18 Burst results for "Ted Global"

Mindset And Blind Spots With Jarrod Haning

Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

05:07 min | 5 months ago

Mindset And Blind Spots With Jarrod Haning

"Nama stay an welcome to live. Love engage. I am gloria grace rand and today. We're we're gonna be talking about breakthroughs and business hand. Let me let me explain what i mean by that a little bit. So you know how when you're in a corn maze and you're not sure if you should go left or right but when you step on a ladder. Suddenly the maze is no longer a mystery. Well that's what my guest at jared. Haning does for business owners by teaching them how to think at a higher level they are able to see the whole picture and suddenly obstacles that were blocking the growth no longer exist and everything he teaches comes onto this one thing a breakthrough in your business. Will i happen as a breakthrough in your thinking. Which i've loved so welcome jared to live. Love engage thanks for having me. I appreciate Having you here and let me just tell you a little bit more about This gentleman because He is an award winning speaker. And i can attest to this. Because i watched one of his fedex. Talks was very impressed with it. It's related to mindset performance. But he's also been on. Abc's nightline spoke on stage all across the country. He's got clients around the world. He's also been chosen by ted global as a featured speaker of the week and what makes him unique that he specializes in a nobel nominated process. That teaches you how to get a higher level and allows you to access different parts of your brain on demand. And as a result his most of his clients gone to double their income by purposely. Working half as many hours. And who doesn't wanna do that. You know offense not enough. He's also a classically trained musician Which is also equipped him with a unique set of tools for leveling up your leadership and when he's not doing that well except for during corona virus days. I guess you'd normally find him. Or maybe he has been still flying skydiving or mountain bike riding. And i love this. This is really fun. is that his. He says his most prized accomplishment was winning. The world tickle championship in the five-year-old category. So you have to explain that. actually. I real quick. Come on Okay told that is a fictitious title coming up and gave to myself. Well i like it. I only have one kid. And he's no longer five now ten so so so basically the the championship was at home. Is that you will vary call many years ago. Why like that i. I think that's awesome. So let's let's talk a little bit now about this You know the having a breakthrough in your business in part of this one of the things that you claim is that by normally. We are so focused on getting things done that that actually kills your productivity and and checking things off the to do list which i must confess. I do like doing that from time to time Is that it actually lowers your income. So why do you say that. So productivity is not about getting things done it's actually about causing things to be done When you check something off your to do list you don't solve the problem of why it had to be done to start with. And if you're the one doing the work well you're going to be the one doing the work again tomorrow And that is a bad strategy and we just can't solve with stubbornness even epic. Olympic levels of stubbornness cannot fix that bad strategy. So one of the reasons that trying harder Doesn't move the ball forward It doesn't work. It actually just masks. The problem is because trying harder working harder working smarter even this. These are just themes on a variation more of the same trying to work. Smarter is just coming up with more of the kinds of ideas that already make sense and those are the kinds of ideas that have you stuck to start with a working harder. Just as doing more of the activities that already makes sense to do and like i mentioned earlier When you check something off your list if it doesn't address what caused the demand to start with. You didn't fix the problem and no matter what you're doing in that block of time. No matter how good you are at it. There's twenty seven other things that aren't getting done and so this is just really sophisticated. Spinning your wheels

Gloria Grace Jared Ted Global Nama Fedex ABC
"ted global" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

09:43 min | 1 year ago

"ted global" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"It's time to start sleeping longer and deeper so you wake up refreshed and ready to take on the day in right now. Now you can try the Pod for one hundred nights if you don't love it. They will refund your purchase in a range. A free pick-up get one hundred and fifty dollars off your purchase when when you visit eight sleep dot com slash fire. Today that's E. I G. H.. T. SLEEP DOT com slash. Fire the biggest needle mover in my business funnels leave. Allow me to do so much. Like deliver free courses to my audience resulting in tens of thousands of leads. They've also helped helped me present live masterclasses to teach thousands of others of how to create lost their own podcast and they've helped me generate millions of dollars in sales but I couldn't have done any of it as effectively as I have without the right software to help. Click funnels with click finals. You can build sales funnels without a program and without knowing any code in these sales funnels. Walk your visitors through the sale in a way that maximizes conversions and earnings and the great thing about click funnels is that it's not just your funnel building editor is also your shopping cart. Your email auto responder your membership software your Philly at management software and so much more join over ninety thousand entrepreneurs who are actively using click funnels to easily they get their products and their message out to the world visit. Ill Fire Dot com slash. Click to start your free fourteen day trial today. That's ill fire your dot com slash click. Are I fire nation. We're back. Let's Divan so that is how to create a single story. Show a people as one thing as only only one thing over and over again and that is what they become. It is impossible to talk about the single story without talking about power there is a word an Igbo word that I think about whenever I think about the power structures of the world in it is Nicoli. It's a noun that loosely translates to to be greater than another like got economic and political worlds stories too are defined by the principle of Nicoli. How they are told who tells them when they're told how many stories are told? It's really dependent on on power. Power is the ability not just to tell the story of another person but to make it the definitive story of that person the Palestinian poets me rid Barghuti again pronunciation rice. It if you want to dispossess people the simplest way to do it is to tell their story and to start with secondly start the story with the arrows of the native Americans now with the arrival of the British in you have an entirely different story. Start to story with the failure of the African state not with the colonial creation of the African state and you have an entirely different story. I recently spoke at a university. Where student told me that it was such a shame that Nigerian men and were physical abusers like the father character in my novel? I told him I just read a novel called American Psycho and it was such a shame that young Americans were serial murders. And how obviously Veasley. I said this in a fit of mild irritation but it would never have occurred to me to think that just because I read a novel in which a character was a serial killer that he was somehow representative of all Americans arrogance. That is not. Because I'm a better person than that students. But because of America's cultural and economic power I had many stories of America. I had read Tyler Updike and Steinbeck and Gaitskell. I did not have a single story of America when I learned some years ago. That writers were expected to have really unhappy childhoods to be successful vessel. I began to think about how I could invent horrible things. My parents had done to me but the truth is I had a very happy childhood full of laughter and Love in a very close loose-knit family but I also had grandfathers who died in refugee camps. My cousin Poli died because he could not get adequate healthcare. One of my closest friends. Oklahoma died in a plane crash because because our firetrucks did not have water I grew up under repressive military governments that devalued education so that sometimes my parents were not paid their salaries and so as a child I saw jam disappear from our breakfast table then margarine disappeared and then bread became too expensive. Then milk became rationed in most of all a kind of normalized. Political fear invader lives all of these stories. Make me who I am but to insist on only these. Negative stories is to flatten my experience into overlook the many other stories that foreign me the single-story creates stereotypes and the problem with stereotypes is not that they are untrue. But that they are incomplete they make one story become the only story of course. Africa is a continent full of catastrophes. There are immense ones such as the horrific rapes in Congo and depressing such as the fact that five thousand people apply for one job vacancy agency in Nigeria. But there are other stories that are not about catastrophe and it is very important. It is just as important to talk about them. I've always felt that it's impossible. Impossible to engage properly with a place or person without engaging in all the stories of that place in that person. The consequence of a single story is it robs people of dignity entity it makes our recognition of our equal humanity difficult. It emphasizes how we are different rather than how we are similar. So what if before my Mexican trip I had followed the immigration debate from both sides the US and the Mexican. What if my mother told me that feed his family was poor and hardworking? What if we had an African television network that broadcast diverse African stories all over the world. This is what the Nigerian writer Chinua Achebe calls a balance of stories. What if my roommate knew? About my Nigerian publisher publisher Mukhtar Bakaray a remarkable man who left his job in a bank to follow his dream and started publishing house now. The conventional wisdom was that Nigerians. Don't read literature torture he disagreed. He felt that people who could read would read if you made literature affordable and available to them. Shortly after he published my first novel I went to a TV station in in Lagos to do an interview and a woman who worked as a messenger came up to me and said I really liked your novel. I didn't like the ending. Now you must write a sequel in this is what will happen. She went on to tell me what's right. In the sequel. I was not only charmed. I was very moved. Here was a woman part of the ordinary masses of Nigerians. who were not supposed to be readers? She had not only read the book but she had taken ownership of it and felt justified. In telling you what to write in the sequel. Now what if my roommate knew about my friend Fumi Janda a fearless woman who host TV show in Lagos in determining to tell stories of what we prefer to forget. What if my roommate knew about the heart procedure that was performed in the Lagos hospital last week? What if my roommate new about the contemporary Nigerian music talented people singing an English and pidgin an IBO in your rubel? An EGO mixing influences from Jay Z to fail out Bob Marley and their grandfathers what my roommate knew about the female lawyer who recently went to court in Nigeria to challenge a ridiculous law that required women to get their husband's consent before renewing their passports. What if my roommate knew about Nali would full of innovative people making films? Despite great technical odds film so popular they are really the best example of Nigerians consuming assuming what they produce. What are my roommate? Knew about the wonderfully ambitious hair baiter. who started her own business? Selling hair extensions or about the millions of other Nigerians who start businesses and sometimes is fail but continue to nurse ambition every time I'm home. I'm confronted by the usual sources of irritation for most Nigerians. Our failed infrastructure our failed government but also by the incredible resilience that people who thrive despite the government. Rather than because of its. I teach writing workshops in Lagos every summer and it is amazing. Listen to me how many people apply and how many people are eager to write into. Tell stories my Nigerian publisher and I have started a nonprofit called Faira Fina trust and we have big dreams aims at building libraries and refurbishing libraries. That already exist and providing books for state schools that don't have anything in their libraries and also of organizing lots and lots of workshops and reading and writing for all the people who are eager to tell our many stories stories matter. Many stories matter stories have been used to dispossess into maligned but stories can also be used to empower and humanize stories can break the dignity of people but stories can also repair that broken dignity. The American writer Alice Walker wrote about her southern relatives who had moved to the north. She introduced him to a book about the southern life that they had left behind. They sat around reading the book themselves. Listening to me. Read the book and a kind of paradise was regains. I would like to end with this thought that when we reject the single story when we realized that there is never a single story worry about any place we regain a kind of paradise. Thank you fire nation. Hope you enjoyed the danger of a single story by Tim. Amanda Negoti Dietschy and again. This speech was originally delivered by Ted Global in July. Two thousand nine Ted is a copper owner of this talk doc and you could find the original video by going to websites in googling the danger of a single story. I hope you enjoyed fire nation. And I'll catch you on the the flip side. It's time to start sleeping longer and deeper see you wake up refreshed and ready to take on the day. Get One hundred and and fifty dollars off your purchase of the Pod by eight sleep when you visit eight sleep dot com slash fire today that's e. g. the ht sleep dot com slash. Fire the biggest needle mover in my business funnels the software I used to build my funnels. onnell's click funnels no question visit e o fire dot com slash. Click to start your free fourteen day trial today. That's the L.. Fire Dot com slash click..

Lagos publisher Nicoli America Nigeria writer Ted Global Oklahoma Lagos hospital Africa Congo Chinua Achebe US Amanda Negoti Dietschy Divan Barghuti Veasley editor
"ted global" Discussed on Are You Real

Are You Real

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"ted global" Discussed on Are You Real

"Like just the peace of god came over me in that moment and like i got off the stage and people from the ted staffer like crying like oh my gosh you did it like it was maybe one of the best nights of my life and i don't even say that because i got to give this ted talk like it was because i felt like for the first time standing in a room of people i did not feel like the oddball anymore i didn't feel like i was weird i had people that were walking up to me afterwards being like this is an amazing idea like where i had come from it was like yeah amazing idea but like you were kind of the accord in the round like you were the different one like you were the one kind of going off on your own path and so i like i just felt completely known i felt like i belonged in that space and so they basically said that they were going to put the videos up online and then people were going to vote and then they would pick one person from every ted in the fourteen countries to go to ted global so the chances of me actually getting picked out of i think like forty american talks the slim to none but they sent the email that basically side you know like we're sorry like you haven't been picked for ted global or something full for you so i thought the dream was done at that point i'm like okay at least i want and i did it i i have this great video but this random day i believe in like november of that year i'm like at my computer like doing my work and my friends just start texting they're like hannah like you're on ted dot com like you're ted talk that day and i thought like it was some steak i like call the ted content coordinator he'd become my friend at this point being.

hannah coordinator ted ted global
"ted global" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"ted global" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"This ted talk features digital rights activists negot dad recorded live at ted global 2017 checkout a special bonus episode of ted's podcast worklife with adam grant adam and malcolm glad well debate about how to avoid doing tasks you don't like what makes an idea interesting and why malcolm things we shouldn't root for the underdog listen now wherever you get your podcasts imagine making up to a stranger sometimes multiple strangers questioning your right to six to existence for something that you wrote online making up to a angry message scared and worried for your safety welcome to the world of cyber harassment the kind of harassment that women face in pakistan is very serious and leads to sometimes deadly outcomes this kind of harassment keeps women from accessing internet essentially knowledge it's a form of oppression but stan is the sixth most populous country in the world with one forty million people having access to mobile technologies and fifteen percent of internet penetration and this number doesn't seem to go down with the rise of new technologies pakistan is also the birthplace of the youngest nobel peace prize winner malala use of say but that's just one aspect of pakistan another respect it is the twisted concept of honor is linked to the woman and their bodies where men are allowed to disrespect women and even feel them sometimes in the name of socalled family honor where women are left to die right outside their house for speaking to a man on a mobile phone in the name of family honor let me say this very clearly it's not honor it's a cold blooded murder.

adam malcolm harassment stan pakistan murder ted global ted fifteen percent
"ted global" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"ted global" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"This ted talk features author robert newark's recorded live at ted global twenty seventeen out a special bonus episode of ted's podcast worklife with adam grant adam and malcolm glad well debate about how to avoid doing tasks you don't like what makes an idea interesting and why malcolm things we shouldn't root for the dog listen now wherever you get your podcasts so what i'm doing is a thought experiment now you may know of or have read this book by this guy it's probably the first and maybe the only bestseller ever written about economics and you probably know a bit about what it says it talks about how nations all over the world will prosper through the individual pursuit of individual profit individual profit will be the mechanism for the prosperity of the world but the funny thing about adam smith is that he was a stay at home kind of guy he actually never went further from edinburgh than france and switzerland so my thought experiment is to imagine what would have happened if adam smith had visited africa and fortunately there's actually an easy answer because the arab lawyer and traveler it been but tuta traveled down the east coast of africa in the fourteenth century and what he found when he got the mogadishu was a market and he wrote about it and basically merchant ships came to the harper and they weren't even allowed to land they had to drop anchor in the harbor and boats came out to them and locals pick them and said you are my guest i am now your broker and they had to do business through the local broker and if they went around that and didn't do business through the broker they were they could go to court and deal would be cancelled and they would be thrown out of the town and through this mechanism everyone prosper and so if that was adam smith he might look like this guy and say that's a mutual aid society that's a share the wealth free market and when i put this question to christian who had the stage at the beginning of the session he responded that if adam smith had come to.

robert newark malcolm edinburgh france switzerland adam smith tuta africa mogadishu harper ted
"ted global" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"ted global" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"This ted talk features drummer and because sionist kosiba mature recorded live at ted global twenty seventeen explore histories surprising connections with a new podcast the thread with ozzy the thread unravels the stories behind some of the most important lives and events in history to discover how one thing leads to another this season the thread takes you inside a remarkable chapter in american history one that runs from the casting couch is of early hollywood to the metoo movement today witness how the stories of figures like gloria steinem and hugh hefner hinge on the past and influence the future get the threat with ozzy that's osy y on apple podcasts or wherever you listen listen do you hear that my grandmother asked me listen listen to what the beaten is saying i would spend hours and hours listening to the little beetle rolling a huge ball of dung and while at it i heard of a riot ov environmental sounds with a keenest of years i would hear family chatter laughter the wind howling and even crickets chirping all these sounds criss crossed into each other and i would hear rhythm in between then i would beat my plate with a spoon and my chest with my tiny hands trying to recreate what i was hearing i have been beating the same plates shakers drums pans and so much more ever since to becoming a professional drummer and percussionist.

hollywood gloria steinem ozzy hugh hefner
"ted global" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

03:07 min | 3 years ago

"ted global" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"This ted talk features director and playwright don judith recorded live at ted global 2017 i'm writer director who tells sasha shane stories because they believe stories touch and movers stories humanize and teach us to empathize stories changes when i write and direct plays amplifying voices of disadvantaged groups i'm fighting the selfcensorship that has kept many ugandan artist away from show show political theater since the prosecution of artists by former ugandan president idi amin and most importantly i am breaking the silence and provoking meaningful conversations on taboo issues where often silence is golden is the rule of thumb conversions are important because they inform and challenge your minds to think and change starts with thinking one of my struggles with activism it's often onesided nature that blinds us to alternative veal that numbs our empathy that makes us feel those see issues differently has ignorant self hating brainwashed sell out of plain stupid i believe no and is ignorant we are all experts on in different fields and this is why for me the sayings tae in your truth is misleading because if you're staying in your truth is entity logical that the pass on you believe is wrong is also staying in the truth so what you have to extremes that shut out all possible avenues of conversations i create provocative theater and film to touch humanize and move disagreeing parties to the conversation table to bridge miss understood endings i know that listening to one another or not magical solve all problems but give a chance to create avenues to start to work together to solve many of you monetize problems with my fast play silent voices based on interviews with victims of the northern uganda war between the government and joseph kony's l arab group i brought together victims political leaders religious leaders culturally does amnesty commission and transitional justice leadership for critical conversations on issues of justice for war crime victims the fast of its kind in the history of uganda and so many powerful things happen that i can't even cover them all right now victims were given the opportunity to sit at the table with amnesty commission leadership and the express the bid injustice day suffered when the komo.

don judith director idi amin uganda ted global writer sasha shane president joseph kony
"ted global" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"ted global" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"This ted talked beatrice poet dancer and play right mark but moody joseph recorded live at ted global 2017 the two places where i feel most free aren't actually places they are moments the first is inside of dance somewhere between rising up against gravity and the feeling that the air beneath me is falling in love with my body's wade's i'm dancing and the air is carrying me like i might never come down the second place that i feel free is after scoring the goal on the soccer pitch my my body floods with a chemical that they put inside of epi pins to revive the dead and i am weightless race less my story is this am a curator at a contemporary art centre but i don't really believe in art that doesn't bleed or sweat or cry i imagine that my kids are going to live in a time when the most valuable commodities are fresh water and empathy i love pretty dances and majestic sculpture as much as the next guy but give me something else to go with it lift me up with the aesthetic sublime and give me a practice or some tools to turn that inspiration in our understanding and action for instance i'm a theater maker who loves sports when i was making my latest peace pillow i thought a lot about how soccer was a means for my own immigrant family to foster a sense of continuity and normality and community within the new context of the us in this heightened moment of xenophobia an assault on imigran identity i wanted a think through how the game could serve as an affirmation all tool for generation americans in immigration kids to ask them to consider movement patterns on the field as kin to migratory patterns across social and political borders where the footballers are not immigrants in the us play on endangered ground.

joseph wade soccer us assault ted ted global
"ted global" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"ted global" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"This ted tightly to his agricultural us and social entrepreneur suker who mbo recorded live at ted global 2017 i want to introduce you to my bad asman's meet thelma and louise i'm passionate about cows and although they been getting into a lot of crap lately due to maintain emissions and climate change i hope that i can redeem their reputation in part by showing you how incredibly important they are in solving one of the world's biggest problems food security but more importantly for africa its resultant childhood stunting stunting nutritional stunting manifest itself in a reduction of growth rate in human development and according to unicef death stunting doesn't come easy it doesn't come quickly it happens over a long period of time during which a child endures painful and debilitating cycles of illness depressed appetite insufficient nutrition and inadequate care and most kids simply can't endure such this but does it do survive they carry forward longterm cognitive problems as where this losses of stature the numbers of stunted children under under the age of five in most regions of the world has been declining i really hate to say this but the only place where they haven't been declining is here in africa hear fifty nine million children three in ten in that age group struggle to meet their genetic potential leffal genetic potential protein is one of our most important dietary requirements an evidence shows that lack of essential amino acids the building blocks of proteins in young children's diets can result in stunting essential amino acids are called essential because we can't synthesized monopolies we have to get them from all foods and the best sources animalderived milk meat and eggs most protein consumed on the african continent is cropbased and although we have millions of small farmers rearing animals and livestock production is not as easy as we think.

thelma ted global louise i africa milk
"ted global" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"ted global" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"This tactic features environmental policy expert now ishi recorded live at ted global nyc 2017 like ted talks you should check out the ted radio our with npr stay tuned after this talk to hear sneak peek of this week's episode tax season is here and if you're like me you've got questions like how do you know you're getting the biggest refund are you taking all the right deductions which ones are those exactly and did you do everything by the book well fear not because tax act has your back with the deduction maximize are designed with freelancers and the self employed in mind and the one hundred k accuracy guarantee you can feel confident your maximizing your deductions and your refund so get the most out of tax season by visiting tax act dot com slash talks daily for 25 percent off federal and state filing tax act filed today audio books are great for helping you be a better you this year try book titles like the power of habit the four hour work week or grit that can help you feel healthier get motivated or learn something new audible unmatched selection of audio books includes original audio shows news comedy and much more from the leading audio book publishers broadcasters entertainers and magazines and they help you listened to more books by letting you switch seamlessly between devices picking up exactly where you left off audible is offering our listeners a free audio book with a thirty day trial membership just go to audible dot com slash ted talks and download a title free to start listening it's that easy go to audible dot com slash ted talks or text ted talks two five zero zero five zero zero to get started today.

environmental policy ishi ted global ted npr self employed one hundred k 25 percent thirty day four hour
"ted global" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"ted global" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"This tactic features environmental policy expert now ishi recorded live at ted global nyc 2017 like ted talks you should check out the ted radio our with npr stay tuned after this talk to hear sneak peek of this week's episode tax season is here and if you're like me you've got questions like how do you know you're getting the biggest refund are you taking all the right deductions which ones are those exactly and did you do everything by the book well fear not because tax act has your back with the deduction maximize are designed with freelancers and the self employed in mind and the one hundred k accuracy guarantee you can feel confident your maximizing your deductions and your refund so get the most out of tax season by visiting tax act dot com slash talks daily for 25 percent off federal and state filing tax act filed today audio books are great for helping you be a better you this year try book titles like the power of habit the four hour work week or grit that can help you feel healthier get motivated or learn something new audible unmatched selection of audio books includes original audio shows news comedy and much more from the leading audio book publishers broadcasters entertainers and magazines and they help you listened to more books by letting you switch seamlessly between devices picking up exactly where you left off audible is offering our listeners a free audio book with a thirty day trial membership just go to audible dot com slash ted talks and download a title free to start listening it's that easy go to audible dot com slash ted talks or text ted talks two five zero zero five zero zero to get started today.

environmental policy ishi ted global ted npr self employed one hundred k 25 percent thirty day four hour
"ted global" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"ted global" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"This had tucked features are feared curator touria el glory recorded live at ted global 2017 let's talk about how the narrative of africa is being told and who is doing the telling i wanna share with you the selection of work by contemporary artists from africa and it's just for a i love this arts i find it beautiful and inspiring and thrilling and i really hope i'm able to peak your interests i want to share something about myself and why art matters to me i'm the daughter of an artist so that means that growing up i had the chance to see my father do artwork in his studio my home was surrounded by arts and i had an early arted eucation being dragged to museum and exhibition over the summer holidays what i did not understand with you at the time is that this also give me an early understanding about why art is important how to look at it how to understand it but also how to love it so art matters to me on a personal level and not only because it's beautiful and inspiring and thrilling but because our tell powerful stories all his artists have stories to tell you but what it means to be african stories that tell you and touches about our african indentity but also stories that tell us about who we are as african but also stories that tell us about our complex history so how can art tell you powerful stories i wanna share with you this siri by senegalese artist or mavericks dodge job this is a serious selfportrait and the artists in this particular serey is focusing on the representation of african in artistry between.

ted global africa
"ted global" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"ted global" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"This had talked features entrepreneur an engineer christopher added gaqa recorded live at ted global 2017 how many of you tired of seeing celebrities adopting kids from the african continent well it's not that bad i was adopted i grew up in rural uganda lost both my parents when i was very very young when my parents passed experienced all the negative effects of poverty from homelessness eating out a trash piles you name it but my life changed when i got accepted into an orphanage through one of those swanson often programs sponsored and given an opportunity to acquire an education i started off in uganda i went through school and there were these particular program worked you finished high school and after high school ugo leonard trade to become a carpenter a mechanic was something along those lines my case well there was a little different this sponsor family those sending these twenty five dollars a month to this often age to sponsor me which never i've never met them said well we'd like to send you to college instead oh it gets better and they said if you get the paperwork we'll send you to school in america instead so we their help i went to the embassy and apply for the visa got the visa i remember this day like it was yesterday i walked out of the embassy with this piece of paper my hand i hope in my step smile on my face knowing that my life is about a change.

christopher uganda ugo leonard trade engineer ted global america twenty five dollars
"ted global" Discussed on Millennial Money

Millennial Money

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"ted global" Discussed on Millennial Money

"They basically like get on get on a iphone and send us the 60second video and so i did that and a few months later they reach shamanee so that was finalists for the united states arms rapto i went i went to new york city and i delivered my audition and i knew it was probably like slim that i would get chosen to go to like ted global just because they were only going to be picking like one person from like ev all fourteen countries that they were going around to looking for these undiscovered stories so i didn't get chosen to go to ted global on i really thought k that was such a great experience i dunno where it's going to go from here but like i did it and i'm proud of myself because that was kind of like my first speaking engagement was my ted toook um but what i didn't know is that they ended up taking man auditioned heat and putting it up on ted dot com it's a ted talk of the day and it was like they just loved the original talk so much that they didn't want to have it redone end my life just kind of flipped upside down in a matter of 24 hours from that talk going online hundreds of thousands of views that led to literary agents reaching out to me and publishers reaching out to me and i kind of just like was like okay i guess i'm writing a book okay and like that's really how the whole entire journey has been is that one thing has just let into another thing so that's head talk led insists speaking around the country which is what i do now but i really have like huge anxiety about speaking on stage as i would have told you that's not something i'm going to do but like inquiries started just coming in and i just started saying guest to them you know and really by being willing to go outside of my comfort zone on i kind of built a career off of that conflict been fiveyear selfemployed on unjust continuing to say yes said things that challenge may amend wanting to crete things that just make the world better i think that's such a great story know i mean obviously your in your sweet spot in your owning it not that that can evolve.

iphone united states new york ted global 24 hours 60second fiveyear
"ted global" Discussed on Millennial Money

Millennial Money

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"ted global" Discussed on Millennial Money

"Story i guess they basically relate get on get on a iphone and send the 60second video and so i did that and a few months later they reach soundness allows finalists for the united states arms while i went i went to new york city and i delivered my audition and i knew it was probably like still that i would get chosen to go to like ted global just because they were only going to be picking like one person from like ev all fourteen countries said they were going around to looking for these undiscovered stories um so i didn't get chosen to go to ted global on i really saw okay that was such a great experience i dunno where it's going to go from here but like i did it and i'm proud of myself that was kind of like my first speaking engagement was my ted talk but what i didn't now is that they ended up taking man auditioned heat and putting it up on ted dot com to ted talk of the day and it was like they just loved the original talks so much that they didn't want to have it redone and my life just kind of flipped upside down in a matter of 24 hours from that talk going online hundreds of thousands of views that led to literary agents reaching out to me and publishers reaching out to me and i kinda just like was like okay i guess i'm writing a book okay and like that's really how the whole entire dirty has been is that one thing has just led into another thing so that's head talk led into speaking around the country which is what i do now but i really have like huge anxiety about speaking on state as i would have told you that's not something i'm going to do but like inquiry started just coming in and i just started saying guest to them you know and really by being willing to like go outside of my comfort zone on i kind of built a career off of that conflict been fiveyear selfemployed and just continuing the say yes if things that challenge me and then wanting to crete things that just make the world better i think that's such a great story you know i mean obviously your in your sweet spot in your owning it not that that can evolve.

iphone united states new york ted global ted 24 hours 60second fiveyear
"ted global" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"ted global" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"This had tacked features transport entrepreneur jole jackson recorded live at ted global 2017 imagine if your daily commute involved tens of kilometers on these kinds of rhodes driving this kind of vehicle without me nearby service stations or breakdown assistance for millions of drivers in many parts of africa this is the norm since over ninety percent of passenger cars were imported often used they're just not designed for local usage high import duties often compound the problem sometimes doubling the price of a car so most vehicles are either too expensive or to unreliable for the average consumer welldesigned vehicles or any part of the transport challenge though for every one hundred adults in africa less than five people actually owned a vehicle public transport is available and in countries like kenya itself often run by local entrepreneurials using minivans like this but in most rural and periurban areas it's fragmented an unreliable in more remote areas without transport people have to walk typically tens of kilometers to get to school or click clean drinking water or buy supplies nearby markets bad roads disparate communities low average income levels in an inadequate vehicles all impair the transport system and ultimately constrain economic output despite this constrain the panafrican african economies booming combined gdp is already over two trillion dollars this is a massive commercial and social opportunity not a helpless continent so why isn't that already something better around the world automotive is court of the manufacturing sector but in africa it's generally been overlooked by carmakers you have focused on larger established markets and emerging economies like india and china this lack of industrialization which itself creates a vicious cycle barrier to the emergence of industry has caused the dependence on imports there is a supplydemand disconnect with the vast majority of automotive spending on the continent.

africa kenya india china jole jackson ted global two trillion dollars ninety percent
"ted global" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"ted global" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"I first met margit no wise at the ted global conference in edinburgh several years back as soon as minds it took to the states do as ten tom i was fascinated to hear his harrowing stories of being radicalized in the uk moving to egypt spending time in a cairo prison and lending humming one of the world's most important voices an antiextremism force terrorism has been one of the defining themes of the past couple of years and in 2017 it's reared its ugly had again here in the uk in europe and beyond so monge it's tong terrorism and trump is this the new normal from our voices gathering in 2016 has just as much resonance today i hope you'll enjoy listening to his insights and his lessons and just a quick known mounted song was recorded in front of a live audience so please forgive any audio issues on fifteen years old and i'm walking down the road money mind business and i'm surrounded at the time kohl by surprise by a group of neonazis in a van outing what they call packie bashing hunting people who look like me just to target us and if they find us to attack us with hamas machetes and screwdrivers i'm surrounded by them grown men in their twenties five six seven or eight i've lost count but to a 15yearold it makes no difference and he's incredibly intimidating i think the time that it's the end of my life i've seen by this time four five lost count of the number of my friends who have had to watch stabbed because of the fact that they looked different.

margit uk europe edinburgh tom i egypt cairo hamas fifteen years
"ted global" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

02:46 min | 4 years ago

"ted global" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"This attack eateries kiessling hefford recorded live at ted global 2017 before we get started we'd like to ask a favour ted talks daly is conducting a listener survey to learn a little bit more about our listeners and get your feedback about the shell it should only take about ten minutes to complete please visit survey narrates dot com slash ted talks dahary to take our survey now that survey nerds dot com slash tad talks dairy thank you now hegel he very famously said that africa was a place without history without passed without narrative get i'd argue that no other continent has nurtured has fought for her celebrated its history more concertedly the struggle to keep africa narrative alive has been one of the most consistent and hardfought endeavors of african peoples and continues to be so the struggles endured and the sacrifices made to hold onto narrative and the face of enslavement colonialism racism walls and so much else has been underpinning narrative of our history narrative has not just survived the assaults the history of thrown at it we left a body of material culture artistic magistry and intellectual output we've mapped and we've chartered we've captured our histories in ways that are the measure of anywhere else on earth long before the meaningful arrival of europeans indeed whilst europe was still mired in its dark age africans were pioneering techniques in recording it nurturing history forging revolutionary methods for keeping their story alive and leaving history dynamic heritage it remains important to us we see that manifest in so many ways i am reminded of how just last year you might remember it the first members of the alqaida or affiliated ansa dean were indicted for war crimes and sent to the hey i'm one of the most notorious with was armored our fucking it was a young money it was charged with genocide not with ethnic cleansing but with being one of the instigators of a campaign to destroy some of mali's most important cultural heritage this wasn't vandalism these weren't thoughtless acts.

europe dean mali vandalism ted global ted daly africa ten minutes