwife said, she could see the baby's head. But all I could feel was a ring of fire. I turn to my mother and said, I can't, but she was already pouring my grandfather's prayer in my ear dot the Vonolagi bud Bramsen I the how wins cannot touch you. You are brave. She said. You are Braves. And suddenly. I saw my grandmother standing behind my mother. And her mother behind her and her mother behind her a long line of women who had pushed through the fire before me, I took a brass I pushed my son was born. As I held him in my arms shaking in sobbing from the Russia box, the toast in that flooded, my body, my mother was already preparing to feed me nursing, her baby. As I nursed mine, my mother had never stopped laboring for me from my birth to my son's birth. She already knew what I was just beginning to name. That love. More than a rush, A feeling that happens to us if we're lucky. Love is sweet. Labor fierce bloody imperfect life-giving. A choice we make over and over again. I am an American civil rights activist who has laboured with communities of color since September eleven fighting unjust policies by the state and acts of hate in the street, and in our most painful moments in the face of the fires of injustice. I have seen Labour's of love, deliver us. My life on the front lines of fighting hate in America has been a study in what I have come to call revolutionary love. Revolutionary love is the choice to enter into labour four others who do not look like us for our opponents who hurt us. And for ourselves. In this era of enormous rage, when the fires are burning all around us, I believe that revolutionary Love is the call of our times. Now, if you cringe when people say love is the answer. I do too. I am a lawyer. So let me show you how I came to see love as a force for social justice through three lessons. My first encounter with hate was in the school yard. I was a little girl growing up in California, where a My family has lived and farmed for a century. When I was told that I would go to hell because I was not Christian call the black dog because I was not white Iran to my grandfather's arm spot Budgie ride my tears gave me the words of good or Nonoc the founder of the sick. Fay. I see, no stranger said Nonoc I see no enemy. My grandfather taught me that I could choose to see all the faces I meet and wonder about them. And if I wonder about them than I will listen to their stories, even when it's hard, I will refused to hate them even when they hate me. I won't even vow to protect them when they are in harm's way. That's what it means to be a sick. As I K H to walk the path of a warrior Saint. He told me the story of the first sick woman warrior, my ball, go the story goes there were forty soldiers who abandoned their posts during a great battle against an empire. They returned to a village and this village woman turned to them and said, You will not abandon the fight. You will return to the fire. And I will lead you. She mounted a horse, she donned a turban, and with soared in her hand and fire in her eyes, She led them where no one else would. She became the one She was waiting for. Don't abandon your posts. My dear grandfather saw me as a warrior. I was a little girl and through long brave. But I promise. Fast forward, I'm twenty years old. Watching the Twin Towers fall, The horror stuck in my throat, and then a face flashes on the screen, a brown man with a turbaned and bearded. And I realize that our nation's new enemy Looks like my grandfather and these turbans meant to represent our commitment to serve cast us as terrorists and six became targets of hate alongside our Muslim brothers and sisters. The first person killed in a hate crime after September eleven was a sick man standing in front of his gas station in Arizona. Well, they're seeing Sodei. Was the family friends I called Uncle murdered by a man who called himself patriot.

Braves TED Talks Costa NPR Ueki Fethi Valery car Twin Towers Russia Arizona California America Fay Iran Nonoc founder twenty years
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"I was invited to the ted women's conference to perform a poem but for me poetry is not about art in performance it is a form of protest yesterday during rehearsal i was told that there had been two to three recent ted talks about black lives matter that maybe i should cut down my ted talk so that could just be about reproductive justice but that poem and this talk has fundamentally about my inability to separate the two i was twenty one years i was twenty one years old when trayvon martin was murdered trayvon martin seventeen year old black boy a black child reminded me reminded us how little this nation actually values black life the hashtag black lives matter became the most recognize call for black people and our children to live in safe environments and healthy communities without fear from violence from individuals or the state or government months later when george zimmerman was not held responsible for murdering trayvon martin i heard sabrina fulton trayvon martin's mother speak her testimony so deeply impacted me that i found myself constantly asking what would it mean to mother in the united states of america in the skin what does motherhood really mean when for so many who looked like me it is synonymous with morning without realising it had begun to link the reproductive justice framework and the movement for black lives as i learned more about reproductive justice at women with a vision and as it continued to be active in the movement for black lives i found myself wandering others to see and feel the similarities i found myself asking whose job is it in times like this to connect ideas realities and people i want to dedicate this talk.

trayvon martin george zimmerman united states america ted sabrina fulton twenty one years seventeen year
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"This ted talk features artist poet and storyteller cleo weighed recorded live at ted women 2017 my best friend recently had a baby and when i met him i was in awe of witnessing this tiny beautiful being enter into our lives i also had this realization that he wasn't just entering our lives he was entering the world this crazy world that especially now feel so incredibly challenging i spend a lot of time in my work talking to people about who we are who we must be and what are healing looks like so i mean the first time i held him i had my pep talk ready you know i wanted him to know that the we we find our strengths through our challenges i wanted him to know that we can all do something big when we start small i wanted him to know that each of us is more resilient than we could ever imagine so here i am holding little felonious i look down at him and it hits me he's a baby he's not going to understand a single word i say to him so instead i thought it'd probably be a better idea if i went home and roach so you know this this is for grownups but it's also fourth aloni us when he's old enough to read it the world will say to you be a better person do not be afraid to say yes start by being a better listener start by being better at walking down the street see people say hello ask how they are doing and listened to what they say star pre being a better friend a better parent a better child to your parents a better sibling a better lover a better partner start by being a better neighbour meet some one you do not know and get to know them.

cleo roach partner
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"You're listening to a special archive presentation of TED Talks, audio this talk features, psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, and send priest. Robert Waldinger recorded live at Tadic's Beacon street 2015. What keeps us healthy and happy as we go through life? If you were going to invest now in your future best self, Where would you put your time and your energy? There was a recent survey of millennials asking them what their most important life goals were. And over eighty percent said that a major life goal for them was to get rich and another fifty percent of those same young adults said that another major life goal was to become famous. And we're constantly told to lean into work, to push harder and achieve more, were given the impression that these are the things that we need to go after in order to have a good life pictures of entire lives, of the choices that people make and how those choices work out for them. Those pictures are almost impossible to get. Most to what we know about human life, We know from asking people to remember the past and as we know hindsight is anything but 2020 We forget vast amounts of what happens to us in life. And sometimes memory is downright creative. But what if we could watch entire lives as they unfold through time? What if we could study people from the time that they were teenagers all the way into old age to see what really keeps people happy and healthy? We did that. The Harvard study of adult development may be the longest study of adult life that's ever been done. For seventy five years, we've tracked the lives of seven hundred twenty four men. Year after year, asking about their work, their home lives, their health, and of course, asking all along the way without knowing how their life stories. We're gonna turn out. Studies like this are exceedingly rare, almost all projects of this kind fall apart within a decade. Because too many people drop out of the study were funding for the research dries up or the researchers get distracted where they die, And nobody moves the ball further down the field. But through a combination of luck and the persistence of several generations of researchers, this study has survived about

Robert Waldinger TED Talks Tadic Harvard seventy five years eighty percent fifty percent