6 Burst results for "Ted Orland"

"ted orland" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

04:30 min | Last month

"ted orland" Discussed on LensWork

"They're all relatively thin books, but as has so often been said be careful of thin books because they're dangerous once they are so distilled. To the essence of the ideas. That they're deceptively simple looking. But when you get into him, you find out that there's a tremendous amount of meat and potatoes, and that certainly exists with these five short books the first of which is. On being photographer by David Hernan Bill J I suspect many many of you listening podcast or already familiar with on being photographer partly because we published it. And you're already plugged into lens work through these podcasts. So you've probably heard of Bill J. and David hearn, his friend was magnum photographer. They approach me with the idea of having. US, published this book. Oh, Gosh twenty years ago now, and it's It's never been out of print since then it's just a terrific idea and a terrific book in this book, if you're not familiar with it, basically although build offers plenty of his opinions, he functions more as the interviewer for David and it's more like a conversation between these two lifelong friends about David's ideas about being a photographer and the pragmatics of being photographer not f stops and shutter speeds and not necessarily esoteric gallery stuff but just the life of being a photographer and what that's involved with and so many good practical ideas. So that's the first one again a thin book but packed with great ideas on being photographer, David Hurn and Bill Jay. The next one is same thing very thin book. It looked like you can read it quickly it will require the rest of your life to really understand it and it's called art and fear. By David Bales and Ted Orland Ted Orleans was pretty well known I. Think because he was an ansel Adams darkroom assistant early on and he's been around photography for a longtime David. Bayles also very smart guy the two of them have had a lifelong friendship and they put down their ideas about. The art life and the difficulties of the art life in this small book art and fear, but it is so packed with ideas. I've probably read this book ten times in the course of the last ten or twenty years it's almost an annual read with me. Because every time I read it, there's something else that I get from it. It's like you know you've read it but it didn't sink in because you weren't prepared for it, and so it's the kind of dense book of ideas. Given in very easy to understand language conversational language but so powerful and so well written. It's a perennial bestseller and a highly recommended I've I've said for years that in my way of thinking art and fear is a mandatory read for anybody who's interested in fine art photography and personally expressive photography. David Bills and Ted Orleans get that one the next one. is a little more esoteric. It's called Zen in the art of archery by Ugandan Harrisville. and. This is going to appeal primarily if you're interested in what I might characterize as the internal process of being one with what it is that you do in this case, the book is written about. But it could have been Zinn in the art of photography by Yogi Berra goal and accomplish the same thing. It's really about state of mind it's about how we think. About differentiating between everyday consciousness and the kind of consciousness that connects with the universe on a deeper level. It's like I say a little bit esoteric. Skip those parts of won't do but zero in on the parts were He. He really speaks about universal ideas that are applicable for making a photograph just as much as they are about aiming and Arrow at a target. Zen in the art of archery by Hegel Short little book, but a great one..

David Ted Orland Ted Orleans David Hernan Bill J David Bales David Hurn David hearn David Bills Bill J. Yogi Berra Bill Jay Bayles Ted Orleans Zinn
"ted orland" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

04:47 min | Last month

"ted orland" Discussed on LensWork

"I love it. . When readers asked me a specific question that. . I haven't really given a lot of thought to because it causes me to have to think and to share things with you. . So here we go. . Here's an email I received dear, , Brooks I hope you don't mind if I ask for a bit of your time but I'm just beginning photography and looking for some good books to take my work to the next level I'm not talking about technical stuff. . That's all over the place it Amazon. . But I'd love to find something more like your podcasts on the creative side of photography. . Can you recommend some good books I should read? ? This is from a reader named Darrell. . Will Darrell that is a fascinating question. . and. . It caused me to have to go back into my library and really look at. . The books that I own I, , probably have at last count about five thousand books in my personal library on art and photography. . And you know. . How do you narrow that down? ? But nonetheless, , your email prompted me to do so and I think I've got a list here that I would be comfortable in recommending of feel a little guilty in little hesitant because. . There are so many books that I didn't put on the list that have been influential in my photography. . But I think all of these that I'm about to share with you or ones that you could develop a really solid foundation for your creative life with the ideas that are encapsulated in these books. . And I've divided the list into two groups well, , three groups really but. . Mainly the two groups are the five short book recommendations for All photographers. . And then I felt like I wanted to put together a list of longer books that need. . Study as that are probably the kind of thing that will take decades to really absorb because they're bigger books but also because they have so many ideas. . The five short books are ones that I think you could all approach fairly quickly and you would find them well worth your time. . They're all relatively thin books, , but as has so often been said be careful of thin books because they're dangerous once they are so distilled. . To the essence of the ideas. . That they're deceptively simple looking. . But when you get into him, , you find out that there's a tremendous amount of meat and potatoes, , and that certainly exists with these five short books the first of which is. . On being photographer by David Hernan Bill J I suspect many many of you listening podcast or already familiar with on being photographer partly because we published it. . And you're already plugged into lens work through these podcasts. . So you've probably heard of Bill J. and David hearn, , his friend was magnum photographer. . They approach me with the idea of having. . US, , published this book. . Oh, , Gosh twenty years ago now, , and it's <hes>. . It's never been out of print since then it's just a terrific idea and a terrific book in this book, , if you're not familiar with it, , basically although build offers plenty of his opinions, , he functions more as the interviewer for David and it's more like a conversation between these two lifelong friends about David's ideas about being a photographer and the pragmatics of being photographer not f stops and shutter speeds and not necessarily esoteric gallery stuff but just the life of being a photographer and what that's involved with and so many good practical ideas. . So that's the first one again a thin book but packed with great ideas on being photographer, , David Hurn and Bill Jay. . The next one is same thing very thin book. . It looked like you can read it quickly it will require the rest of your life to really understand it and it's called art and fear. . By David Bales and Ted Orland Ted Orleans was pretty well known I. . Think because he was an ansel Adams darkroom assistant early on and he's been around photography for a longtime David. . Bayles also <hes> very smart guy the two of them have had a lifelong friendship and they put down their ideas about. . The art life and the difficulties of the art life in this small book art and fear, , but it is so packed with ideas.

Brooks Jensen Darrell Lens Work Publishing Amazon editor
Photography Book Recommendations

LensWork

04:47 min | Last month

Photography Book Recommendations

"I love it. When readers asked me a specific question that. I haven't really given a lot of thought to because it causes me to have to think and to share things with you. So here we go. Here's an email I received dear, Brooks I hope you don't mind if I ask for a bit of your time but I'm just beginning photography and looking for some good books to take my work to the next level I'm not talking about technical stuff. That's all over the place it Amazon. But I'd love to find something more like your podcasts on the creative side of photography. Can you recommend some good books I should read? This is from a reader named Darrell. Will Darrell that is a fascinating question. and. It caused me to have to go back into my library and really look at. The books that I own I, probably have at last count about five thousand books in my personal library on art and photography. And you know. How do you narrow that down? But nonetheless, your email prompted me to do so and I think I've got a list here that I would be comfortable in recommending of feel a little guilty in little hesitant because. There are so many books that I didn't put on the list that have been influential in my photography. But I think all of these that I'm about to share with you or ones that you could develop a really solid foundation for your creative life with the ideas that are encapsulated in these books. And I've divided the list into two groups well, three groups really but. Mainly the two groups are the five short book recommendations for All photographers. And then I felt like I wanted to put together a list of longer books that need. Study as that are probably the kind of thing that will take decades to really absorb because they're bigger books but also because they have so many ideas. The five short books are ones that I think you could all approach fairly quickly and you would find them well worth your time. They're all relatively thin books, but as has so often been said be careful of thin books because they're dangerous once they are so distilled. To the essence of the ideas. That they're deceptively simple looking. But when you get into him, you find out that there's a tremendous amount of meat and potatoes, and that certainly exists with these five short books the first of which is. On being photographer by David Hernan Bill J I suspect many many of you listening podcast or already familiar with on being photographer partly because we published it. And you're already plugged into lens work through these podcasts. So you've probably heard of Bill J. and David hearn, his friend was magnum photographer. They approach me with the idea of having. US, published this book. Oh, Gosh twenty years ago now, and it's It's never been out of print since then it's just a terrific idea and a terrific book in this book, if you're not familiar with it, basically although build offers plenty of his opinions, he functions more as the interviewer for David and it's more like a conversation between these two lifelong friends about David's ideas about being a photographer and the pragmatics of being photographer not f stops and shutter speeds and not necessarily esoteric gallery stuff but just the life of being a photographer and what that's involved with and so many good practical ideas. So that's the first one again a thin book but packed with great ideas on being photographer, David Hurn and Bill Jay. The next one is same thing very thin book. It looked like you can read it quickly it will require the rest of your life to really understand it and it's called art and fear. By David Bales and Ted Orland Ted Orleans was pretty well known I. Think because he was an ansel Adams darkroom assistant early on and he's been around photography for a longtime David. Bayles also very smart guy the two of them have had a lifelong friendship and they put down their ideas about. The art life and the difficulties of the art life in this small book art and fear, but it is so packed with ideas.

David Ted Orland Ted Orleans David Hernan Bill J Darrell David Bales David Hurn David Hearn Amazon Brooks Bill J. Bayles Bill Jay
"ted orland" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

14:52 min | 8 months ago

"ted orland" Discussed on LensWork

"Here's the editor of Lens Publishing Bruce Jensen in the nineteen eighties. I took a workshop from David Bales. Who along with Ted Orland is one of the authors of that really terrific called art and fear? We had a long weekend to work with. David doesn't ever so who were attending the workshop and he began the workshop with something. I've never forgotten. He asked us why we make art. And we went around the table and offered are somewhat stumbling excuses about what motivated us to WanNa make art. He then proposed that all of us were essentially the weird ones in society. He put it this way not not to insult but just to be more clear and more precise he said. Do you realize how many people there are in the world who have a camera who have no compulsion whatsoever to create artwork and so the obvious question is what makes us different. What makes us want to become artists with the camera? And since we're a relatively small group of people compared to all those who own cameras doesn't make sense that we're kind of the odd ones. Everybody else is normal. But we're the ones who feel compelled and he proposed that we needed to think carefully about why we wanted to make artwork. He didn't answer that question. He left it for each of us to stew on it and to come up with their own answers. And it's taken me many many years but I think I have a better understanding now of why it is that I wanna make art. Let me ask it in a slightly different way. What is it that we seek in the process of being an artist? Well some people seek fame or money or accolades. But I suspect that most of you listening to my podcasts are not interested in fame money or accolades unless they fell in your lap. I mean we'RE NOT GONNA TURN IT DOWN. But that's not the reason we pursue our art because if it was we'd probably be doing different kinds of things photographic -ly than we do so for most of us were seeking something else. What is it that we seek from our creative life? I'M GONNA go out on a little bit of a limb here and explain what I think. The answer is for me. It may or may not be an answer for you but nonetheless here it is for me in a nutshell. What I'm trying to accomplish with my art life is to have a certain kind of experience. I kind of got onto this idea with cardiac Brussels. The decisive moment in his thoughts about photography. I have different term. I call it the aesthetic moment. That's really why I'm photographic artist. I seek the aesthetic moment and I suppose in order to make that clear. I kind of need to explain what I mean by the aesthetic moment. The best example I can think of that isn't about photography is probably Haiku. So let me begin by talking a little bit about Haiku with a couple of examples. The great translator of Japanese Haiku of course is our H. Blythe. He did a wonderful series of books. There's a four volume set called Haiku. Each book is a different season and he also did a two volume set called the history of Haiku. I have loved these books now for forty years and I go back to them from time to time and RH Blythe says quote. The nature of Haiku cannot be rightly understood until it's realized that they imply a revolution in our everyday life in ways of thinking. Close quote that is to say the aesthetic moment. The aesthetic moment is the moment when we have a shift of consciousness. I I tend to think of it this way. It's a sudden and off an unexpected shift in awareness when the everyday act of seeing becomes a fleeting but meaningful glimpse at some sort of deeper understanding. That's a very coarse way of trying to explain an if you've had the experience you probably know what I'm getting at if you haven't had it maybe a couple of Haiku will help so here's a good example of the shift of consciousness in talking about in this Haiku a brushwood gate and for a lock.

David Bales H. Blythe Ted Orland Bruce Jensen Lens Publishing editor RH Blythe Brussels
The Aesthetic Moment

LensWork

09:18 min | 8 months ago

The Aesthetic Moment

"In the nineteen eighties. I took a workshop from David Bales. Who along with Ted Orland is one of the authors of that really terrific called art and fear? We had a long weekend to work with. David doesn't ever so who were attending the workshop and he began the workshop with something. I've never forgotten. He asked us why we make art. And we went around the table and offered are somewhat stumbling excuses about what motivated us to WanNa make art. He then proposed that all of us were essentially the weird ones in society. He put it this way not not to insult but just to be more clear and more precise he said. Do you realize how many people there are in the world who have a camera who have no compulsion whatsoever to create artwork and so the obvious question is what makes us different. What makes us want to become artists with the camera? And since we're a relatively small group of people compared to all those who own cameras doesn't make sense that we're kind of the odd ones. Everybody else is normal. But we're the ones who feel compelled and he proposed that we needed to think carefully about why we wanted to make artwork. He didn't answer that question. He left it for each of us to stew on it and to come up with their own answers. And it's taken me many many years but I think I have a better understanding now of why it is that I wanna make art. Let me ask it in a slightly different way. What is it that we seek in the process of being an artist? Well some people seek fame or money or accolades. But I suspect that most of you listening to my podcasts are not interested in fame money or accolades unless they fell in your lap. I mean we'RE NOT GONNA TURN IT DOWN. But that's not the reason we pursue our art because if it was we'd probably be doing different kinds of things photographic -ly than we do so for most of us were seeking something else. What is it that we seek from our creative life? I'M GONNA go out on a little bit of a limb here and explain what I think. The answer is for me. It may or may not be an answer for you but nonetheless here it is for me in a nutshell. What I'm trying to accomplish with my art life is to have a certain kind of experience. I kind of got onto this idea with cardiac Brussels. The decisive moment in his thoughts about photography. I have different term. I call it the aesthetic moment. That's really why I'm photographic artist. I seek the aesthetic moment and I suppose in order to make that clear. I kind of need to explain what I mean by the aesthetic moment. The best example I can think of that isn't about photography is probably Haiku. So let me begin by talking a little bit about Haiku with a couple of examples. The great translator of Japanese Haiku of course is our H. Blythe. He did a wonderful series of books. There's a four volume set called Haiku. Each book is a different season and he also did a two volume set called the history of Haiku. I have loved these books now for forty years and I go back to them from time to time and RH Blythe says quote. The nature of Haiku cannot be rightly understood until it's realized that they imply a revolution in our everyday life in ways of thinking. Close quote that is to say the aesthetic moment. The aesthetic moment is the moment when we have a shift of consciousness. I I tend to think of it this way. It's a sudden and off an unexpected shift in awareness when the everyday act of seeing becomes a fleeting but meaningful glimpse at some sort of deeper understanding. That's a very coarse way of trying to explain an if you've had the experience you probably know what I'm getting at if you haven't had it maybe a couple of Haiku will help so here's a good example of the shift of consciousness in talking about in this Haiku a brushwood gate and for a lock It's nothing more than a moment of recognition. When all of a sudden something is seen little differently is seen unexpectedly when in this case the snail is not normally the lock. But we kind of see it that way because we're not gonNA go through the brushwood gate because we don't want to disturb the snail and so the snail becomes the lock. Here's another one in the old will. A fish leaps up at a net. The sound of the water is dark. That Haiku brings forth in me that aesthetic moment. I'm not thinking about the water. I'm not thinking about The dark but somehow the fish leaping brings us the darkness of the water to my attention and I have a moment when I'm sort of separated from normal consciousness and I have an aesthetic feeling for what is happening that I would not have had. If in this case the fish had not leapt up at nat so that experience sparked something in the person who wrote this Haiku. I think it was ISA but I'm not exactly sure. Remember that right. But it sparked an aesthetic moment and became the genesis of the Haiku. Here's another one. The Autumn Wind is blowing. We are alive and CONC- each other you and I I have this idea here of two people who've maybe spent the day together maybe they've been photographing together. And all of a sudden the autumn wind blows. And you realize the person that you're with is there. In the moment they become even more alive and even more real than they have prior to that that somehow there was that shift of consciousness that happened when the wind was blowing and the connection was made one last one the bright autumn moon on the Tatami Mat the shadow of the pine tree here again I visualized sitting in some old Japanese hut somewhere. And here's the bright autumn moon and with no other lights around all of a sudden because of this bright moon I see the shadow of the pine tree on the floor. And there's a connection now suddenly between the moon the pine tree the light and me and it's more alive than it would be if I wasn't paying attention so once again that sudden and often unexpected shift in awareness when the everyday act of seeing becomes a fleeting but meaningful glimpse of understanding of connectedness of really becoming aware in the moment. Lots of other photographers of talked about this. And it often comes up with a phrase. I've never quite sure I understand. And that is the Japanese term. Wabi Sabi I I don't I. I can't speak to that because I'm not really sure I understand what that really means but I do know the moment when looking at something ordinary I experienced that. Flip of wariness. Now I I'm not very verbal and I'm not a poet so I I don't do Haiku so for me. The attempt to express that aesthetic moment takes on the form of visual art hands on photographer. But one thing I do know is you can have that breakthrough to the aesthetic moment in all kinds of possible things in photography it can happen in the field

David Bales Ted Orland Autumn Wind H. Blythe Rh Blythe Brussels Tatami Mat
"ted orland" Discussed on The Art of Charm

The Art of Charm

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ted orland" Discussed on The Art of Charm

"Like yourself because true mastery as we know takes years usually decades to achieve and even the most talented naturally gifted people have to put in a huge amount of time to become incredible and that principle applies to all people in all fields in all cultures at every single point in history there's just no way around it in this book called art and feared david bales and ted orland they tell us interesting story about a ceramics class on the first day the class the teacher announces the students are going to be divided into two groups half the class was told they're going to be graded on quantity right however much they can make and on the last day of class the teachers that he's going to come up with some scales and way all the ceramic pots the students said made and you can imagine you're gonna think they're just gonna make a bunch of crap and largely you're right here fifty pounds a pottery is going to get an a forty pounds of pottery is going to get a b thirty pounds get to see you get the idea the other half of the class was told they'd be graded on quality alone all they had do is bring one beautiful perfectly designed pot to their final class and at one pot will determine their entire final grade that sounds like law school said you're not making putts to sit exams integrating time the teacher discovered something really interesting the best in most beautiful pots they were all produced by the group graded four quantity the worst and lease creative thoughts all hailed from the group grated for quality so what the heck is going on here and as the authors explaining the book while the quantity group was busily just charney out piles of work and learning from their mistakes and not even caring about making them because of grated on the way to the clay the quality group headset theorizing about perfection and in the end they had little more to show for their efforts other than grandiose theories in a pilot dead clay so what does this mean for us it means that to make amazing things you have to make a lot of amazing things and probably start by making lots of crappy not so amazing things as well so quantity and quality.

law school david bales ted orland charney thirty pounds fifty pounds forty pounds