21 Burst results for "Ted Olson"

Who Would Make a Great Supreme Court Advocate?

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

05:22 min | 2 months ago

Who Would Make a Great Supreme Court Advocate?

"Just because you've watched so many Supreme Court arguments, you know, so many of the justices, you know, so many of the legal people. If you had to recommend a Supreme Court advocate today, someone called you up and their company is on the line, they have to argue before the Supreme Court, who would it be? I guess it would probably be Paul Clement. You and I said the same thing. I got asked that question a couple of years ago. And I've never met Paul Clement or spoken to him, but I hit Paul Clement. Tell people why. Well, because he's just if he weren't such a nice and intelligent and good guy, I would say that he was an idiot savant of an advocate. I mean by that, I don't mean that he's an idiot. I mean that even when he was a baby advocate, he came to the Justice Department with John ashcroft for whom he had worked on the Senate Judiciary Committee, I think. And he was in his young 30s and Ted Olson was the solicitor general and had just won Bush versus gore for president Bush by then president Bush and ashcroft, I think, actually wanted Paul to be solicitor general and the compromise was that he would be deputy, which he was for four years, and then he became solicitor general on his own. But as Ted also would say, Paul is just an amazing advocate. And he is not a, you know, when he worked for the government, he represented the government. When he worked for the Catholic Church, he represents the Catholic Church. Do I think that is closer to an approximation of his views? Yes, I do. But he was a just a bang up advocate for the government. And so was Ted Olson. They both represented they both defended the McCain feingold law. And one in the Supreme Court, and it fell apart years later, and they represent different interests now that they're in private practice, but that didn't stop them from being the best advocates possible for their client at the time and their client at the time was the United States government. You just named two of the four of the greatest Supreme Court advocates of my generation, the other two being the now chief justice John Roberts, and the fourth being an it'll come to me. I just forgot his name. And there are four. And they were always, I get calls, and when the chief justice was in private practice at Hogan, I would say go get him. And now when I get calls, I say go get Paul Clement because Ken Starr judge Starr is no longer practicing. They work great Supreme Court advocates because they just are at ease and I bring that up because of your Walter dellinger story on page one 30 and God bless the late Walter dellinger, who is a great man in the law, with whom I disagreed often. But he mixed up the names of justices, O'Connor and Ginsburg in his first argument. That's over practicing. Nina, that's don't you think that's what it was. He was overprepared he had thought about it so much. I'm not going to mix them up. I'm not going to mix them up. I'm not going to mix them up, and he mixed them up, and they were not happy. I don't even know if it was that. First his first argument, it just was maybe the first time he faced the two of them on the court. You're right. You're right. And he said, I mean, I've done this. I've said North Carolina when my script says South Carolina, I don't know what happens. In a less than ladylike expression, it's a brain fart. Yeah. Happens to me like on a daily basis. Nina totenberg. I mean, on a daily basis, three hours of radio you're going to do it, your buddy Steve never makes a mistake inscape. And I really hate that. But I make mistakes every day. Let me go on now to what the essence of dinners with Ruth is. And I remind you of the Frank luntz role, we've got to say the title of dinners with rouge 7 times for people to remember dinners with Ruth and order dinners with Ruth. And I want to tell my Friends on the center right in the right, this book will charm you and inform you and you'll be better for having read it. I said that most recently about Evan Thomas's one, Evan is a friend, one is about justice O'Connor and as dinners with Ruth does for justice Ginsburg one did for justice O'Connor and together they do what is only very infrequently done they give you a glimpse of the real world of the Supreme Court. And you know what? So much better than I do. I know some of the justices, but not as friends. I mean, colleague, John Roberts, an old colleague, chief just a justice Thomas and Stephen Breyer sat for interviews. And justice Gorsuch had been spent time with, but I don't know them like you know them. And you are a great storyteller. And you humanize them, but especially judge justice Ginsburg. Did you intend that when you began?

Paul Clement Supreme Court Ted Olson Walter Dellinger Senate Judiciary Committee President Bush Mccain Feingold Catholic Church John Ashcroft Paul Ashcroft Justice Department John Roberts Gore Ken Starr Connor Ruth United States Government TED Nina Totenberg
"ted olson" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:57 min | 2 months ago

"ted olson" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

"We can't see tomorrow, but we can hear it. And it sounds like a wind farm powering homes across the country. We're bridging to a sustainable energy future, working today to ensure tomorrow is on. Enbridge, life takes energy. Would you tell us where you were when you heard about the first attack in 93 against the World Trade Center? Back in 93. Yes. In 93, I was in private law practice. I was a lawyer. And I was running for mayor. It was the year of the election. For mayor of New York, I had run in 1989 against David dinkins and laws by less than 2%. So when, as far as I was concerned, things didn't go well in the city and that three year period we had to riots. We had 2000 murders a year, we were at 10% unemployment. A lot of really, really bad factors. I felt I should run because the solutions that I had suggested in 89 when I put into place and I thought the same ones I suggested in 89 would work in 93. Particularly crime. And my background was criminal justice. I was an assistant U.S. attorney as head of the narcotics division of the U.S. attorney's office during the French connection days. I was the U.S. attorney who went after the mafia, put away the 5 families in New York. I prosecuted bosky and milked it and Wall Street. I prosecuted about half of that conscious administration. So I knew corruption in the city. So in a strange way, I felt like maybe it's a little boastful to say, I felt like I was the right person. If the city ever needed a prosecutor, this is the time it needed one. And not just a prosecutor, but a really experienced one. I was and then I was the third ranking official. In Ronald Reagan's Justice Department, I worked for president Reagan for 8 years. And he was my hero. He was, I was going to model what I did as mayor on what he did as president. I handled an air traffic controller strike with Ted Olson we were the two lawyers on the air traffic controller strut. So I wasn't just part of the administration. I really bought into it. I brought into the tax programs. I was the first mayor in the history of the city of the lower taxes. I thought about lowering tax before. So I decided by 1992 that I had a run to the city needed lower taxes and better business environment and my goodness..

Enbridge David dinkins U.S. attorney's office World Trade Center New York U.S. Ronald Reagan Justice Department Ted Olson
"ted olson" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

06:16 min | 3 months ago

"ted olson" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

"Welcome back, America. I'm here at my penultimate book of the summer. Is this little book? The virtue by my next guest John garvey, and John, this is a little bit weird. I feel like I should know you because we grew up ten miles apart. Your aunt and uncle lived next door to my parents when I was born and they were there fast Friends forever your cousin keelan is one of my closest friends in the world. I think you left Harvard's campus three months before I set foot on it. Bob rosenfeld may have been on your law review. You've been in legal academic circles forever, and I would go to the ALS, but I never mentioned there. And then you've lived in D.C. since I've been there. I mean, how long were you president of Catholic university, John? For 12 years. And what's more, you left Michigan right before I went to teach at the law school there and we were both in the Reagan administration, although you were much more important person than I was. Oh, that's not true. I was down the hall the smart people were at OLC with Ted Olson and I was running around with the attorney general doing the classified stuff, but it was workman like it didn't require deep thinking. John, so I'm glad to make your acquaintance finally. Sharon kid turned out well. I'm pretty amazed by that, given that you have to be a steelers fan. Are you a browns fan or a steelers fan, John garvey? I'm embarrassed to say I'm a patriots fan. Oh man, that could end it right now because of Bill Belichick, but I'll digress. I love your book. And I want to begin with the virtues by telling people what I told people online. It's the perfect group for small groups of all sorts. Men's group, women's groups, youth groups, couples groups. Did you have that in mind, John garvey? Because that's a very Protestant thing as opposed to a Catholic thing. No, I didn't actually have that in mind. The book grew out of a bunch of talks that I gave at commencements every year for gosh, nearly 25 years. And in the last half dozen years, I've taught a class called the virtues to freshmen in the honors program at Catholic. That's what it grew out of. What a great let me begin with the four things that I know the most about. The number one, the most memorable line. And the takeaway of people don't read the virtues. I want them to remember this from page one 52, repentance is the duct tape of family life. I've already used that two or three times because it's so true, John, explain that. Well, the thing you have to learn when you're when you get married is to say, I'm sorry and mean it. So that helps people make up and bring families back together. So yeah, you learn a lot of virtues when you get married. We've noticed this with our own children. You know, when kids go through when kids are growing up, when they get to be 14, 16, 18, they're going through their teens, there's so much to changing in their lives. They're focused on themselves. And rightly so. But man, they're selfish. Yes. The first step away from selfishness that we've noticed with our own children is when they fall in love with somebody and they've got to begin worrying about someone else. And then when they have children, they have a whole new set of concerns. So getting married is a good school of virtue. It is. And the second line, which I used again this weekend, is I am blessed with 5 grandchildren, the middle one of whom is called Genghis Kate. And your page went that mercy is a grandparent's virtue. Absolutely correct. Can't be a parent's virtue all the time, but it's always a grandparent's virtue, John garvey. Why don't you expand on that? We had this experience in our House at different we have 5 children and at one time or another, four of them have lived with us as married adults with children. Either because somebody has crashed and burned or because their lives have moved them to a new city where they need a different place to live. And we found that in the case of our fourth child, he and his wife live with us through the last part of college and all of law school and a year in between. So their children grew up in our House. They would get in our bed, you know? They had three by the time they left. We found that we couldn't treat them the way the rule in our House when our kids are growing up was that the rules of the rules and grandparents can do whatever they want. If you're living together with if you're living together with the parents and you do whatever you want, then you're busting the parents rules and the kids that don't understand the distinction. So mercy is something that grandparents can show. But not if they're taking care of not if the children are living with them. Because my daughter is a military spouse. We've had her in the house with her children for extended months, and you're absolutely right, mercy is a grandparent's virtue. Now I always say in a book, there's a memorable anecdote. Something I haven't found before. The story you tell that I had not read before was about Dorothy day on the bus. And that's from on page 52, would you explain that to or describe it to people? Because it's quite striking. Well, we find this to be true, one of the things that we've tried to do with our own children in bringing them up is to have them come and work at soup kitchens or get acquainted with people whose lives are not as fortunate as their own, you know, they had the good fortune to have a dad and a mom who had jobs and could put food on the table every day. And one of the things that Dorothy day says about the poor and she lived with him and knew better than any of us is they're not necessarily grateful and they can smell. So don't expect to be doing this for their thanks. That's not that's not what charity is about. Well, I'm recalling when she's on a bus, surrounded by poor people, and she just spontaneously begins to cry, which is, as you put it, a moment of love, a moment of charity because she just feels for these people in a way that a lot of Americans confronted with omnipresence of homelessness are taking out of their emotional repertoire, John. I think that's actually vanishing because of the immensity of the population. You know, it's not just the immensity of the population. It's the fact that since the 1930s, we've outsourced our generosity to the government. And we don't consider it part of our own responsibilities to take care of people who aren't as fortunate as we are..

John garvey keelan Bob rosenfeld John steelers Ted Olson OLC Reagan administration Catholic university Genghis Kate Bill Belichick workman Harvard browns D.C. patriots Sharon Michigan America
"ted olson" Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:10 min | 5 months ago

"ted olson" Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

"A group of conservatives now reading from a CNN article, a group of conservatives, including prominent lawyers and retired federal judges issued a 72 page report. Categorically rebutting each of the claims made in court by former president Donald Trump in his supporters over the 2020 election results. So you've got a group of these jurists. Who are we talking about? Thomas B Griffith, retired federal appeal court judge, J Michael ludig. A guy I know, Michael McConnell, a very smart guy, and professor at Stanford University, former solicitor general Ted Olson, former U.S. senator John Danforth, and Gordon Smith. And a couple of other people. Now CNN does admit quote several of them are longtime Trump critics. So these are these are kind of never Trump jurists. And they contend, and it looks like this report. It's a 72 page report that was produced to help the January 6th committee. In other words, they're working in a sense to support the democratic narrative on this. And they say that Trump and his supporters quote had an obligation to recognize the election debate was over. Now, on what basis do they come to this remarkable conclusion? Well, it turns out, all that they do is they review in some depth, the cases that went before various courts. Now they admit this group does that many of these cases were not adjudicated. Some of them were dismissed for lack of standing or you filed it in the wrong court. You should have filed this one before the election. And this one is now moot. And so it seems to me that, I mean, I don't have difficulty believing that in those cases, filed in the immediate aftermath of the election, there was insufficient evidence there. That the election was stolen.

Thomas B Griffith J Michael ludig Michael McConnell senator John Danforth CNN Trump Ted Olson Gordon Smith Donald Trump Stanford University Liz Cheney Bill Barr U.S. Congress Kerry gore Bush
Prominent Conservatives Issue Report Rebutting Trump Election Claims

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:10 min | 5 months ago

Prominent Conservatives Issue Report Rebutting Trump Election Claims

"A group of conservatives now reading from a CNN article, a group of conservatives, including prominent lawyers and retired federal judges issued a 72 page report. Categorically rebutting each of the claims made in court by former president Donald Trump in his supporters over the 2020 election results. So you've got a group of these jurists. Who are we talking about? Thomas B Griffith, retired federal appeal court judge, J Michael ludig. A guy I know, Michael McConnell, a very smart guy, and professor at Stanford University, former solicitor general Ted Olson, former U.S. senator John Danforth, and Gordon Smith. And a couple of other people. Now CNN does admit quote several of them are longtime Trump critics. So these are these are kind of never Trump jurists. And they contend, and it looks like this report. It's a 72 page report that was produced to help the January 6th committee. In other words, they're working in a sense to support the democratic narrative on this. And they say that Trump and his supporters quote had an obligation to recognize the election debate was over. Now, on what basis do they come to this remarkable conclusion? Well, it turns out, all that they do is they review in some depth, the cases that went before various courts. Now they admit this group does that many of these cases were not adjudicated. Some of them were dismissed for lack of standing or you filed it in the wrong court. You should have filed this one before the election. And this one is now moot. And so it seems to me that, I mean, I don't have difficulty believing that in those cases, filed in the immediate aftermath of the election, there was insufficient evidence there. That the election was stolen.

Thomas B Griffith J Michael Ludig Michael Mcconnell Senator John Danforth CNN Ted Olson Donald Trump Gordon Smith Stanford University U.S.
"ted olson" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

04:00 min | 5 months ago

"ted olson" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Mister producer reminded me who this Alex Stein is. He actually is quite funny at that school board meeting when he was singing and dancing right rich. Yeah, okay. They'll try and destroy him. Let's continue with our callers. I would argue, let's continue. What do you say? Fred Houston, Texas. On the Mark Levin app I assume, go right ahead, yes. Yes, Mark. I'm calling about this war on fossil fuels. The whole idea of the reason that the other side is saying that they don't like fossil fuels is because it gives off greenhouse gases. CO2. Now the Supreme Court just ruled that they don't have that authority anymore. So I'm wondering, where is the pushback? It seems every one of these blasted things that you're talking about that they wanted to do. Where is Congress? No, you can't do that. Sorry, I hope the authority. Well, Congress has controlled by them, right? I understand that. But there still needs to be a law. What needs there can't be a law when they control Congress. However, I get your point and hopefully it's a damn good point. Hopefully some of these companies will start suing and pushing back, I think, is more to the point, right? And cite the Supreme Court. Supreme Court, it means something. Issue rulings. Yeah. And so the problem is the problem is these are executive orders. And what's happening here when you have an administration like this that is utterly lawless when it comes to applying the immigration laws and so forth. You have a president who really has taken the issue of executive orders further than any modern president that I can think of. And he really is legislating by executive order. He's nationalizing effectively by regulation and taxation and penalties. Directing the bureaucracy to do this and do that. The purpose of an executive order was originally for the executive the president to put out an order to the people in his branch of the government to do X, Y or Z, not the substitute for legislation. This really does need to be litigated, especially with the makeup of this court now. These executive orders are so far out of control. And we have executive orders now being issued that affect elections to use the federal government involved in elections. People are trying to figure out what it is exactly he's up to. But it's very difficult to find out right now. Thank you for your call, Fred. I saw a group of so called conservative Republicans. This lawyer Ginsburg. I guess if you worked for Bush, you're conservative Republican. I saw Ted Olson, who kind of has a banded conservatism some time ago. Was an old buddy of mine. And others. Who claimed to be conservatives, claimed to represent you and me and they put out a book of some kind that they did thorough research of all the issues, the 64 lawsuits we've heard there were 66 67 60 61 and 64. And they found no fraud whatsoever that would have affected even the outcome in any precinct in America. Wow. In a way that might affect the outcome of the election. Well, there you have it. They put out a book. And their point is, I saw them on TV today. They're out there saying things like, we don't want to dissuade conservatives from voting and we're afraid that that's what's happening here. So these are mostly never trumpers. Former judges, sky Griffin and so forth. I thought to myself

Alex Stein Fred Houston Supreme Court Congress Mark Levin Texas Mark Ted Olson Ginsburg federal government Fred Bush America sky Griffin
President Biden Visits Seoul

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:44 sec | 7 months ago

President Biden Visits Seoul

"I was still covering state politics at the time in Virginia. So I didn't, I wasn't down in Florida, but I watched it like everybody else, and I do think you're right. There's some eerie similarities there. Oh my goodness, I've got tattoos from then. Because every day, it was every day was a new headline, 25 different lawsuits. David Boyce squaring off against Ted Olson, Ted Cruz down there. W are running around. James baker in town. Al Gore. It was wild that I think Pennsylvania is going that way. So Michael, the president's in Seoul, Korea. I'm just curious, how did you not draw the short straw and have to go? A lot of people think everybody loves to go on these trips. I'm not sure that's true when you're over 50.

David Boyce Ted Cruz Ted Olson Virginia Florida James Baker Al Gore Pennsylvania Seoul Korea Michael
"ted olson" Discussed on Gun Talk

Gun Talk

07:15 min | 7 months ago

"ted olson" Discussed on Gun Talk

"And nobody nobody the gun makers wants to say to negative about the NRA. They don't want to peer to be disloyal or not part of the Second Amendment support group and all that. But privately, most of them, I was going to say all, but let's just say most of them. A lot of them are saying it is time for Wayne to go. We need to either fix the NRA or frankly, and this is the other discussion that's taking place, replace the NRA. We're at that point now. It would be interesting to know how many memberships or have they lost memberships because there's a lot of life members, I understand. But has there been a change since all of this has come to light? Are we being effective in trying to get our point across that we want change as members? What I have been told and it does not make me happy is that membership is not really gone down. Really? I said they've been a very effective at telling everybody the New York attorney general is after us that we must rally. You have to support us. You have to renew now for the Second Amendment because they're coming after your gun rights and go, no, they're actually coming after Wayne Lapierre. But once again, they are a very good fundraising organization. So I've been told I don't know if it's true but I've been told that the membership numbers have not gone down. I actually suspect the problem he has. And we're just being lied to again. Because if you have that many members, well, I mean, I'm sure that there's a lot of yearly members. And of course, you can always upgrade and become guardians and all that other kind of stuff. Maybe. I don't know. One of the things that has happened, I think people have stopped donating and they've stopped upgrading their memberships. I mean, the amount of people that have called in on the radio program and seem to be that there would be some kind of indication that there's a down fire. How many times have you had somebody say I have not going to renew as soon as you get rid of Wayne lap here? I'll be back. Right. Lots of people. Most of them. Yeah. Yes. That would call in here, yeah. Right. So I suspect that when we hear from the NRA oh, our numbers are good and strong. I'm thinking, you're just full of crap. Well, they got to make it clear. Yes. We're successful. We'll keep going because we still want you to send you money. And so we're going to keep telling you everything is great. And that money is just going right to legislative action. Not legislative. That's what I meant to say. Sorry. I wish it was going. The good news is the institute for legislative action. I could never say that. Is a separate group and they are still being effective on the legislative side. And they do some pretty good work on the litigation side in courts. Probably not as much as they used to do, and I think probably the Second Amendment foundation has picked up a lot of the slack. They are doing good work. But this New York case, the brewing case, that's a narrow case. So, I mean, that's a good case, and it's been argued they used Ted Olson, former solicitor general of the United States to argue the case for the NRA and he's very good. So that's a good thing. They're still doing good work. And they have not been not been named in any of these lawsuits to clarify. Not that I am aware of that IA has been included in that. I heard they were totally yeah, so there's all of that. It's a weird thing. And you don't hear much. You don't hear much about them. Being in action, you know, it used to be all the lobbying, the NRA lobbyists, you know, but you don't really hear that anymore. Yeah, I don't hear much of anything after. You tend to think that they are still doing stuff. Speaking of which, we have to speak up for GM because this is Jim blow himself up kenzie for this today. I saw the video. You're the only guy I know who tried to blow himself up and have video of it. That's true. The video was an intention. All the video was just because surveillance caught it. Well, that's because the seismic. Or a nuclear explosion. You just didn't we have a problem. Yeah, it's a space launch in your backyard. So what'd you do to express or shut down for a couple hours? But no big deal. Yeah, sure. I had a memorial burning of a friend of our family who's passed away, and they had some things they just wanted burned. And I said, I got the perfect place for it. Come on out. So brought a bunch of stuff and put it in my pit. We have a big pit out front. Got a burn pit. Okay. It's supposed to be a koi pond, but I don't like the explosions. But anyway, it's got fried fish. Thanks for lunch. Oh, my friends come over every Friday, this Catholic, you know? How come on, don't be coy. Tell us. Oh my God. So anyway, being in, you know, impatient as I was because I had a lot of other things to do. Somebody somehow must have put some accelerant on this. Burn pile to be. Somebody who looks a lot like Jim Kinsey pouring gasoline. Yeah, well, I'm never going to cop to that. Somebody put accelerant on there. It appears. It must have been a rich person. We decided. So it decided to not just burn, but it decided to actually blow up. Which accelerants IE gasoline will do. Yeah, I understand that to be the case now. How close were you to this physically? 5 feet, maybe. And how did you come out of it? I mean, we were conditioned. What? Yes. I don't know. Something was pretty miraculous because I didn't get hurt at all. I had melted plastic in my hair, but yeah, I mean, I could have got eye injury could have gone deaf could have got killed. But I didn't, I mean, I've had millions of millions. I've had one. Okay, I've had several burn piles over the years, and I've never had one explode, ever. Fire, gas, very scientifical. Yeah. Yeah, so. Thank you. I win the Darwin award for your mother voice on him. Given to my eye right now. There you go. I think I'm grounded. So what lessons have we learned here, sir? Don't be stupid. Number one, I have to relearn that regularly. He did have a garden hose out because it's still melted to the driveway, or he just decided to leave it. No, I mean, anytime I have a fire, I have a hose out there just because he doesn't know. You could get some possibility. I may blow myself up, so I'll have a garden hose. The wind could come and actually there wasn't a wind, but wind could come pick something up and I don't want to slip the neighbors Woods on fire or anything else..

NRA Wayne Lapierre Wayne Second Amendment foundation New York Ted Olson kenzie Jim Kinsey GM United States Jim
"ted olson" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:13 min | 8 months ago

"ted olson" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"That was the late justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg questioning attorney Ted Olson with the firm Gibson Dunn who argued and won that case Just a quick recap here The case was about a film that had been made criticizing Hillary Clinton the first time she tried to run for president It was funded by a cohort of right-wing organizations and corporations including Coke industries so the federal election commission had said that the movie couldn't screen without identifying itself as campaign material and noting its funders The filmmakers and their attorneys argue that this violated their free speech rights and they won opening the door to unlimited corporate funding of political propaganda What's generally referred to as simply dark money But citizens united was not the first battle in the war over corporate free speech nor was it the last The story actually begins back in the late 1960s with mobile oil and its issue advertising program It was a multifaceted strategy that included defining a personality for mobile aligning the company with cultural institutions and advertising ideas rather than just gas The strategy came from mobile's VP of public affairs herb shirts as a way to counter widespread criticism of oil companies in the press and it was championed by the company's CEO Raleigh Warner Here's schmertz later in life describing mobile's personality Well it was multifaceted It was a personality where we believe very strongly about the importance for public policy issues Secondly we believe fervently that as a sort of custodian the large corporation and is custodians of vast resources and employment and everything else that we were not doing our job if we did not participate in the marketplace of ideas Third part of our personality was we believed in that a democracy is composed of a group of free institutions We believe in free markets freedom of speech freedom.

Gibson Dunn Coke industries Ted Olson Ruth Bader Ginsburg federal election commission Hillary Clinton Raleigh Warner Here schmertz
"ted olson" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:07 min | 8 months ago

"ted olson" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"It looks like mostly the board Of the Reagan foundation Which I feel a very close affinity to our Friends and surrogates and confidants of the chairman Fred Ryan to make sure he has no challenges And your little fare early on he was staff assistant at the pregnant president Reagan in the office of presidential advance Where of course he would have met his friend Fred Ryan Just giving you some examples Let's see here We have John lonsdale cofounder managing partner 8 VC a U.S. based venture capital firm which manages $4 billion Something is strange here mister producer Why all these individuals these investors these finance guys there aren't many reaganites on the Reagan border directors ladies and gentlemen and McLaughlin core locus is Steve Forbes is Then you have Susan McCall businesswoman former diplomat and philanthropist She served as the U.S. ambassador to the republic of Austria under whom And is currently president of S and R capital investments We have Rupert Murdoch and Lachlan Murdoch those are two reaganites Peggy noonan really a reaganite name only Ted Olson used to be an old buddy of mine but he's crossed the railroad tracks Gerald parsky chairman of aurora capital Jim Patterson chairman chief executive officer for sole owner of the Patterson group Canada's third largest privately held company I know that was here oregano

John dorm FBI Michael sussman Hillary Clinton Lizzy chaney sussman alpha bank Fred Ryan Rodney jaffe dorma U.S. government State Department Philly Donald Trump Russia Hillary Washington Post Moscow Department of Justice John McCain
Are All Reagan Presidential Foundation Board Members Reaganites?

Mark Levin

02:07 min | 8 months ago

Are All Reagan Presidential Foundation Board Members Reaganites?

"It looks like mostly the board Of the Reagan foundation Which I feel a very close affinity to our Friends and surrogates and confidants of the chairman Fred Ryan to make sure he has no challenges And your little fare early on he was staff assistant at the pregnant president Reagan in the office of presidential advance Where of course he would have met his friend Fred Ryan Just giving you some examples Let's see here We have John lonsdale cofounder managing partner 8 VC a U.S. based venture capital firm which manages $4 billion Something is strange here mister producer Why all these individuals these investors these finance guys there aren't many reaganites on the Reagan border directors ladies and gentlemen and McLaughlin core locus is Steve Forbes is Then you have Susan McCall businesswoman former diplomat and philanthropist She served as the U.S. ambassador to the republic of Austria under whom And is currently president of S and R capital investments We have Rupert Murdoch and Lachlan Murdoch those are two reaganites Peggy noonan really a reaganite name only Ted Olson used to be an old buddy of mine but he's crossed the railroad tracks Gerald parsky chairman of aurora capital Jim Patterson chairman chief executive officer for sole owner of the Patterson group Canada's third largest privately held company I know that was here oregano

Fred Ryan Reagan Foundation John Lonsdale President Reagan Susan Mccall VC Steve Forbes U.S. Lachlan Murdoch Republic Of Austria Mclaughlin Reagan Rupert Murdoch Peggy Noonan Gerald Parsky Ted Olson Aurora Capital Jim Patterson Patterson Group Canada
"ted olson" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

The Doug Collins Podcast

04:21 min | 11 months ago

"ted olson" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

"You were there at some pretty, I guess pivotal times with DoJ, especially with, as you mentioned, 9 11, the world on terror. You've told me a little bit about that before. How did it feel, you know, besides working a little property which led you when we're going to talk a lot about music here in a minute, but I'm fascinated because that was when you had the terror issues, you had the everything was coming together. Everybody was sort of in a panic. Describe working at the Department of Justice during that time. Well, when I first got there, I think that our mission was to try to clean up the department. It had gone through several previous attorneys general that I think had very unsuccessful terms, a lot of division, a lot of questions about the integrity of the department. And John ashcroft came in with I think a very strong feeling that he wanted to rebuild the department. On his very first day, he insisted on shaking the hands of everyone in this enormous building, which took pretty much the entire day. But it was his approach to how he wanted to govern as attorney general. Show me statement mentality. It really was. And he went through a very tough confirmation hearing, but yet his approach was to not hold any grudges and instead to try to go in and be the best attorney general he could. And as I mentioned, it wasn't that long after that he was sworn in that 9 11 happened. And I was with him on a small plane flying as many of the cabinet secretaries were to destinations to do reading events with the president's reading initiative. And so we were on a small plane to do that when the first attack happened. Wow. And we landed. We refueled the plane. We turned around and even though there was a no fly order, we took off. And headed back to Washington. And several times, the plane was told to divert and land because they were bringing all the planes down to the ground in this era of uncertainty of what was going on. But we insisted on getting back to Washington, finally, we got to the outskirts of D.C. when we were told that there was a shoot down order for any plane that entered the airspace. And so we had to kind of wait. And they sent an F 15 escort plane that pulled up right next to us. I have a picture from out the window. Wow. We then flew over the smoking Pentagon, which had just been hit. And learned at that time that one of our close personal friends in our solicitor general Ted Olson's wife had been on that plane that hit The Pentagon. I had just had dinner with her a few nights before. And so we flew over the smoking Pentagon landed as the last plane to land with this fighter escort and immediately went to the FBI, where we basically lived for several months. You know, we'd go home to shower or change clothes, but it was pretty much living at the FBI. And it was during that period of time that the Patriot Act was born and there was focus on not just figuring out what had happened, but also about how to prevent any future attacks. And it was an incredible time to be there next to the attorney general and to watch how we got through that period. And it really continued throughout the tenure of terrorism being an issue for the entire period. And what's often happens in crises is you have pendulums that swing one way or the other. And I think, you know, there was an effort to focus on preventing the next attack, which was the right focus right after 9 11. And then at some point, people very quickly forget, and there's a focus on, did you go too far and should you bring it back? And there were a lot of issues that brought up a lot of tensions during that time, whether it had to do with torture, Guantanamo, surveillance by the government. These were all issues that were very front and center that you were trying to balance at a time where you were expecting more attacks, but yet you didn't want to forget who we were as a country and what was important to us in terms of our principles and our values. And so it really was an amazing time. I was fortunate to be able to serve during that time. And my respect for John ashcroft only grew during his tenure. I think he was a remarkable attorney general in a great man. I think it'll go back in time and I think that's going to come back.

Pentagon John ashcroft DoJ Department of Justice Washington FBI Ted Olson cabinet D.C. Guantanamo
"ted olson" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"ted olson" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Well it's a pleasure to have Mark Meadows on the program Former chief of staff to president Trump Mark how are you my friend I'm doing fine Mark and thank you for having me on And my best to you and your lovely wife And likewise Merry Christmas to you my friend While as a lawyer I'm not going to put you on the spot with what you're confused Let me just say this And I don't want you to comment on it as a lawyer I'll give you that advice I could not be more disgusted What's taking place taking honorable people who have served this country And trying to turn them into criminal defendants I've never seen anything like this You know I worked for 8 years in the Reagan administration I represented attorney general meese and I ran contra With other lawyers Lori represented president Reagan Ted Olson other lawyers represented other people I've never seen anything like this This is really a horrifically rogue operation As I said I don't want you to comment on it Your lawyer is George to willow Is that correct That's correct Mark He is He's a fantastic lawyer He was Deputy Attorney General And he'll give you good advice So you hang in there the nation is with you The lavina force I feel I feel that And if you if I could take a point of personal privilege you just thank all the listeners for their well wishes and their prayers I can tell you our country is worth standing up for Mark and you have done that over and over and over again You bring the truth to the American people Every single week and it's honored to call you my friend but it's also an honor to stand for the forgotten men and women Amen And likewise likewise well you've written a fantastic book the chiefs chief And you know what's amazing As soon as it comes out the propagandist in the Democrat party media are looking to create controversy between you and president Trump Did you notice that Yes I noticed that all too well The good thing is is if anybody buys the book and read it it's a tribute to the unbelievable accomplishments that actually you and I got to witness up close and personal on a number of times whether I was chief of staff or as a member of Congress but yeah they try to in even now They're trying to make sure it doesn't sell and it has a bad headline here or there But I can tell you the Patriots out there are encouraging us and certainly I think it tells the story about how president Trump honestly came in and did things that have never been done before in Mark you and I know that but one of the ones that I outlined in the book is moving the embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem and a lot of us are candidates and presidents had promised that but it was only one who did it You really were a witness to history When you look at the accomplishments of this president whether you were in the house or whether you were serving by his side it is absolutely remarkable how much was achieved in four years and how much was achieved that's patriotic pro American and conservative And then you look at the attacks from the rhinos From the families or individuals and prior administrations and so forth that accomplished so little And I come out of the Reagan administrator I look at Trump and I said why is it that these people want Look at the things that this man at you whether it's the border whether it's the economy whether it's the military Look at the foreign policy achievements You can go on and on and on and then you compare them to what Biden did There really isn't any question is there Mark Meadows There is no question whatsoever I mean the contrast couldn't be more stark And the one other thing I want to tell your listeners that they may not understand about president Trump is that he wanted good advice He wanted different differing opinions and would act on it and you're listeners need to know that you are reluctant and hesitant to call at times But when you did not only did that message get through to president Trump but it resonated and he knew that it had authority because you were connected to millions and millions of people across the country and he loves to refer to him as his base but he also listened to people like you that would say I think you need to go this direction or that And I thank you for that advice Well you're very kind And you know I did not take advantage of that right It was only maybe You did not In fact if anything I wanted you to call more and you were always very reluctant adviser but when you called there used to be an old commercial when EF Hutton talks people listen Well I could say the same about you my friend You're awfully kind Very very kind So tell me this What is it that caused you to write this book You're watching everything that's going on And before you even get to that there's a lot of people who are around president Trump are writing these very negative books I'm not going to put you in the spot We know who they are Or they're in the cabinet and they're writing these very very negative books You got along with the president You helped move his agenda You are a sounding board for the president You cared about the president.

president Trump Mark Meadows president Trump Mark Mark attorney general meese Reagan Ted Olson Reagan administration Lori Democrat party chiefs George Tel Aviv Patriots Jerusalem Congress Reagan Biden EF Hutton cabinet
"ted olson" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"ted olson" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Told the commanders there that he knows that this is a battle that the federal government has to to work on battling all of these wildfires, not a Democrat thing, It's not a Republican thing. It's a weather thing. It's a reality. It's serious and we can do this. We can do this process building back. We can create jobs while he was in Boise. He promised to do whatever possible to help the firefighters who were on the ground, including paying several firefighters more. He doesn't have control over Cal fire and local firefighters. But federal firefighters, he says they need to get more money directed my administration to provide for Pay bonuses and incentives to ensure every federal firefighter because that's the only authority I have. Makes at least $15 an hour. I mean, I should make a hell of a heck of a lot more and Kenny. He toured the center, he held an axe. He looked at a dia rama to about wildfires, He said. Thank you to firefighters saying that That God made firefighters and any thank them for everything that they do. Okay. Well, Alex, we know that the president's visit is twofold. We've got a recall election tomorrow. So tell us what he's doing tonight. Yeah, that's the other part of what's going on. And then why he's in California. So tonight, heading down to Long Beach, he will leave Sacramento around seven o'clock tonight. He'll be appearing at the community College in Long Beach with Governor Newsom, really the and so we'll have the president's remarks before he leaves And then, of course, covering that story later tonight, Right now, it's 4 28 kpk will head over to our traffic center. Now for KPK State has you by Wadhwani PSA insurance Downtown of the split is 13 minutes, he's found Cap City so fairly slow ride here. On this Monday afternoon. You get some slowing getting out of midtown and as you approach Want Avenue split to Roosevelt 11 minutes here and started to clean up. So that should change down Ted L Grove also 11 minutes. Nothing delaying you there. 15 minutes on 99, which is sluggish from it Looks like Centerville. To about Sheldon. Maybe even one part. Maybe even Calvin. Consume this, but anyway, yes, slowing down. Ted Olson. 24 minutes eastbound 50 16 minutes to Woodland north on I five and downtown to Davis west about 80 going to be a 10 minute trip and get some heavy traffic coming toward town, possibly because of an accident at fifth. On eastbound 50. But anyway, it's backed up to the causeway..

Alex 13 minutes Long Beach Woodland California Davis Boise 10 minute 11 minutes Sacramento Kenny 15 minutes tomorrow Ted Olson tonight Centerville 24 minutes Republican Roosevelt Cap City
"ted olson" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

07:27 min | 1 year ago

"ted olson" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Show a day of remembrance as we are literally just minutes away from the 20th anniversary, the historic one of 9 11. Now we do this segment every night on our show called Support our heroes. And tonight, every single one of you are heroes. And I think about especially those folks who are running into the twin towers. Maybe they were running into the Pentagon. Maybe they were there in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. And my heart and my prayers go out to all of the family members who lost loved ones on 9 11 and we've been talking a lot about New York but I also want to bring up The military, the number of veterans and military and active duty who are also involved, particularly on the Pentagon flight, and it's very near and dear and personal to me. Um, just a few days before 9 11. Barbara Olson, who was a really good friend of mine was on that plane that crashed into the Pentagon on 9 11. I had talked to Barbara Soon before 9 11. I had interviewed her many times. I was senior correspondent for Fox News in Washington. She was very well known one of the top conservative consultants and contributors if you will. And I think, 9 11. When I first saw the planes going into the twin towers, I just my gut. It just broke my heart. And when I saw that plane crashed into the Pentagon, and then they put up the picture of Barbara Olson And it was a picture from the interview I had done with her just a few days before it really, really, um just made it so unbelievably real to me and to know that a friend of mine was on that flight and her last few moments she was talking to her husband. Then Solicitor General Ted Olson, who was telling her that the plane was about to crash because they had known what had happened with the two planes in New York, and they knew what was going to happen very shortly to that plane that was then slamming into the Pentagon. And as we talk about supporting our heroes tonight, There were many people also inside the Pentagon. That fateful day who died all told 125 military personnel and civilians were killed in the Pentagon. Along with 64 people, including my friend, Barbara Olson was on board that fateful flight. You know so many emotions as we are now on the 20th anniversary of 9 11, and last night on the show, we had a caller. We get so many beautiful calls from all of you and I love hearing from all of you and we're going to continue with calls in a moment, but there was one caller last night. John, who is a retired F D n Y from the Fire Department, the great Fire Department here in New York and he was so emotional and it really hit with this anniversary is all about some of the anger. Some of the frustration some of the heartbreak that many of us are feeling. I'm feeling it with you, and I wanted to play that call back. This is John, who called us Last night on the show. I served my city as a police officer before the fire department correction opposite I get three jobs for the city of New York. Well, I just retired, and I responded that night. Down to ground zero as they call it. And I'm sitting here looking up Facebook of all my friends that is sick. I was I was dead or five times a Methodist hospital revived. I'm very, very sick from 9 11. I don't know how much I got to live, but I am so disgusted, disgusted of what's going on giving back that country. It's a slap in the face you all heroes here and our heroes over that country in the country that tight I have a friend. My name is John. Silence. I have a friend Don Regan, who died That day was never found. We were probie school make called me. He has 13 Children. He's graduating. Never thought I was blessed to walk my daughter down the aisle and see my grandchildren, But it's just my heart broke broke. What this government do it. They just given out cookie back to them, and we got to both about and I hope to see them boarded up before you ever bears away. Once resting. We would respond again and do this faith things if we ever have to. God forbid. We are that dedicated and our hearts and our souls for this city, you know, country It is unbelievably Emotional to hear from someone like that. And I know so many of you are feeling that tonight. We're taking your calls, because I love hearing from all of you. And our thoughts and prayers are, of course with John. And every great American out there The numbers 1 808 489222. Let's go to dumb in Minnesota. Dom, you're here on this special program. I want to hear your emotions You just heard from John I. It brings tears to my eyes when I think about what he went through and how he feels America is today. You know, I was holding onto my emotions. And just after now humans to go and I heard John it started developed Even after 20 years. I am a teacher by trade have been for the last 35 years. I was in class at eight. A.m.. Process started, and then we heard students rush into my classroom right about Little after 8 45 50. In my class and said that a plane had crashed into the World Trade Center. Everybody. We drop everything and rush to the cafeteria to wash the second plane hit the South tower. And that's when he kind of knew it started talking all this is not a crash. This is happening intentionally. How sad and we were all looking at each other. They know what to say. And I could see The face. I mean, the the the the horror on the people's faces. All of our students are like, what the heck is going on? So, uh, I decided at that point. You know, um, to do something good about it. And many years later, and I've been making contributions to the Minister Taras Foundation for the last 10 years. Monthly contributions. How beautiful By the way, Dumb. Thank you. Thank you for the call. Um, and thank you for supporting the tunnels. Two Towers Foundation because they are extraordinary. And I remember meeting Frank Siller years and years ago and he was telling me about his heroic brother and what he went through, um, and to see where they have become an all the incredible good that they do. So Bravo! That's really, really beautiful. Let's go to Ed from Long Island Edge. You're here on the Rita Cosby Show on this very special day of remembrance. Go ahead. Period at called two hours ago. I hung on and I'm back again. Yeah, you've been on for two hours. I'm glad we got you. Thank you, Ed. Come on. It's so nice to hear your sweet, iconic voice. You're a gem. Read it. You really are You really are. Thank you. By the way, I everybody I feel so moved today, and it's such an honor for me to be with all of you. Well, every day. We feel like this because you know you You were the one you're anchoring America right now. Our hopes and our dreams. You really are You angry? Our country. You really.

Barbara Olson Frank Siller Don Regan Two Towers Foundation 1 808 489222 Ed Minnesota Washington World Trade Center John New York Barbara Soon Fox News 64 people two hours tonight 13 Children two hours ago Last night 20th anniversary
"ted olson" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"ted olson" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"Before was in my office was just a young associate law firm and remember. I had a legal writing. Professor adam alani who had gone into teaching law after being in a law firm in oklahoma city after the oklahoma city bombing. That's an event that really didn't have profound national psychological consequences. But he said he had people from his office who were in that building when it blew up and had a guy come in from out of town and just demanded that they still do. A deposition was little offices and shocking. That was the day. He decided he wouldn't be lawyer. That was in my office that he watching what was happening. My boss's daughter was in the building and we had a lawyer come in demanded. We had to do this deposition that day had to be done and i just thought i don't. I don't want to work with people like this and that. That was actually the day. That i knew i could not make a living as a lawyer. I had to work with and deal with people like that. it just it it. It struck me. The same thing happened to my law. Professor i knew i wanted to be a law professor though there was no. I'm just gonna have to come up with something. I didn't like being a lawyer anyway. There's this thing called a client blue when we come back. Brigadier general lawrence study is going to join me. He was in the pentagon on september eleventh. Two thousand one would talk about his experience happening there. He lives just outside of atlanta now. is retired from the national guard. One of my just honors in life was to get to know former defense secretary don rumsfeld Got hang out with him multiple times at connected a friend of mine to his office as after he left the pentagon and she helped him write his memoir which is a fantastic read. And then i got to spend time with him a number of times. He died very recently. He told me stories about being in the pentagon on september eleventh. What it was like My next guest was also in the pentagon that day Retired brigadier general lawrence dugny Who lives outside of atlanta in canton General thank you very much for being with me. Thank you so much for having me on today. So i remember secretary rumsfeld One of the things that you know when you talk to people who are new york on nine eleven one of the things they say is that it was. It was beautiful weather clear sky. It was cool. The summer was finally over and secretary rumsfeld said would he remember he was in the pentagon and what he remembered was just the the smell the smell of the plane it stuck with him for the rest of his life on impact in what was going on that day he just e silva he can never get that smell of just the the jet fuel smell out of out of his nostrils it seemed like just haunted him and i were there that day and i know you know i. I lost a friend on that plane. Barbara olson I was in law school. She was ted olson's wife the solicitor general. She was on the plane that flew into the pentagon that day. and i. if you wouldn't mind just just let's talk about what it.

secretary rumsfeld Professor adam alani pentagon oklahoma city lawrence dugny atlanta national guard lawrence canton new york Barbara olson silva ted olson
"ted olson" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

07:18 min | 1 year ago

"ted olson" Discussed on WSB-AM

"But you're right Switch to Geico. It's obviously a good idea. Five Tomorrow Sunny on Sunday Low 63 high 88 77 degrees in Midtown. I'm Sabrina Coop at 95.5 WSB Atlanta's News and talk join Eric's Army of Activists. Text Army 233777 now One of my just honors in life was to get to know. Former defense Secretary Uh don Rumsfeld got to hang out with him multiple times had connected a friend of mine to his office as after he left the Pentagon and she helped him write his memoir, which is a fantastic read, And then I got to spend time with him a number of times He died very recently, he told me stew. Worries about being in the Pentagon. On September 11th what it was like, Uh, my next guest was also in the Pentagon that day, retired Brigadier General Lawrence Delaney, who lives outside of Atlanta in Kenton, General. Thank you very much for being with me. Eric. Thank you so much for having me on today. So I remember Secretary Rumsfeld one of the things that you know when you talk to people who are in New York on 9 11 1 of the things they say is that it was it was the beautiful weather Clear sky. It was cool. The summer was finally over, and Secretary Rumsfeld said Would he remember he was in the Pentagon and when he remembered was just the smell. The smell of the plane. It's stuck with him for the rest of his life on impact. And what was going on that day. He just He said that he could never get that smell of just the the jet fuel smell out of out of his nostrils. It seemed like it just haunted him. And you were there that day, and I know you know, I lost a friend on that plane. Barbara Olson, Uh, I was in law school. She was Ted Olson's wife, the solicitor general. She was on the plane that flew into The Pentagon that day, and I just if you wouldn't mind, just just let's talk about what it was like to be there that day. Well, it was on a Tuesday and that was the day Yeah, that I went in early. Everybody kind of had a duty roster. Who would go in early and open up? Uh, the alphas. To you was my day. Uh, get in there About five o'clock and more. Get the coffee pot. I don't get lights on everything else. Um And So I'm doing some work working on a couple of briefings that morning, too. I kind of lost track of time. The general secretary came by the general he was on leave. But the general secretary came back toward the coffee part and she said something to me about a plane and I just wasn't paying any attention doesn't Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. Yeah, I know. Had no idea what she was talking about. Then she came back a second again, She said, Uh, Lieutenant Dan, another plane hit the building. I said, What are you talking about? So I got up and then I kind of looked around because their office was laid out. It was like four rooms. It was like a reception area where the general secretary was and his executive assistant. And then there was an operations guy and then a TV sitting over in the corner, and then his office was directly beside that reception area and then in the back Was all our workstations. I called it deal with veal. But our workstations were back there and then at the end, but a carpet part coffee part was another. Small office where the deputy work And I kind of stood up and looked around at the gosh. Where is everybody? And then I go in and everybody around the T. V, you know, with the World Trade Center. And I'm looking at it. And it didn't seem real. I mean, I'm looking at none of us were saying anything there was about eight or 10 of us around the T V. It just didn't seem real. To me. It was like a Steven Seagal, a Bruce Willis movie. It just it wasn't registered. And I'm not sure how long I was standing there or any of us would have been 20 seconds, two minutes. Whatever. Then everybody kind of started moving. So I went back to my cubicle started sending out emails of people saying, Hey, are you aware of this kind of stuff, and, uh, you know what's going on with the World Trade Center. And then, uh, I called a friend of mine, a marine colonel, which kind of ties in what Secretary Rumsfeld said about the weather. I had this Marine Colonel did I was in the war college with it was on the joint staff. He worked on the far side of the building. Uh, he actually rule with me for a while until he could get his wife moved up from San Diego. So I called him And I said, right? I said, What is this is a terrorist attack as well. How could you tell? He said, Well, I'm an aviator. You've got to look at the weather conditions. They like pretty much unlimited visibility. You know, Whatever. Okay, so during that point in time, the plane here Uh, And it threw me You know, across the room. And when I got up a little later, I still had to receive him My hand and I had a desktop sitting on top of me Good grief. And Then I hear the screaming going on and it was the secretary. And she's the only person besides needed. I think you know that we're still alive. So I ended up getting up and going to her and the wall that separated Dilbert bill from the General's office in the reception area was Partially blown away. I was able to climb over the wall to get to her. And soon as I put my hands on her, she just squeezed and living daylights out of me, She said. I'm scared. I said, are you He said. I'm scared. I said there's are you hurt, she said. I'm scared, and I said, Well, that's OK. I'm scared, too. But I said, everything's gonna be all right. And, uh, I'll give you the G rated version. What she said No crap gonna be all right, You know, but I said I said, okay. We're getting out of here. I said, Let's head towards that. The, uh Table where the coffee party is. So I picked the ref. And went work my way back over to where The table was and then we had a filing cabinet that back corner. And got up on top of it with her and the all fish. Beside next to us away from the point of impact. There were people over there, so I was able to get there's over to them. And during this time, everybody else in the Alpha started answering that. So I said, Come to me. Come to me. Come to me. Come to the copy part. Come to me. People started coming over there and I started Yeah, getting my hand down, getting them up getting them over. And then the Deputy he was standing there. And we just kept going back over. Okay? Who do we get out? Who and we could account for everybody? But one person we could account for.

Barbara Olson Ted Olson San Diego New York Steven Seagal Sabrina Coop Bruce Willis 20 seconds September 11th two minutes today Dan Sunday Dilbert Tuesday 88 233777 Kenton Eric T. V
"ted olson" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

06:35 min | 1 year ago

"ted olson" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"So that happened pretty quickly. He ordered all american airline planes in the northeast that weren't currently in the air to stay on the ground. After the second tower was hit in new york american airlines executives thought that it must have been flight seventy seven and when they learned that united was also missing a plane that's when they ordered a ground stop of all their planes nationwide at this time. According to the nine eleven commission report at least two passengers on flight seventy seven called family members from the plane renee may called her mother and told her that the plane had been hijacked. She asked her mother to alert. American airlines and her mother did that right away. Another passenger barbara called her husband. Ted olson ted olson at the time was the solicitor general of the united states. The call was cut off about a minute into the conversation. At which time. Ted unsuccessfully tried to reach john ashcroft the attorney general barbara called back shared more details. She asked ted for advice on what she should tell the pilots and the crew to do and at that time ted told barbara about the world. Trade center crashes barbara did not panic and she did not seem aware that a crash was imminent. She was trying to look out the window to tell ted where they were. She told him that they were flying over. Some houses and the call was cut off at eight fifty five. Am there was an announcement to the south tower of the world trade center and everyone was told to stay in their offices and to stay. Put not evacuate. I know that this is very difficult to hear a think about but there thousands of people in these towers and i think that the thinking was if they fled the streets. It's going to make any sort of evacuation emergency vehicle around the towers anymore difficult now. This didn't direction to stay put. Didn't last very long so at nine o'clock along with the flu the calls coming from flight. Seventy seven flight one. Seventy five has also attacked several passengers and flight attendants on that plane are making calls as well and reporting very similar things Box cutters hijacking. That transformers is it's a it's a similar. They were clearly following a similar plan so at nine oh two after the initial instruction of the for the people in the south tower to stay. Put the port authority officially broadcast to evacuate both towers via the public address system. An estimated ten thousand to fourteen thousand people are already in the process of evacuating when at nine. Oh three a. M. hijackers crash united airlines flight. One seventy five into flour into floors seventy five eighty five of the world trade center south tower killing everyone on board and hundreds inside the building. This is only seventeen minutes after the first impact which is an incredibly short amount of time. Although i will say at this point i highly recommend everyone watching one hundred and two minutes. That changed america. It's a it's a history channel documentary in it is just found footage from new yorkers and people in the surrounding area of that day. And it's it's it's the hundred two minutes so it's just it's Editing the audio and the video from that time and it's really impactful to see it unfold in real time and to see how people were putting together what's happening. There's an incredibly horrific moment when there are some students at nyu feeling from their dorm room and they film as this second flight crashes into the south tower and just their their terror. There tear filling like we're under attack it you know. We are marching through this knowing what we know now but like i said it wasn't just government officials that couldn't comprehend even the people who knew that it was a hijacking from the beginning couldn't comprehend what was happening people on the ground. It was so many people thought that the first plane was an accident and they just accidentally flowed into a tower. That had happened early in the twentieth century with people flying into skyscrapers. It's interesting in. We'll talk about this in the events leading up to nine eleven that the nine hundred ninety three world trade center bombing had more of an impact i think on new yorkers and they did on the rest of america because there were several people in the found footage you say oh they came back. This is member. They tried nineteen ninety-three. They kind of instantly thought that this was terrorism but the second plane hitting the south tower is when you feel the energy and this footage in an audio and people's tear really shift dramatically. And that's when you start to see the government understanding what's happening as well because at nine eight the faa banned takeoffs flights going into new york city or through the airspace around the city and nine twenty one. The port authority closed all bridges and tunnels in the new york city area at nine twenty four. The faa notified needs of the suspected hijacking. A flight seventy seven because of the that were coming from passengers on that plane and at nine thirty one president bush spoke from florida and called the events an apparent terrorist attack on the country so back on board flight. Seventy seven at nine twenty nine the autopilot on that flight was disengaged at nine thirty two controllers at dulles observed something on the radar tracking east at a high rate of speed at nine thirty four ronald reagan. Airport advise the secret service that an unknown plane was heading toward the white house. The plane made a three hundred and thirty degree. Turn and descended rapidly through two thousand two hundred feet pointed toward the pentagon. The pilot advanced the throttles to maximum power and dove into the pentagon at nine thirty seven. Am the plane was traveling at about five hundred thirty miles per hour. Everyone on board and one hundred and twenty-five civilians and military personnel at the pentagon were killed now. This was a part of the building. Correct me if i'm wrong. That was sort of under construction so that was actually not as fully staffed as other parts of the building so at nine forty two. Am for the first time in american history that faa grounds all flights over bound for the continental united states. Some three thousand three hundred commercial flights and one thousand two hundred private planes are guide airports in canada. The united states over the next two and a half hours of several friends that were in flights are grounded in several parts across the world and i think that the impact of people that this decision was really far reaching and and brought home the seriousness of the events in a real way for people all over the world..

barbara ted nine eleven commission Trade center crash united airlines Ted olson ted olson united states john ashcroft American airlines renee Ted faa flu new york united nyu new york city pentagon
"ted olson" Discussed on Reality Life with Kate Casey

Reality Life with Kate Casey

07:13 min | 1 year ago

"ted olson" Discussed on Reality Life with Kate Casey

"Welcome back to another episode of reality life with casey unbelievably this week marks. The twentieth anniversary of the september eleventh attacks often referred to as nine eleven. They were a series of four coordinated. Terrorist attacks by the militant islamicists terrorist group. Al-qaeda against the united states of america on the morning of tuesday september eleventh. Two thousand one on that morning. Four commercial airliners travelling from the northeastern united states to california or hijacked midflight by nineteen. Al-qaeda terrorists the hijackers were organized into three groups of five hijackers and one group of four each group one hijacker who had received flight training and took over control of the aircraft. Their explicit goal was to crash each plane into a prominent american building causing mass casualties and partial or complete destruction of the targeted buildings. The first plane to hit its target was american airlines flight eleven. It was flown into the north tower of the world. Trade center complex in lower manhattan at eight forty six. Am seventeen minutes later. Nine three a. m. the world trade center south tower was hit by united airlines flight. One seventy five both one hundred ten storey towers collapsed within an hour and forty two minutes leading to the collapse of the other world trade center structures including seven world trade center and significantly damaging surrounding buildings a third flight american airlines flight seventy seven flown from dulles. International airport was hijacked over ohio at nine thirty seven. Am crashed into the west side of the pentagon causing a partial collapse of the buildings side and the fourth and final flight. United airlines flight ninety three was flown into the direction of dc. This flight was the only plane not to hit. Its intended target instead crashing into a field near shanksville pennsylvania at three a m. The plane's passengers attempted to regain control of the aircraft away from the hijackers ultimately diverted the flight from its intended target. Investigators determine that flight ninety. Three's target was either the white house or the us capital if you're a longtime listener you know that i've done several nine eleven episodes over the course of nearly four hundred episodes. I've interviewed the author of the oral history of nine. Eleven by gareth graph. It's called the only plane in the sky. I've also interviewed alison crawlers. The mother of wells cruthers when hijacked flight one seventy five hit the world trade center south tower people on the seventy eighth floor. Sky lobby huddled together frightened and confused. There was no escape as far as they could tell and then a man with a red bandanna covering his nose and mouth suddenly appeared from the wreckage and smoke. He spoke in a calm voice in guided them to a stairway leading them to safety the man in the red bandanna made three trips to the sky lobby saving as many people as he could until the burning building collapsed a few months later after nine eleven stories from survivors surfaced about this mysterious man wearing the red bandanna so when alison crowther. Read an article about the hero and the new york times. She knew that was her son. Twenty four year old welles crowther. He had carried a red handkerchief since he was a boy. He worked as an equities trader and was also a volunteer firefighter. The red bandanna is a documentary on amazon prime. But also a book by tom rinaldi. It's a great book to share with your children. And most inspirational story about heroism and i've also interviewed gideon and now day the french filmmakers who shot the only clear video of an airliner slamming into the world trade center's north tower. It is a gripping moment in documentary history. Watching the plane hit the building. They were in new york city at the time because they were making a documentary on members of engine seven ladder. One firehouse in lower manhattan. That footage shot in two thousand one was made into the two thousand documentary. Nine eleven and that video camera that jews was using the captured flight eleven crashing into the world. Trade center is now on display the national museum of american history in washington dc. I'd also like to recommend a documentary. Just watch this week. It is called nine eleven inside the president's war room it is available on apple. Tv when the planes hijacked by al-qaeda terrorist destroyed the twin towers in the world trade center it took a lives of nearly three thousand americans and the chaos was such that there actually was no single room that president george w bush is advisors afraid of their own safety and constantly searching for information. Were on the move all day and they had to conduct their business in an airbase bunker. The back room school and aboard the president's jet air force. So what's great about this documentary. Is it gives you that sensation of reliving. Each moment with the former president and his closest advisors in one of the most pivotal moments in. Us history that day is often described as a disaster movie that no screenwriter would dare imagine. What's most compelling is that each government official shares the recollections on camera so the vivid pictures are outstripped by these personal anecdotes for example. You hear from the situation room captain who recalls having debris herself against the presence desk as air force one made a steep emergency takeoff saying that they went partially weightless and they were petrified. And the deputy communications director. Who got flustered. when president bush's doctor handed out anti anthrax pills and then they took all seven at one time and then worried that they may have set themselves up perch for death. That incredible documentary includes interviews with former president. George w bush former vice president. Dick cheney condoleeza rice colin powell andy card ari fleischer karl rove air force. One pilot mark tillmon ted olson and others. Of course ted olson's wife. Barbara died in the plane crash of flight. Eleven this documentary. I really want you to watch it again. It's called nine eleven inside the president's war room on apple tv on nine eleven. I was living in a near a military base in virginia beach. I was with someone. At the time who was on deployment in england with the us navy and in a strange sequence of events i ended up giving the fbi a tip about hijacker who had been using a mail depot across the street from an apartment that i lived earlier that year. My sister megan was working for seven world trade center for city group that day and it would be more than nine hours before i was able to locate her later that evening and then finally my friend show from college was one of the first responders. The pentagon on nine eleven. And it's something that we've discussed recently. And i'm so grateful that in this episode he is opened up about what transpired that early morning. And also how it's impacted the rest of his life and career. Joe is a retired army ranger in green beret and he has a passion for helping veterans with their mental health struggles. every year. my kids. I spend time bringing cards and treats to our local fire and police station on a nine on nine. Eleven.

qaeda Trade center world trade center south tower al shanksville gareth graph alison crawlers wells cruthers Us alison crowther welles crowther tom rinaldi manhattan united airlines american airlines dulles casey United airlines president bush
"ted olson" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

08:24 min | 1 year ago

"ted olson" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Those seem like they're two very different. The different songs very different songs one about being. I'm guessing being able to cry when you lose a love and the other one is about being all muscle and bone and punch death. It's it is. It's a real weird choice to have as an aside side. Like i feel like besides should've just been a baby to cry instrumental. It's a really good song it's jazzy kind of it's a bluesy country song with a little sadness to it but not like sixteen tons right right. It's it's much more it's similar to. I would say like what was on the radio at the time. Which i guess is why they thought it would be a huge hit like it's a great performance. It's a really good song and it's it seems very radio friendly like let's be honest. Sixteen tonnes is radio friendly right. There's not a whole lot of music to it and it's very says says he'll well. Yeah and you know what says the executives at capital so radio deejays began playing the b. side within eleven days the sixteen ton single sold four hundred thousand copies in twenty four days. It sold one million copies and in less than two months. Two million copies sold and this feels like every decade. Somebody figures this outright which is just write a song about how worked socks people eat it up like take this job and shove it nine to five. Yeah like i'm sure there's other examples and it's like just you really write that song you release and people are going to go nuts for like it like i said every decade i feel like there's one of those figures that out everybody's working for the weekend that's how i was thinking i'm trying to think of a really recent one but i can't i. I'm sure there i'm sure there's one there there. I guess the only one that's really the opposite of of that is fancy by the end. She's doing great. She's for the work you got like mansions everywhere that's true. So at the time of its release sixteen tonnes became the fastest selling single in capitals history. The recording was number one on the country charts for ten weeks and number one on the pop charts for eight weeks in nineteen ninety eight. Ernie ford's recording sixteen tons was inducted into the grammy hall of fame which honors recordings of lasting qualitative or historical significance. That are at least twenty five years old in twenty fourteen. It was added to the national recording registry again which preserves audio recordings for their aesthetic historic or cultural significance So technically sixteen tonnes is on the national recording registry twice. Now yeah it's a pretty cool. Yeah so what is it about this recording like like we were saying like it's not like anything that was on the radio at the time right. It's not like anything's on the radio. Ever it's not. It's not us on that. You would think like yes. This is. This is going to be a hit. Yeah so. According to another national recording registry author ted olson quotes ernie ford who said of the recording. We used a flute a bass clarinet trumpet clarinet drums guitar vibes in a piano. They gave it a real wonderful sound. It had a good solid beat to begin with. In addition i snap my fingers author it. Sometimes i set my own tempo during rehearsal by doing that. The orchestra leader asked me what temple you want. Earning i'd say about like this. And i begin to snap my third finger and thumb together gets really into the details snapped. I mean buddy. Most people snap yeah after. I was through rehearsing that song. Lee gillette who is in charge of the recording session for capitol records screen through the telephone from the control room. Tell ernie to leave the finger snapping in when you do the final waxing. It's certainly added to that song. It gave it an effect. I hadn't heard before which is true. I mean it's true. He is putting a lot on that finger snapping that is one of the most interesting elements of the song. It's when you think of that song. Outside of his amazing vocals you think of the clarinet. And you think of that kind of echoey yes snap. Back gra yes. I agree but he really leaned into that. Snapping wasn't playing the clarinet rachel. He's like we have these other instruments blah blah blah but. Did you hear my snapping. I think it's the snapping one. It's it's such a huge element of that song and it also like you can almost hear the echo in the recording studio like ran here the space that it's in and there's something very sort of surreal but also realistic about it. It's it's very. There's a a weird sounds like a wing sounds like you're in a coal mine. Yes and it's echoing their ends. I i want to say that. I think the production is brilliant. And i'm sure that led to a big part of the reason why the song was popular. I do also want to say that as people driving in their car the hearing song ago. Yeah my job. Sucks to this guy's yet but what's interesting is that the song had existed for almost ten years before this and it hasn't really done anything right you know so. I think a lot of it was was the arrangement and a lot of it was tennessee. Ernie ford's definitely interpretation like it's just one of those things where arrangement and song and production and singer kind of like all meet and and it's perfect like this is what worked. Yeah yeah and that's all. I have to say about that so on october fourth nineteen fifty-six the ford show starring tennessee ernie ford variety show sponsored by the ford motor company. Premiered on nbc. So real cool that. They got forward to sponsor it because they could just call it. The ford shown that meant everything that you know four four ford ford and i didn't even adopted afford not like those fake warner's over there. It was the number one half hour. Primetime variety show for five years. It ran until june twenty nine thousand nine hundred sixty one and he ended each show by singing. A hymn would sort of became his trademark and he is credited for popularizing Spiritual music and bring it into the mainstream. He continued recording and working on television including daytime. A variety talk show from nineteen sixty to nineteen sixty five. He recorded more than fifty albums in the country. Pop and gospel genres mike. God that's a lot of albums he did it in one day..

Ernie ford grammy hall of fame Lee gillette ted olson ernie ford rachel tennessee nbc warner mike
"ted olson" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"ted olson" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Is a cancer for the Republican Party. Somebody who suggested that perhaps no airplane hit the Pentagon on 9 11. Stop right there. What So I went looked And here is Marjorie Taylor Greene in the video that she made in November of 2018 cutting a break, But we had witnessed 9 11 right with witness 9 11, the terrorist attack in New York and the plane that crashed in Pennsylvania and the so called plane that crashed into the Pentagon. Thought there's never any evidence shown for a plane in the kind of All right. Of the caucus. I ran the Marine Corps Marathon in 2000 and one I ran around the Pentagon. I followed on individual who ran with Captain Jack punches his name on the back of his shirt. Hadn't trained Barely made it. But he was going to honor his friend Jack punches who was killed by that plane. That carried Ted Olson's wife, Barbara, and many other fine Americans. I saw we ran around the Pentagon. I saw it with my own eyes. Everybody knows it's true. That's lunacy. And throwing out that little Oh, by the way, let's play it again. So that's all you need to hear. I thought you were there. 9 11 right with witness 9 11. The terrorist attack, Um, in New York, and the plane that crashed in Pennsylvania and the so called plane that crashed into the Pentagon. Thought there's never any evidence shown for a plane in the air. That's not really that's not reality. There is evidence there. It's just crazy. So, McConnell says. GOP representative Marjorie Taylor Greens embrace of loony lies and conspiracy is a cancer for the Republican Party quote. Somebody who's suggesting that perhaps no airplane hit the Pentagon on 9 11. That horrifying school shootings were prestaged. And that the Clintons crashed. JFK Junior's airplane is not living in reality. This has nothing to do with the challenges facing American families with a robust debates on substance that can strengthen our party. McConnell is once again, right. And Kevin McCarthy and the GOP should remove her from committees and excuse her from the conference. Just throw out of the conference. You cannot Constitutional law. The case of Adam Clayton Powell, You can't throw out of the Congress. That's nuts. She won. She want one. She won't win. Next time you just Shutter Fraser out. Sorry, Georgia. She can vote. We cannot do anything about it. You gotta get yourself a different representative, and that's crystal clear. 1 805 to our 1234. If you want to disagree with me fine or agree with me. She should not be in the Republican Conference..

Pentagon McConnell Republican Party Marjorie Taylor Greene Captain Jack Republican Conference GOP New York representative Pennsylvania Marjorie Taylor Greens Adam Clayton Powell Shutter Fraser Marine Corps Ted Olson Kevin McCarthy Clintons Um Georgia