35 Burst results for "Ted Talks"

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

01:34 min | 2 months ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"It's ted-talks daily.

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

01:39 min | 4 months ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"It's TED Talk.

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

07:40 min | 4 months ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Management scaling technology and the blockchain can be used to address urgent, global issues. Today's episode is brought to you by logic 2020, a nationwide consulting firm that elevates client performance using strategy, technology, and data, voted a best company to work for a year after year, logic 2020 is hiring remote and hybrid engineers, developers, data professionals, and strategy consultants in connected locations across the country. If you are collaborative driven and have a passion for new technologies, visit logic 2020 dot com slash PRX to learn more. When you think about innovation and technology, you most likely thinking about the latest app on your smartphone or maybe you think about rockets going in space. But what about some of the world's biggest challenges like global hunger or climate change, they can seem overwhelming or maybe you just think that should be a nonprofit organization that takes care of that. But why is it that we think so traditionally about some of the world's biggest challenges? I believe innovation and technology can help tackle some of the world's biggest challenges. The barrier is our own thinking and there's something about this where big global challenges are no different than big global business challenges. So let's change that. Let's talk about one of those topics, global hunger, hunger may seem like your most problem for you, but the effects of it are pretty drastic, hunger means you do not have enough calories on a daily basis to live a healthy life. And there is up to 811 million people on the planet who are hungry. So what can we do about it? I think innovation and technology is the answer. A couple of years ago, a friend and I realized that you denied nations World Food Program can feed a child for a full day for only 80 cents. We were shocked. We thought if more people knew about this, if we made it easy, imagine you're having dinner with your Friends and you're enjoying yourselves. Wouldn't you want to share your meal with a child in need? And that's exactly why we found it an app called share the meal. It's so simple. With one tab on your smartphone, you can share your meal with a child in need for only 80 cents. And I'm excited to tell you, it's working over 130 million meals have been shared so far by 6 million app users across the globe. And share the meal was even an app of the year in 2020 by both Apple and Google. When. We started sharing me, we had to push really hard to make it a reality. They're just wearing so many support mechanisms out there to support social entrepreneurs. When you compare it, for instance, with a number of startup accelerators for for profit ventures. Coming from that inspiration, I got the opportunity to start the world food problems innovation accelerator. Exactly with the goal of replicating of what Silicon Valley does well, but for global social impact. It's a startup accelerator that supports startups and nonprofit innovations globally and helps them scale to disrupt global hunger. So let's look at two of those examples. The first one is about blockchain. Now, when you think about blockchain, you may think about Bitcoin or cryptocurrencies. But that's not how we think of it. We use blockchain technology so that refugees can go into stores and purchase food. It's an innovation called building blocks. And why blockchain? Blockchain helps because it's not my blockchain or your blockchain, it's the neutral blockchain network. And that way it makes collaboration among 8 organizations much easier. And how does it work? Every month, 8 organizations transfer money to individual blockchain accounts. And then that individual can go into a store, shop for the groceries and at the checkout, they pay with the iris scan, or with another authentication method. That innovation had first been submitted to us by World Food Program finance officer, who participated in our innovation boot camp. He then developed a prototype and tested it only two months after starting in Pakistan with about 100 people. And the next pilot was already with 10,000 refugees in Jordan. And that was so successful that that solution scaled to over 100,000 people within 7 months. And right now, building blocks is reaching about 1 million people transferring over $300 million of cash to people in urgent need of food. And here's another example. Did you know that corn flakes and a lot of other serials have added vitamins and minerals? That's called food fortification when you add critically nutrients to staple foods we eat every day. This particularly important, when people do not have access to a healthy diet or maybe they can not afford it. This is where social business called sank who comes in. Sank who has developed an Internet enabled machine that 45 maze flour, a small meals in Africa. Now, they have a market based model that helps provide fortified nutritious flour to their clients of the small meals at no additional cost. Right now it's reaching up to 3 million people and scaling further. So, does it work? Can accelerate innovation and technology help us tackle some of the world's biggest challenges? When we first started the world food problem innovation accelerator, it seemed like a crazy idea that innovation and technology can help us make a meaningful impact on global hunger. But since starting in 2015, we've consistently doubled the number of people reached every year through the innovations that we've supported. In 2021, we've positively impacted the lives of 8.6 million people already. And now we even run accelerator programs for other global problems, like primary healthcare, vaccine delivery, or gender equality. Imagine what the impact could be if you take action today as an individual as a company or maybe as a startup founder. Innovation and technology can enable so much good in the world and together we can solve the world's biggest challenges. Thank you. Hey, listeners, I have really exciting news. We are launching ted-talks daily premium exclusively for Ted members. That means you get to listen to ted-talks daily ad free all while supporting our show. Ted members help us make big ideas accessible to everyone. And as a member, you get access to exciting perks like live events with Ted speakers, and now your own private ted-talks daily premium feed. Here's how you get access. Go to Ted dot com slash premium and sign up for Ted membership. Once you're a member, go to the podcast tab on the member dashboard to add the feed to your podcasting app of choice. All right, we appreciate your support. Ted-talks daily is hosted by me, Elise Hugh, and produced by Ted. Theme music is from Alison Leighton Brown in our mixer is Christopher phase bogan. We record the talks at Ted events we host or from TEDx events, which are organized independently by volunteers all over the world. And we'd love to hear from you. Leave us a review on Apple podcasts or email us at podcasts at Ted dot com. PRX..

profit ventures World Food Program Silicon Valley Ted Apple Google Pakistan Jordan ted Africa Elise Hugh Alison Leighton Brown Christopher phase bogan
Will Chamberlain of the Article III Project Talks Big Tech

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:02 min | 5 months ago

Will Chamberlain of the Article III Project Talks Big Tech

"Let's return to big tech. Here's a little cut from the second richest man in the world because guys, it's actually Putin, who's the richest. I mean, he literally has privatized half of Russia into his back pocket. So it's not on the books, but he is the richest man in the world. Elon Musk is a close second. And this is what he said at a recent TED Talk. Cut one play cut. Intuitive sense is that having a public platform that is maximally trusted and broadly inclusive is extremely important to the future of civilization. But you've described yourself. I don't care about the economics at all. Okay. Richest man in the world or second, which says, I'm not in it for the money. Interesting. And he says it's vital for the future of civilization, not exactly what you hear from liberals. Well, deal with the question of whether or not we trust this man, but give us the strategic analysis of how important a development is it, that a guy who made his money out of PayPal, then electric vehicles, a darling concept of the left. And then reinvigorating almost single handedly America's space program that this is the guy who wants to buy Twitter, how unusual is that well? I mean, it's very unusual, especially because we're used to billionaires kind of hewing to the line of the left, like they're almost, they're scared as anybody else of The New York Times of The Washington Post. Writing a hippie's on them, which they shouldn't be because they're that wealthy. So it is really unique and it's really gratifying, I guess, would be the word, just to see someone step out and be willing to, despite their high standing and elite circles, be able to say, no, this is just wrong. What you have been doing is completely wrong. And not only, I'm literally going to buy the biggest and most not the biggest, but the most consequential and influential social media platform in the

Ted Talk Elon Musk Putin Russia The New York Times Of The Wash Paypal Twitter America
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

07:02 min | 5 months ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"It's TED Talks daily. I'm your host, Elise Hugh. Financial institutions like banks have outsized power in the fight against climate change. They finance fossil fuel industries after all. In her talk from the 2021 countdown summit, financial responsibility campaigner Lucy pinson makes a convincing case for why financiers should stop backing polluters and polluting as soon as possible. Hey, I'm doctor Jen gunter, host of a podcast from Ted, called body stuff. We're back with new episodes, tackling more of the stickiest medical myths, like whether you can boost your metabolism. And if you should try to optimize your sleep and we're exploring some of our body's most fascinating mysteries, like how your sense of smell works and why we develop food allergies. Check out body stuff with doctor Jen gunter, wherever you listen. Support for ted-talks daily comes from Nissan, the future will be great, but today is just as incredible. Meet Nissan's most advanced lineup. If you can't get enough adrenaline, there's the all new 400 HP Nissan Z or for your off road adventures, check out the all terrain Nissan frontier. If you're more of a spontaneous road trip type person, hop in the Nissan pathfinder. And for something more electric, there's the stylish Nissan ariya. So let's enjoy the ride. 2023 Arya and Z not yet available for purchase expected availability, this spring for 2023 Z, and this fall for 2023 Arya. Support for ted-talks daily comes from progressive. Are you thinking more about how to tighten up your budget these days? Drivers who save by switching to progressive save over $700 on average and customers can qualify for an average of 6 discounts when they sign up. A little off your rate each month goes a long way, get a quote today that progressive dot com. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. National annual average insurance savings by new customers surveyed who saved with progressive between June 2020 and May 2021, potential savings will vary discounts vary and are not available in all states and situations. When we think about climate change and pollution, we usually think about also worlds, fossil gas platforms in the Arctic, or black smoke rising above core plans. We never think about banks insurers and investors. But we should. Because money is a driving force beyond fossil extraction and environmental destruction. The most polluting sector on the planet is not for fuels. It's finance. Sure. You've heard things are increasingly putting money into green projects. And yes, they are financing green projects. But they are doing it on top of new polluting oil, coal, and gas projects. I have been looking at the masks for a decade. And still a green droplet in the ocean of pollution. I started to campaign to protect the environment and human rights. When I was at university, and I can not count how many times I heard finance the thinning me, sorry, we need coal. Sometimes they said we can make it clean. Mostly I've heard it's impossible. There is nothing we can do. Rather than be discouraged, that gave me the strength to prove them wrong. But how does someone like me with a small group of partners take on the big bangs and insurers? Well, we stopped by making smart demands. Then we incentivize action. And finally, we are the spoonful of blackmail that I like to think of as a friendly nurse. When we say to serve the issues of the world, we might want too much at once. The end of poverty, a peaceful world, a healthy planet, but how do you climb an scalable mountain one step after another? The most important thing is to identify the smart demand smart as in. Something that is specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time bound. Some things that you can realistically achieve based on the resources you have, your target and the balance of power between you and your target. You don't want something that requires more than 12 to 18 months to achieve, because you will lose momentum. Victory says, defeat does not. However, you don't want your objective to be too easy either. Because if it's too easy, it's not likely to change anything in the way the system works. And we want to see them to change. So you want your objective to be disruptive and transformative to bring your clother to your final goal. For the past ten years, my goal has always been the end of all financing of old fashioned fuels. But back in 2013, even the IDs that banks could automatically reject her whole sector of the economy appeared as crazy and was not open for discussion. So at that time, a smart objective was to convince one bank to withdraw from one project. And it didn't take me long to come across one of the most insane projects. A huge coal mines that could open the way to 8 other core projects and destroy the Great Barrier Reef, a UNESCO site. This was alpha coal mine in Australia, supported by French bank society general. Our first math objective was to get this bank out of this project. And we succeeded after a year of relentless campaigning. Today. Today is the core of the alpha coal mine is still in the ground. And from there, we moved on to our second objective. To get French banks to commit not to finance any of the projects located in the same base in the alpha coal mine. We succeeded, moved on to our third objective. To get French banks to commit not to finance any new coal mines, any new coal plants worldwide. We did one bank two bank three banks full banks until we convinced all French banks. The fourth biggest banking sector worldwide to reject all project financing.

Nissan Jen gunter Elise Hugh Lucy pinson ariya ted TED Talks pathfinder Ted Arctic French bank society Great Barrier Reef UNESCO Australia
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

03:08 min | 5 months ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"It got me thinking, <Speech_Female> what <Speech_Female> if we could get <Speech_Female> communities of women moving <Speech_Female> actually <Speech_Female> physically moving <Silence> away from the house? <Speech_Female> That <Speech_Female> would open a window <Speech_Male> where <Silence> they could move psychologically. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Where they <Speech_Female> could <Speech_Female> understand or realize <Speech_Female> that she could step <Speech_Female> out of bad <Speech_Female> situations <Silence> and have the ability <Speech_Female> to do it. <Speech_Female> This <SpeakerChange> way we would <Speech_Female> have more women <Speech_Female> feel safe <Silence> and confident. <Speech_Female> So <Speech_Female> Jeff Hardy and I, <Speech_Female> the we both <Speech_Female> decided <Speech_Female> that we are going <Speech_Female> to join forces <Speech_Female> and create <Speech_Female> a movement <Silence> exclusively for <Speech_Female> women. <Speech_Female> Focused on mobility. <Speech_Female> We <Speech_Female> have set up a system <Speech_Female> where <Speech_Female> a woman can <Speech_Female> train to drive <Speech_Female> for themselves <Speech_Female> or <Speech_Female> for ubers, <Speech_Female> taxis, or <Speech_Female> just become <Speech_Female> delivery agents <Speech_Female> for Amazon <Speech_Female> and other big companies <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> or local <Speech_Female> businesses. That's <Speech_Female> money in the bank. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> the freedom and <Speech_Female> the psychological <Speech_Female> know <Speech_Female> that I <Speech_Female> can step outside <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> of my <Speech_Female> home. We are <Speech_Female> connecting these <Speech_Female> women drivers on <Speech_Female> a national network <Speech_Female> where they can <Speech_Female> reach out to each other <Speech_Female> for support <Speech_Female> and to share experiences <Speech_Female> and not <Speech_Female> just that. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> She can actually ping <Speech_Female> another <Speech_Female> driver in her <Speech_Female> vicinity. <Speech_Female> If she is <Speech_Female> feeling distressed, <Speech_Female> if she's <Speech_Female> in danger, <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> or if she simply <Speech_Female> just waiting for her next <Speech_Female> ride or pick up <Silence> and doesn't want to wait <Speech_Female> alone. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> For us, <Speech_Female> receiving <Speech_Female> our first paycheck might <Speech_Female> be very <Speech_Female> empowering. <Speech_Female> But for 59 <Speech_Female> year old naga money, <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> moment arrived <Speech_Female> when she <Speech_Female> put her scooter <Speech_Female> on a center stand. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> feeling physically <Speech_Female> strong <Speech_Female> and proving to <Speech_Female> the society that she's <Silence> beyond being just a sidekick. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> We have trained 1800 <Silence> <Speech_Male> women <SpeakerChange> who <Speech_Female> are road ready. And <Speech_Music_Male> raring. <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Road ready <Speech_Female> and raring <Speech_Female> to go and our <Speech_Female> decade long <SpeakerChange> mission is <Speech_Female> to bring 1 million <Speech_Female> women <Speech_Female> into mobility. <Speech_Female> And be <Speech_Female> the largest <Speech_Female> network of women drivers <Silence> connected to each <Speech_Female> other. <Speech_Female> By rethinking <Speech_Female> mobility for women, <Speech_Female> giving them <Speech_Female> a safe transport <Speech_Female> and safety <Speech_Female> outside of home. <Speech_Female> It is our <Speech_Female> hope to <Speech_Female> transform our culture, <Speech_Female> apart <Speech_Female> from having a profound <Speech_Female> impact on <Speech_Female> the Indian economy. <Speech_Female> This <Speech_Female> is about <SpeakerChange> something <Speech_Male> much bigger. <Speech_Female> As <Speech_Female> you <SpeakerChange> all know, <Speech_Female> when we <Speech_Female> move, <Silence> we can be seen. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> The more women <Speech_Female> see other <Speech_Female> women in public spaces, <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> more safe, <Speech_Female> independent, <Speech_Female> and empowered <SpeakerChange> <Silence> each one of <Speech_Female> us will be. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> So, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> if we can learn how to <Speech_Female> work, <Speech_Female> certainly we <Silence> can learn how to fly. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> Thank you. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Ted-talks daily <Speech_Female> is hosted by me, <Speech_Female> Elise Hugh, and <Speech_Female> produced by Ted. <Speech_Female> The music is <Speech_Female> from Alison Leighton <Speech_Female> Brown and our mixer is <Speech_Female> Christopher fazy <Speech_Female> bogan. We <Speech_Female> record the talks at Ted <Speech_Female> events we host or <Speech_Female> from TEDx events, <Speech_Female> which are organized <Speech_Female> independently <Speech_Female> by volunteers <Speech_Female> all over the world. <Speech_Female> And we'd love to <Speech_Female> hear from you. Leave <Speech_Female> us a review on Apple <Speech_Female> podcasts or <Speech_Female> email us <SpeakerChange> at podcasts <Speech_Music_Male> at Ted dot com. <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Music> PRX.

Jeff Hardy Amazon Elise Hugh Alison Leighton Christopher fazy Ted Apple
Elon Musk Is One Step Closer to Owning Twitter

The Trish Regan Show

02:19 min | 5 months ago

Elon Musk Is One Step Closer to Owning Twitter

"Out. Let's get to Elon Musk because I think it's increasingly likely that this guy gets Twitter as much as it's driving some people in certain circles quite crazy. I detailed yesterday. I went through the SEC filing and I looked at what the actual financing looked like. There is a new development I'm going to get to that just momentarily because it looks like he's creating a holding company that could apparently be for maybe three companies. Anyway, let's talk about the money. He's got 25 and a half $1 billion from banks, led by Morgan Stanley, so Morgan Stanley, who is his adviser, investment banker in this. And they've gone out and worked with other banks to get him the financing 25 and half $1 billion lined up from the banks. Now, part of that is a margin loan against his shares of Tesla, 12 and a half $1 billion. Margin loan against Tesla don't forget Tesla has just been killing and earnings of 81% the other day. Not entirely clear whether that upside can continue only because of the supply chain problems that have been going on. But again, Tesla just really, really doing well proving, I would say once again, the brilliance, the brilliance of Elon Musk. $21 billion is going to come out of his own pocket. He's shelling out 21 billion of his own money for Twitter. This is how much he cares about this project, which makes sense. You look at some of the other things that he's been in and whether it be the EV industry, which has been obviously important to him, whether it's the SpaceX, another industry, clearly clearly very important. In his view, it is important to own Twitter because this is otherwise threatening in his view to democracy. He's described Twitter and did this the other day on a TED Talk as effectively the town square. And so he wants to edge on the side of allowing a lot of speech, a lot of diverse speech as opposed to immediately shutting it down and you know where I stand on that. So I think he's got a really good shot at getting this company. The flip side would be does somebody else say, wait a second, we just don't want him to have it. And so we're going to partner up and get all the money we can and make this absolutely impossible for him to take Twitter out.

Tesla Elon Musk Morgan Stanley Twitter SEC Ted Talk Spacex
Elon Musk: Twitter Bid Is 'Not About Economics'

The Dan Bongino Show

01:37 min | 6 months ago

Elon Musk: Twitter Bid Is 'Not About Economics'

"You got one clip Okay Elon has spoken out publicly now about what's going on with his bid to take over Twitter and buy the entire company and we had a few points will play some of the clips for you in a second He said first very important this is not about economics to him I mean listen I have no reason to believe given some of the stuff he's done in the past that he would be lying Think about it You may say oh Dan of course he's going to say that no no no no stop Stop for a second Elon Musk runs an electric car company one of the biggest in the world He's this I don't know Elon Musk personally have no dog in this fight at all He's the same guy who tweeted out that it would be a good idea for us to drill for more oil Folks you have any idea how damaging that could be to his own brand if he didn't believe it This is a guy who says what he means He's got a reputation for doing it If he says it's not about the economics that says to me this guy may go even though he said it was his last and final offer He may be back with others to take this thing at an even higher price and he may not be ready to give up Play one of the cuts from this was at a TED Talk just happened a little bit ago check this out My strong intuitive sense is that having a public platform that is maximally trusted and broadly inclusive is extremely important to the future of civilization But you've described yourself I don't care about the economics

Elon Elon Musk Twitter
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

04:40 min | 10 months ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Hey, it's TED Talks daily. I'm your host, Elise, you. If there's one straightforward individual action we can take to combat climate change, it's changing the way we eat. Animal agriculture is destroying the rainforests and meat production is an outsized contributor to climate change. In his talk recorded for the countdown summit in 2021, former carnivore turned vegan chef Derek sarno shows us the way to plant based eating because it's better for us and a lot better for the planet. Hi, I'm Derek sarno. I'm a vegan chef. I specialize in bringing mushrooms and veg to the center plate by unleashing the mighty flavors of plants. I cofounded a plant based food company called wicked kitchen, and I lead plant based innovation at one of the world's largest grocery retailers. In case you're wondering what plant based and vegan means, it's super simple. Vegan and plant based foods are entirely free from animals and from their byproducts. Think no animals harmed nor killed. No meat, no fish, no dairy milk or eggs are used at all. Just amazing plants. Vegetarianism also doesn't contain animals or fish, but allows dairy and eggs. The byproducts taken from animals. Here are a couple vegan things that I've made recently. A steak, no way, actually, there are no T bones about this. It's made of lion's mane mushrooms. The barbecue butter sauce, cast iron seared, one of the most nutritious mushrooms on earth and known to be brain boosting. Pressed Greek inspired souvlaki steak sandwiches with all the fixings. This one is made with super sexy, delicious Brown oyster mushrooms. Grilled pepper steak kebabs? Great on the barbecue. Packed with punchy flavors and made with the super versatile and delicious king oyster mushrooms. Yes. All of these are plant based and all of these are done with a variety of mushrooms. Why is this so important? Meeting is linked to climate change. Eating animals and animal agriculture is the leading cause of rainforest deforestation. Meat production is a significant source of greenhouse gas emissions. And there's a reason moms and doctors tell us to eat more veg. That's partly why I'm a vegan chef. My other reason has to do with grief and dealing with the unexpected death of losing my partner. The suffering and grief I felt was suffocating. I had two choices to go down a road of self destruction or accept what had happened and find a way through it. The loss of Amanda made me realize my whole life to that point was based on ego and attachment. Being the best, cooking anything and everything without a second thought is to the consequences of my actions. As long as the food tasted great and I was paid well for it, I didn't care where it came from or if it was animals or the implications and consequences that had. Long story short, I ended up laying my old self to rest. Selling off the food business and living in a Buddhist monastery for three years, where I learned to sit and studied compassion and how my mind worked. What I discovered was a connection to food and heart that I had ignored. Animals suffered just as we do from then on, it became my mission to find alternative ways to prepare amazing food that not only benefited people, but avoided animal suffering as well. That time reflecting and learning helped me reorientate my own moral compass and opened up a whole new world of creative cooking. It also helped me become much less of a jerk. There are so many reasons to eat plant based and any reason that resonates with you is the best reason. I understand it's not always easy. But eating even one plant based meal a day makes a huge difference. I used to be a longtime meat eater as a regular chef. I used to cook lots of meat and never made that connection that they're living beings just like us with feelings, emotions, and families. I'm now on a mission to unleash the mighty power of plants to create foods that we crave. Full of flavors and textures that are more nutritious and better for us and the planet. I believe in compassion and action and the way I express that is through cooking and developing amazing recipes that inspire and teach people how to make and eat delicious foods without animals. Vegan food for meat eaters and vegans alike because like most people, I want to save the animals and the planet, but there's no way that's going to happen. If I have to compromise on taste. Thank you..

Derek sarno TED Talks Elise Amanda
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

04:43 min | 10 months ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"It's TED Talks daily. I'm Elizabeth. Listeners, we've got a little change of pace for you today. Spoken word poetry. I'm so excited because this is beautiful. From poet naima henan, she recorded it for the countdown summit in 2021. It's an evocative, moving tribute to natural world, and our connection to it. Enjoy. Support for TED Talks daily comes from progressive. Are you thinking more about how to tighten up your budget these days? Drivers who save by switching to progressive save over $700 on average and customers can qualify for an average of 6 discounts when they sign up. A little off your rate each month goes a long way, get a quote today that progressive dot com. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. National annual average insurance savings by new customers surveyed who saved the progressive between June 2020 and May 2021, potential savings will vary, discounts vary and they're not available in all states and situations. I'll wonder if the sun debates Dons some mornings. Not wanting to rise out of bed from under the down feather horizon. If the sky grows tired of being everywhere at once adapting to the moods, swings of the weather. If clouds drift off China, hold themselves together. Mc deals with gravity to loiter a little long. I'll wonder if rain is scared of falling. If she has trouble letting go. If snowflakes get sick of the imperfect all the time, each one trying to be one of a kind. Wonder. If stars wish upon themselves before they died. If they need to teach their young, how to shine. I wonder if shadows long to just for once feel the sun. If they get lost in the shuffle, not knowing where they're from are wonder if sunrise and sunset respect each other, even though they've never met, if storms have regrets if volcanos get stressed if compost believes in life after death. I wonder if breath ever thinks of suicide. If the wind just wants to sit still sometimes and watch the world pass him by. If smoke was born, knowing how to rise if rainbows get shot backstage, not sure if their colors match right. I wonder if a lightning needs an alarm clock to know when to crack if rivers ever stop and think of turning back if streams meet the wrong sea and their whole lives run off track. I wonder if the snow wants to be black. If the soil thinks she's too dark if butterflies wanna cover up their marks if rocks are self conscious of their weight, if mountains are insecure of their strength, our wonder. If waves get discouraged, crawling up the sand, only to be pulled back again to where they began if land feel stepped upon. If sand feels insignificant, if trees need to question their lovers to know where they stand, if branches, wave at the crossroads and sir of which way to grow, if leaves understand they're replaceable and they still dance when the wind blows. Our wonder where the moon goes when she is in high. I want to find her there and watch the ocean spin from a distance, listen to her. Stir in her sleep. Perfect. Give way.

TED Talks naima henan Elizabeth China
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

06:40 min | 10 months ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"It's TED Talk daily. I'm Elise you. The planet is speaking to us these days. Loudly. And today's speaker says of all natural disasters flooding is the most destructive. In her 2021 talk at TEDx Villanova U, civil engineer, Virginia Smith offers a more future oriented, sustainable way to address the global challenge presented by flood risk. Like ted-talks, you should check out the Ted radio hour with NPR. Stay tuned after this talk to hear sneak peek of this week's episode. TED Talk daily is brought to you by progressive. Have you tried the name your price tool yet? It works just the way it sounds. You tell progressive how much you want to pay for car insurance. And they'll show you coverage options that fit your budget. It's easy to start a quote and you'll be able to find a rate that works for you. It's just one of the many ways you can save with progressive. Get your quote today a progressive dot com and see why four out of 5 new auto customers recommend progressive. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. Price and coverage match limited by state law. Support for TED Talks daily comes from aspiration. Now you can help combat climate change with aspiration zero, the credit card that rewards you for going carbon neutral. For a limited time, get a $300 bonus when you open an account and spend $3000 in the first 90 days. Terms and conditions apply visit aspiration dot com slash credit for more information. The aspiration zero Mastercard is issued by beneficial state bank member FDIC, pursuant to license by Mastercard international incorporated. I was in a village in Samoa in the South Pacific. And I don't remember when The Rain started just that it didn't stop. For more than a month, 24 hours a day, it just kept coming. The rivers rose and soon no one or nothing could come in or out. We were just there and the flood. Have you or a loved one ever been affected by flooding? Think about it. Chances are based on statistics, you or someone you know has been impacted by flooding. There's a powerless feeling in a flood. You can't stop the rivers from rising. But for the first time, we are in a place where we can shift the power paradigm of flooding. According to the world water resources, the world resource institute, flooding is the most globally impactful of all natural disasters. Taking between four to 5000 lives every year. In the United States, 14.7 million properties, homes, businesses, are at substantial risk of flooding. Costing billions in economic losses every year. In fact, in 2010, we spent a $176 billion on global flood recovery, and by 2080, were projected to spend over $4 trillion on global flood recovery. Wow. That's a lot of money. Now I'm talking in terms of groceries because that's something I can wrap my head around. I know how much I spend on food. But that money could go to anything to the national debt healthcare education back to the citizens you can do a lot with $4 trillion. Now we're pretty good at knowing just how bad a flood will be. And we're pretty good at knowing when they're going to happen. We've been looking to solve flooding since our earliest civilizations. Since Noah, we've been looking for a flood work around. So why is this still such a huge problem? Because we love water. We need it. We always have to have it. We build our cities next to oceans and rivers, because being next to this critical resource makes our lives easier. Today, in fact, most of the world lives in coastal areas. And more and more of the world lives in urban zones. Students and entrepreneurs seeking bright futures are drawn to exciting opportunities in cities. In 2008 for the first time, half the world's population was urban. By the time my little girls are my age, more than 70% of the world's population will be urban. That's a rapid growth. And as cities rapidly grow, they alter their landscape, resulting in more stormwater runoff, a decrease in water quality and ultimately, greater impacts due to floods. We seek to allay this through storm water and flood plain management, but in our dynamic and constantly involving urban environments, the numbers suggest our traditional approaches just aren't enough. Unfortunately, those hurt the worst are the most vulnerable. Low income, unsanctioned housing is often located in areas of an elevated flood risk. Families and communities without the ability to prevent and combat the economic upheaval associated with flooding are those hurt the worst. And our hurt repetitively. This is a global challenge. And I saw this stranded in the village of Samoa where those same floodwaters destroyed crops flooded markets, and shut down businesses. Where this recently washed out bridge had previously connected communities to their farms and schools. Living in Thailand and working in Vietnam and Cambodia seasonal urban flooding made daily activities like commuting, not only a challenge, but risky, floodwaters not clean. This was reinforced this summer when 63 million people in Southeast Asia were affected by floods. I saw this working in Afghanistan where the dry climate is perfect for flash floods. Lack of resilience, rapid urban growth and flood frequency have unfortunately made Afghanistan one of the world's leaders in deaths per CAPiTA due to flooding. On top of dealing with decades of war this was reinforced in the spring and summer of 2020, 1000 lost their homes and hundreds lost their lives and flooding in Afghanistan. And I saw this working in projects in Kenya, Sierra Leone Paraguay Haiti,.

TED Talk Virginia Smith Mastercard world water resources world resource institute TED Talks Elise national debt healthcare educa Samoa NPR ted South Pacific FDIC Noah United States
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

07:57 min | 10 months ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Could improve and possibly extend life on earth too. Support for TED Talks daily comes from Capital One, Capital One believes everyone deserves better banking, meaning easier access to your money and more security and that's why Capital One is investing in machine learning. They're fighting fraud with random forests, giving mobile app outages the causal model anomaly detection treatment, and speeding up online shopping with machine learning at the edge. Search, machine learning at Capital One to explore more Capital One. What's in your wallet? I am all in on sending humans to Mars. There is nothing I want to achieve more in my career than seeing human step foot on that planet because I know it could be the start of humanity spreading into the cosmos. I'd be happy to be that first person on Mars, but my wife thinks that a three year vacation to a deserted planet with no oxygen, no real atmosphere. Nothing to eat or drink, freezing temperatures, bone depleting gravity, and space radiation is a bad idea. For some reason. So I'll settle for sending someone else. Okay, so I'm going to tell you why we should go to Mars and why we should spread humanity into the rest of the solar system. I'll also show you that by setting out on the next great age of space exploration, we'll actually make earth a much better place to live as well. But before we do that, I want to tell you about something that happened very recently that I am very excited about. We made oxygen on Mars. I work on the Mars 2020 rover. Perseverance is what it's called or Percy for short. My role on the mission is to help one of the instruments on board called moxie, make oxygen from the atmosphere on Mars. I am fortunate to be part of the excellent team that has made moxie reality. Moxie stands for the Mars oxygen ISRU experiment. ISRU stands for in situ resource utilization. Don't ask me why we chose to put an acronym within an acronym. Sometimes we make bad decisions in life. What this all means is that moxie takes the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere of Mars and converts it into oxygen. It's kind of like a tree on Mars doing photosynthesis. Moxie is helpful for two reasons. One is you gotta breathe. But there's actually a second reason that requires way more oxygen than breathing. And that's rocket propellant. Rockets burn a lot of propellant, so we have to make a lot of oxygen. Without oxygen, we can't breathe. We can't move. We can't explore. I am in charge of sending commands to the rover to make oxygen on Mars. We package up commands to tell Percy what to do the next day. And Percy listens and does what we ask. It's really exciting because we actually just made oxygen for the first couple of times on Mars in the past couple of months. The first time we did, it was a pretty historic moment. And now that we've made oxygen, I can't wait to explore what's next. Okay, so why should you want to go to Mars and explore the rest of the solar system? And what are we going to do about all those issues, my wife pointed out about Mars? It doesn't sound like a great place to go and there's a million problems we could be solving here on earth with our time and money instead. I want you to imagine in the past, a group of people that live on a South Pacific island. They've been there isolated for over a thousand years, living generation after generation. They had no idea what was across the water, and it was incredibly dangerous to try an expedition to go find out. One day, the volcano that had formed the island initially, erupted, and wiped out the entire civilization on the islands. In one day, their 1000 year old culture vanished. Some of us might think, if only they had taken a leap and ventured out beyond their island and gone to other places, we might still know what their culture was and know more about them as a people. By the way, this has happened before. The Bronze Age island of Thera erupted and he raised a settlement that had been there for multiple millennia. Now, this could be self induced, or it could be from any number of natural causes, like an asteroid collision, a gamma ray burst or a magnetic pore reversal. It really isn't a question of if the earth will face one of these events that threatens our species survival. It's a question of when. I hope it doesn't happen, but I'm playing the odds. Armed with this information, don't you think we should watch some sort of insurance? Some backups to preserve humanity's shout in the universe to not put all of our eggs in one basket. If we had humans on another planet or on many planets, for example, then the survival of our species is much more likely, even if something happens to the earth outside of our control. Now a lot of people don't necessarily like what I just said because it could sound like we're trying to abandon the earth. Run away from our problems instead of addressing them. That's not it at all. I mean, when you finish backing up your computer, do you go to the nearest river and chuck your computer into it? Thanks for all the memories, computer, but I don't need you anymore. I've got a backup now. That defeats the whole purpose. No, we want to take excellent care of the earth and go to space at the same time. And here's the best part I haven't told you about yet. Going to space actually helps the earth tremendously. We have seen time and time again that technology is developed for space missions, have greatly helped life on earth. Their applications are far reaching and not limited to the space missions to which they were designed. To prove it to you, here is some technologies that we use everyday on earth that were originally developed for space missions. Cheaper and quieter artificial limbs, smartphone cameras, firefighting equipment, baby formula, memory foam, advanced solar cells, better Lasix surgery, water filters, scratch resistant lenses, air purifiers, the list goes on and on. These technologies help us fight climate change, pollution, and save lives every day on earth. We invented these things because we decided to go to the moon and to explore space. So we can't even imagine what we might invent if we decide to go to Mars. Why did I start out talking about Mars when it's really my grand plan to explore and settle the entire solar system that I want to tell you about? Well, Mars is the first leap we should take in that journey. If we can get humans set up on Mars, it will serve as a stepping stone to enable further exploration into the rest of the solar system. This should be our target. If we push ourselves towards establishing a human presence on Mars, it will be a giant leap and becoming a truly spacefaring species with all the benefits that brings. Earth really is by far the best planet to live on in the solar system. But the solar system is still worth our time and energy. As president Kennedy said, we do these things not because they are easy, but because they are hard. If we can start to move humanity into the solar system, we can make those hard places more and more livable while improving life here on earth at the same time. I want to put a quota from someone who inspired a lot of people to think more and more deeply about space exploration. He said, imagination will often carry us to worlds that never were. But without it, we go nowhere. 10,000 years ago, people rarely ventured beyond their birthplace. Today, we travel all over the planet. Well, at least when there's not a pandemic going on. Those people from 10,000 years ago would have their minds blown by how far and wide we traveled today. And people 1000 years in the future will look back on us and think the same thing that we would have our minds blown by how far and wide they travel throughout the solar system. Think about that. We are the island in the vast ocean that is our galaxy. I invite you to dream big with me. We could populate hundreds of planets, travel between worlds, make great new discoveries about our time and place in the universe..

Percy TED Talks South Pacific island Rockets Kennedy
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

07:04 min | 11 months ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Inclusive workplaces and communities. Hey, it's Adam grant. I host work life, a podcast from the Ted audio collective. I'm an organizational psychologist, and the show is about how to make work not suck. In the upcoming season, I'm sitting down with some of my favorite thinkers, leaders and achievers to rethink assumptions that we often take for granted. Today I'm talking with longtime PepsiCo CEO Indra nooyi about what it means to be a great leader and a great mentor. Find and follow work life without him grant. That's me. Wherever you're listening. Support for TED Talks daily comes from LinkedIn. Let's pretend for a moment that you're about to launch a campaign. It tested well, your entire team is happy. Everything is going according to plan, except for that one thought in the back of your head. How do I ensure the people I want to target will be in the mindset to receive my message? The answer? LinkedIn. Because when you market on LinkedIn, your message reaches people who are ready to engage with your business. And that means your advertising campaign will work as hard as it can, as soon as you launch it. Do business where business is done. Get a $100 advertising credit toward your first LinkedIn campaign. Visit LinkedIn dot com slash ted-talks. LinkedIn dot com slash TED Talks terms and conditions apply. Now what's next, a podcast from Morgan Stanley helps make sense of life during and after the pandemic. With nearly two decades of experience reporting on culture and the economy, host inari glinton meets people who are looking for solutions to the cracks exposed by the pandemic. From how we care for our children and the elderly to what we do with shopping malls, these are stories of everyday people trying to figure things out and where they're finding hope. Search for now what's next wherever you listen to podcasts. We all have our biases. The set of assumptions that we make and the things we don't notice about people's race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, appearance, another traits. They come from the part of our mind that jumps to conclusions that we might not even be aware that we have. I really can't tell you the number of times people assumed I was the receptionist. When I was an executive at the company. That kind of bias gets in the way of good collaboration, performance and decision making. It creates an invisible tax of resentment and frustration. The more frustrated we are, the more silent we are likely to be. And the more silent we are, the less we may be able to do our best work. The good news though is, bias is not inevitable. So here's how to disrupt bias in three steps. The first step is to create a shared vocabulary. Sometimes buy a shows up in big embarrassing gaffes, but more often it comes out in the little words and phrases we choose, which are packed with assumptions. In meetings especially, these often go unnoticed or even worse, people notice, but don't know what to say. That's why we recommend coming up with a shared word or phrase that everyone agrees to use to disrupt bias attitudes or behaviors. Examples teams are using our bias alert, stoplight, or even throwing up a peace sign. Leaders often ask us to give them the right words. But the best words are the ones your team will actually say, not the ones that leaders impose. So talk to your team. My very favorite is the one that you recommended tri air. Purple flag. When someone says or does something biased, we'll say purple flag and maybe we'll even wave a purple flag. It's not a red flag. It's a friendly purple flag. It helps us become more aware of our blind spots. Purple blood purple flag. Thanks for pointing that out. I've been noticing lately, I use a lot of sight metaphors that often portray disabilities like being visually impaired and negative ways. But I'm committed to doing better I'm working on it. I am too. Another great shared vocabulary trick is to ask members of your team to respond to bias with an I statement. And I statement invites the other person in understand things from your perspective rather than calling them out. Like, I don't think you're going to take me seriously when you're calling me honey. Or I don't think you meant that the way that it sounded. Usually, when people's biases are pointed out to them clearly and compassionately, they apologize and correct things going forward. Usually, but not always. That brings us to the second step. Create a shared norm for how to respond when your bias is pointed out. When my bias is flagged, I can only be glad that I'm learning something new if I can move past the shame. I hate the idea that I've harmed someone. And when I feel ashamed, I rarely respond well. So it's really helpful to have that shared norm, so that I know what to say in those moments. We recommend you start with thank you for pointing that out. It took courage for that person to disrupt the bias. So it's important to acknowledge that. Then there are two choices on what to say next. When I get it, or two, I don't get it. Could you explain more after the meeting? The other day, you and I were recording a podcast. And I said, HR serves three masters and you ate the purple flag. I knew what I had done wrong. Why was I using a slavery metaphor? We hit pause. I thanked you, and we re recorded. It was no big deal. The thing I love about the purple flag is how efficient it is. Flagging the bias didn't prevent us from getting the work done. In fact, it helps us work together more honestly. It's even harder when I don't know what I did wrong. Once I asked someone out to lunch, out came the purple flag. I had no idea why. So I was relieved to know what to say next. Thank you for pointing it out. But I don't get it. Could we talk after the meeting? Afterwards, the person reminded me that they were fasting for Ramadan. It instantly made sense to me, and I discovered something that I could be more aware of. But to get to awareness, I had to move through shame. It was hard to say, I don't get it. The shared norm helped me listen and learn rather than getting defensive. The fact that there was a norm at all, reassured me that other people are making similar kinds of mistakes and that we're all learning together. Disrupting bias may start off feeling uncomfortable. But with time and consistency, we can build the stamina we need to push through it. When it becomes routine for us to notice our biases, all of a sudden, they feel less threatening. It's hard to break bias habits, yet we can change the pattern with consistent effort. We've got to be patient with ourselves and with others. Patient and also persistent. Yeah. Which brings us to our last step. Once a team has come up with a shared vocabulary and agrees on the shared norm for how to respond. The team should commit to disrupting bias at least once in every meeting. If bias isn't flagged in a meeting, it doesn't mean there wasn't any bias. It just means either nobody noticed or nobody knew what to say. When we are silent about bias, we reinforce it. And it can't be just the targets of bias who pointed out. Observers and leaders have got to speak up. We all have a responsibility. By.

LinkedIn Adam grant inari glinton Indra nooyi TED Talks PepsiCo Morgan Stanley Ramadan
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

07:35 min | 1 year ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"It's TED Talks daily. I'm your host, Elise Hugh. Dads should be taking time off after a new baby is born, because paternity leave benefits everyone, including businesses. Author and feminism advocate shoe matsuo post makes that case from an episode of our video series. The way we work. Looking for the perfect holiday gift, universal yams is a snack subscription box that delivers tasty treats from a different country every month straight to your door. Universally young snack boxes include snacks and candies that'll satisfy the pickiest eaters and the biggest foodies in your life. The boxes come with trivia and games making it an activity the whole family will enjoy. Universal yums holiday box makes a great holiday gift, with yummy holiday treats from different countries like Italy, Argentina, Sweden, and more. Go to universal yums dot com and order by December 25th with the code Ted to get up to $30 off. Like history? Then you'll love who when, wow. A new tinker cast original podcast from the creators of wow in the world. Each week, host Rebecca sheer brings you into the lives of unsung heroes, heroines, and amazing humans who will make you say, wow, like Shirley Chisholm, Roberto Clemente, Harry Houdini, and many more amazing change makers, you might not hear about in school, but who brought plenty of wow to our world? Who went wow is available every Wednesday wherever you get your podcasts or the sun ad free and one week early by subscribing to one day plus kids in Apple podcasts or one plus in the one re app. I remember the day. My wife was three months pregnant and I knew that I wanted to take time off. But when I walked into my boss, I was so nervous. I was about to ask for 7 months of paternity leave. And I just didn't know how my boss were react to that. Like most men in Japan, I grew up being told that masculinity is supposed to look a certain way. You're supposed to be stoic and strong. Dominant and in control. The breadwinner for your family. But when I met my wife, she challenged me on that. She pushed me and thinking that men should always pay for dates. I'm assuming that women should always do the child care. Japan offers both mothers and fathers 12 months of paid parental leave. It's been ranked number one in the world in terms of length and compensation for paternity leave. But here's the crazy thing. In 2020, only about 7% of all those two kit. And of that 7%, three quarters took a leave of two weeks or less with pressure at work. Most Japanese man just aren't at home during this pivotal time. And that's a shame, because paternity leave, it benefits everyone. Here's why I normalizing it is so important. I believe deeply in gender equality. I took my wife's last name and even wrote a book about it, and still, I was terrified asking for paternity leave. I'd heard of bosses denying the request. A questioning their employees masculinity. I was scared that in asking for time off, I might be replaced or left behind, but my boss, he accepted my request right away, which made me feel so valued and let me focus on what was most important. My family. I can describe how much joy I got seeing my newborn son each day. I especially loved my early morning shifts with him, so his mom could sleep in. When he was a newborn, we just got on the couch. And when he got a little bigger, he became my best workout buddy. As a cheerleader during my morning runs in his stroller. Or as a human dumbbell for squats and biceps girls. I feel so close to my son now. And it's not just me. Men who take paternity leave experience a stronger bond with their babies. Research shows that the longer the paternity leave, the more engaged the father is in the first few years of a child's life. I was shocked to learn that over half of all U.S. fathers report feeling dissatisfied with the amount of time they spend with their children. Paternity leave is a chance to change that. My relationship with my wife also deepened on my leave. We went on a walk together every day. And I became a better cook and cleaner because I was able to spend more time on household duties, which made her happy. In a McKinsey and company survey, 90% of fathers who took paternity leave say, it improved their relationship too. This happens along a few different dimensions. First, because you gain a whole new respect for what's involved in child care and housework. And it makes you step up and take home more. And by being home, you're providing emotional support. Statistics show that when a mother's partner is involved, especially in the first few weeks after birth, it reduces the risk of postpartum depression significantly. But this is really just the start because paternity leave is also good for business. Fraternity leave can have a profound impact on gender equality in the workforce. There's an inherent imbalance if women take child care leave and men don't. Work your mothers are often juggling two full-time jobs, one at work, and one at home. Many don't return to the workforce or decide to take reduced roles. By taking paternity leave, men can give women more options, and even boost their ability to rise into leadership roles. A study in Sweden showed that for every month of parental leave taken by the father, the mother's earnings increased by approximately 7%. It's interesting to note that 90% of female students in Japan say they'd want their future partner to take parental leave. And nearly 80% of men entering the workforce here. And I suspect in other countries too. Say they want to take particular leave. For employers to have that open, inclusive culture where paternity leave is respected, that can help companies attract and retain the best talent. Workers are increasingly choosing the company based on the culture. This is a space where any company can give themselves a boost. I've been back on my job for about three months now, and I can already tell you, I feel so much more productive. I'm very focused and always looking for ways to be more efficient. So I can get home to my family. I've heard this from many mothers coming back from maternity leave, too. And studies confirm 80% of companies that offer paid family leave reported positive impact on morale and 70% notice a boost in productivity. It's a positive for any company, and that brings me to my final point. Paternity leave, it's good for society. Paternity leave is one of the big steps we can make in giving partners the opportunity to share the work both at home and at work. It's one of our best best to break the gender gap overall. Research shows that when that gender gap gets smaller, people report higher life satisfaction. Iceland, Norway, and Finland, ranked top three in the global gender gap index, and over 70% of fathers take paternity leave. And if you take a look at the ranking in the world haps report, there are very, very high. This might be a coincidence, but I don't think so. That freedom to be yourself and make choices without gender expectations. It feels really good. We live in a patriarchy. And what I've realized is that the same world that systematically favors men, it's also trapping us in a cage. We need more countries to set up systems that allow all parents to take paid child care leave. To give everyone new options, we need to build a culture that encourages and values men as caretakers. Because we can do it, too. PRX..

Elise Hugh matsuo post Rebecca sheer TED Talks Shirley Chisholm Japan Roberto Clemente Harry Houdini Sweden Argentina Ted Italy Apple McKinsey
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"It's TED Talks daily. I'm your host, at least you. The tragedy of COVID-19 brought on tectonic shifts in the way we live, learn, and perhaps, especially in the way we work. Work futurist Debbie Levitch says a lot of the changes in those early weeks were amazing for worker agency, autonomy, and accountability. In her 2021 talk at Ted at BCG, she offers leaders some must dos to not go backwards and get the future of work right as we move forward. Hi, I'm going to try to be host of a new Ted podcast called am I normal? Everyone wants to know if they're normal. Is my body normal? Are my feelings normal? Each week we'll tackle a question by digging into the numbers, consulting experts, strangers, and even my mom to get the bigger picture. Get ready to ask yourself does normal even exist? This season breakups. How long does it take to heal from heartbreak? Check out am I normal wherever you listen? TED Talks daily is brought to you by progressive. Have you tried the name your price tool yet? It works just the way it sounds. You tell progressive, how much you want to pay for car insurance. And they'll show you coverage options that fit your budget. It's easy to start a quote and you'll be able to find a rate that works for you. It's just one of the many ways you can save with progressive. Get your quote today at progressive dot com and see why four out of 5 new auto customers recommend progressive. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. Price and coverage match limited by state law. Support for TED Talks daily comes from away away makes the suitcase that I personally carry as well as the overnight bag that I want everybody to have. I love the compression pad that I have in my carry on as well as the phone charger that comes with it. That's an essential, and there's a 100 day trial on everything away makes. Start your 100 day trial and shop the entire away lineup of travel essentials, including those bestselling suitcases I'm talking about. At a way travel dot com slash ted-talks that's a way travel dot com slash ted-talks. When I moved from New York to Boston in 1989, I completely lost my sense of direction. It wasn't me though. It was those winding nonsensical Boston roads. Urban legend has it that in Boston, they paved over cowpeas to form the very roads we had today. Now, if you're an urban planner, designing a city from scratch, you would not base it on how the cows wandered. And if you think about it, that's exactly what we've done with work. Hundreds of years ago, in the industrial revolution, people left their homes to perform repetitive tasks in the fixed time and place of the factory floor. And when knowledge workers entered the scene, we kept the same model this time with fixed job descriptions and fields of cubicles from 9 to 5. Even globalization and technology did little to change the dynamic. Fixed time, place and job descriptions are the cow paths of work. And like cowpeas for roads, it just doesn't make any sense. I've been challenging and changing how companies work for the past 15 years. Starting with my own company, Boston consulting group, and then with dozens of other Fortune 500 organizations. And I have to tell you something amazing happened to work during the tragedy of COVID-19, especially those first weeks and months. If you remember all the low value work disappeared, it didn't matter what your job technically was. People just worked together across silos and even companies to get stuff done, wherever, whenever, however, it was needed. Leaders simply had to trust their people. They didn't have time for endless steering committees or death by PowerPoint. We just needed to trust people to deliver and they did. So I'm on a mission, a mission to bottle these great work practices. And not go back to the old ways. And yes, of course, I want to get rid of endless back to back zooms and loneliness and days that blend into evenings. But we have to make sure we don't go back to the rigid structured bureaucratic sluggish ways that suck the joy out of work. And I have to tell you the future of work is not going to be created with top down opinion driven edicts from senior leaders whose day to today realities don't match those of us dual career, time pressed and in compressed people. Of course, senior leaders want to go back. That worked for them. But they have to recognize that for 18 months now, there are people experienced unprecedented agency control, flexibility, trust and accountability and people don't want to go back. And it's this difference in perspective from senior leaders and their people that's one of the main reasons driving so much backlash to all these return to office announcements over the past months, with employees venting on social media and quitting and what's being called the great resignation. And employees, I don't blame you. But before you take to social media and walk, try talking to your leaders. Tell them what you loved about the past 18 months. Tell them what you want to keep. They might be more receptive than you think. And leaders, let me share three tips, rather three must do's. To get the future of work right, number one, trust your people, millions of workers and employees have proved their trustworthiness since March 2020. But even with that, so many leaders want to go backwards. As part of the work I do, I've spoken with hundreds of leaders over the past 18 months. And I get some really crazy questions. One is, well, Debbie, how can I tell if my workers are productive when they're working from home? And I can't help but say, well, how'd you know they were productive when they were in the office? Just because you could see someone doesn't mean they're productive or I have to love this, you know, when it's safe to go back to the office, we're gonna let people work from home two days a week as long as it's not a Monday or Friday because we don't trust them not to slack off and take long weekends. What does that say about the culture of trust? Will there be abusers? Of course. But there will be a tiny few. So why make rules for the vast majority who've earned your trust every day for the past 18 months? A trusting culture will not only attract retain and motivate your people, it will also save you a lot of time enforcing rules. So that's number one. Trust your people. Number two,.

TED Talks Debbie Levitch BCG Ted Boston TED ted New York Debbie
New film 'Dear Even Hansen' is a misfire on just about every level

The Big Picture

02:58 min | 1 year ago

New film 'Dear Even Hansen' is a misfire on just about every level

"Let's talk about youth or at least an attempt at representing youth. I'm talking about the weekend's big release. Dear evan hansen which is in theaters on friday. Who where to begin. Amanda dear oven has what is. Dear of enhancing amanda. It is an adaptation of a tony winning musical which will come back to and it is about a young man named evan hansen. Who is having a very difficult time in high school going through some mental health issues some social anxiety issues and has been encouraged to write himself letters of you know like self belief and pas positive thinking one of these letters falls into the hands of another person and i just i'm gonna say because we need to talk about what this film okay. Another troubled student at the high school who then takes his own life and the parents of the second teen find the letter. That evan hansen has written to himself. They believe their son wrote this last letter to evan hansen before he killed himself and then assume that evan hansen. This tea and with no friends actually had a beautiful friendship with their now deceased child and the main character. Evan hansen goes along with it. And it's like yeah. He was my friend and invents a whole story and friendship and ultimately like a philosophy on how to live and connect with other people that becomes like essentially a hit. Ted talk on the internet and then he become something of a mental health advocate but really just sort of friendship at a community of care for other people a wellness figurehead popular on the internet. And and then things sort of unravel but for the most part no one is held responsible for any of the choices made in in the in the musical and the movie and then people sing songs about discovering themselves and it ends. That is the one part. I want to underline you. You just described the bones of the story very accurately and it's a musical. This story is a musical and so of course. The character is break into song as the story unfolds. I thought this was very troubling movie. A movie that really did not work for a variety of reasons. I think neither you. Nor i saw the show on broadway and so we don't really have a relationship to the show. It was a big hit and of course it. Was tony winning. But it is. Unnerving film is unnerving in a in a variety of

Evan Hansen Amanda TED Tony
How to Design the Life You Want

TED Talks Daily

01:51 min | 1 year ago

How to Design the Life You Want

"Help you design your life. We're gonna use the technique of design thinking innovation methodology works on products works on services. But i think the most interesting design problem is your life. So that's what we're going to talk about. I want to just make sure. Everybody knows my buddy dave evans dave and i are the co authors of the book and he's the guy who helped me co find the life design lab at stanford. So what are we doing. The life design lab while we teach the class. That helps you figure out what you wanna be when you grow up. There's a meta narrative in the culture in my when when i was growing up. Twenty five. you're supposed to have you know. Maybe a relationship maybe have gotten married starting to get the family together in the in the book or in the class. We don't believe in. Should we just think all right you wherever you are. Let's start from where you are. You're not late for anything. So i'm gonna give you three ideas from design thinking the first one is this notion of connecting the dots so we looked in in the positive psychology literature and the design literature and it turns out that those who you are. There's what you believe. And that's what you do in the world if you can make a connection between b-street things if you can make that a coherent story you will expe- experience your life as meaningful the increase in meaning making comes from connecting the dots. So we do two things. We asked people write a work view. What's your theory of work. Not the job you want. Why do you work. what's it for. What's working service of what you have that. Two hundred fifty words then. This one's a little harder to get short. What's the meaning of life. What's the big picture by you. Here what is your faith or your your view of the world when you can connect your life you and your work together a coherent way you start to experience your life as meaningful

Dave Evans Stanford Dave
How Playing an Instrument Benefits Your Brain

TED Talks Daily

01:59 min | 1 year ago

How Playing an Instrument Benefits Your Brain

"Did you know that every time musicians pick up their instruments. There are fireworks going off all over their brain on the outside. They may look calm and focused reading the music and making the precise and practice movement's required but inside their brains. There's a party going on. How do we know this well in the last few decades neuro scientists have made enormous breakthroughs in understanding how our brains work by monitoring them in real time with instruments like fm r. I n. p. e. t. skinner's when people are hooked up to these machines tasks such as reading or doing math problems each have corresponding areas of the brain where activity can be observed but when researchers got the participants to listen to music they saw fireworks multiple areas of their brains for lighting up at once as they process. The sound took it apart to understand elements like melody and rhythm and then put it all back together into unified musical experience and our brains. Do all this work in the split-second between when we i hear the music and when our foot starts to tap along but when scientists turned from observing the brains of music listeners to those of musicians the little backyard fireworks became jubilee. It turns out that while listening to music engages the brain in some pretty interesting activities. Playing music is the brain's equivalent of a full body workout. The neuroscientists on multiple areas of the brain light up simultaneously processing different information in intricate interrelated. An astonishingly fast sequences. But what is it about. Making music that sets the brain alight. The research is still fairly new but neuroscientists have a pretty good idea. Playing a musical instrument engages practically every area of the brain at once especially the visual auditory and motor courtesies and as with any other workout disciplined structured. Practice in playing music strengthens those brain functions allowing us to apply that strength to other

Skinner
What is Anxiety?

TED Talks Daily

02:26 min | 1 year ago

What is Anxiety?

"Think about a time when you're feeling really anxious what was making you feel that way. Maybe a big test or serious conversation. You had to have with someone important to you or when you've had to drive at night during a rain store. How did that anxiety. Feel in your body. Did your heart start to race. Did you start sweat. Anxiety isn't just happening in your mind. It's a full body reaction. So how does it work. I called up. Dr kelly cyrus and brings got things set up perfectly and they were just. Yeah jen jen. And i are just technological mac. Ask she's a psychiatrist in washington dc. I asked her to give me the basics so anxiety is generally i would say a form of fear or form of worry either. You are afraid that something is going to happen or you are just increasingly worried. You're kind of Maybe apprehensive you're not sure something bad is going to happen. You are maybe overly focused on the expectation of some kind of outcome. Like you just can't stop thinking about something you know. One thing i sometimes is that you know you should just be less anxious to just try to be anxious but i mean you know that sounds like trying to say to someone. Why don't you just have high blood pressure or you know. Why don't you have just less abnormal cells in your uterus. It's that's exactly the case. It's just that we don't think about feelings and emotions in that way for some people it's actually part of your genetic makeup or there was something in your environment where you were predisposed to so many circumstances where you you were alert and if you can't control your environment you certainly can't control your genes. You can't just get rid of your anxiety. Dislike yourselves or your high blood pressure. Anxiety is a normal emotion that all humans experience just like happiness sadness and anger it turns out all feelings have purposes looking at evolution can give us some insight here for example joy and affection tie families together to create stronger bonds of support. Anxiety exists to keep us alive. It's part of our threat response. System and anxiety and fear are closely

Dr Kelly Cyrus Jen Jen DC Washington
You Can Grow New Brain Cells. Here's How

TED Talks Daily

01:56 min | 1 year ago

You Can Grow New Brain Cells. Here's How

"Can we as adults grew new nerve. Sounds these still some confusion about that question. As this is a fairly new field of research for example are sticking to one of my colleague robert with an oncologist and he was sitting me cendrine. This is puzzling. Some of my patients. That have been told there are queued. Are cancer still develop symptom of depression. And i responded to him from my point of view that make sense so drug you give to your patients that stops a cells multiplying also stop the newborn neurons being generated in your brain and then robert looked at me like i was crazy and said but sundering visa adult patients either do not grow new nurse and much street surprise. I say well actually we do. And we sees a phenomenon that we call muroo genie's so now roburt is not a neuroscientist and when you went to medical school it was not to what we know. Now that the other brain can generate new nurse airs so roburt being a doctor. He's wanted to come to my lab to understand a little bit better topic. And i took him for two of one of the most exciting parts of the brain when it comes to new jersey's the compass so vis vis gray structure in the center of the brain and what we know seems already very long is that this is important for learning and memory and mood and emotion however what we have learned more recently. Is that this is one of the unique structure of the other brain where new neurons can be generated

Robert Confusion Roburt Depression Cancer New Jersey
The Benefits of a Bilingual Brain

TED Talks Daily

02:43 min | 1 year ago

The Benefits of a Bilingual Brain

"Oblast. Suspend your poly. Say you wish ulama if you answered si we or quay chances are you belong to the world's bilingual and multilingual majority and besides an easier time traveling or watching movies without subtitles. Knowing two or more languages means that your brain may actually look and work differently than those of your monolingual friends. So what does it really mean. to noah. language language ability is typically measured in two active parts speaking and writing and to passive parts listening and reading while he balanced bilingual has near equal abilities across the board in two languages. Most bilingual's around the world know and use their languages in varying proportions and depending on their situation and how they acquired each language they can be classified into three general types for example. Let's take gabriella whose family emigrates to the us from peru when she's two years old as a compound bilingual gabriella develops to linguistic code simultaneously with a single set of concepts learning both english and spanish as she begins to process the world around her. Her teenage brother on the other hand might be coordinate. Bilingual working with two sets of concepts learning english and school while continuing to speak spanish at home and with friends finally gabrielle is. Parents are likely to be subordinate. Bilingual's who learn a secondary language by filtering it through their primary language because all types of bilingual people can become fully proficient in a language regardless of accent or pronunciation. The difference may not be apparent to a casual observer but recent advances in brain imaging technology have given neuro linguists at glimpse into how specific aspects of language learning affect the bilingual brain. It's well known that the brains left hemisphere is more dominant and analytical and logical processes while the right hemisphere is more active in emotional and social ones though this is a matter of degree not an absolute split the fact that language involves both types of functions while lateral ization develops gradually with age has led to the critical period hypothesis. According to this theory children learn languages more easily because the plasticity of their developing brains. Let's them use both hemispheres in language acquisition while in most adults languages latter allies to one hemisphere usually the left. If this is true learning a language in childhood may give you a more holistic grasp of its social and emotional

Gabriella Noah Peru Gabrielle United States
How to Pave a New Career Path

TED Talks Daily

02:23 min | 1 year ago

How to Pave a New Career Path

"Today we're gonna be exploring stepping into the unknown head to talk about it. I am joined by debbie. Millman that hosted one of our first podcasts. Ever or one of the first time ever. Hi debbie hang lease. Great ac- air. It's great to see you If you haven't tuned in before debbie's cast is called design matters. And i have been listening while i go on runs and Really enjoy your conversation. Thank you thank you so much. We'll to frame this talk Why don't we start by talking. About how stepping into the unknown applies in your own life in in your own career. Well i was really influenced. Several years ago. I interviewed the great writer danny shapiro and we were talking after the interview. She came into my office at the school of visual arts and saw that i had stacked on my task. Three books had just come out a barrel confidence. I i really had felt at the time. That confidence is by holy grail. But this is what. I was looking for to find my whole life if i could find the confidence to step into any without fear that that would be like my life likely be made and she and i started talking about that and she said oh i think. Confidence is really overrated. What what like ed explodes. And i pressed her for more information. And she said that she felt the confidence overrated that most people that just head oodles oodles of confidence were jerky thought was more important than confidence was actually courage and that courage to step into that unknown was was far more important to being able to reach any kind of call in so it set me on a pass of a research to really find our What confidence actually meant. What does it mean to have. What have you have you get confidence. You're not good with supermarket in like polls confidence shelves

Debbie Hang Debbie Danny Shapiro Millman School Of Visual Arts ED
Walk With Little Amal, a Theatrical Journey Celebrating the Refugee Experience

TED Talks Daily

02:08 min | 1 year ago

Walk With Little Amal, a Theatrical Journey Celebrating the Refugee Experience

"Among muniz. Irby i was born in east jerusalem and a tough part of town between between the neighborhood and the shafat refugee camp. I'll mix child that means. My mother is jewish and my father's palestinian so the refugee experience runs very deep in the dna of the family. When my jewish grandparents were fleeing europe because of world war two. They came to palestine and drove the other part of my family into exile. When i was fourteen. I stumbled by accident into a theater show and this rough part of town and i fell in love. I fell in love with a reality that was being created in front of me reality. That was full of possibilities. That was wilder was free. A reality that was an opposite contrast of the harsh reality we were living in and i became a theatre. Practitioner becoming a theatre. Practitioner and palestine is like conjuring water in the desert. We don't have the infrastructure. We don't have the big artistic institutions. What we do have is a need and something to say about the world. We live in taking my shows to communities in refugee camps in palestine. I was always struck by the immediacy of the encounter and that became a very powerful experience for me in two thousand fifteen at the height of the refugee crisis when hundreds of thousands of people were walking across europe with all the pain and the anguish that we saw. I started thinking that maybe we need to create a new model of theater. Maybe we need to take our theater out of the theaters and into the streets. The streets where these people were walking. And i started working with good sean theater company Company that creates theater about the refugee experience together. We created the walk. The walk is a rolling arts festival. That will cross eight thousand kilometers sixty five cities towns and villages in its way and we will create one hundred twenty events of welcome.

Shafat Refugee Camp Palestine Irby Muniz East Jerusalem Europe Wilder Sean Theater
An Interactive Map to Track (and End) Pollution in China

TED Talks Daily

02:12 min | 1 year ago

An Interactive Map to Track (and End) Pollution in China

"Choking smog polluted waters climate change. This has been the environmental cost of the tremendous wells in china of the past forty years at the same time. Hundreds of millions of people have put themselves out of poverty as environmentalists in china. I have witnessed all of this first. Hand the challenge we're phasing is. Can we clean up as fast. And as broadly as the massive development degrading our air water and climate china has one point four billion people a steel fast growing economy and is responsible for the biggest share of the current greenhouse gas emission. china knows it's global responsibility and has pledged to be carbon neutral by twenty sixty. It means more than ten billion metric. Tons of carbon emission must be stopped abi neutralized. How can we possibly do it. The pressing global climate situation requires each of us. Not just to do it but to do it faster. I believe there's a chance for us to succeed. As i know a tool that i've work to help reduce the enormous environmental pollution. It is the power of transparency. Pollution information made public using mobile internet and other. It technologies many empowers millions of citizens to speed. Change by holding corporations and government agencies accountable. I personally got involved in the transparency drive for or pollution control years ago. Besides lake tied the third largest freshwater lake in china. I saw a group of fishermen using loan lados to scoop out the one fisherman said to me when i was young on a holiday like this i would jump into the lake for a bath but now he said the fish are gone. And we're paid to scoop out the algae pointing to those factories not far from the shoreline. He said the lake would not be clean onto. They stop dumping years of research. Made me understand how hard it is to check the dumping

China Besides Lake
Don't Call People out -- Call Them In

TED Talks Daily

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Don't Call People out -- Call Them In

"First of all thank you all for listening to me. I come to y'all because most black women don't go the klu klux klan rallies on purpose. I did because it was my job. I've monitored hate groups. But i really wanted to find out how people could hate strangers so much. Mostly i wanted to work for peace and justice but fortunately for me my mentor at the time was the legendary civil rights leader. Reverend ct period. Who'd been an aide to dr martin luther king and see ts to say when you ask people to give up hate the you need to be there for them when they do now the time. Ct set those words. I started muttering under my breath. Because you can't curse out a preacher you know. But if i didn't make any sistemi to me because if the clan hated black folks al's all right with hating them back sounded okay to me but then something happened. It became my job to help people who were leaving hate groups and then once i got the norm i couldn't hate him anymore and then i got confused. I'm a survivor. A racial violence rape and incest. And i needed to find another moral compass for my life's work and the conference had this schiff from hate to love and so that improbable journey is why i'm here to talk to you today. Because i really really want to build a culture and a world that invites people in instead of pushing them out is called a calling in culture

KLU Dr Martin Luther King AL Schiff
Remembering Climate Change, a Message From the Year 2071

TED Talks Daily

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Remembering Climate Change, a Message From the Year 2071

"Twenty two thousand. As we're a crux in human history they began with the first pandemic a slap to the face of everyone as they had to acknowledge that they were a single civilization on a single biosphere utterly dependent on science to keep them alive. Civilization is a fragile thing and although people started the twenties hoping to ignore that profound truth even after the first pandemic the great heat waves of twenty twenty three torched any such hope humans cannot survive combinations of high heat and high humidity that rise above an index temperature called wet bulb thirty five and that year the wet bulb thirty six events in india in southeast asia and in the american midwest killed so many more people than the first pandemic that it was made clear to everyone things simply had to change the arrival of the second pandemic put an exclamation mark on all that the question that desperate point was could things change could humanity stop it's destructive ways and restore balance to its relationship to its biosphere crucially. Could it lower the global average temperature of the earth in time to avoid killing millions more people more animals and indeed entire species looking back from our perspective sixty years later this of course looks possible because they did but it was by no means a sure thing you have to imagine what it felt like at the time when panic filled the air and no one could be sure. Success was even physically possible many declared that humanity was doomed. This is why that decade gets called the turbulent twenties or the terrifying twenties only much later did some historians began to call it the terrific twenties or even the roaring twenties although that's a historians joke and as usual a bad one it was not at all like the roaring twenties of a century before it was much stranger than that in these critical years lessons learned in the first pandemic put to use. The scientific community had rallied to meet that crisis in an unprecedented way. Unleashing a burst of cooperation and creativity never seen before and now they did it again.

American Midwest Asia India
The Informal Settlements Reshaping the World

TED Talks Daily

01:59 min | 1 year ago

The Informal Settlements Reshaping the World

"When i was six years old growing up in columbia. I made one of the most baffled decisions of my life. I asked my mother to change me in the school to this cool words. She was teaching my surprise. She say yes so. I switched from my reach private catholic school to a public school where ninety nine percent of the students leaving condition of extreme poverty. Only meal some of my friends ate today was the one that was given a school. My friends and i live close to each other worlds apart. I live in a neighborhood with a museum a library parks and they live in a neighborhood. We lack of the most basic necessities. So just whatever. Water tweeted more importantly leaving a place surrounded by danger from guns two landslides. There's still funny was not unique up. In the mountains and dean informal settlements thousands of families were having the same problems that my friends under families fearing that the police or the rains will take their homes away. I learned so much from my friends. With what continue to surprise me. The most is there. Asean and optimism in the face of adversity. Growing up with people that i care. He's with had lived me to this informal settlements. I teach now at the university of colorado boulder in the province of environmental design. I still waiting for moments. Because even if they're invisible to most of us. Dave represents one of humanity's biggest challenges and yet they provide great insight. Yuko cd's develop and innovate.

Columbia University Of Colorado Dave
The Radical, Revolutionary Resilience of Black Joy

TED Talks Daily

02:00 min | 1 year ago

The Radical, Revolutionary Resilience of Black Joy

"Smile. Don't forget to let daddy see you smile. That's out here for months at the age of four from the time the sheriff took my dad away until the time the probation officers say it was okay for him to come home on his own smile. It's weird to me. We call finding joy so many things these days resiliency determination survival etc but at the end of the day joy. it's just a simple moment of gratitude and happiness. You allow yourself to have joy. It's not this toxic. Positively where we force ourselves to ignore the realities of the world and avoid the problems in our life joy. It's just a moment of reflection and happiness. By which we were able to tell ourselves there is more this life. There's more to this world. The just pain joy is our ancestors survived. Joy is how we know what to fight for. Joy is how we build our community. Joy is how we show love. Joy is why we're still here. You see there. This indescribable joy that comes from being able to live and thrive despite all of the obstacles and barriers that come with living an anti blackness part of it is a hope that things will soon get better and part of it is a celebration of still being around. Still being here

Are Wild Animals Really "Wild"?

TED Talks Daily

02:07 min | 1 year ago

Are Wild Animals Really "Wild"?

"So human relationships with animals can be pretty weird We put them in categories based on how we see them. So there's pets. They're like members of the family. And then there's farm animals and they're often very similar to pets in terms of their cognitive abilities and their emotional abilities but of course we eat them and then there's wild animals and i've been wondering what allow animals even are anymore like you can get a degree in wildlife management but if you're managing them are they really wild. I started thinking about this. In the context of wolf reintroduction so when wolves were first brought back to the american west in the nineteen nineties they were pretty heavily managed and they still are today. A lot of them were callers they have. Gps trackers they have their dna on file names and numbers and if they get a taste for livestock than we hayes them with rubber bullets or air horns or sometimes those floaty guys that you see in used car lots and of course if they don't get the message they can be shot. So how wild are they really. If they're being this carefully managed it's occurred to me that a ground squirrel or a city. Robin is in some ways wilder than these wolves because although they might live in a city known is managing their day to day life but of course they are living in the human world a world that's been shaped by massive influences like conversion of land to agriculture extinctions domestication's movement of species across continent we've rerouted rivers and of course there's climate change which means that every animal no matter how distant from a human settlement has some influence of the human world so every animal lives in human world. Does that mean that we somehow though the more than we used to. I think it does so. Take polar bears for instance. Some populations of polar bears are struggling to live on the sea ice in the summer. There's not enough sea ice for them to go hunting for seals which is what they normally eat

Wilder Robin
The (De)Colonizing of Beauty With Sasha Sarago

TED Talks Daily

02:20 min | 1 year ago

The (De)Colonizing of Beauty With Sasha Sarago

"Today i would like to talk to you about beauty and how. We've got it all wrong when it comes to our perceptions of women particularly aboriginal women but before i do i would like to acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land in which i stand upon the gotta go people of the urination. I pay my respects to the elders past present and emerging and give thanks to our ancestors who guide and protect us. It was nine hundred ninety. And i was pumped was off to my first birthday party just before i hit the terrible teams no chaperone in. No brady's sister to tag along so she could snitch. I had my cute little outfit on gift in hand. And i was hoping that this little cutie that i liked would show up and i was hoping that this little cutie would ask me this one question. You know that question. That makes you hot. Beat right out to chest. Do you wanna be my girlfriend. Even though i had no business having a boyfriend at that age but it didn't matter because back then it was all about the rush. I never did get asked that question but the question i did get asked was what should background and like any proud. Aboriginal child would declare. I'm aboriginal given the reaction of the room. Being aboriginal was clearly a dirty word and at the tender age of eleven. I was told by my best friend's adult system that i was too pretty to be aboriginal by this time. My mouth is dry. My blood is boiling. And i'm trying so hard to fight back. What feels like an ocean of tears. I calmly joined my circle of friends and begin to fake laugh. At whatever is funny to mass. My embarrassment as i clutch on to my new found complex.

Brady
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"What if you own a hotel? ? I'm one of the key principles in your mission statement is a commitment to treat all employees and customers equally including on the basis of gender and religion. . And then a large group books event, , you'll space and when you look at the booking, , you realize it's a religious group I. One . of their key principles is that women should never leave the home and should have no opportunities for professional development outside of it. . What do you do? ? Do host the events and get criticized by some or refuse and get criticized by others. . In my work council organizations on how to create rules to navigate ideological disagreements and controversial speech. . And I defend my clients weathering to from the government when their a challenge. . The structures I recommend recognize the real homes that can come from certain types of speech bought at the same time seek to promote dialogue rather than shut it down. . The reason is that we need disagreement creativity and human progress depend on it. . While it may be often easier to speak with someone who agrees with everything, , you say it's more enlightening and times we'll satisfying to speak with someone who doesn't. . But disagreements and discord can have. . Meaningful costs disagreement particularly in the form of hateful speech can lead to deepen lost wounds and sometimes results violence. . And in a world in which polarization and innovation or increasing out seemingly exponential rates, , the needs create structures for vigorous but not violent disagreement have never been more important. . The US Constitution's First Amendment might seem like a good place to start to go to France you like I may have often heard somebody say that some form of a speech restriction whether from an employer, , a website or even somebody else violates the first amendment. . But in fact, the , First Amendment usually has little if any relevance at all. . The First Amendment only applies when the government is seeking to suppress the speech of its citizens. . As a result. . The First Amendment is by design, , a blunt instrument and narrow category of speech can be banned based on its content almost everything else cannot. . But the First Amendment has no relevance when what we're talking about is a private entity regulating speech and that's a good thing because it means private entities have disposal a abroad and flexible set of tools that don't prohibit speech but do make speakers aware of the consequences of that woods here are some examples. . When you go to university, , it's a time for the free and unrestricted exchange of ideas. . But some ideas and the words used to express them can cause discord whether it's an intentionally inflammatory event hosted by a student group or the exploration of controversial issue in costs in order to protect both intellectual freedom and the most vulnerable students. . Some universities have formed teams brings speaker unlisted together free from the possibility of any sanction to hear each other viewpoints. . Sometimes, , students don't want to meet on. . That's fine. . But in other circumstances, , mediated exposure to an opposing view can result in acknowledgement recognition of unintended consequences and broadening of perspectives. . Here's an example. . On, , a college campus, , a group of students supporting the Israelis and those supporting the Palestinians were constantly reporting each other for disrupting events, , tearing down posters and engaging in verbal confrontations. . Recognizing that most of what the students were reporting did not violate the university's disciplinary? ? Code. . University invited both groups to sit down in a so-called restorative circle where they could hear each other's viewpoints from the possibility of sanction. . Off To the meeting, , he ideological disagreements between the groups remained a stock as ever but the rankle between them significantly dissipated. . Now. . Obviously, this , doesn't always happen. . But by separating reactions to speech from the disciplinary system institutions of higher education have created a space for productive disagreement and the broadening perspectives. . We're all biased I. . don't mean that in a bad way. . All of us are influence and rightly. . So by family background education, , all lived experience and a million other things organizations to have influences most importantly the beliefs of their members but also the laws under which governed or the marketplace in which they compete. .

Ted Talks Illinois Chicago Tribune Allison Leyton Brown Supreme Court Europe skokie US Christopher Facie Hugh Bogan Chicago Federal Building Tamatsh Virginia Charlottesville
"ted talks" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"ted talks" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Ted talk.

"ted talks" Discussed on Tessa and Elliot Argue

Tessa and Elliot Argue

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"ted talks" Discussed on Tessa and Elliot Argue

"I mean I guess if you bake it in a bag yesterday you wipe the grease off. It's not as bad again. I'm just thinking about Greece. Gross but if he gets like the Microwave Bacon e wipe the grease off your good. Yeah anyway what's your last one jungle? Cruise boats thinks with guests inside at the Magic Kingdom. I WANNA see the video. I know you said Oh my God. I've said I heard this story. I watch so good I heard it was kinda crazy. We went on jungle. As we waited wasn't the worst of all the rights we did say was the worst of all the parks even like small. It's a small world sucked ass but it wasn't a wave it was it wasn't a long and it was like one of the things that you do. Yeah I if we ever go back I have no interest in doing small world every unless the weight is instant right. You know so raking hairline. Yeah we're not doing a small wrong problem. Wants US young or hers I get it. The weight was instant I would do. Maybe had a better. Yeah The lady. The girl are captains sucked too and she is. She was probably a normal person. Didn't really want to be there. Unlike the rest of those idiots Disney rejects. Stop It. They're all WANNA BE ACTORS THEY WANNA be actors but they're never gonna be as far is you're gonNA get your internship. Stop it fuck you. Disney cast member please at me. Elliott's GONNA fight. The Disney can just their Disney college program and their own college kids so for I know. I watched a watched a video of this girl. Who did the college program? She's complaining about. How like broker and like all of this like really like in the real world. That's just the way life as like like she get. She got upset because she didn't she wrote down the time that she was supposed to leave instead of the time that she was supposed to get up and get ready or something and so she was like freaking out because she couldn't get ready. I Dunno and she was just like broken as a person like fuck off people die can. Yeah get married. See how broken you are after that. You got that last Florida story..

Disney US Greece Magic Kingdom Elliott Florida
"ted talks" Discussed on Tessa and Elliot Argue

Tessa and Elliot Argue

12:37 min | 2 years ago

"ted talks" Discussed on Tessa and Elliot Argue

"Free bagels. Every Tuesday cool one BAGEL is equal to seventies of bread. Also Elliott goes at like five in the morning. So it's geriatric our values or my people. I know I'm just one time. They changed the show that was on. They change the channel shows the channels on the TV's and the one dude flipped fucking Shit. He's like I watch this every day at nine o'clock and that one dude was Elliott. Okay it was. It was a little upsetting that. If my my my schedule's different don't like it. Only changing my schedule my favorite is that like if you ever like heard. Us talk about well. You've heard US talk about the cat. Have you ever listened to that if you ever listener? But the cat in Elliott or fucking the same person because it's not fucking the same personnel only fucking Tessa and Dexter fucking anyway. He's a virgin. No Okay there. They are the same person Like we got a new bad and dexter could not handle the fact that like that had changed like he was so upset for as you they moved. They change your channel me okay. I liked to sit in the one bike because I can look at myself in the mirror without blowing anything so I can see. I can see that TV. I I don't understand. I like to sit in the same. I like to use the same bike. I use the same treadmill. Use the same lifter as use the same rower. There's two rowers and there's the grower in the batterer I don't like the bad one I just don't him. Index are the same person and the cat. The HAT will lose his mind. If Elliot. When Elliot started going to the gym he had to leave earlier and the cat just lost his yet. So mad at me so manhasset all my shoes. Yeah in that you are mad because they not. It's just I enjoyed it. They took it away from me. They're getting what. Why keeping up with the Kardashians. Give me hint charmed Jokic there. You just got to the point where the one sister had left. She endured he's had left. The new one was brought in the sugar good. I thought I'm not saying 'cause it's charmed and then they show an episode of supernatural. I liked watching them La You like supernatural. I don't dislike Subaru supernatural. They're almost supernatural. Is it was a show that got really shitty really fat band though. Well not really the fans because this show is really the first like four or five seasons are really good. Yeah like really good. Yeah but they ended essentially yeah. They solve they fix the problem right and then they're just like Oh. The show's really popular will keep going right now. As that's the problem of that show. Is They just got really bad ray quick. It's the same thing with loss. Man Season One season two in some of season three super great and then they just lake just takes a huge nosedive and quality. Yeah so people are photo shopping trump as a little kid just to annoy his fans. I love it. They put one where he's sitting on the toilet. All those are great. I aren't those great. Yeah those are yeah. All Right Corona virus. Still pretty serious. How do you think North Korea's dealing with Corona virus? I don't know Oh the best. Perhaps the best way possible. They're not letting North Korea deals with corona virus by execution eating patient. Oh my gosh you're dead. Oh my God problem. Solved Zero Cases Reporting Beccaria. One Dude haddish executed a straight up and they're not even fucking like Joe. They're not even like no. We didn't do that. They're like no we murdered him. We took him back. Kill yeller all yell at that asshole. Don't get curve North Korea. Holy Shit what else do you want for bus North Korea? What do you expect if anything? This is how we should be doing it crazy. That is insane. It's funny because I've read because I don't know why this this has reminded me so much of World War Z. As opposed to like Ebola or anything else but I WANNA see it well wars e started in China and started from a anyway. Yeah yeah and it's funny. 'cause THEY'RE THEY. North Korea the way that they handled it. They shut off all their borders and stuff like because everybody closer orders but like North Korea. Shut him off with people inside that had been infected and now it's a completely dead country like they don't there's no light like Al and like there's no sign of human life left because everything North Korea will be one of those places that would probably be okay from things like that if all forget it also the country that survived was Israel hank his Israel visit Israel or Pakistan. God's chosen people because they built wallowing. He builds a wall and they would screen people. And if you had if you were taken off probably the Ellard Via that's what. Yeah but this is funny because almost the same lake. China didn't deal with it like they people were allowed to go in and out like I mean. There were all like everyone. Everyone's afraid of saying anything right well in the black market. I guess like organs were sent and they were tainted with the Zombie virus and so they would be putting people and then people would turn and so it happened in like Brazil haven't everywhere. It was crazy. Frigging SHENANIGANS PRESIDENT TRUMP DR HIDDEN CAULIFLOWER IN MASHED POTATOES TO IMPROVE. Diet. Yeah and they stopped letting me as much ice cream ice cream available. Sorry the ice cream stores closed ice cream stores closed on this. The little kid they cauliflower. You can tell because I eat a lot of cauliflower race now you can tell us not real rice. Oh Yeah you can tell. There's call the mashed potatoes cauliflower isn't isn't I don't recall fellers really that great for you it's just not bad. It's not as bad as there's nothing bad about it. Yeah right isn't that it is just like basic. I don't think yeah how. `Bout Celery is. That like is good for your poops. Well and Broccoli is good for Pinson. Knits it's got iron in that leg. It's not like amazed. Yeah now call part of that. It's like not there's nothing it's like the most like the water of food. Yeah you know what I mean like cauliflower. I it's fine. I like eating it raw though I don't like to cut I much rather have it. I masked as something cauliflower steaks. There was a test several years ago. Where seventy undercover agents try to sneak bombs or guns through the. Us airport sixty seven succeeded as a joke. My TSA is a joke. Say is all about like. Oh look we were pretending to help. Omega Sixty seven seventy. Tsa's when we went to Orlando going going to Orlando is breeze. Because it was five o'clock in the morning it was really the airport is is it's small. Yeah yeah still international so yeah because it goes to Canada. Oh it doesn't go out and does not go over single or two were to landlocked to go. International flight to you could probably go to your from Columbus but like like lax. Yeah Yeah L. A. Area Anyway so but coming back from Orlando to Columbus was ridiculous was crazy owes. Yeah but at the airports shoot. It was generous. There's a himself between the two we get in line and we just kept moving be like over because they would open up a new line so we would go to the next line and we go to the next line and finally push you. They just kept pushing you down and down and so they get in there and they were like take off. Take your belt off everything off. Put it in your bag. So Elliott takes his belt off everything no shoes or anything. We didn't take every. Take everything out of your pockets. Everything in your bag. Yeah and so. I took his belt off. Well then they brought the dog around and then the one guy came over and he was like well. I take your belt off. You can get so mad at us. Yeah so Elliott. Put his back on. Then we get up to the dinner. And the guy's like. Take your belt off your belt and it was like prowl. Can three different people have told me three different things buddy want? Yeah they're all. They have no idea what they're doing. Yeah it's and then we'll show and then we airport at all either either all WanNa be Disney cast members mcgruff. The Crime Dog actor gets sixteen years in prison off. What do you do is some drugs? Await Yep twenty seven guns one grenade launcher nine. Hundred rounds of ammo eat one laundry. Just need a lotta thousand plants thousand. We'd plants swells by someone who doesn't we'd is here. We are the Pentagon promises to use artificial intelligence for good not evil liars. Tell to warn us. Be Prompt trust us. Don't like candy and the kids the kids who are like what's that and I'm like I you'll like it. You'll like it one time. I was like it's medicine so Reece's medicine. Yep daredevil dies in failed homemade rocket launch to prove earth does. Do you know now much further. That's I literally just read that in the title Elliott Ladder but also this is like the third or fourth time. He's tried to shoot this off. This is the first time he got. Success was successfully allowed to shoot off the other ones. They stopped him because he didn't have permits Shit. Well he probably shouldn't have had a permit you died and that's one less ladder. Hopefully he didn't have children or more. He spun to flatter through for his one day. She's now here's a follow up story. Utah Woman Pleads guilty to lewdness being topless in her own house I remember that yeah. Yeah she pleads guilty why I don't understand I don't either I keep trying to get you. Take your shirt off. All the time he won't this is why. Because I'M GONNA get charged with Lewd Nutty. The blinds are there blackout blinds. No one can see them. Dexter has poked holes all of them They said was like no dexter hates when the Internet is going wild over these inflatable latex trousers. I don't know how they're walking in them. I am into latex. Latex is probably my number. I will only wear latex if they played. That's true. What's your number one. That's number one quiz. Pretty high up cheeses not on yours redistrict cute outfits my number one kink and now you like Cute Office. I do you look so cute. Mike. God here's my last one. Dunkin donuts got new food. Coming out. Pancakes not pancakes. Waffles stupidity is not desert. No J. Duncan latest releases quite simply a bag of Bacon. Act like French fries. Bacon that bill crazy slices bake sale?.

Elliott Ladder North Korea Dexter US Elliot Orlando China Subaru Dunkin donuts Tsa Pinson Tessa Canada La PRESIDENT Disney Joe Israel fellers J. Duncan
"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

03:53 min | 3 years ago

"ted talks" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"There's three billion working people in the world and about forty percent of them say they're happy at work that means about one point. Eight billion or almost. Two billion people are not happy. Be At work. What does that do both to those people and the organizations that they work in well. Let's talk about money. Organizations that have a lot of happy. Employees have three types of revenue growth compared to organizations where that's not true they outperformed the stock market by a factor of three. And if you look employee turnover. It's half that organizations decisions that have a lot of unhappy employees. The miracle thing is. You don't have to spend more money to make this happen. It's not about Ping Pong tables and massages and pet walking. It's not about the perks. It's all about how they're treated by their leaders and by the people that they work with. So I'd like to share a few ideas that create happy employees idea number one one in organizations where employees are happy. What you find is to present. Trust and respect leaders often say we trust our employees we empower employee's and then when an employee needs a laptop and this is a true example. Fifteen people have to approve that laptop so for the employees all the words right but but fifteen levels of approval for fifteen hundred dollar laptop. You've actually spent more money than the laptop on the approval and the employee feels. Maybe they're really not trusted trusted. So what can organization due to have a high level of trust the first organization that comes to mind is four seasons they have magnificent properties all around in the world and their employees are told. Do whatever you think is right when servicing the customer to hand that trust to your employees to do whatever they think is right makes makes the employees feel great and this is why they're known for delivering some of the best service in the world idea number two fairness the thing that erodes roads trust in our organization faster than anything else is when employees feel that they're being treated unfairly. Employs WanNA be treated the same regardless of their rank or their tenure eighteen year or their age or their experience or their job category compared to anyone else when I think about great organizations get fairness right the first organization that comes to mind is salesforce. They've found that men and women working in the same job with the same level of proficiency. were making different amounts of money so immediately they calculated the difference and they invested invested three million dollars to try and balance things out idea. Number three is listening so to be a listener who connects with all types of people. We have to unlearn a few things. We've all been taught about active listening and I contact and intense stare and a compassionate look. That's not listening repeating what the person says. That's not listening being humble and always hunting and searching for the best idea possible. That's what listening is and employees can feel whether you're doing that or not. They want to know when they talk to you and Sharon idea. Did you consider it when you made a decision. The one thing that everybody appreciates. She ate and watts when they're speaking is to know that what they say matter so much. You might actually change your mind. Otherwise what's the point of the conversation. We all know the things. We need to change the things that we need to do differently. The way you behave the way you treat others the way you respond the way you support defines the work experience for everyone around you changing to be a better person. The world is littered with those failures but changing changing. Because there's something you believe in some purpose that you have where you're willing to risk almost everything because it's so important to you. That's the reason interchange if it's not you should probably find a different place to work for more. Ted Talks but TAD DOT COM.

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