35 Burst results for "Ted Talk"

"ted talk" Discussed on Defocus Media

Defocus Media

05:57 min | 2 months ago

"ted talk" Discussed on Defocus Media

"By the way, I put like an hour in the meter for my car, parked the car out on the street, I was like, an hour is more than enough, right? So I go in chit chat for 15, 20 minutes, do the talk. And gosh, I don't remember the name of this other person who was there. But after I was done the talk, he just sat there and looked at me and didn't say anything for a while. And then he said, why are you doing this talk? And I was a little taken aback, didn't know how to actually answer that question. Like, what are you actually trying to say in your talk? And then I got a little bit more. I was stuttering like this saying, I mean, I think I conveyed that from an optometrist and I care I'm passionate about eyes. I care about eye care. I want people to think differently about their eyes. Yeah, I didn't really get that in your talk. And I almost fell over. I was like, I don't really know how I could have conveyed that any more passionately or clearly in the last ten minutes that I was standing here talking to you. He's like, yeah, I just don't see the point. And so I'm still now three months later, as I'm talking to you guys here, still a little stunned and still a little speechless and didn't know. He's like, yeah, you know what? Let's do it again. We're going to go through it a few times. Let's change some stuff. Let's make sure you're going to have more passion. Like, I'm not getting any passion from you. It's just kind of monotone. And that word really floored me. I was like, monotone. I mean, I don't think I monotone in average conversation, let alone trying to do a presentation like this. And he's like, yeah, your sentences are too long. I kind of drifted off. I just didn't really connect. Like, wow, I felt like I was being torn to shreds here instead of as I thought coming across here, confidently, in fact, I was apparently not landing at all. So I wanted to, oh my God, I had all these different emotions blowing through my head at that moment through my entire body at that moment, but I said, okay, I have to go put more money in the meter for my car. So I gave me an excuse to go outside, get some fresh air, think about it a little bit. I came back and I said, I mean, you basically took it all apart. Am I supposed to redo the whole thing? And four days, 5 days before this TED Talk and I've been rehearsing for the past couple of months. And so instead what we did is I tried my hardest to not retaliate or respond with any kind of negative feelings and simply thought, okay, this guy is an organizer. He's done this before. He has many other actually, in fact, he teaches these speakers, he kind of brings them up so they can create these talks and present them. So I had to take this man at his word that he was not trying to simply just break me down, but in fact, hopefully helped me to be better, but man, I can't tell you the emotions that.

TED Talk
"ted talk" Discussed on Defocus Media

Defocus Media

05:24 min | 2 months ago

"ted talk" Discussed on Defocus Media

"For taking the time to join me here to learn and to grow guys as always. I truly appreciate all the support. And I'm trying to support all of you out there as well, seeing amazing things happening on social media through other channels, I'm seeing so many of our colleagues doing amazing things. So I'm trying, hopefully, to support everyone else the same way that everyone's been supporting me. So thank you for that. Today we have an episode of eye to eye. And if you haven't heard one of these before, this segment is a short segment where it's just me sharing some lessons that I've learned and continuing to learn through out my career and personal life. And usually, you know, we try to keep them short and to the point, but like I'm talking one on one with you here. Hopefully there's something that you'll find in these episodes that you can apply to your lives as well, whether it's your business, your personal, your career, whatever it is your education. Today's episode, I don't know, I'll title it something along the lines of like criticism, constructive criticism, maybe something like that. There's probably two main lessons that I want to share with you. And they both came from one specific interaction, or one short period of time, very recently, you may know that a few months ago in December of 2021, I did a TED Talk, a TEDx talk. And if you haven't seen it, I'll make sure the link is in the notes here. But please go check it out. I'm quite happy with the way it turned out. And we've been getting so much positive feedback on it and how everything's gone there. So I hope you enjoyed that. I hope you find something valuable in that as well. It's about a ten minute talk. So hopefully you got ten minutes to spare to watch that. So when I was doing this preparation for this TED Talk took some preparing some rehearsing, some very interesting things happened right before the talk. So I wanted to share that experience with you. And then I'll hopefully extrapolate the lessons that kind of learned from that experience. So the talk, if you do listen to it, or if you've heard it, is a compilation of these short sort of philosophical videos and sound bites that I've created over the years that are related to eyes..

TED Talk
"ted talk" Discussed on Ask The Health Expert

Ask The Health Expert

04:56 min | 3 months ago

"ted talk" Discussed on Ask The Health Expert

"But someone says, okay, I need in on this. How would they work with you and your team? Well, so if you go to go to our website, we'll see that we have a wide variety of options for you. We have just started seeing patients again. So people who need intensive support with love to see you, we also have an online course to autoimmune intervention mastery course that is really great, great support, and you can get that with 7 weeks of coaching. And then we have the radical health upgrade, which again is online in virtual, which is 12 weeks of a much smaller, more intimate group support with me, and with individual support with my health coach. And so we have levels of support from the online course to very intensive one on one patient. And you're also training other practitioners, correct? Yes, yes. We train practitioners. As a matter of fact, we just did our case series this morning. So we have people with help licenses, physicians, nurses, movement, nutrition professionals. We have health coaches, people with a health related license or certificate is eligible. And we are have the spring enrollment happening right now. Awesome. This is so fantastic. It's crazy to me what you've had to do to get this happening to get this research going and to get diet and lifestyle accepted as safe and effective. In that diet and lifestyle should be part of the treatment plan for people with MS, we have made so much progress, when my TED Talk first went viral, I was interviewed by a wide variety of neurology folks who in the end would condemn me for creating false hope. That was wild interviews. What are we without hope? Because as crazy as false hope because I was just telling my story and say, you know, this is the research that we've got going..

TED Talk
"ted talk" Discussed on Health Shi"F"t

Health Shi"F"t

03:27 min | 3 months ago

"ted talk" Discussed on Health Shi"F"t

"Well, yeah, I'll give you the ideal morning. You know, on my best days, it would be turn the alarm off or wake up. You know, and my best days, I put myself to sleep in time to wake up before the alarm goes off. Use facilities come back and meditate for 45 minutes. And then sit down with a journal for 15 to 20 minutes to map out my day. And then either before or after, hopefully both, talk to my wife, let her know how much I love her. And ask her about her day, and then step into my first one, two or three tasks that get me to the goal I want to get to. So that would be my general mourning, and then at the end of the day, I do my stretching exercise, et cetera to create a transition. And then in the evening, I'll oftentimes give myself the break of sports or news. Or I'll do some learning like watch a TED Talk or watch a documentary or, you know, look at a masterclass or do some reading. So that's kind of my daily rhythm or schedule. And it doesn't vary a lot on the weekends. Great. You know, I'm so energized by the work, and by thinking about it, often on the weekends, the thing that I'll enjoy even more, I'll do probably a very similar schedule, but I'll just let my mind wander a bit more on the weekends. Like I don't feel like I have to get to a meeting or to an email or anything. So there's just more space to do what I'm trying to do during the week. Does that answer your question? It does. It's beautiful. You know, I call it life work because like yourself, you know, there's not really a beginning or an end to the work and the life and the things that really kind of jazz me up when I get passionate about that's really great. And it's interesting because we chatted just a few minutes before we got on here. Why in my podcast? Am I including leaders and executive function specialists in neuropsychologists and things like that? And part of it is that I really see all of this as part of the ecosystem of total health. And leaders show by example, and this is also part of their example is part of their work that they do in terms of tuning into their own spiritual nature. Like what is it that is lighting lighting your light or charging your battery in order for you to support other leaders in the work that they do. So I really see leadership as being so much a part in parcel of our total healthcare system. Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. That's wonderful. So any other things that you have to add in terms of the work that you're doing or some of the new, the new agenda items that you have upcoming in the new year..

TED Talk
Will Chamberlain of the Article III Project Talks Big Tech

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:02 min | 3 months ago

Will Chamberlain of the Article III Project Talks Big Tech

"Let's return to big tech. Here's a little cut from the second richest man in the world because guys, it's actually Putin, who's the richest. I mean, he literally has privatized half of Russia into his back pocket. So it's not on the books, but he is the richest man in the world. Elon Musk is a close second. And this is what he said at a recent TED Talk. Cut one play cut. Intuitive sense is that having a public platform that is maximally trusted and broadly inclusive is extremely important to the future of civilization. But you've described yourself. I don't care about the economics at all. Okay. Richest man in the world or second, which says, I'm not in it for the money. Interesting. And he says it's vital for the future of civilization, not exactly what you hear from liberals. Well, deal with the question of whether or not we trust this man, but give us the strategic analysis of how important a development is it, that a guy who made his money out of PayPal, then electric vehicles, a darling concept of the left. And then reinvigorating almost single handedly America's space program that this is the guy who wants to buy Twitter, how unusual is that well? I mean, it's very unusual, especially because we're used to billionaires kind of hewing to the line of the left, like they're almost, they're scared as anybody else of The New York Times of The Washington Post. Writing a hippie's on them, which they shouldn't be because they're that wealthy. So it is really unique and it's really gratifying, I guess, would be the word, just to see someone step out and be willing to, despite their high standing and elite circles, be able to say, no, this is just wrong. What you have been doing is completely wrong. And not only, I'm literally going to buy the biggest and most not the biggest, but the most consequential and influential social media platform in the

Ted Talk Elon Musk Putin Russia The New York Times Of The Wash Paypal Twitter America
Elon Musk Is One Step Closer to Owning Twitter

The Trish Regan Show

02:19 min | 4 months ago

Elon Musk Is One Step Closer to Owning Twitter

"Out. Let's get to Elon Musk because I think it's increasingly likely that this guy gets Twitter as much as it's driving some people in certain circles quite crazy. I detailed yesterday. I went through the SEC filing and I looked at what the actual financing looked like. There is a new development I'm going to get to that just momentarily because it looks like he's creating a holding company that could apparently be for maybe three companies. Anyway, let's talk about the money. He's got 25 and a half $1 billion from banks, led by Morgan Stanley, so Morgan Stanley, who is his adviser, investment banker in this. And they've gone out and worked with other banks to get him the financing 25 and half $1 billion lined up from the banks. Now, part of that is a margin loan against his shares of Tesla, 12 and a half $1 billion. Margin loan against Tesla don't forget Tesla has just been killing and earnings of 81% the other day. Not entirely clear whether that upside can continue only because of the supply chain problems that have been going on. But again, Tesla just really, really doing well proving, I would say once again, the brilliance, the brilliance of Elon Musk. $21 billion is going to come out of his own pocket. He's shelling out 21 billion of his own money for Twitter. This is how much he cares about this project, which makes sense. You look at some of the other things that he's been in and whether it be the EV industry, which has been obviously important to him, whether it's the SpaceX, another industry, clearly clearly very important. In his view, it is important to own Twitter because this is otherwise threatening in his view to democracy. He's described Twitter and did this the other day on a TED Talk as effectively the town square. And so he wants to edge on the side of allowing a lot of speech, a lot of diverse speech as opposed to immediately shutting it down and you know where I stand on that. So I think he's got a really good shot at getting this company. The flip side would be does somebody else say, wait a second, we just don't want him to have it. And so we're going to partner up and get all the money we can and make this absolutely impossible for him to take Twitter out.

Tesla Elon Musk Morgan Stanley Twitter SEC Ted Talk Spacex
Elon Musk: Twitter Bid Is 'Not About Economics'

The Dan Bongino Show

01:37 min | 4 months ago

Elon Musk: Twitter Bid Is 'Not About Economics'

"You got one clip Okay Elon has spoken out publicly now about what's going on with his bid to take over Twitter and buy the entire company and we had a few points will play some of the clips for you in a second He said first very important this is not about economics to him I mean listen I have no reason to believe given some of the stuff he's done in the past that he would be lying Think about it You may say oh Dan of course he's going to say that no no no no stop Stop for a second Elon Musk runs an electric car company one of the biggest in the world He's this I don't know Elon Musk personally have no dog in this fight at all He's the same guy who tweeted out that it would be a good idea for us to drill for more oil Folks you have any idea how damaging that could be to his own brand if he didn't believe it This is a guy who says what he means He's got a reputation for doing it If he says it's not about the economics that says to me this guy may go even though he said it was his last and final offer He may be back with others to take this thing at an even higher price and he may not be ready to give up Play one of the cuts from this was at a TED Talk just happened a little bit ago check this out My strong intuitive sense is that having a public platform that is maximally trusted and broadly inclusive is extremely important to the future of civilization But you've described yourself I don't care about the economics

Elon Elon Musk Twitter
"ted talk" Discussed on Diet Culture Rebel Podcast

Diet Culture Rebel Podcast

05:22 min | 4 months ago

"ted talk" Discussed on Diet Culture Rebel Podcast

"It's confusing. To the point now where it's kind of slowly, slowly slowly, but she was willing, right? So now where she is a fat positive where she you would point out instances of fatphobia to me, where she talks about how, you know, people are struggling with food. And I'm like, what the heck? This is incredible. And so that was so wonderful. Things like that happening. And also sad where some friends can't, they can't. And that's them, and that's them being in maybe an eating disorder or. And that's okay. You know what? One friend who was deep in disordered eating. I lost contact with him and then recently he's reached out saying, I read your book and I watched your TED Talk and I really, really want to talk to you about this stuff. And I was like, oh my God. Okay, yes. Yeah. So, you know, you never know what's going to happen, but what was important was protecting my own mental health. And if someone wants to come along for the ride, cool. And if not, you know, okay, maybe see you later. Yeah, I think that's an important thing to remember that we don't have to please everyone and you have to put your relationship with food and mental health first too. I kind of like experience that a little bit with dietitians when I first started doing this, I know I was like, I can be friends with all the dieticians. I can still talk to all the weight loss dietitians and it's not going to bother me and I did for a while and then over time slowly but surely I just lost my patients and I began to get more irritated and I was like I can't do this anymore because it's just what one it's like it's just rubbing against everything I believe in and it just doesn't feel ethical and you just like it's okay to put those boundaries in place..

TED Talk
"ted talk" Discussed on The Aloönæ Show

The Aloönæ Show

03:46 min | 4 months ago

"ted talk" Discussed on The Aloönæ Show

"Each and every one of us, it is not fair for us to be paying for the transgressions of our forefathers. Or ancestors, that is our past and we are not our past our past has already happened in our future is yet to be determined so within the now we need to be who we supposed to be. Absolutely. Why do you see yourself 20 years from now? You and TED Talk. Really? And what kind of talks for videos are you thinking about making in 20 years from now? A huge campaign on me. Finding your need and tipping vibrations. You know, my exercise is going to touch the world in a way that you'll be able to self generate, become a self generator of the love and expand the capacity of that love. Not only through yourself, but through others as well. We all need to be able to find our need and without being absent in mind because our media is absent. It lives inside of our unconsciousness. And the reason why is there in unconsciousness is because each and every one of us have experienced something in our lives that was a great tragedy. Each and every one of us have experienced fear. Each and every one of us have experienced procrastination, limiting beliefs and self stop self sabotage and behavior. And all of those what is common about them all is that they are all attached to a high emotional frequency that only the unconsciousness can handle. And so you need this there as well because it's attached to a high double frequency. And the most important thing is for us to realize that and find out where we are. So the exercise is designed to help you bring your me out of your unconsciousness and put it into your consciousness, which is the now. We're supposed to be. Yeah? I agree. What was the last good book you've written? The last good book I've written? Yeah. Either way. I'm in the process of writing the book. Okay. The book is tempering vibration. It's going to teach each and every one of us all how to come from a place of good vibrations that we could carry throughout the day and how to create the shift necessary to generate the vibration. Okay. Great. If you could travel back in time, which decade would you like to live in? I keep hearing about the 50s and 60s and the stories that go on with them. You know, would make one curious to experience those times. Each time that decade that we go through, creates a different experience. Right? So the ones that I have experienced, I already have that. So I would want to go for something that I didn't have. I want more. I want to grow, you know, there's something to learn and experience that, you know,.

TED Talk
"ted talk" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

05:01 min | 5 months ago

"ted talk" Discussed on Good Life Project

"That I made something that people are willing to do. That they find enough value in it that they are willing to spend their time. I mean, some of these artists are so huge that they have no end to the kind of opportunities that are presented to them. And so that any of them would say yes, it's really meaningful to me. You know, I can think about it in a sort of cerebral way that like, yeah, I put together this idea for this show and I've seen it through enough that this got to happen. But it's rare that I feel emotional about it. Sometimes people ask me like, oh, don't you get so nervous when this huge person is on the show. And despite being somebody who feels stage fright, I don't. I think that it's a little bit like what we were talking about with the crit, you know, even though this is something that I made, it feels closer to the idea of doing a cover than doing my own song. It's still more of a job in my mind than it is my art, which still feels like music to me. So, you know, we have our interaction, we have this conversation, and then they go away, and I spend a lot of time listening to their voice and putting together this episode over the course of weeks before it comes out. And maybe I'm speaking about this from these many years into it. But, you know, I would tend to fall in love with all of my guests a little bit by the end of it. And then, but I've started to realize that's a one way relationship. For a lot of these folks, if not 99% of them, I'm just another person that they talk to. And then they moved on and that was it. And for me, I was like, oh, it's this really meaningful conversation we got to connect really deeply and isn't that special? And then I started to realize that there was only special for me. And once you start to realize that enough times, I think I kind of stopped thinking of it as being quite as special. Sounds so cynical. So but now I'm really curious about this, right? Because you're creating something that other people are experiencing as extraordinary. And even though it's almost like this is a job for you, not that you don't enjoy it in many different ways. There is something that tends to come through on the tape that feels different than the thousands of other quote interviews that these people have done. And it really feels like there's, you know, you take people who have created something where the world only experiences the final product, right? And very often, they're hesitant to deconstruct. All of the stumbles systems the stories that went into that. But there's something that happens when they're in conversation with you. Whether it's a shared point of reference as musicians as psychological safety that comes out of it, that allows them to go there. And I feel like shares not just the process, but the humanity. In a way that does something similar to what music does. Thanks. I really love talking to people. And I love asking them about, yeah, I love asking them about how they thought of something. It's definitely a benefit of editing the show because I edit for that side of things. You know, I'm drawn to the more all the moments where they feel the most human and sort of like the least sort of distant and cool musicians, which I think, you know, so many times you appreciate a musician with some degree of remove. There's literally like a stage that they're on top of that they're on. And I always had this desire for song exposure to be a way to listen to an artist that you might admire and just see how mortal they were or something, how much this great piece of work that they created came out of the series of small, very human instincts and decisions. So I'm editing for that. But yeah, I really, despite what I said before about, oh, I don't feel emotional about who's been on the show. I do really enjoy talking to people. And I feel, I think, like I said, I think that's more a learned response, the distance that I'm putting between me and it. I think my instinct is to I just want to, you know, I just want to hang out with them and be their best friend and ask them all the questions that the way that two close friends would talk. And I only have an hour or so an hour and a half with them to get to that place. I try and bring all of that, I don't know how to articulate it, but I think I feel it and maybe they can feel it too that I love what they do and I want to just know more about it. Yeah, my sense is that they probably do. And that also seeds something that you shared in a recent TED Talk, which was like, what if you actually took this out of the context of music out of the context of a songs? And what if you could be in conversation with if you could simply sit across from another human being and try to just be with them, like truly and utterly with them present with them to.

TED Talk
"ted talk" Discussed on Health Babes Podcast

Health Babes Podcast

04:32 min | 5 months ago

"ted talk" Discussed on Health Babes Podcast

"But we do north of 40 need to eat differently than we did in our 20s and 30s. It's just a fact of life. And I like to do it in a way where there's no fear mongering. I just like to provide the information the research, the science, and allow women to kind of navigate getting through this program. And so I'm really, really excited. It's intermittent fasting transformation. I have 45 is the actual name of the program that I created in response to that TED Talk that went viral. And so allowing me to have three years of tinkering, what works, what doesn't work, what are the things you need to look out for because I think on so many levels, if you take 20 women, you might have a couple that just won't, it just won't resonate for them. And that's totally okay, but most, if not all women, benefit from meeting less often. Yeah. And if you guys are listening to this prior to March 15th, right? That's the release date. It's on pre order to order it anyway. And if you're listening to a post march 15th, you can get it now. So, and do you have any specific and if you have a specific link, you want us to link to, we can definitely put that in the show notes if there's absolutely. And there's a lot of pre launch bonuses. So this is one of the things I've been encouraging people to understand, like there are a lot of bonuses that are only available prelaunch. So prior to the 15th, which we will definitely make accessible to your team so that you can share it with your listeners, really cool things. Like I'm a big believer if I'm going to give some a bonus, it's going to be something that's worth their time and effort and obviously the bonuses far exceed the value of the book. So my team and I have been very diligently putting them together, it includes bonus recipes for the book, it includes a pantry guide, like a real pantry guide with real information. I sometimes feel like free anything on the interweb or social media, sometimes you get it. Well, that wasn't worth my email address. And so really making sure there's an emergency weight loss guide, not that I want everyone to focus solely on that, but it's kind of tongue in cheek and provide some really salient, helpful details that people can benefit from as well. So you guys will want to go to the show notes and when click on the link in there. To get that. Okay. So you'll definitely link to that. Well, where else can everyone find you? I'm kind of everywhere right now. So I have a podcast called everyday wellness and I really kind of zoom in on serving women's needs at midlife and beyond, although we definitely also address topics that are relevant to women still in their peak fertile years..

TED Talk
"ted talk" Discussed on Forever35

Forever35

04:56 min | 7 months ago

"ted talk" Discussed on Forever35

"Are my problems. I mean, look, everything is chaos, the world is chaos. We're in this oh Macron surge, not to mention everything else is wild. So you cling I do. I cling to things. And in the hopes that they might bring me a small sense of comfort in an otherwise chaotic world. And right now, for me, that is, you know, like washing my face. And then also, I'm reading this book called the circadian code. Okay, tell me more. Okay, so someone recommended this book in a circle of women that I'm in. And I was like, this sounds interesting because it's actually some ideas that I have kind of dabbled with, especially when it comes to sleep hygiene. Now, of course, the book is called the circadian code, lose weight, supercharge your energy and transform your health from morning to midnight. So of course, there is always a weight loss tack on which drives me crazy and I am not interested in that part of things. But I did want to flag for anyone who is hearing me talk about this that is part of the title that is discussed. But what is more interesting to me is this idea of our bodies being on this kind of circadian cycle that has to do with the outdoor light that we are exposed to and how that influences us when it comes to bedtime and our sleep health. Go on. So I've only just started listening to the audiobook, but what I have gathered from listening to the author's TED Talk and kind of talking to friends about this is not anything revolutionary. I mean, it's the idea that the exposure to these screens essentially are waking us up. So and I know that reading this was validating because when I go back out to work, like from if I go to work at 8 p.m., do more writing or work on the podcast or something. And I try to go back into our House at like 11 to go to bed. I am wired..

TED Talk
"ted talk" Discussed on How to Be a Better Human

How to Be a Better Human

05:53 min | 9 months ago

"ted talk" Discussed on How to Be a Better Human

"It's clearly something that's sticking with me or allowing that notebook to show me what my brain has been snagging on recently so that when I have time to really meditate on it or to really dig into it, that I have clues. Because I think so many people want to write and then sit down in front of a blank screen or a blank piece of paper and are like, okay, world inspire me now. And honestly, that is very hard to do it that way, I think. So this is a little trick of just marking down these little delights and curiosities so that when I have the writing time, I have these little breadcrumbs to return to. Do you have any sort of writing practice or routine where you go back through those ideas and sort them out into actual writing or is it less formulaic and more like you just go back a few feel inspired? I think a little bit of both, I think sometimes whatever has been floating around in my brain shows up strongly enough and pulls me to the desk and sometimes I have to be intentional about making writing time. I also think that so much of my joy in connection with poetry is the writing and is the sharing of my own work. But is also just being around other people that love poetry and so just getting to talk about poetry and analyze text and discuss it with folks who also are passionate about poetry in and of itself gets my enthusiasm engine running. And so that also I think really helps significantly in pushing me in my own process too. And also, I think with an art form like poetry, sometimes people assume that that is a very solitary art form, which it can be, certainly, and when I'm keeping my notebook, that's something I do for myself by myself. But at least, in my case, I didn't fall in love with poetry in a textbook or a classroom. I fell in love with poetry in a dive bar. And it was because that space was where poetry felt communal and urgent that it really captivated me. And so that continues to be an element of poetry that I really respond to is the ability to be in community with other people and to share poetry with other people. My own and others. I mean, very few things make me as alive, make me feel as alive as when I read a poem by someone else, and I go, oh my God, I needed this poem right now. They found language for a thing that I couldn't find language for and they did it. And I have it in my hands. Can you believe this? And that feeling is just like plugging my soul into an amplifier or something, right? As an educator, what's your favorite exercise for getting people who don't think of themselves as poets into writing poetry? I would say that one thing that I'm always thinking about is trying to lower the stakes around both poetry writing and also performing because those are two things that I think people have a tendency to really raise the stakes for themselves. And so I usually like to start workshops with asking folks to write some kind of list because a list as a form is much more accessible, I think, immediately, or at least much more familiar to people. People write lists all day long in their life. And so being tasked with a list doesn't feel as terrifying as being tasked with a poem, I think. So in my TED Talk, I mentioned writing ten things I know to be true..

TED Talk
"ted talk" Discussed on Mindful Mama - Parenting with Mindfulness

Mindful Mama - Parenting with Mindfulness

04:03 min | 9 months ago

"ted talk" Discussed on Mindful Mama - Parenting with Mindfulness

"At the table as I talk to Jill stoddard. And you ask a great question in your TED Talk, which I think is so cool. So you ask about basically what is the goal of parenting and, you know, so I'm like, okay, the goal, you know, I want to raise happy, healthy, emotionally, adjusted kids. And then you say, and if you could basically reach that goal by magic and just like I could snap my fingers and the result is like you could have a perfectly well adjusted 30 year old, would you do that? So I loved that question and I wanted you I was wondering if you could tell us why you asked that question. Just kind of bring us in that way. Yeah, absolutely. I love it. I think, you know, the really the point of the TED Talk is how it's so natural for us in this culture, especially in western cultures, to be really focused on outcomes, you know, goals and outcomes. But the problem is we don't have a lot of control over that. The part that we get to control is the choice that we make in this moment right now. And, you know, it's essentially like a cliche, it's not about the destination. It's about the journey, but the TED Talk expands that. In a lot of ways because I don't think so for as difficult as parenting is on a day to day or even moment by moment basis. None of us would give our kids away and take them back at 30, even if that meant they were perfect, whatever perfect means. Because we do really get that it's about the moments that we're spending with them that really matter, like even when so many of those are so difficult. Yeah, yeah. I really got that from your TED Talk, and it was like, yes, yes. I mean, you know, my daughters are now 11 and 14..

TED Talk Jill stoddard
"ted talk" Discussed on Welcome To Reinvention

Welcome To Reinvention

05:32 min | 11 months ago

"ted talk" Discussed on Welcome To Reinvention

"I didn't know anyone up there. So I was commuting. So I wanted to see in the city and eventually I just was like, okay, I gotta move this drive is ridiculous. So I moved up there and I was actually feeling pretty lonely, not very satisfied. I just didn't feel like I was on the path that I was meant to be on. I was drinking too much as having trouble concentrating and then one night I went to a movie store. I think I talk about this in my TED Talk, maybe in a more assessing way. And I'm glad we have more time now. But I went to a movie so I documentary like fell off the shelf. I went home with it. I watched it by myself, and it was about the women in Rwanda who had survived the genocide. Wow. It wasn't hotel Rwanda. It wasn't some big need for the screen movie. And it started to break my heart open. I heard their stories. It broke my heart and for the first time I started feeling my own pain of what I had experienced in college. I was studying abroad, and I was attacked and raped in France. And I had to come back to the states. They never found the person, so I still live with that memory and it brought all of that And I think it just shook me awake. It shook me awake. It shook me out of soft pity. It shook me out of feeling alone. And it just it woke me up. I was like, oh my gosh, you know, first of all, I'm not alone, and that's what I would want other women to know like, no matter what you've experienced or they've experienced, we might be unique, but we're not alone almost everyone's had the same experience in some shape or form..

TED Talk Rwanda France
New film 'Dear Even Hansen' is a misfire on just about every level

The Big Picture

02:58 min | 11 months ago

New film 'Dear Even Hansen' is a misfire on just about every level

"Let's talk about youth or at least an attempt at representing youth. I'm talking about the weekend's big release. Dear evan hansen which is in theaters on friday. Who where to begin. Amanda dear oven has what is. Dear of enhancing amanda. It is an adaptation of a tony winning musical which will come back to and it is about a young man named evan hansen. Who is having a very difficult time in high school going through some mental health issues some social anxiety issues and has been encouraged to write himself letters of you know like self belief and pas positive thinking one of these letters falls into the hands of another person and i just i'm gonna say because we need to talk about what this film okay. Another troubled student at the high school who then takes his own life and the parents of the second teen find the letter. That evan hansen has written to himself. They believe their son wrote this last letter to evan hansen before he killed himself and then assume that evan hansen. This tea and with no friends actually had a beautiful friendship with their now deceased child and the main character. Evan hansen goes along with it. And it's like yeah. He was my friend and invents a whole story and friendship and ultimately like a philosophy on how to live and connect with other people that becomes like essentially a hit. Ted talk on the internet and then he become something of a mental health advocate but really just sort of friendship at a community of care for other people a wellness figurehead popular on the internet. And and then things sort of unravel but for the most part no one is held responsible for any of the choices made in in the in the musical and the movie and then people sing songs about discovering themselves and it ends. That is the one part. I want to underline you. You just described the bones of the story very accurately and it's a musical. This story is a musical and so of course. The character is break into song as the story unfolds. I thought this was very troubling movie. A movie that really did not work for a variety of reasons. I think neither you. Nor i saw the show on broadway and so we don't really have a relationship to the show. It was a big hit and of course it. Was tony winning. But it is. Unnerving film is unnerving in a in a variety of

Evan Hansen Amanda TED Tony
Understanding the Mind and Emotions by Investigating Brain Circuits

WNYC Programming

02:07 min | 1 year ago

Understanding the Mind and Emotions by Investigating Brain Circuits

"Research program is designed to understand the mind by investigating brain circuits. Specifically, how does our brain give rise to emotion? It's really hard to study feelings and emotions because you can't measure them. Behavior is still the best and only window into the emotional experience of another. For both animals and people. Yes Self report is a behavioral output. Motivated behaviors fall into two general classes seeking pleasure and avoiding pain. The ability to approach things that are good for you and avoid things that are bad for you is fundamental to survival and in our modern day society, trouble telling the difference can be labeled as a mental illness. If I was having car trouble, and I took my car to the mechanic, first thing they do is look under the hood. But with mental health research, you can't just pop over the hood with the press of a button. So this is why we do experiments on animals specifically in my lab mice to understand the brain. Well, we need to study brains. Okay, So how does she do this? And where does she do that? She has a lab. So she is working out in California, using a technique called up dough Genetics. So in every Ted talk, I like there to be a cab vocabulary word you will be tested on this later. That will be the vocabulary. The word here, so algae have this light sensing Jean right? The gene tells them when to migrate up and down in the oceans. Remember the oceans? I do so the light hits it and the algae knows, so let's go get more lights. You can put this gene into other cells, and one of the cells that they put it in is neurons. Those are the core cells of your brain. So when you shine a light on the neuron it either turns on or off and by controlling the neuron, you can then control the mind.

TED California
How dirt bikes and STEM ignite ingenuity in Baltimore | Brittany Young [TEST]

TED Talks Daily

08:10 min | 1 year ago

How dirt bikes and STEM ignite ingenuity in Baltimore | Brittany Young [TEST]

"Hi it's bryce dallas howard guest hosting today on ted talks daily. Here's a talk from an incredible ted fellow and the stem educator brittany young a community leader tackling national issues by turning passions into opportunities for stem education and career development. Hey ted talks daily listeners. I'm adam grant. I hosted another podcast. From the ted audio collective called work life and it's about the science of making work not suck next time the number of protests targeting firms. Today it's on the order of sixty times. The numbers that you would see and early tens employees activism is on the rise. But how can we use our voices effectively. And how can leaders manage all those voices find. Work life on apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you listen. I show people all around. Dc antiquites my guests engaged. I liked sprinkle in a fun factor to net. Stop dupont circle. Also here's a lifestyle tip for you. Try apple pay. You can now just tap with your phone or watch to get on the bus or train all over the dc area at your smart trip to the apple wallet then just have to ride apple. Pay on iphone now. Arriving on metro. Support for ted talks daily comes from odu odors suite of business. Apps has been you need to run a company. Think of your smartphone with all your apps right at your fingertips odu is just like that for business but instead of an app to order takeout or tell you the weather you have sales inventory accounting and more union the department we've got it covered and they're all connected joined the six million users who stopped wasting time and started getting stuff done go to odu dot com slash ted to start a free trial. That's od co dot com slash. Ted i want you to take this journey with me. Let's set the stage. Is a sunday in baltimore in a park. We endure a hill watching dirt bike. Riders go pash do tricks. Willies do stunts zipping. He hit the engines revving. Smell the gasoline. You could see the join excitement. Netface someone's probably learning how to fix the dirt bike way too expensive to buy. Then they can go to school. They can get a pop quiz or a test teacher. You'll account we all heard. And we've all hated train as leaving new york to cleveland. But they're here in baltimore. How does this relate. They don't get it. They fail the test and now they can hate then now. World can turned upside down. They can get on facebook instagram. Get a call or text. They can watch as their friend can become a hashtag. A kid in the wrong place wrong time lost to the streets loss of the system lost a gun violence or kick that could be arrested for dirt bike. Because of my city it can be a misdemeanor. Possession of dirk like this can be elected story for black kids across the country. And he's like miami. Cleveland atlanta philly. Whatever please had the dirt bike task force now. Acts yourself if the thing you used to relieve your stress if it was demonized would you still do it if it was criminal us. The answer is yes. That's the reality black people across the us right now. They've watched as we made room in. Cities escape borders bicycles in any other sport. They can watch tv in seattle games olympics on. Espn the style and stain ad campaigns and films but in baltimore would they have looked forward to would do. Right is get from all of it. No space no outlet just typical narrative. Like i said this is a communist story. I was a kid in the park. I wanted to be just like the big crowd is but i hate the fall. Instead i became like bill nye the science guy i was doing all kinds of experiments blown out burrows off glowing people to the chair and i may or may not have made stink bombs at school. They would describe me as a bad kid. Where they didn't see was all my jeans. My talent my voice was not hurt. Then i became that black girl from west baltimore working stem my first position. I was confused for the secretary was pissed but liquefying soon get more people in industry and it's one eight hundred. That's what i start doing. Working small groups for kids students teach them some activities then and twenty fourteen. I lost my little brother to the prison system. In twenty fifteen. I lost all faith. In system period. The world watched following a freddie gray uprising as possible burn. I wondered people go and listen. Where would it solutions. And where was investment into my community and twenty sixteen. I broke the system and became the founder and ceo of beat through sixty carbonell. I went back to my experience in park. I thought about the kids bikes those scales. People use to pay the bills just like mechanics mechanical news. We lane in system s sights the sign's behind popping best willie playing in dirt bike. It's home o'clock is busy quesion technology. The technology needed to get the best radio tires. So you don't have the channel asphalt engineering. The engineers needed to fix peg dirt bike. But the also get the best mac mac. 'em mathematics the math needed for the guests to oriole ratio. So you dirt. Bike does not explode then also gonna step further. I thought about the rights new only way to have programming solutions was ahead of them at because the people closest to the problem onto solution i thought about. Mike says he was six. He's rendered by geez when he seventeen graduating high school. He didn't know what you wanted to do but he knew he loved everything about their bikes and started working with us and beat through sixty. He's helped us. Educate kids trained by gratis and x twenty one. He's our lead instructor. He's created mates showed them across the country and he really represents the best to be three sixty at the corvallis. Work is constantly thinking about what people like. Like one for mike. He was a space. Basically work of students on our curriculum space. Keep training more. Riders and growing a skill sets a space where he no longer has skating but he has something his own city for him with your support and it's of more cities we can make this reality since two thousand seventeen. We've saved the city of baltimore about two hundred thirty three million dollars by dorm programming over seven thousand students. We saved the city of baltimore. One million dollars by growing workforce opportunities for people. Just like mike. That's less people that could possibly go to jail. Less money spent on dollars and cents of incarceration and more money going and saw black communities our leaders our culture and our voices. We don't need to black squares. We don't need your campaigns but will we do need as your dollars and cents behind us to make roach. We need more people like you and cities to believe in invest in our model of growing the people. What will you choose to be an ally being impact be the revolution be three sixty. Thank you hello there. I'm chris anderson. The guy lucky enough to run. Ted now has a podcast called the ted interview and this week on the show. I took someone really special name me. The woman married to jacqueline nova 'grats. She's been that he is learning how to use the tools of business to tackle global poverty got drawn into capitalism raised to the rank of religion. And now we have an opportunity to have a very different conversation. Find the ted interview. Wherever you listen to podcasts.

TED Apple Brittany Young Adam Grant Baltimore Pash Netface Bryce Dallas Howard Bill Nye West Baltimore Cleveland Carbonell Espn Olympics Miami Atlanta Seattle Facebook
The death of the universe -- and what it means for life | Katie Mack [TEST]

TED Talks Daily

07:39 min | 1 year ago

The death of the universe -- and what it means for life | Katie Mack [TEST]

"Hi neil degrasse. Tyson here guest hosting today on ted talks daily. Here's a talk from a ted fellow and fellow. Astrophysicist katie mac. She's a thought leader. Who's trying to make sense out of the complicated and theoretical issues related to the future of the universe. Wait wait actually. Her specialty is the end of the universe. That's where she's coming from or at least that's where she's going or that's where she's going to take us. Check it out. hello then. i'm chris hansen. The guy lucky enough to run ted now host a podcast called the ted interview and this on the show. I talked to someone really special name. The woman i'm married to jacqueline nova grads. She's been thirty years. Learning how to use the tools of business to tackle global poverty. We got drawn into capitalism raised to the rank of religion. And now we have an opportunity to have a very different conversation. Find the tudent. Few wherever you listen to costs. I showed people all around dc antiquites. My guests engaged. I liked his sprinkle in a fun. Factor to next off dupont circle. Also here's a lifestyle tip for you. Try apple pay. You can now just tap with your phone or watch to get on the bus or train all over the dc area at your smart trip to the apple wallet than just tap to ride apple. Pay on iphone now. Arriving on metro. Support for ted talks. Daily comes from odu dues suite of business. Apps has everything you need to run a company. Think of your smartphone with all your apps right at your fingertips odu is just like that for business but instead of an app to order takeout or tell you the weather you have sales inventory accounting and more union the department we've got it covered and they're all connected joined the six million users who stopped wasting time and started getting stuff done go to odu dot com slash ted to start a free trial that's od show dot com slash ted. I the universe. The vastness the mystery the astonishing beauty of the stars. I love everything about it. And i devoted my life to studying it from adam's two galaxies from beginning to end but lately i've gotten stuck on that last bit the fact that the universe is dying. I know this may come as a shock. I mean it's the universe it's everything it's supposed to be eternal right but it isn't. We know the universe had a beginning and everything that begins and the start of the story is familiar one. In the beginning there was light. We know that because we can see it. Directly the cosmos today is filled with low energy background radiation leftover from a time when the whole universe was an all encompassing inferno in its first three hundred and eighty thousand years space or dark. it was thick. With a churning humming plasma it was hot and dense it was loud but it was also expanding over time the fire dissipated and space cooled clouds of gas pulled together by their own gravity form stars and galaxies and planets and us and one day astronomers using a microwave receiver detected a bit of static coming from every direction the sky the leftover radiation from that promote. He'll fire we can know map out the cosmos to the farthest reaches of the observable universe. We can see distant galaxies whose light has taken billions of years to reach us so by looking at them. We're looking deep into the past. We can watch how the expansion of the universe has slowed down since that hot early phase. Thirteen point eight billion years ago we can see collisions of entire galaxies. And watch the star formation the result from the sudden conflagration of all that cosmic hydrogen and we can see that these collisions are happening. Less and less. The expansion of the universe isn't slowing down anymore. A few billion years ago. It started speeding up. Distant galaxies are getting farther apart faster and faster star formation has slowed in fact we can calculate exactly how much and when we do we find something shocking of all the stars that have ever been born or that ever will be around ninety percent have already come into being from now until the end of time the universes were he'll just that last ten percent the end of the universe is coming. There are few ways that could happen but the most likely is called the heat death and in agonizing slow languishing of the cosmos stars. Burn out leaves smoldering ash. Galaxies become increasingly isolated in their own dimples of light particles decay even black holes evaporate into the void. Of course we still have some time. The heat is so far in the future. We hardly have words to describe it long. Past a billion years when the sun expands and boils off the oceans of the earth long past one hundred billion years we lose the ability to see distant galaxies and that faint trace of big bang light long after we are left alone in the darkness watching the milky way. Fade it's okay to be sad about it even if it is trillions of years in the future. No one wants to think about something. They love coming to an end as disconnected as it may be us here now. It is somehow more profound than personal death. We have strategies for accepting the ability of that. After all we tell ourselves something of us will live on. Maybe it will be our great works. Maybe it will be our children carrying on our genetic material or perhaps our basic outlook on life. Maybe it will be some idea worth spreading humanity might venture out into the stars and evolve and change but something of us will survive but the universe ends at some point. We have no legacy. There will come a time when in a very real sense our existence will not have mattered. The slate will be wiped clean completely. Why should we spend our lives seeking answers to the ultimate question of reality. If eventually there will be no one left to tell. Why build a sandcastle when you can see that the tide is coming in. I've asked a dozen other cosmologists. And they all had different answers to some. The death of the cosmos seems right. It's freeing to know that we are temporary. I very much like our glibness one told me to others. The question itself motivates the search for some alternative theory. There must be some way to carry on the slow fade to black. Just cannot be our story ends. One found comfort in the possibility of the multi vers. It's not all about us. He said personally. I feel lucky our cosmos existed for billions of years before us and it will carry on long after. We are gone

TED Neil Degrasse Katie Mac Jacqueline Nova Apple Chris Hansen ODU Tyson Adam
Microsoft Pledges to Be Carbon Negative by 2030

Planet Money

02:01 min | 1 year ago

Microsoft Pledges to Be Carbon Negative by 2030

"The ceo of microsoft gone on onstage at microsoft headquarters. Please welcome saatchi. now della. He walks on and stands facing the crowd behind on. There's this wall covered with these healthy looking green leaves. Thank you so very much. It's fantastic to be here today. It kind of looks like a ted talk crossed with the product announcement. That's corporations it up opposite. Actions must be aligned to helping solve the world's problems not create new ones and then he gets to microsoft's new pledge to fight climate change today. You're making the commitment that by twenty thirty microsoft will be carbon negative carbon negative. What does that even mean. Microsoft has offices around the world that use lots of electricity they have fleets of cars and trucks. Data centers. That use diesel. All of those things mean carbon emissions but somehow the ceo of microsoft is saying his company's going to eliminate all those carbon emissions even better reverse them their plan. The answer in part has to do with what's displayed on the screen above him images of giant pristine forests forests trees. These are not just nice. Nature images trees are gonna solve some serious climate accounting problems for microsoft. This is the decade to take bold steps forward to address a most pressing challenges. Thank you one. Fifth of the world's largest companies have made pledges this one to reduce their carbon footprint. Two zero or beyond. They've done the math and decided that they can do this. In part by paying someone across the world to save trees. Which really is that really. We're gonna do this.

Microsoft Saatchi Della
"ted talk" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"ted talk" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Does make you different, though I would, I would say is that you were very good at articulating a lot of things that people might feel. But I just don't know how to possibly put into words. And I think at this point, I'd love to play a clip of your Ted talk. If that's okay, I'll listen to it. I'll cringe at the sound of my own voice, like any human would. Grief is kind of one of those things like falling in love or having a baby or watching the wire on HBO, where You don't get it until you get it until you do it. And once you do it once it's your love or your baby. Once it's your grief and your front row at the funeral. You get it? You understand what you're experiencing is not a moment in time. It's not a bone that will reset but that you've been touched by something chronic. Something incurable. It's not fatal that sometimes grief feels like it could be. And if we can't prevent it in one another What can we do? What can we do other than try to remind one another. That some things can't be fixed. Not all wounds are meant to heal. We need each other. To remember to help each other. Remember the grief is this multi tasking emotion that you can and will be sad and happy. You'll be grieving and able to love in the same year or week, the same breath..

HBO Ted talk one
Why good ideas get trapped in the valley of death -- and how to rescue them |  TED-Ed - TEST

TED Talks Daily

06:42 min | 1 year ago

Why good ideas get trapped in the valley of death -- and how to rescue them | TED-Ed - TEST

"It's ted talks daily. I'm elise hugh. Birthday is thursday april twenty seconds so we thought it would be a great time to share another lesson from our friends at ted. Ed this is part of a video series designed to cut through the complexity around climate change and explain the science in a clear way. It's all inspired by bill. Gates's new book how to avoid a climate disaster. This lesson is about how a lot of the smartest solutions to reduce. Carbon pollution actually already exist and how they're getting stuck in the valley death. How can we get them out of this trap. You can watch all seven lessons for free at ed dot ted dot com slash plan for zero. That's plan f. o. R. zero wants a gourd. Ted talks daily is brought to you by lulu lemon. I am a longtime runner and my attitude about workout clothing is i don't want to have to think about it at all. And that's why. I run in lululemon these days. I work out a lot alone. But i prefer doing it with friends. I have such great memories of really bonding with whoever. I'm running with my friends. They trust lululemon to my running buddy rob whereas the men's lululemon running shirt that comes in short sleeve or long and he says it's so light so dry so breathable. You'll never run in another shirt again. You can get your own shop. The fast and free shirt at lululemon dot com support for ted talks daily comes from odu odors suite of business. Apps has everything you need to run a company. Think of your smartphone with all your apps right at your fingertips odu is just like that for business but instead of an app to order takeout or tell you the weather you have sales inventory accounting and more union the department we've got it covered and they're all connected joined the six million users who stopped wasting time and started getting stuff done go to odu dot com slash ted to start a free trial that's od odio dot com slash ted. They've passed every test cleared every huddled jumped through every hoop now. All that remains is to unleash them on the wait. What's yes there's one more challenge. They must now cross the valley of death. All new products must pass through here before they reach the market. Many never make it out and sometimes that's okay if they don't work don't feel a need all for any number of other reasons but inventions. That could help address massive global issues. Also face this risk that's because technology's potential isn't the only factor that determines whether it will succeed. The valley of death is especially risky for innovations involving complex physical objects as opposed to software and for those in highly regulated industries like medicine building materials and transportation regulations and other obstacles aren't inherently bad. They're often designed to keep people safe but they do tend to scare off investors and that's what traps good ideas in the valley of gaffe that funding dries up before they can become profitable one of the fields where this problem is most pressing. Today is zero carbon technologies that is central to our future because they will help us eliminate greenhouse gas emissions and stabilize our climate but they also have features that make them particularly vulnerable in the valley of death. Let's look why that is and how we can change it. All new technologies must go through a development fans before they can become profitable for zero carbon technologies. The costs of this phase are high. The time lines are long and in spite of the good they can do. Demand is often low because they can require big changes in both infrastructure and consumer behavior for example electric heat pumps don't burn fossil fuels and when you factor in savings on energy use off cost competitive with gas furnaces but only change that heating and cooling systems every few decades direct air capture technologies meanwhile remove co two directly from the atmosphere. We need these technologies to reach our emission goals and several of them have already been proven to work but they're at risk of getting trapped in the valley of death because they're expensive. This creates a vicious cycle because the best way to know a costs is by well practicing making more of a product and refining it but high initial costs scare off investors and without their money companies can't continue to develop that technologies and can't ultimately decrease cost. Fortunately there's a way to break this cycle. Governments can help the gap when private investors won't fund technologies with such a high potential for social benefit. This isn't just theoretical. In the one thousand nine hundred ninety s functioning solar panels existed but one widely adopted because of that cost to change this. Germany offered government loans to companies creating soda piles and legally obligated utility companies to buy electricity produced using renewable energy the us and china followed suit by financing major solar panel projects. The cost of solar has dropped almost ninety percent since two thousand nine making it much easier to adopt a similar thing happened for wind energy. During the oil crisis of the nineteen seventies denmark invested in wind power and started taxing winds fossil fuel based competitors other countries took similar steps and as more wind power was generated worldwide. The costs of this technology dropped dramatically. These success stories tell us that government initiatives walk initiatives like boosting spending on research and development offering tax and loan incentives to stops that want to develop zero carbon technologies and consumers who want to buy them and putting a price on carbon emissions. We need governments to do what they did. For solar and wind for many more innovations at the end of the day ideas and inventions alone can't solve our most daunting problems. Policies and markets have to be shaped so the most promising

Elise Hugh R. Zero Lulu Lemon TED Gates ROB Bill Germany Denmark China United States
Julie Lythcott-Haims on Her Book 'How To Be an Adult'

Ask Lisa: The Psychology of Parenting?

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Julie Lythcott-Haims on Her Book 'How To Be an Adult'

"Julius cut hames is joining us today. She's a new york times bestselling author of how to raise an adult which led to her. Ted talk now. Viewed more than five million times or second book is an award-winning prose. Poetry memoir real american. It illustrates her experience as a black biracial person in white spaces but her latest book out. Just this week is called your turn how to be an adult. She was also in a previous life. A corporate lawyer and at stanford the dna freshman. Hey julie welcome thank you so much. It's great to be with you. We are thrilled to have you with us so actually. Let's talk for a minute about your new book. What a great topic tell us about. This book is a response to the pleas. Coming out of the millennial generation. I don't know how to adult. I don't want to adult. I'm scared to adult. I have been rooting. For this batch. Of young folks to make their way confidently down the path of their choosing for a long long time. And this book is me. Trying to simulate what it's like to be in a safe cozy conversational space with a trusted person who's just older a little bit farther down the path of life than you so it's a compassionate to generation of young folks who. I'm who. i'm totally rooting. For and who. You've worked very closely with you know in stanford and you know this population well and you're also a mom. Rachel i am. I have a twenty one year old son and a nineteen year old daughter. Very much in the throes of to hashtag adult. I'm just so. We say the title. Because i love the title is your turn how to be an adult. That's right. I mean it's it's crafted. I suppose by the publishing folks as a sequel. The first book was how to raise an adult on the harm of helicopter. Parenting on the impact on children of an overall parenting style. This isn't some ways at back to that if you will. It's four young people. You're turn how to be an adult.

Julius Cut Hames Stanford New York Times TED Julie Rachel
Going After What You Want in Life Without Shame

The Self-Leadership Club Podcast with Jess Wagner

06:55 min | 1 year ago

Going After What You Want in Life Without Shame

"I feel like what we have to do here. I is talk a little bit about shame. So a lot of what i've learned about. Shame comes from bernie brown which is probably no surprise. So i feel like. I need to shout out here at the top of the episode because she researches shame like that's been her main life's work and of course she's written a lot of books about it and ted talks about it and all that stuff. But she's like the foremost researcher chaim. And so this is where i've learned a lot about. What is what it means and what we can take away from ant so her work has informed a lot of thoughts and reflections here. So let's turn to brennan for a comprehensive definition of shame. So this is what she says. I defined shame as the intensely painful feeling or experience of believing that we are flawed and therefore unworthy of love and belonging. Something we've experienced done or failed to do makes us unworthy of connection. I don't believe shame as helpful or productive. In fact i think shame is much more likely to be the source of destructive hurtful behavior than the solution or the cure i think the fear of disconnection can make dangerous another interesting quote from brennan. Shame corrodes the very part of us. That believes we are capable of change. The reason this particular hind stuck out to me so much is because if we don't believe we can change. We're not going to go after what we want right. That's if our belief in our mind is that. I'm not capable of change or i'm not worthy of change than we never take that step forward to actually go after what we want in life and part of living unapologetically as this line says that we're talking about today. Unapologetic is going after what you want in life and so when we believe that we will accept where we are without question because we don't think we're worth whatever comes on the other of change for us. We believe that what we have is. Maybe even what we deserve. It also makes me think of that quote from one of my favorite books of all time the perks of being a wallflower. That book has meant so much to me and my life and there's a quote from the book that when i read it as a teenager it certainly meant something to me then but it does not even come close to the understanding. I have of this quote now in my life and that cool is we accept the love. We think we deserve and as a teenager. I was like okay. Yeah like i get it. I'm like kind of a surface level. But now i've had a lot more experience both with accepting love from other people and for accepting love for myself and i have found that to be so incredibly true. We accept the love. We think we deserve. We accept a lot in a lot of ways. We accept the life. We think we deserve right. And i don't wanna like gloss over privilege and access and and having money like the things that that can do for us in the world's because there is certainly certainly for a lot of us relations. Why maybe the exact life we want. It's not just because we we don't think we deserve it right. There's a lot more to it. The not but i think it is hopeful lens to look at some of this stuff through like i simply accepting what i think i deserve here. Do i think the. I deserve less in this situation and so i have found it very enlightening to look at in this in this area of like accepting a life that i think are or am i accepting lake the call for something bigger or something different and so matching like my sense of worth my sense of deserving ness to what i want so yeah but yet we were talking about shame. I got off her but i do. Think that year quote from brunei. About like shame corroding the part of us. That believes we're capable of change I think that's really important to look out along with her definition so now that we've established like what we're talking about when we say shame. Let's think about the first part of the cement going after what you want in life. So let's give this some context. Okay i have had conversations with people where i will ask them what they truly want in their lives and they can't answer me and by the way that's not because they don't want anything bites. I believe it's because they have learned that the are allowed to want things or that they're not worthy of wanting things that they should just accept things the way they are because what they want is impossible for them and again. This is not something. That's like a super conscious thoughts on the surface. It's not like i asked the question. What do you actually want in life. And they're like While what i want is impossible Because they don't believe him worthy of it right not the actual thoughts going through. Someone's had but it's kind of these underlying beliefs that we have about ourselves Sue ya and and it's really interesting. Because i think on the surface to a lot of us think i know what i want. I totally know what i want like. I just wanna be happy or ida. Slake wanna i don't move to a bigger house or like i just want to be out of debt right but like my question is what are you truly. Want in your life lake. Where do you truly see yourself and what. How does that correspond to like the values that you have your core values right and that's when the conversation gets gets more interesting because it's kind of off of that surface level and more into like the depths of lake. How do you actually want to live. And that question can be challenging to

Bernie Brown Brennan TED Brunei Sue Ya
The Content Glut With Adam Lederer

Champagne Sharks

05:13 min | 1 year ago

The Content Glut With Adam Lederer

"Hey how's it going champion sharks With us against adam lederer. I pronounced your name correctly on his a a great Quick question is it like a french name or not no. I think it wasn't french company. Visited but i'm just from like standard eastern european jewish sucked so any that like smelly soups. That's run from okay. Okay cool cool. So yeah if you don't mind telling the people who you are and where to confined you ran on what you do. Yeah so i am a writer and a producer and pearly ready for a show on netflix. Do animated show. That should come out and the day it goes up but will come out at some point in the future and You can find me at my name. Add with an underscore at the end of it out on twitter. And i think it's just an clubhouse nuts where at t and i met i don't know i can t either one you know i'm fine. I'm just that's that's okay Funny you weren't a few people who actually does Productive rooms on in constructive rooms on clubhouse. I make you've been there longer than the signal to noise. Ratio is pretty awful on there now like it wasn't that rare to find a constructive room when i first got on clubhouse so it wasn't that hard to Make your acquaintance. Plus we both know our gabriella. Who's a a friend of the show and that's how we met but nowadays it's the signals noise ratio is is awful but it's There's discussions on there. I feel like. I'm down on a lot and i wanna make people think you know. It's the total hellhole. But no it's not. There's still a lot of good discussion on there and stuff. But there's a of ilan though like i was gonna say i wonder like why did you get on it. Like what airline. What now late november. I sort of wonder this is like the natural progression social media in real time which is like sort of a curve where breaking mortgage zafy relate the online barkley. He will find it business coaches and so we just sort of hit that exact moment like it's weird seeing were now like this sort of late stage tech two point now where we we know how these social media companies actually function so. I think you're right. There definitely are still interesting people. But i wonder if like either one of the later than did it would just be immediately sort of disenchanted with a you know. Kinda weird is that i finished. The life cycle of what's happening with clubhouses very predictable. Every social media app has a saturation point. But this is the fastest. I ever seen it like. I feel like. I saw years worth decline in two months like like twitter. Had a good like two years of being pretty fun before you realize okay. This is getting kind of toxic. And i mean it's a slightly different crowd. I think ruined twitter. I feel that it's the it's the league in my blind right. Yeah exactly someone lengthen meets. I forgot how somebody put it but someone put it really well. The worst parts of twitter meets the worst parts of lincoln. was a brit. Great way to put it and then there was a third ingredient. It'll it'll come it'll come to me. It was one of those like conferences. Gallows or one of those things. Bigly remember something along those life. Ted talks this differently. This definitely. a big Ted talks ted talks by by two. It there's definitely a big tech. Ted talks vibe to it The worst parts of twitter part. I think is coming because a lot of the a lot of the Social justice types now have have kind of discovered it kind discovered it as well which doesn't which doesn't help because they're having a lot of triggering and trauma and violence conversations on there and kind of Bullying people and everything in. That part's kind of kind of nasty too. But you still have. Good rooms in there You had recently. Oh i appreciate that. 'cause i was worried even a good rooms we start getting overrun by the bad people but i think yours are so smart that they just naturally filter pop into your room. Sometimes that people are. I know trolley and then this kind of leave stink. There's nothing pretty distinct. Two teeth in to as far as drama like very drama. Free smart rooms. Yeah not very messy. I guess also. I think part of it is like you were talking about the like sort of matter. Rooms pop up direct comments on other rooms here. And i feel like it's almost like this falls red pill blue pill thing that happens. You don't actually have to gauge. That stuff is just like people think that there's this binary choice if you don't sort of like the red meat or you don't name room something that is like specifically supposed to be provocative it generally doesn't attract those people anyway and as like you know the one thing i says going forward is opposed to twitter is like i think audio Voice sort of lends a certain level of nuance. And you can. You can have opinion taken. You information that change your opinion of all the real time with taxes life. It's almost like tattoos on the internet. And you don't have the ability. You have to trickle down because you can't admit defeat in that same way.

Adam Lederer Twitter Zafy TED Gabriella Netflix Bigly Barkley Lincoln
Interview With Former Air Force Officer, And Motivational Speaker Toolika Rani

A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

05:59 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Former Air Force Officer, And Motivational Speaker Toolika Rani

"Hello and welcome to another edition of a dc woman. Podcast i am your host sonia ago play and today in honor of international women's day. We are so excited to welcome. Retired indian. Air force officer mountaineer motivational speaker research. Scholar and travel writer to ronnie deluca is the first woman from uttar pradesh india to climb mount everest and the first indian woman to climb the highest volcano of asia. Known as mount. Dama avant in san to look i served in the indian air force for a decade and was squadron leader an outdoor training instructor in the prestigious indian air force academy in hyderabad india and she was even involved. The physical training of hundreds of feature officers including india's first three women fighter pilots with twenty three mountaineering expeditions and tracks in india nepal bhutan iran africa and russia under her belt. To look at is now working on her. Phd continuing to train for future tracks and she serves as a motivational speaker which includes a hugely popular. Ted talk and she has been featured widely in mainstream media india and south asia. She is a staunch advocate of women's rights and human rights. Globally juelich out. Welcome to the show. Is sonia thank you for having made you to look i. I wanna say that the messages you received from your family and especially your mother growing up or such a tremendous example of female empowerment and a genuine belief in human spirit. You were taught that you only have this life to pursue your dreams and goals and that nothing can get in your way so long as your mind believes it you can achieve it while if every young girl or woman receive this message growing up. What could be accomplished on planet earth. So really really impressed by that. And you've talked a lot about your spiritual beliefs and faith. And i wanna ask you. What is going to remind as you ascend a mountain. do you go into a meditative state. Will you rely on your deep spiritual beliefs and constantly have to retain mindfulness in assessing the physical challenges. Along the way i would imagine. There's a variety of protocols and situational awareness. That is needed. But i'd really like her more from you on that. Because in my estimation this mindset is what separates those who make it to the top and those who unfortunately do not on different stages of climbing i have a different kind of a mindset. I would say that. If i fain like there there might be avalanche. There might be a route wash. That might be bad weather. Something which has detained my plans to climb a mountain. I get into a buddy confrontational mode. Because i am. I'm trained as a soldier. And i had to fight my adversity so at times i started seeing the mountain. Asthma adversity. it happened to me on mount everest. I had to in my second attempt. Also i had to turn back from three thousand feet twice before i made my tent and succeeded so in those two attempts i started challenging everest. That either you can give me death or injury you can go ahead and give me that and i will keep on doing what i'm capable of doing. So sometimes i get into that kind of confrontational mode. Where i see that. Yes the mountain in front of me. Is the obstacle that i have to overcome he. It is an enemy. And i have to fight it with all my might that i have sometimes from vivid me. There are certain sentences accord or something but have support him that just springs up bent. The conditions are really tough. I'm climbing exhausted and the going gets very very tough. I have seen these flashes. Coming from within a volume by Kipling everybody had about displaying very famous swim. If so there was this lions from this point if that some everything is finished and nothing is left to new that still a wasting your head which says hold on so at one time this would hold on just a up in my mind and i just continued. I just held on and kept my foot one foot after another in front official. So that is how it happens sometimes. It is ready spinach with because london's are so beautiful. I get into that meditative state also but i contemplate the nature of life seeing a mountain see a mountain the stance alone so anybody who is strong mighty and wants to rise high. Perhaps in life would be like that alone solitary having his own battles and also facing all kinds of storms videos rain gold snowfall everything but still standing very tall and after that i absolve that seed they also the cloud at times at times it is just sunny so this is how life also is on. Mountain's what i love the most about is that i don't have that usual crowd around me.

India Ronnie Deluca Climb Mount Everest Dama Avant Indian Air Force Academy Sonia Indian Air Force Uttar Pradesh Hyderabad Bhutan Air Force South Asia Nepal Asia TED Iran Russia Fain SAN
Is Multitasking Killing Your Business?

The $100 MBA Show

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Is Multitasking Killing Your Business?

"A few years ago in my software company. Women are ninja. I started to realize that many of our team members were really scattered. They were getting things done efficiently. Have the meeting after meeting. And every time we met their to do list would get longer and longer and the things. They said they would get done by. The next meeting was not done yet. We're moving at a snail's pace in every department. And i started to realize that i'm just giving my team very unstructured work. I'm just giving all a bunch of tasks a bunch of goals to hit. And i'm saying go at it and what's happening. Is that when you do this with your team. They can't help but feel the urge to work on multiple things at a time. Now you might be seeing what's wrong with that. What's wrong with working on many things at one time. I do this all the time. Well it's not the most efficient way to work and this has been proven time and time again. You can do a ton of research on this online. But i've done my own research. You can check it out. you cal. Newport's work his book deep work as a masterpiece. His ted talk is also worth watching. But let's take an example. Let's say you give your marketing department or your marketing person. Three things to do on to run facebook ads. A want you to also run an affiliate contests and i want you to redo all our email automations for email marketing when you tell somebody to do all three things and give them no structure. What happens is that they do something from each task every single day because they feel overwhelmed they want to do everything and they want to show you progress in each of those tasks now on its surface you might be like. Oh what's wrong with that. Well the problem is that you're wasting a lot of time when you're switching from one task to the next this is called context switching and it's very very costly if you're wearing on one thing and then you switch over to another it takes you some time to readjust your brain to get into the groove of this new task to get into the zone. Being in the zone and working on a project is high high value time. You don't wanna take that away from somebody in fact you want to keep them in the zone for as long as possible but when people are working on multiple things at one time they get in the zone they get disrupted. They have to get into the zone of the next task. That's a little bit of time. And then they could disrupt it again and they have to get into the phone again and not only is this taking a lotta time. But it's very draining. Drains your energy. So what happens is that they come to the next meeting. And they're like this is my progress and is actually very little progress for each of the three tasks they feel like they worked so hard but they really didn't make much progress. The problem with this is that they never get any momentum. Now compare this to if you do focus work. And you don't multitask instead of telling your marketing person. I want you to do three things. You say listen. There are three things we want accomplish. The first thing we're going to accomplish this is the only thing you're going to focus on and you're going to get it done by the end of the week and that's running a facebook ads campaign. This is all you gotta focus on. This is the goal. This is the criteria. This is the outcome. We're looking for what happens. Is that they just stay in the zone that task day in and day out until they complete it. They come back the next week. Say hey finish that task. It's done here the results already. They're working on a different different level. They have momentum. They have a win. They completed something and then they can shut the brain off from that task and work on the next task. You're going to give them. This needs to be done in every department with every kind of work you do in your business. This is up to you as a leader to build this into your culture. And i realized this of years ago and it really allowed me to be a lot more efficient with my team. Sometimes you're gonna have to remind team not to jump around even when you give them you know prescribed instructions. I do this with our engineers. I have a daily stand up with engineers every single day. We we meet for fifteen minutes. We talk about what they're going to work on today. Actually i talk about where they worked on yesterday and then whether going to work on today and then we really get laser focused. This is all you need to worry about today. This is the focus for today. This is the goal. This is the win why that way when they come to the meeting tomorrow when they come to the standup they feel proud. This is what i worked on yesterday at. Got it done. We gotta win. we can mark it off. I love showing numbers of show the progress. Okay now. We work on the next task. Multitasking dozen allow momentum multitasking. Doesn't allow you to get wins and give them motivation to keep going. It holds you back it. Hold your team all back so you wanna make sure you stay away from it at all costs

Facebook Newport
The Truth About Needle Fear with Amy Baxter, Founder & CEO at Pain Care Labs

Outcomes Rocket

04:41 min | 1 year ago

The Truth About Needle Fear with Amy Baxter, Founder & CEO at Pain Care Labs

"Hey everybody saw marquez's here and welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Today i have the privilege of hosting dr. Amy baxter once again. If you haven't heard our podcast interviews with her one of my favorite guests that we've had on the show episode four twenty six or. She talks about the work that she's doing with her company biber cooled. The product is phenomenal buzzy. Another one episode for twenty six and also at the soda. Five twenty where she goes deep on covid nineteen and some of the things that we should be thinking about just a ton of really good content. Check those out if you haven't already. But she founded paintcare labs in two thousand six to eliminate unnecessary pain. She invented fiber cool. Vibrational cryotherapy for tendonitis and to decrease opioid use and her buzzy device as blocked needle pain for over thirty five million procedures. This is key and what we're going to talk about today around. Kovic vaccination after yale and emory medical school trained in pediatrics. Child abuse and emergency pediatrics. Federally funded for needle. Pain and fear opioid use and neuro modulation research. She publishes and lectures on needles. A needle fear sedation and pain. Scientific contributions include hypnotic enzyme algorithm to time child abuse creating and validating the barf nausea scale for kids with cancer identifying the cause of the needle phobia increase amd buzzy and cool. She spoken on ted man. She's done ted talks bottom line. She's phenomenal and we're gonna talk about some really great things today around cove nineteen needle fear and a lot of her research that he's actually doing and has done and is helping our nation with day with The vaccination so amy welcome back thaw and i feel so. Adhd listening to that list. Well you got a lot on your plate you. You're certainly always keep things interesting. And i appreciate you for that and the listeners. Appreciate you for that so talk to us a little bit about what you've got going on a you know we. We sort of got reconnected. With this topic of neil fear. So why don't you introduce your work. There and the relevance today sarah sure will you know for anybody who's here before the story thus far was that i invented a device that used mechanical vibration to block needle pain got a grant for it found founded. It also decreased other pain. Kinda did some work with needle. Fear needle pain and founded. Americans really didn't care that much. So that's why did the ted talks. That's why did the techs is to raise awareness of the fact that the way we are vaccinated kids causes adults to stay afraid of needles. But because i've got this company in this product i moved on to vibrate wall opioid stuff and all of a sudden needle. Pain is relevant again. Yeah well it is and It's a big deal today because we've got to vaccines available as of now. We've got one more coming with jay and more and more people are getting the vaccine. Many are not and so talk to us a little bit about your research love to hear more about it and how it is impacting people's willingness to get vaccinated sure. Well the go thing is that. I've actually been asked to testify or the art celts. New and services on needle. Fear and needle pain. It had never been an issue before enter. Probably wouldn't have been an issue if the strains of covid nineteen stayed the way they were if the are not if that transmissibility number was at two or even two point five we only would of needed sixty percent of the population to be vaccinated with the v. One one seven with the south african variants all of a sudden. Now you're talking about needing seventy percent seventy five percent of the relation to vaccinated the issue with that is it. Twenty percent of people said they're not getting a vaccine anyway know-how and this means that you need to start working on those people that may get one that not get the second one said. That's where all the sudden it became important to really look at needle. Fear needle dread fainting anxiety. Pain all these issues that may be enough of barrier to someone that they're not gonna get that second vaccine then they're only fifty percent covered or for the people who are gonna freak out and don't get the first vaccine not because they think there's conspiracy or not because they're afraid of the immune system in their body being co opted by space aliens lasers but because they just can't bring themselves to stand gang that

Amy Baxter Paintcare Labs Kovic Yale And Emory Medical School TED Marquez Nausea AMY Neil Cancer Sarah JAY
Bill Gates & How to Avoid a Climate Disaster

Squawk Pod

02:39 min | 1 year ago

Bill Gates & How to Avoid a Climate Disaster

"It's great to have you on the program again. This extraordinary book. And i want to start here. I want to start in two thousand six because you talk in the book about having an almost eureka moment in terms of realization and. I think that there's still some people in this country that haven't had that realization. I wanted to understand what brought you to this place in two thousand funded. The gates foundation and started traveling to africa in seen only the lack of electricity but how the weather is getting tougher for the farmers there and that led me to learn about climate. I haven't spent time on it. But i was kind of horrified to learn that over time. It's just going to get worse. And worse. and the sources of the missions are are very very broad and so that in a brought me in to think about actually do a ted talk in two thousand ten five years before. I did the pandemic talk in the book. You warn that. The economic damage caused by climate change will likely be as bad as having a covert sized pandemic every decade. What do you think the role of business should be in solving this business you know. Businesses are paid to think ahead and They consumers will be looking at the carbon footprint of the companies. They buy from They will be looking for business to be part of the dialogue about shifting these systems around and so climate climate is big the younger generation. I think their energy already very high. But i see that going up Even in a bipartisan way and so measuring Footprint being open about that and being willing to devote resources to getting those numbers down over time i think no matter what business you're in that that will deserve a lot of attention but can the problem be solved if big businesses and microsoft and apple and google and others have have announced very ambitious plans. But they are all idiosyncratic mean. They're doing it on their own. Can it work. Everybody's doing it on their own or does it effectively require regulation and laws over time. You'll you'll have regulations that will drive the market for green products

Gates Foundation Africa TED Microsoft Apple Google
Melinda Gates discusses annual letter from Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Melinda Gates discusses annual letter from Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

"Bill Gates predicted the current pandemic. Now he and Melinda Gates are calling for a global effort costing billions of dollars a year to prepare for the next one. Let's learn more about that from Cuomo's Corwin Hate in the newly released annual letter from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation the gates and say it is not too soon to start thinking about the next pandemic. And how to mobilize the world's resource is against it. Bill Gates has more than a little credibility on this point, thanks to his Ted talk more than five years ago that warned a pandemic was coming and that the world was unprepared. He then called for the creation of military style strike forces to mobilize against any nation health threats. We need a medic reserve Corps. Lots of people have got the training and background who are ready to go with the expertise and then we need to pair those medical people with the military. Taking advantage of the military's ability to move fast to logistics and secure areas. Now the Gateses are renewing the call for this kind of preparedness, noting it will likely cost billions of dollars a year. The gates is say they like everyone want to return to normal, But one thing they hope never returns is quote our complacency about

Bill Gates Bill And Melinda Gates Foundat Melinda Gates Corwin Cuomo Reserve Corps TED
How To Get on Podcasts as a Guest

The $100 MBA Show

10:25 min | 1 year ago

How To Get on Podcasts as a Guest

"One of the most free questions. I get asked about podcasting is how do i get on other podcasts as guest and its frequent for good reason because people know that podcasts are powerful way to market themselves to get out there to be known. Nobody wants to be ignored. But how do you get on a podcast. You just use cold outreach. Do spam people in their inboxes. Asking to be on their podcast. What is the most effective way to regularly show up on other podcasts. Well i'm going to tell you share with you my system so you can lineup guest appearances for the rest of the year. First of all. I want to address something. That's very very important. One of the things. We all have to come to terms with no matter where you are in your entrepreneurial. Journey is understanding. Why you should be on a podcast. Not talking about the benefits here. i'm talking about. Why would a podcast host. Won't you on their show. You have to honestly answer that question for example. Take a look at some of the bigger podcasts. Out there W f by marc maron. Joe rogan the jordan. Harbinger your show. Why is elon. Musk being interviewed by. Joe rogan. Why did richard bring it on the dribble. your show. Why did president. Braga obama get on w. f. with marc maron. How did that happen. That cold email. joe rogan. No probably the other way around right so the first thing we have establish is the more value can add to an audience. The more likely it's going to be that you're going to show up on that podcast. Let me say that again. The more value you can add to an audience the more likely you will be a guest on that podcast so elon. Musk shows up on. Joe rogan because joe rogan knows. His audience wants to hear from him. He sought after the something here. There's something that he can offer. That makes it worth him trying to get him on the show. One of my favorite podcast interviews is with jamie fox on the tim. Ferriss show and tim for a shares that it took him years to get to the point where he knew jamie foxx enough to convince him to get on his podcast. He had to put a lot of work in a lot of time. A lot of sacrifice a lot of investment and. I'll talk a little bit about how he actually got jamie fox at the end and how relates to today's lesson. Why did tim ferriss go through. All that effort will because he knew the jamie foxx would be a brilliant episode who share incredible stories. He has a lot of value to add. So i want you to start thinking in that way. Yes we all are not jamie fox or president barack obama but we can add value to an audience and we could start somewhere we will have to start with the can show right. We can start with smaller podcast with audiences that are more niche that can really benefit from what we can offer but a lot of us get disappointed that. Hey i'm reaching out these podcasts. And they're not getting back to me. I can really offer a lot of value. Omar will one of the reasons why they're not getting back to us because they just never heard of you or they don't really have any kind of rough of what you can deliver so we're going to solve this problem immediately. One of the best ways to get on a podcast. If your brand new is to be noteworthy that means you have to show people that you can deliver for example if somebody wanted to get on a podcast and they just reached out by email and said hey podcast. I'm an expert at seo. I think i'd be really valuable to your audience versus somebody who says hey. I'd love for you to have me on your show an seo expert. I should talk about how. Google has become the dominant search engine and y. Here's a link to that ted talk hoover's opening the email whoever's reading the email whether it's the host or the executive system that works for the host. They have a lot more mature work with now. They have a reason to say. Yes they have a ted talk to watch and say. Wow this person's credible they really delivered Enough people in that room were willing to listen to this person. He commanded an audience. Might be worth having on the podcast so you have to really give them something to say. Yes. this is why your own content is really really important until you have a few great interviews under your belt where you can share those in your pitches then you need to shoot something else whether it's a youtube video whether it's a bestselling book up performance onstage. Give something to. The decision is easy. It's an easy s now. Our which is one of the ways you can do. This is one of the strategies. I used in the beginning where i literally would go to the pages of all the podcasts. I wanted to go on. I emailed them and Ask them to be on. And i gave him some materials to kind of look through to know that. I'm legit but a more effective way is what's called a warm introduction. Introductions are one of the best ways to get on podcast and it's the fastest way to get a. yes now. there's a few things you can do. Let's start with one of the easiest step step number one is do you know anybody. That's been on amy podcasts. As a guest. Look at all your friends on facebook on social your emails. Is there anybody in your network. That's been on a podcast guest. That knows that can vouch for you if so ask that person. Hey can you introduce me to that. Podcast you're on. A warm introduction is an easy way for them to say. Hey that gas was good and the recommending somebody. There's a good chance that somebody is going to be worth my time. This is why. I really emphasize the importance of building. Your personal network making friends in your industry because you can always help each other out vouch for each other and remember. I talked about how a lot of just don't know who you are. The more you network the more. You're well known. There are so many people. I know that are so good at networking yet. They don't have a best selling book. They are not a social media phenomenon. But if i say their name people know they are because they are great at networking. They're great at making friends in their space and people like that will never starve because they can always find opportunities because they know somebody. So get a warm introductions one of the best ways to get on podcast. Next piece of advice is your aim. Should be trying to get on five. Podcasts doesn't matter the size of the audience or how newer old the podcasts. Is you wanna get some rips. You wanna really understand the process and you want to deliver. Will you wanna do in those first. Five is be the absolute guest that podcast has ever had. I'm talking about study. This podcast study everybody. Who's in your niche or have spoken about the topics that you might talk about in the interview or in the podcast episode and cover things that haven't been covered address issues. Problems challenges that other people haven't addressed on the podcast before you want to be the most guests they've ever had you want to be the jamie foxx episode. Okay why because this is how you're gonna viral market yourself if you knock it out of the park. And you're the best episode for each of these. Podcasts podcasters listen to other podcasts. And the here episode the blake. I gotta get this person on my show and that really worked for me. I work super hard on making sure. I nail my first interviews. That i crush it that i really deliver value. It's my only goal. I'm not trying to promote products and services if the host talks about my websites or my products. That's great. that's fine. But i don't even mention the asking. That question is are any way people can reach out to you. I give out my e mail or give out my twitter handle and try to get the conversation to continue on those mediums. The point here is that you just got to really nail. This not only will help you with the viral marketing of a. But it's a great set of interviews that you can use as samples of your work when you reach out to other podcast to be a guest on. My next tip is make a list. Make a list of all the podcasts. You want to be on. And it's okay if you shoot for the stars and he may even wanna work to that list so like number. One is joe rogan number two. Is tim ferriss. Show whatever just you know naming names here. But you have your favorite podcasts or the best podcasts you want to be on and work your way down. you know. it's okay if that list is one hundred. Two hundred three hundred podcasts. And see as you know a a bucket list you know. I wanna cross these off. And i want to get through all the podcasts as much as possible. And don't forget new. Podcasts are being launched all the time. so you're gonna want to update this list but the list is great to have so you can track your progress and is literally just a spreadsheet on google sheets. You know the podcast name. The podcast host The link to the podcast. And then i actually have a column or linked to my episode. Once i'm on it when you're starting out on another quick tip. I have to say this. But i've noticed some people don't do this but when you're starting out when you're trying to get on other podcasts. Dopey a prima donna. Okay don't be too precious. A lot of people. Don't want to fill out forms. They wanna do pre interviews. They don't wanna do the initial chant. Sometimes they think well this established business successful This is beneath me and this podcast is not popular anyway. Why should i do this. Well you should do it because if you wanna get on the show. That's what needs to be done. There's no room for pride here. You want to get on the podcast. Go through the format. It's good for you helps you prepare helps you do your best when it's time to actually be on the podcast and you're on the road of the actual episode. You gotta earn your stripes. You might be successful in your own area in your own business. But you're entering a new world podcasting and you're nobody here. I don't want to speak on your behalf but if you're a beginner you are still earning your stripes. You're still proving yourself as good guest as a gray guesses a valuable guests so run through the steps in the is as needed. And sometimes you're going to have to do all these kinds of hoops and prepare and schedule months in advance before the episode of airs. The better podcasts. Actually you know. Have a pretty long lead time. Some of the bigger podcasts. I i've been on. They had four five six months of lead time. But as you know time flies so put in the work now so you can reap the benefits later.

Joe Rogan Jamie Fox Marc Maron Jamie Foxx Tim Ferriss Elon Musk Braga Obama Omar Jordan Barack Obama Hoover Richard TIM TED Google Youtube AMY Facebook Twitter
"ted talk" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"ted talk" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Ted talk.

"ted talk" Discussed on Tessa and Elliot Argue

Tessa and Elliot Argue

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"ted talk" Discussed on Tessa and Elliot Argue

"I mean I guess if you bake it in a bag yesterday you wipe the grease off. It's not as bad again. I'm just thinking about Greece. Gross but if he gets like the Microwave Bacon e wipe the grease off your good. Yeah anyway what's your last one jungle? Cruise boats thinks with guests inside at the Magic Kingdom. I WANNA see the video. I know you said Oh my God. I've said I heard this story. I watch so good I heard it was kinda crazy. We went on jungle. As we waited wasn't the worst of all the rights we did say was the worst of all the parks even like small. It's a small world sucked ass but it wasn't a wave it was it wasn't a long and it was like one of the things that you do. Yeah I if we ever go back I have no interest in doing small world every unless the weight is instant right. You know so raking hairline. Yeah we're not doing a small wrong problem. Wants US young or hers I get it. The weight was instant I would do. Maybe had a better. Yeah The lady. The girl are captains sucked too and she is. She was probably a normal person. Didn't really want to be there. Unlike the rest of those idiots Disney rejects. Stop It. They're all WANNA BE ACTORS THEY WANNA be actors but they're never gonna be as far is you're gonNA get your internship. Stop it fuck you. Disney cast member please at me. Elliott's GONNA fight. The Disney can just their Disney college program and their own college kids so for I know. I watched a watched a video of this girl. Who did the college program? She's complaining about. How like broker and like all of this like really like in the real world. That's just the way life as like like she get. She got upset because she didn't she wrote down the time that she was supposed to leave instead of the time that she was supposed to get up and get ready or something and so she was like freaking out because she couldn't get ready. I Dunno and she was just like broken as a person like fuck off people die can. Yeah get married. See how broken you are after that. You got that last Florida story..

Disney US Greece Magic Kingdom Elliott Florida
"ted talk" Discussed on Tessa and Elliot Argue

Tessa and Elliot Argue

12:37 min | 2 years ago

"ted talk" Discussed on Tessa and Elliot Argue

"Free bagels. Every Tuesday cool one BAGEL is equal to seventies of bread. Also Elliott goes at like five in the morning. So it's geriatric our values or my people. I know I'm just one time. They changed the show that was on. They change the channel shows the channels on the TV's and the one dude flipped fucking Shit. He's like I watch this every day at nine o'clock and that one dude was Elliott. Okay it was. It was a little upsetting that. If my my my schedule's different don't like it. Only changing my schedule my favorite is that like if you ever like heard. Us talk about well. You've heard US talk about the cat. Have you ever listened to that if you ever listener? But the cat in Elliott or fucking the same person because it's not fucking the same personnel only fucking Tessa and Dexter fucking anyway. He's a virgin. No Okay there. They are the same person Like we got a new bad and dexter could not handle the fact that like that had changed like he was so upset for as you they moved. They change your channel me okay. I liked to sit in the one bike because I can look at myself in the mirror without blowing anything so I can see. I can see that TV. I I don't understand. I like to sit in the same. I like to use the same bike. I use the same treadmill. Use the same lifter as use the same rower. There's two rowers and there's the grower in the batterer I don't like the bad one I just don't him. Index are the same person and the cat. The HAT will lose his mind. If Elliot. When Elliot started going to the gym he had to leave earlier and the cat just lost his yet. So mad at me so manhasset all my shoes. Yeah in that you are mad because they not. It's just I enjoyed it. They took it away from me. They're getting what. Why keeping up with the Kardashians. Give me hint charmed Jokic there. You just got to the point where the one sister had left. She endured he's had left. The new one was brought in the sugar good. I thought I'm not saying 'cause it's charmed and then they show an episode of supernatural. I liked watching them La You like supernatural. I don't dislike Subaru supernatural. They're almost supernatural. Is it was a show that got really shitty really fat band though. Well not really the fans because this show is really the first like four or five seasons are really good. Yeah like really good. Yeah but they ended essentially yeah. They solve they fix the problem right and then they're just like Oh. The show's really popular will keep going right now. As that's the problem of that show. Is They just got really bad ray quick. It's the same thing with loss. Man Season One season two in some of season three super great and then they just lake just takes a huge nosedive and quality. Yeah so people are photo shopping trump as a little kid just to annoy his fans. I love it. They put one where he's sitting on the toilet. All those are great. I aren't those great. Yeah those are yeah. All Right Corona virus. Still pretty serious. How do you think North Korea's dealing with Corona virus? I don't know Oh the best. Perhaps the best way possible. They're not letting North Korea deals with corona virus by execution eating patient. Oh my gosh you're dead. Oh my God problem. Solved Zero Cases Reporting Beccaria. One Dude haddish executed a straight up and they're not even fucking like Joe. They're not even like no. We didn't do that. They're like no we murdered him. We took him back. Kill yeller all yell at that asshole. Don't get curve North Korea. Holy Shit what else do you want for bus North Korea? What do you expect if anything? This is how we should be doing it crazy. That is insane. It's funny because I've read because I don't know why this this has reminded me so much of World War Z. As opposed to like Ebola or anything else but I WANNA see it well wars e started in China and started from a anyway. Yeah yeah and it's funny. 'cause THEY'RE THEY. North Korea the way that they handled it. They shut off all their borders and stuff like because everybody closer orders but like North Korea. Shut him off with people inside that had been infected and now it's a completely dead country like they don't there's no light like Al and like there's no sign of human life left because everything North Korea will be one of those places that would probably be okay from things like that if all forget it also the country that survived was Israel hank his Israel visit Israel or Pakistan. God's chosen people because they built wallowing. He builds a wall and they would screen people. And if you had if you were taken off probably the Ellard Via that's what. Yeah but this is funny because almost the same lake. China didn't deal with it like they people were allowed to go in and out like I mean. There were all like everyone. Everyone's afraid of saying anything right well in the black market. I guess like organs were sent and they were tainted with the Zombie virus and so they would be putting people and then people would turn and so it happened in like Brazil haven't everywhere. It was crazy. Frigging SHENANIGANS PRESIDENT TRUMP DR HIDDEN CAULIFLOWER IN MASHED POTATOES TO IMPROVE. Diet. Yeah and they stopped letting me as much ice cream ice cream available. Sorry the ice cream stores closed ice cream stores closed on this. The little kid they cauliflower. You can tell because I eat a lot of cauliflower race now you can tell us not real rice. Oh Yeah you can tell. There's call the mashed potatoes cauliflower isn't isn't I don't recall fellers really that great for you it's just not bad. It's not as bad as there's nothing bad about it. Yeah right isn't that it is just like basic. I don't think yeah how. `Bout Celery is. That like is good for your poops. Well and Broccoli is good for Pinson. Knits it's got iron in that leg. It's not like amazed. Yeah now call part of that. It's like not there's nothing it's like the most like the water of food. Yeah you know what I mean like cauliflower. I it's fine. I like eating it raw though I don't like to cut I much rather have it. I masked as something cauliflower steaks. There was a test several years ago. Where seventy undercover agents try to sneak bombs or guns through the. Us airport sixty seven succeeded as a joke. My TSA is a joke. Say is all about like. Oh look we were pretending to help. Omega Sixty seven seventy. Tsa's when we went to Orlando going going to Orlando is breeze. Because it was five o'clock in the morning it was really the airport is is it's small. Yeah yeah still international so yeah because it goes to Canada. Oh it doesn't go out and does not go over single or two were to landlocked to go. International flight to you could probably go to your from Columbus but like like lax. Yeah Yeah L. A. Area Anyway so but coming back from Orlando to Columbus was ridiculous was crazy owes. Yeah but at the airports shoot. It was generous. There's a himself between the two we get in line and we just kept moving be like over because they would open up a new line so we would go to the next line and we go to the next line and finally push you. They just kept pushing you down and down and so they get in there and they were like take off. Take your belt off everything off. Put it in your bag. So Elliott takes his belt off everything no shoes or anything. We didn't take every. Take everything out of your pockets. Everything in your bag. Yeah and so. I took his belt off. Well then they brought the dog around and then the one guy came over and he was like well. I take your belt off. You can get so mad at us. Yeah so Elliott. Put his back on. Then we get up to the dinner. And the guy's like. Take your belt off your belt and it was like prowl. Can three different people have told me three different things buddy want? Yeah they're all. They have no idea what they're doing. Yeah it's and then we'll show and then we airport at all either either all WanNa be Disney cast members mcgruff. The Crime Dog actor gets sixteen years in prison off. What do you do is some drugs? Await Yep twenty seven guns one grenade launcher nine. Hundred rounds of ammo eat one laundry. Just need a lotta thousand plants thousand. We'd plants swells by someone who doesn't we'd is here. We are the Pentagon promises to use artificial intelligence for good not evil liars. Tell to warn us. Be Prompt trust us. Don't like candy and the kids the kids who are like what's that and I'm like I you'll like it. You'll like it one time. I was like it's medicine so Reece's medicine. Yep daredevil dies in failed homemade rocket launch to prove earth does. Do you know now much further. That's I literally just read that in the title Elliott Ladder but also this is like the third or fourth time. He's tried to shoot this off. This is the first time he got. Success was successfully allowed to shoot off the other ones. They stopped him because he didn't have permits Shit. Well he probably shouldn't have had a permit you died and that's one less ladder. Hopefully he didn't have children or more. He spun to flatter through for his one day. She's now here's a follow up story. Utah Woman Pleads guilty to lewdness being topless in her own house I remember that yeah. Yeah she pleads guilty why I don't understand I don't either I keep trying to get you. Take your shirt off. All the time he won't this is why. Because I'M GONNA get charged with Lewd Nutty. The blinds are there blackout blinds. No one can see them. Dexter has poked holes all of them They said was like no dexter hates when the Internet is going wild over these inflatable latex trousers. I don't know how they're walking in them. I am into latex. Latex is probably my number. I will only wear latex if they played. That's true. What's your number one. That's number one quiz. Pretty high up cheeses not on yours redistrict cute outfits my number one kink and now you like Cute Office. I do you look so cute. Mike. God here's my last one. Dunkin donuts got new food. Coming out. Pancakes not pancakes. Waffles stupidity is not desert. No J. Duncan latest releases quite simply a bag of Bacon. Act like French fries. Bacon that bill crazy slices bake sale?.

Elliott Ladder North Korea Dexter US Elliot Orlando China Subaru Dunkin donuts Tsa Pinson Tessa Canada La PRESIDENT Disney Joe Israel fellers J. Duncan
"ted talk" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

11:47 min | 2 years ago

"ted talk" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"Are they more extemporaneous. It depends what kind of big talk they're giving. If I'm preparing speaker for a Ted Talk. We memorize yes and I say that because you do not want to give a tedtalk off of bullets because if you go off on a tangent and forget most of your content that video lives online for the rest of your life exactly so we memorize is to the point where you get past the threshold of being memorized and it becomes part of your DNA. And I know everybody's terrified of memorizing but but really it's just like doing bicep curls I call them the BICEP curls of public speaking it's the repetition and once you get past that point of a it being being so boring and be you hating. You're talk you will find that you pass the threshold and all of a sudden you love your talk again because it's so much a part of your DNA that you are in complete complete command of the content and you get to play a little bit. Now that's the Ted style talk that's the speakers who dare style talk that I'm that I'm talking about. That is what I require of my salon members. However if you're doing a keynote a forty five sixty nine ninety minute presentation? It's not all about being memorized memorized. It's about being impactful. It's about being able to go where the audience is to meet them where they are and like you just said Joan. If you see that something is landing in a certain way you WANNA spend more time on it and that is the difference between being memorized and being in the flow. And I don't think of it as being extemporaneous because I think when you step onto the stage you are on and that means that you're downloading information. You're paying attention to what's happening in the room. You're literally we're having a scene with your audience and that means being extremely present and it means understanding what you're going after at all. Oh costs and that's part of the intention and the action that I teach my speakers just like my actors you WanNa know what you want from your audience which is your objective and you want to go after it. And that's your action. And I say this in terms of Broadway actors do eight shows a week. They don't always want to go to work. Even the ones in Hamilton send you know that's a job. In addition to being a dream it's also a job so if they're having a bad day they're having an argument with their partner. Let's say they don't don't feel well they still have to show up on the stage like it's there for show because it's the audiences I show and that means understanding the art of objective and action. If you're playing a scene with somebody you have to know what you want from your scene partner. And that means you're gonNA play an action until you get it so if I put it in terms of being a human being we use is this technique as human beings every day if we want our kids to go to bed. That's our objective. How we get them to do it is the action? You could tickle them. You could good story. Tell them you could bribe them. Same thing if you want your partner to take out the trash that's what you want your objective. How are you going to get them to do it? Bribe Seduce spay. It's the same thing with an audience if you're standing in front of a room and you've got a sixty minute keynote and your objective is to get them to buy your book. Book change their way of thinking. Donate to your worthy. Cause that's what you go. After relentlessly the entire sixty minutes how you do it changes so if all of a sudden leading something lands because you set you made a funny you are now entertaining them. And if they responded to that action stay with it for a minute entertain them for a little bit longer before you move into inspiring or motivating or educating so you have a call to action if you will in mind setting up. Why they're right? Definitely if in the call to action could be as simple as getting them to adopt your thinking your idea as their own so that they walk out into the world different. It could be that I want this audience to nod their heads. Yes it could be that I want this audience chance to stand up at the end and clap for me. I want them to be so moved and so excited in so energized that they literally rise to their feet. Who and how are you going to get them to do that? And that's why you stay in the moment. That's how you become a captivating speaker. You don't hope that you deliver a good performance. That's when you walk onto a stage. You need to walk onto that stage with technique that you can rely on every single time. I love that you know what comes to mind mind is I emceed this Gal at Lincoln Center recently and they gave out awards at the end and the story of the award award winners was just so compelling that after they had spoken their piece I grab the MIC and said this this is an the ultimate moment for a toast and everybody stood up and I- crafted a toast. In fact I did it on the fly but because I didn't know who was going to win that was nobody really knew and the whole place erupted. I mean it was just it was extraordinary. That's amazing I love that story. How did that make you feel well? It made me feel. Obviously it made me feel great and what was also interesting was. I traveled around the room with my eyes and made eye contact to just just about every human being in that room in the process. It's so beautiful and for the listeners. This is a perfect example of you being vulnerable vulnerable and relatable at the same time and making it about them you were giving you are seeing them it wasn't about you as the MC. You're literally seeing the audience. And that's what they responded to that. So beautiful yeah and I was bringing the audience into putting putting a code on it. You know putting an exclamation mark on. aww right. A lot of my listeners are in sustainability are in energy Aaron climate related issues and these are kind of complicated topics. Right they're not necessarily easy to make pithy. So what do you suggest when the topic that you WanNa talk about is is complicated. It's got you know science in it or technical information in it what do you what do you suggest to speakers who were doing something like that. Like at a technical conference even or you're even a a non technical conference but they need to convey technical information. What's really important here is that you start slowly and you build so you in you share a bit of information? Allow us to digest that and then you build on top top of it and this is this is a great way for speakers who are talking about complicated technical really important. Climate Mitt related conversations. Because if we're given too much information all once we glaze over so it's really the foundation and then once we have the foundation the history of the backstory. Whatever it is the speaker needs us to have before they begin to build deeper? Then you add a little bit more information and it really his building blocks until we have been able to absorb everything that you're saying and understand the the gravity talk with which the problem is right now and I think that when you deliver the content slowly and build on it and add another another complex layer then we're able to really understand the importance and the impact of what you're sharing when it comes to complex subject matter. That's great a and what I also liked to do is have something that the audience themselves can do at the end or so so you don't leave. People basically feeling bummed and freaked out and powerless that you leave them feeling empowered to say okay. So you know this is. What's coming down the pike but this is what you can do in your community? This is what you can do in your apartment building okay. This is what you can do where you art start where you are. That's absolutely right and this is really really important. Because any kind of complex issue we and I say word issue and I'm going to get more specific second. We all shutdown we. We know it's a problem we know it's an issue and it's so big we can't do anything so refreeze we're paralyzed so when you introduce an idea rather than an issue it gives us hope so so if you say people with Parkinson's have no hope because they can't get the meds in the US true rape right true and it makes us off feel terrible but if you say if we say something like What what if everybody treated medicine like Jonas salk right? He gave the polio vaccine to the people. Then we're hopeful so if you turn the global crisis into an idea and then arm us with actions that is how we make big change that is how we feel hopeful hopeful and that is how we walk out of your big talk taking the action that you want to take. You talked about preparation being crucial and I tend to over ver- prepare. I find that it builds your confidence and and frankly it makes it easier to go with the flow of whatever happens. I mean for example including technical issues. I mean frankly at this big event at the Lincoln Center. They did have a teleprompter although I didn't really need it or use it which which was a good thing because it stopped at some points and so if you're not comfortable and prepared and you're dependent on a teleprompter you're dependent don something else. Something goes awry. You could be thrown for a loop so talk about how you suggest preparing for a presentation. tation besides memorizing repetition etcetera. What's the Are there physical things. Their mindset things as well as topical local research we. What's your preparation process that you teach? It's pretty comprehensive. The first thing that we have to understand is that our bodies will betray us when we get in front of other people. It's just physiologically going to happen. And it will manifest in you uniquely to someone else. Whether it's your mouth will get dry. You will start sweating having your knees literally shake your hands are shaking. Your body will have a physiological response to the nerves so that is just something you need to be conscious Kosov. It will happen no matter how many times you've taken a stage so what what I can say to support. That is begin delivering delivering your talk under Mild Stress Your family so that you can have tiny bit nervous rate increase that stress with with maybe your colleagues at work so then you keep increasing the level of stress so that you begin to become comfortable delivering the content and while your body is doing what it's doing and you can separate it. Yes my hand the shaking. Yes my stomach is really upset yes. I'm totally sweating. I hope everybody can't see it but you are still able to get through the talk and so- rehearsing the talk. Under mild stress. Increased stress increases stress increased stress..

partner Ted Talk Lincoln Center Joan Hamilton Kosov polio vaccine Jonas salk US Parkinson rape