40 Burst results for "Ted"

Fresh update on "ted" discussed on Eric Metaxas

Eric Metaxas

00:39 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "ted" discussed on Eric Metaxas

"Welcome back to the dam prop show. This is Jim. Your E O sitting in for Dan. And before this next segment is going to be about sports, and particularly the fact that Russell Wilson has talked about maybe going to the Bears, which I don't care if any people from Chicago this is a big deal. That's but performance that it would like toe say that you know the seat backs going on down in Florida. Ted Cruz finished speaking on Friday. Donald Trump is going to speak on Sunday. This would probably be the first kind of big mass communication he's had since we since we last saw him back in January, and I think it's going to be fascinating. Hear what he has to say. Now it's march. Well, it's not really much, but it's almost March. The sun the sun is higher in the sky and March. 1st means mean March. Primarily to me, means basketball. I'm sitting here with my line. I sweat shirt on with my orange I over the breast pocket, and there's some really good if you guys No, mostly people. Probably. You know, I have watched college basketball to certain we're not. But the N C. A. A tournament is Singley, the finest sporting events on the planet. I'll argue that with anyone, and I love football, and I love the Super Bowl. But the David and Goliath stories that happened with the N C. A. A tournament are fabulous and we were robbed of that last year, and the time it happened. I know I told the story about this last time was on this show. One of my daughters is so so into college basketball, and it was a sad time for us when they canceled it and talking to her on the phone and hearing her cry was just was awful, and I'll remember it forever. But it's a new year and it's happening and it's gonna be great. Baylor and Gonzaga look like great teams. But after that, like the next eight best teams are big 10 teams Michigan, Ohio State. Michigan's Got this young center Can't member's name is think is Dixon, Dickerson or Dickinson? Keep an eye on him. But Illinois has Ioan. It has coffee, and it's gonna be good now on to the big news. Again. The restaurant I own in pal time. Illinois Branson Palate on. I can't believe it's been this long in the show, and I hadn't plugged it yet, but is historically a big bears hang out. And you know some of the bears, radio voices or former bears players, I guess well laid over and if it's just one of them, and I will mention him by name, because I don't think he'll mind, but the Bears haven't had a quarterback since Ever. Okay. Some people argue that old Jim McMahon was a great quarterback Jim McMahon, even for Bears fans in the eighties, which I was was always just just in between injuries, and you could tell we all cheer and yell for the way he played. We went for that extra yard. But in retrospect, it was a dumb way for my franchise quarterback to play. Don't try to get an extra yard and try to play a whole season. One season. He did play. We want a Super Bowl. So now we have Russell Wilson, who you know is a is a well. He played for Wisconsin. So in the Midwest, we consider him a Midwestern son, saying that he's interested in a trade from Seattle and the Bears could be on his list. I don't hate Mitch. Too risky. The current quarterback, I think he's a fabulous, fabulous athlete. I love the way he scrambles, but Reality of it is he doesn't have great accuracy in his throat. And he doesn't read the defense very well. And if you're at O'Bradovich at brands of Palestine, when you bring up those two things, the conversation gets very loud. Because those apparently or two very, very important things for being a quarterback, But Russell Wilson is the deal. And if you're listening to the show, Russell Wilson, we would love you in Chicago and you would love being here. This has been the Dan prop show. I'm Jim. Muriel filling in for Dan. Thank you guys very much for joining us..

Donald Trump Ted Cruz Russell Wilson Jim Mcmahon Sunday Friday Chicago Dixon Dickinson Florida Dickerson January Mitch DAN David Super Bowl O'bradovich JIM N C. A. A TWO
At conservative conference, Trump is still the golden boy

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 3 hrs ago

At conservative conference, Trump is still the golden boy

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting at C. pack former president trump is still the golden boy Florida welcome see Patty may have lost his reelection bid but make no mistake Donald Trump is still the dominant force in conservative politics that frustrate because seventy five million people voted for Donald Trump he is still the leader of this party make no doubt about C. pack the conservative political action conference opened Friday in Orlando Florida where senator Ted Cruz of Texas was among the speakers they want him to go away let me tell you this right now Donald J. trump they go in anywhere C. pack was moved to Orlando this year due to pandemic restrictions in Maryland and the audience bristled when told to obey local mask requirements on Sunday the faithful will get to see trump in his first post presidential appearance hi Mike Rossi up that we need to comply with the rules

Mike Rossi Donald J. Trump C. Pack Senator Ted Cruz Florida Donald Trump Patty Orlando Texas Maryland
Fresh update on "ted" discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

Real Time with Bill Maher

00:34 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ted" discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

"These folks who come in and don't have the courage to say even just like you are bad for the party at this point. And have you lost steve scalise right all these people who walk around in a suit and tie and are the normal. Republicans are the ones enabling him and at some point like this is what history shows over and over and over and over again if like the establishment of the right wing. Party will not stand up to the demagogic players over your democracy will like is at risk of genuine collapse. The two wings of the party that i can see our trump and then the people who want to take his voters who want to be his successor. There's ted cruz. And josh hawley. Nikki haley way. Want to be the nominee. But they're not about to get rid of his voters. they just wanna be trump being. I'm sorry it just one thing. Like before the jaguar. Eight-year face to say i think the jaguars not getting my face right. After when you face and you've already gone through the capital inspection to say maybe next time with a workout differently. They have no control over this not. Let's.

Josh Hawley Donald Trump Steve Scalise Republicans Ted Cruz Eight-Year One Thing Two Wings Nikki Haley Jaguar
Ted Cruz jokes: Orlando isn't as nice as Cancun, but it's nice enough

Sean Hannity

00:31 sec | 9 hrs ago

Ted Cruz jokes: Orlando isn't as nice as Cancun, but it's nice enough

"Senator Ted Cruz at CPAC in Orlando today, joking about his trip to Cancun as a state was suffering through a cold snap. I got to say Orlando is awesome. It's not as nice as Cancun. Well, speaking today that conservative political action conference in Florida he was subject of much ridicule since he was spotted hopping a flight to the resort city last week. Along with family.

Senator Ted Cruz Cancun Orlando Cpac Florida
Fresh update on "ted" discussed on AP 24 Hour News

AP 24 Hour News

00:58 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ted" discussed on AP 24 Hour News

"For Donald Trump. He is still the leader of this party. Make no doubt about it. Donald Trump CPAC. The conservative political action conference opened Friday in Orlando, Florida, where Senator Ted Cruz of Texas was among the speakers. I want him to go away. Let me tell you this right now. Donald J. Trump ain't going anywhere. CPAC was moved to Orlando this year due to pandemic restrictions in Maryland, and the audience bristled when told to obey local mask requirements. On Sunday, the faithful will get to see Trump in his first post presidential appearance. I might grow CIA. We need to comply with the rules. Florida welcome CPAC. He may have lost his reelection bid. But make no mistake. Donald Trump is still the dominant force in conservative politics frustrate because 75 million people voted for Donald Trump. He is still the leader of this party. Make no doubt about it. Donald Trump is CPAC. The conservative political action conference opened Friday in Orlando, Florida, where Senator Ted Cruz of Texas was among the speed. Curs. They want him to go away. Let me tell you this right now. Donald J. Trump ain't going anywhere. CPAC was moved to Orlando this year due to pandemic restrictions in Maryland, and the audience bristled when told to obey local mask requirements. On Sunday, the faithful will get to see Trump in his first post presidential appearance. I might grow CIA. We need to comply with the rules when we made on you, McDonald Spicy Chicken McNuggets. You were Prince hands Emoji. Then we ran out and you were streaming tears emerging. Now they're back so you can be.

Maryland Donald J. Trump Donald Trump Orlando Friday Sunday CIA Cpac Orlando, Florida 75 Million People This Year Texas Senator Ted Cruz Florida First Post First Post Presidential Mcdonald Spicy Prince
The Conservative Political Action Conference happens every year but 2021 will be different

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

02:57 min | 1 d ago

The Conservative Political Action Conference happens every year but 2021 will be different

"In Orlando. It's called CPAC, the conservative political action Conference and with a closer look at this year's gathering, ABC News correspondent Andy Field Andy after losing the White House. What's the tone of the conference going to be this year? Well, the theme is called America On canceled. I think they probably got that from former President Trump, who was none too happy about being canceled by Twitter and Facebook and many other social media Basically, Silencing him on all those platforms after many of his tweets were considered, uh, inciting violence, and many of them in retrospect, appeared to have helped Spark the attack on the U. S. Capitol. So Republicans and certainly the Conservatives of this conservative political action conference are angry about this. They're saying that they're being silenced by liberal media. And they're going to speak out about it, which, ironically will be covered by many of the outlets that they considered to be liberal media. Well, it seems also and maybe on a grander scale. The big task for the Republicans is charting their future and and maybe unifying the party because it seems so at this point, so splintered. Well, it is. There was a survey that came out recently. That said 46% of Republicans would gladly join a new party headed by Donald Trump. In split off from the Republican Party. That's a significant number of Republicans who say they're more loyal to Donald Trump of the party. That's a concern for the rest of the party, and certainly Is going to go play into what this conservative political action conference is all about. This is usually the Super Bowl of folks trying to get attention to say, Hey, look at me. I want to run for president the next time around. Except the leader of that group appears to be the man who just was president and wants to get another shot at it. Let's talk more about the former commander in chief. I see that Donald Trump is on the guest list. What about that? And who else would we know who other famous names are on that list? Andy Well, former Secretary of state Mike Pompeo, who has also released We've heard rumblings that he might want to run for office. But would he do it against Donald Trump? We don't know Other people Tom Cotton Ted Cruz. Josh holy of Missouri. All of expressed some interest in the past or present and even future of trying to get the highest office in the land. So this is really kind of Ah, A tag team elbowing match to see who is going to get the most attention who makes the biggest splash here. And then what will former President Trump say? Well, he ignore what happened at the U. S. Capitol will Hey, talk about where he'd like to see the party will even say, Hey, I'm announcing I'm running again. That's all The mystery involved here, which is what former President Trump likes to do is a former TV host is He's the audience to make sure they tune in. Ted Cruz invited But after what happened

President Trump Andy Field Andy Donald Trump Cpac Abc News Orlando White House U. Andy Well Mike Pompeo Twitter Facebook Ted Cruz America Republican Party Tom Cotton Josh Holy Super Bowl U. S. Capitol
Fresh update on "ted" discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

Real Time with Bill Maher

00:46 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ted" discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

"At right. I mean that's it's owning the lives. So how do you mean. There's a reason why that happened in texas. But i don't think they will pay a political price do you. I don't know. I mean he's he wants to be president. I mean that's what ted cruz wants to do. And it's four years out to the next presidential election about and people may forget about it by then. But i will tell you leaving your dog home. The cold is an unforgivable sin. I'm not actually did that but john. You said the way many of us democrats tend to speak to americans as broken dogged up by self righteousness and identity politics and we're getting whipped in the messaging. War you know. I mean this is what i always say about. The underperforming. republicans is that people would vote for the democrats. But then it's like. Oh i don't like them but these guys are these and the republicans are masters at taking issues that are not mainstream and saying this is what democrats believe in when. That's not the case. The problem is bill is i. Don't think democrats get out into places that they need to get out. Tell their story. And and sometimes these are tough conversations to have but the truth is is. I always point out if you walked into peps bar big sandy and somebody said jon tester. Aren't you a democrat. what are you stand for. And i'd say you know what i stand for making sure we've pup good public education making sure. Our veterans are taken care of making sure we've got an infrastructure our next.

Texas Ted Cruz John Republicans Democrat Four Years Big Sandy Democrats JON Americans
'Frasier' is back in the building: Kelsey Grammer to star in streaming revival

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:48 sec | 1 d ago

'Frasier' is back in the building: Kelsey Grammer to star in streaming revival

"Blues. The actor Kelsey Grammer is confirmed as returning to his role. As the Seattle psychiatrist turned radio host. The revival will launch on Paramount Plus, which is the rebranding of CBS, Viacom, CBS all access. The actor had been leading the efforts to revive the series, which originally ran for 11 seasons between 1993 in 2004 on NBC. The Streamer didn't reveal anyone else that might be on board. The show, which also start David Hyde Pierce team leaves, Peri Gilpin and the late John

Paramount Plus Kelsey Grammer CBS Viacom Seattle NBC David Hyde Pierce Peri Gilpin John
Fresh "Ted" from John Batchelor

John Batchelor

01:20 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh "Ted" from John Batchelor

"Jill Biden flew to Texas today to talk with those affected by the recent deadly winter Storm and the fish. Was working with recovery efforts saving people drive. My mother would say sure you're doing God's work here. Thank you. Storm left millions without power or safe drinking water. For days. Texas lawmakers are investigating the outage and how to prevent another one from happening in the future. The annual conservative political action conference is underway in Orlando, Texas, Senator Ted Cruz blasting coronavirus policies during his speech to the group. Can French kiss the guy next to you? Yelling, abolish the police! And no one will get infected. Watch. If you go to church And say, Amazing Grace. Everyone's gonna die. Former President Trump is scheduled to appear at CPAC on Sunday and what will be his first public speech? Since leaving office? America is listening to Fox News. Now the latest from 77 W. A. B C and the BBC radio dot com I'm Bob Round. Police Air Brooklyn Man is under arrest after stabbing an Asian man and unprovoked attack in Chinatown on Thursday night, he says 23 year old.

Jill Biden Texas Thursday Night Sunday BBC Chinatown Bob Round Senator Today Orlando, Texas 23 Year Old Fox News Millions First Public Speech Asian Cpac Brooklyn President Trump Ted Cruz 77 W. A. B C
Gov. Abbott pledges ‘overhaul’ at ERCOT and stabilization of Texas power grid

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:45 sec | 1 d ago

Gov. Abbott pledges ‘overhaul’ at ERCOT and stabilization of Texas power grid

"Of Texas vowing to overhaul the state's electric grid operator after days of extreme winter weather crippled power for million's no power meant no heat and in some cases, no water for days. Governor Greg Abbott says the manager of power in the state came up way short. Cut repeatedly assured the state and the public. ERCOT was prepared. Those assurances turned out. To be false. He blamed power suppliers of all sources, but also said it was outrageous. That electric operator sent sky high utility bills to customers because demand soared. The state is Already investigating multiple electric providers about these spikes, But utility companies have said they're just following orders from utility regulators.

Governor Greg Abbott Ercot Texas
The people who caused the climate crisis aren't the ones who will solve it

TED Talks Daily

04:35 min | 2 d ago

The people who caused the climate crisis aren't the ones who will solve it

"We don't just have a climate crisis. We have a climate leadership prices. We've acted as though an environmental crisis created by corporate and government elites can now somehow be solved by these same corporate and government elites people on the frontlines the people most impacted by wildfires pollution. Rising sea levels have no other role but to suffer censoring. The leadership of these communities in leading us out of this crisis isn't only the just thing to do. It is the most important thing that we can do to actually solve this crisis because people when they take anymore they rise up and they lead us to a better future. Desperate times lead to creative and just solutions by those most impacted. I know that from experience because like so many other low income families searching for livelihoods when my mother brother. I emigrated from colombia. We made our homes alongside landfills incinerators oil refineries power plants and waste treatment plants in neighborhoods that serve as the sacrifice zones to fuel the economy of this nation and oftentimes the world in the seventies in southwest detroit. We live in the shadow of the marathon oil refinery and in the eighties in queens new york we played handball in vacant contaminant. Lots unknowingly breathing in dangerously high levels of sulfur dioxide from power plants nearby in the. Us if you're poor and your indigenous black middle eastern pacific islander asian or latin necks you most often than not live play pray and work in a sacrifice on. I'm saying this because i've been assaulted by. Pollution violence my whole life. And although i've been on the front lines as a climate justice leader for twenty years. I've been envisioning solutions to the environmental crisis. Since i was a kid dreaming up a better world for people like me. People in sacrifice owns that are also leading adjust transition away from this extractive model of development to one feels just for all of us in the name of climate justice so what is climate justice. It's simple if climate change was created by ecconomic and racial injustice than effective solutions to the climate crisis have to include economic and racial justice climate justice centers. The struggle the solutions of those on the frontlines of the crisis communities who have been under resourced and played by everything from police violence racism struggling schools and so much more these same communities have been historically and disproportionately exposed and subjected to pollution and contamination from industry these are the workers who are essential but treated expendable by big corporations corporations and this wildly unjust economic system in which we live in front line communities. Aren't the people whose homes on the beach are being threatened by rosia in their communities and families whose homes are already underwater children already camry from asthma and neighbors who are ready drinking polluted water poisoned water in the midst of a global pandemic multiple uprisings for racial justice democracy and record wildfires droughts storms. It's time we finally realized that we can't fix injustice with more injustice. I'll go so far as to say that frontline communities are the only ones that can get us of this crisis and in fact they already are and there's so many great examples but to give just one in washington state. A rural farming community

Handball Colombia Queens Detroit New York Asthma Washington
'Undervalued' freshwater fish in decline with a third of species facing extinction

Steve and Ted

00:48 sec | 2 d ago

'Undervalued' freshwater fish in decline with a third of species facing extinction

"News, Freshwater fish are facing a growing threat of extinction. So, says a new report from some of the world's biggest conservation groups, the World Wildlife Fund and 15. Other global conservation groups say one in three freshwater fish is is threatened with extinction. They produced. The report called World's Forgotten Fishes, which says freshwater eco systems are being wiped out by hydropower, dams, agriculture, irrigation and pollution. There's also trouble caused by the introduction of invasive non native species and overfishing, The report says. 80 species of freshwater fish are already extinct. And they say over the past 50 years, populations of freshwater migratory fish have followed by 76%. Till

World's Forgotten Fishes World Wildlife Fund
Why there's no such thing as objective reality

TED Talks Daily

04:16 min | 3 d ago

Why there's no such thing as objective reality

"In the next few minutes. I hope to change the way you think about the very nature of reality itself. I'm not a physicist. And i'm not a philosopher. I'm a historian. And after studying the ancient greeks and many other premodern people's for more than twenty years as a professional become convinced that they all lived in real world's very different from our own. Now of course you. And i here today. We take it for granted that this just one ultimate reality out there. Our reality fixed universal world of experience ruled by timeless laws of science and nature. But i want you to see differently. I want you to see that humans have always lived in a pleura verse of many different worlds. Not in a universe of just one. And if you're willing to see this reverse of many worlds it will fundamentally change. I hope the way you think about the human past and hopefully the present and the future as well now. Let's get started by asking three basic questions about the contents of our reality. The real world that you and i share right here right now. First of all what is it the make something real in our real world welfare us real things material things things made of matter the we can somehow see like atoms. People trees mountains planet by the same token invisible immaterial. Things like gods and demons. Heavens and hells these are considered unreal the simply beliefs subjective ideas that exist only in the realm of the mind to be real a thing must exist objectively in some visible material form whether our minds can perceive it or not second. What are the most important things in our real world answer. human things. People cities societies cultures government economies. Why is this well because we humans thing with special. We think we're the only creatures on the planet who have things like language reason free will by contrast non-human things to us just parts of nature a mere backdrop to human culture amir environment things that we feel entitled to us however we want and third. What does it mean to be human in our real world. Well it means being an individual a person who lives ultimately for oneself. We think nature is made us this way giving each and every one of us all of the reason the right the freedom and the self interest to thrive and compete with other individuals for all of life's important resources. But i'm suggesting to you that this real world of ours is not a timeless no universal. It's just one of countless different real worlds that humans have experienced in history. What then would another world look like the real world that. The cosco athenians in ancient greece. Now of course we usually know the athenians as our cultural ancestors is of our western traditions philosophy democracy drama and so forth. But they're real world was nothing like our own. The real world of the athenians was alive with things that we would consider immaterial and thus unreal it pulsating with things like god's spirit nymphs fates curses oaths souls

Greece
Stevie Wonder is moving to Ghana

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:29 sec | 4 d ago

Stevie Wonder is moving to Ghana

"Says he's moving to Ghana, the award winning singer side of the political turmoil in the US in an interview with Oprah It's an Oprah Winfrey, but I just thought that everybody would know Wonder said that he doesn't want to see his great grandchildren have to say Please like me, please respect me. Please know that I'm important. It's not the first time the iconic performer has considered moving to Ghana in 1994, he said, there was more of a sense of community there than in America.

Ghana Oprah Winfrey Oprah Wonder America
The Truth About Needle Fear with Amy Baxter, Founder & CEO at Pain Care Labs

Outcomes Rocket

04:41 min | 4 d ago

The Truth About Needle Fear with Amy Baxter, Founder & CEO at Pain Care Labs

"Hey everybody saw marquez's here and welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Today i have the privilege of hosting dr. Amy baxter once again. If you haven't heard our podcast interviews with her one of my favorite guests that we've had on the show episode four twenty six or. She talks about the work that she's doing with her company biber cooled. The product is phenomenal buzzy. Another one episode for twenty six and also at the soda. Five twenty where she goes deep on covid nineteen and some of the things that we should be thinking about just a ton of really good content. Check those out if you haven't already. But she founded paintcare labs in two thousand six to eliminate unnecessary pain. She invented fiber cool. Vibrational cryotherapy for tendonitis and to decrease opioid use and her buzzy device as blocked needle pain for over thirty five million procedures. This is key and what we're going to talk about today around. Kovic vaccination after yale and emory medical school trained in pediatrics. Child abuse and emergency pediatrics. Federally funded for needle. Pain and fear opioid use and neuro modulation research. She publishes and lectures on needles. A needle fear sedation and pain. Scientific contributions include hypnotic enzyme algorithm to time child abuse creating and validating the barf nausea scale for kids with cancer identifying the cause of the needle phobia increase amd buzzy and cool. She spoken on ted man. She's done ted talks bottom line. She's phenomenal and we're gonna talk about some really great things today around cove nineteen needle fear and a lot of her research that he's actually doing and has done and is helping our nation with day with The vaccination so amy welcome back thaw and i feel so. Adhd listening to that list. Well you got a lot on your plate you. You're certainly always keep things interesting. And i appreciate you for that and the listeners. Appreciate you for that so talk to us a little bit about what you've got going on a you know we. We sort of got reconnected. With this topic of neil fear. So why don't you introduce your work. There and the relevance today sarah sure will you know for anybody who's here before the story thus far was that i invented a device that used mechanical vibration to block needle pain got a grant for it found founded. It also decreased other pain. Kinda did some work with needle. Fear needle pain and founded. Americans really didn't care that much. So that's why did the ted talks. That's why did the techs is to raise awareness of the fact that the way we are vaccinated kids causes adults to stay afraid of needles. But because i've got this company in this product i moved on to vibrate wall opioid stuff and all of a sudden needle. Pain is relevant again. Yeah well it is and It's a big deal today because we've got to vaccines available as of now. We've got one more coming with jay and more and more people are getting the vaccine. Many are not and so talk to us a little bit about your research love to hear more about it and how it is impacting people's willingness to get vaccinated sure. Well the go thing is that. I've actually been asked to testify or the art celts. New and services on needle. Fear and needle pain. It had never been an issue before enter. Probably wouldn't have been an issue if the strains of covid nineteen stayed the way they were if the are not if that transmissibility number was at two or even two point five we only would of needed sixty percent of the population to be vaccinated with the v. One one seven with the south african variants all of a sudden. Now you're talking about needing seventy percent seventy five percent of the relation to vaccinated the issue with that is it. Twenty percent of people said they're not getting a vaccine anyway know-how and this means that you need to start working on those people that may get one that not get the second one said. That's where all the sudden it became important to really look at needle. Fear needle dread fainting anxiety. Pain all these issues that may be enough of barrier to someone that they're not gonna get that second vaccine then they're only fifty percent covered or for the people who are gonna freak out and don't get the first vaccine not because they think there's conspiracy or not because they're afraid of the immune system in their body being co opted by space aliens lasers but because they just can't bring themselves to stand gang that

Amy Baxter Paintcare Labs Kovic Yale And Emory Medical School TED Marquez Nausea AMY Neil Cancer Sarah JAY
Hollywood Celebrities Band Together to Help Millions of Texans Left Without Power During Winter Storm

Steve and Ted

00:40 sec | 4 d ago

Hollywood Celebrities Band Together to Help Millions of Texans Left Without Power During Winter Storm

"Hollywood celebrities with roots family and friends in Texas have banded together to help raise funds for the millions of residents who were left without power and freezing temperatures after a powerful winter storm used to native Beyonce's providing financial assistance through her foundation, be good and clothing brand Adidas, which teamed up with Houston's bread of life to help feed people in need. Austin native Matthew McConaughey. Tweeted that he reached out to meals on wheels in Austin to help so large Beyonce's sister reached out to the Houston Mutual Aid Society, while reality TV star Bethany Frankel, a New Yorker stepped up to provide relief through her crisis Foundation. Be strong. Michelle Pelino Fox

Beyonce Hollywood Texas Austin Adidas Matthew Mcconaughey Houston Mutual Aid Society Houston Bethany Frankel New Yorker Michelle Pelino Fox
Kroger: Some pharmacy customer data impacted in vendor hack

Steve and Ted

00:40 sec | 4 d ago

Kroger: Some pharmacy customer data impacted in vendor hack

"Grocery chain Kroger, the latest victim of a data breach. Kroger says it was among the multiple victims of a data breach involving a third party vendors file Transfer service and the company says they're notifying, potentially impacted customers and offering them free credit monitoring. The Cincinnati based grocery in pharmacy chain said Friday believes less than 1% of its customers were affected specifically, some using its health and money services, as well as some current and former employees because a number of personnel records were apparently hacked. Progress, said the breach and not affect Kroger stores, I t systems or grocery store systems or data. The company has 2750 grocery retail stores nationwide and 2200

Kroger Pharmacy Chain Cincinnati
Be Careful What You Say In A Job Interview

PR & Law

04:36 min | 4 d ago

Be Careful What You Say In A Job Interview

"Okay you and what have you got on deck this week. Well kim. i wanted to talk about the job interview. Were coming up to the end of february. This is typically You know usually a busier hiring season. You know people usually. They're going to let employees go. That's sort happens kind of late. November you close to close enough to the end of the year but not so close that it sort of falls in that christmas vacation range that sort of almost like a blackout period for terminations and It sort of carries over into the beginning of january and then by february usually kinda companies are looking at at hiring. So i've been chatting with a lot of people lately about Employment agreements and reviewing contracts for for new job offers. And it occurred to me that you know a chattanooga boat job interviews and do's and don'ts for employers employees might not be such a bad idea yeah and you know what. It's the same over here too. I think You know for us. It's after chinese new year when people either have resigned and are looking for work over there are openings in a company for for that year and we have just finished the chinese new year. So i think this is very topical for this part of the world as well perfect. Okay well i mean you know the first thing in the application process itself your cv right. Let's make sure your c vs them to date and that it accurately reflects your experience and you know that may sound like stating the obvious camp. But you'd be surprised. The number of employees that that embellish their accomplishments or skill sets Or or outright lie I came across a survey conducted by check stor There are a prominent reference checking company in the us and according to a survey that they did in in two thousand twenty. Apparently seventy eight percent of candidates admit that they have or they would consider misrepresenting themselves on their job applications so You know not an insignificant amount of people that were to come right out and say sure. I'm i'm prepared to lie on a on a job application. I feel like there must be a lot of gray area here. I mean obviously you cannot make a declared of statement that is false which is lying but i assume there is a lot of embellishment on the on the cv in just ways that might be hard to detect or might be hard to prove. But they're just sort of slight little improvements. That might be made here or there. That are not entirely false but are not entirely true. Either and i think that's probably really hard to kind of police. Yeah i mean you're absolutely right. It's always the gray area. That's gonna be be tricky to monitor You know where you have to be careful as an employee is something that is a complete and utter fiction. You know maybe a particular academic credential that you don't actually possess would be good example and then another one that often gets employees into trouble is if they've been or were fired from a previous employer and then during the job interview. The new perspective employer asks them. You know well. Hey why are you here what you know what happened with his previous position. Why did you leave And employees are often very very hesitant to say something to the effect of. Well i i you know i left because i got fired Or i left. Because i you know i stole something from my employer. Were regardless of the circumstances were even if it was just You know a simple downsizing that really had nothing to do with the employee's performance even in those situations You know often. An employee is is concerned about saying i got fired and how that might come across so they lie and they say something like yeah you know it just. It wasn't a good fit or it was the right time for me to leave. And that's a problem cam because if the employer were to find out after the fact that you were fired and they had relied on your word effectively that you know you left under under more pleasant amicable circumstances. I mean that could be cause for for discharge in terms of getting rid of you after. They've hired you. Yeah you and i mean you know this area well. How often do employers perspective employers. Do these background checks because in the course of my career I feel like they are done a lot now. I'm become more senior sort of in the industry but previously. It seemed like the employer didn't do any background checks

Chattanooga KIM United States
Skyrocketing electric bills are "top priority," Texas governor says

TED Radio Hour

00:49 sec | 5 d ago

Skyrocketing electric bills are "top priority," Texas governor says

"Texas after days without electricity because of the huge winter storm, some residents are now seeing huge electric bills, some in the thousands of dollars. Some relief is on the way. Governor Greg Abbott says the Texas Utilities Commission will stop sending out bills for the time being. Texans who have suffered through days of freezing cold without power. Should not be subjected to skyrocketing energy bills due to an end to due to a spike in the energy market. He also says there'll be a moratorium on power shut offs for nonpayment. Residents with variable rate power plants are charged more because it's based on demand more demand higher bills. But Abbott says he's working with legislatures to shield Texans from unreasonable bills around 30,000. Customers are still without power, but Abbott says all power should be restored by tomorrow night.

Texas Utilities Commission Greg Abbott Texans Texas Abbott
Kroger: Some pharmacy customer data impacted in vendor hack

Leo Laporte

00:31 sec | 5 d ago

Kroger: Some pharmacy customer data impacted in vendor hack

"Chain, the victim of a data breach in December, the data breach involving a third party vendors file transfer service, and the company says they're notifying, potentially impacted customers and offering them free credit monitoring. Cincinnati based grocery in pharmacy chain said Friday believes less than 1% of its customers were affected specifically, some using its health and money services, as well as some current and former employees because a number of personnel records were apparently hacked. Progress, said the reach and not affect Kroger stores, I t systems or grocery store systems or data boxes. Ted

Pharmacy Chain Cincinnati Kroger TED
'Saturday Night Live' targets Cruz, Cuomo

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:19 min | 5 d ago

'Saturday Night Live' targets Cruz, Cuomo

"Night it was called Hoops. You did it again venue to apologize for things you did wrong among those front and center. Governor Cuomo really Pete Davidson. Some of the people who died in the nursing homes were not counted as nursing home deaths. They were counted as hospital deaths. Well, which is basically what happens at Disneyworld. OK, the people die and they moved the bodies. They say. Oh, I guess Brenda died in the parking lot. Not on the teacups. So you know, we just did the Disney thing. And then there was 80 Bryant as Senator Ted Cruz back to frigid, devastated Texas from his tropical vacation in Cancun. Coward is actually the nicest word I heard. Let me ask you this. What a coward have the Kony's to blame his actions on his young daughters. Another SNL know. During weekend update Pete Davidson first played a relationship expert talking about Valentine's Day. But he broke character talked about his own personal life, says he's moving out of the Staten Island home. He shares with his mom, I'm officially moving out of the house. Yeah. Yeah, One of us has to go so way. We're watching that Britney Spears documentary, but I had to turn it off. When I realized my mom has like way more of a case to take over my finances than like Britney's dad ever did. E was like, Wait. She could do that. And she hasn't next week doing double

Pete Davidson Governor Cuomo Senator Ted Cruz Brenda Kony Bryant Coward Cancun Disney SNL Texas Valentine Staten Island Britney Spears Britney
The Moon Through the Houses in the Natal Chart

Astrology Bytes with Theresa Reed

04:03 min | Last week

The Moon Through the Houses in the Natal Chart

"Today we are talking about the moon through the houses in the natal chart. The moon symbolizes your emotions needs and how we respond to others and the world around us. I want to remind you there are twelve houses in the natal chart. You can go back to the old episodes to learn about the attributes of each house and wherever the moon sits in your natal chart in one of these houses shows. Were you can get a little emotional. And because the moon is changeable this could also indicate were in. Your life may fluctuate too so. Let's go through them. The first house. The of the first house indicates a personality that expresses feelings outwardly. Your heart is right under sleeve but sometimes you may be too reactionary. The moon in the second house means money is important to you. It comes and goes which can create insight eighty when you have enough cash to the bank. You tend to be more chill the moon. The third house indicates abotions ted. The color your thoughts. You've got a great imagination and might be intuitive and times you need to work hard to keep your feet planted on the ground. The moon and the fourth house is at home. Since this is the natural placement for la luna hope is where your heart is. And you're probably close to your family. You might have accompany home to. You'll need to guard against holding onto the past. If you can't get you can't let go of the old. you can't be present. The moon of the fifth house makes you a hopeless romantic. You want true love and nothing less will do. You're probably fertile. Couldn't many children. Ed would make an excellent parent but watch out that your pursuit for pleasure doesn't cause you to leave a trail of broken hearts behind you. The moon in the six house means work needs to be emotionally satisfying. You may choose a career as a caregiver or in the food industry drama at work could affect your well being and could sometimes be a catalyst for many job changes the moon of the seventh house places emotional emphasis on relationships. You crave security through long-term partnerships. You're highly empathic. But can also become co dependent. The moon in the eighth house heightens intuition. You can feel things. Am people out with these. You also have good instincts were handling money however boundaries could be week or you may struggle to find emotional intimacy hot and cold. Yep the moon in the ninth house creates a desire to see the world or feed your had you love to learn about other cultures and may have a strong moral compass. Bud this placement of the moon could also indicate restlessness or religious hypocrisy. The moon and the tenth house means the public. Loves you and you love them. You want recognition and you probably get it. The negative side of this placement could be someone who does whatever they think. We'll get the most applause. The moon in the eleventh brings a motion relationships with friends. Friends often become members of the family. Or you may have chosen family of buddies that replaces an unhappy birth family. The mood in the eleventh can also make you susceptible to peer pressure and lastly the moon and the twelfth house indicates a deep emotional need for solitude too much time spent with others stranger batteries frequent sabbaticals or therapy helps you restore your sense of emotional balance. You'll need to be careful that your past experiences to not color the present moment. Let go of those old stories

La Luna TED ED BUD
Here are the Dallas-area cities that have boil water notices

Morning News with Hal Jay & Brian Estridge

00:22 sec | Last week

Here are the Dallas-area cities that have boil water notices

"Water notices after the power outages, not treatment in public facilities offline Arlington Parts of Fort Worth South leg didn't Lewisville Mesquite or just some of the numerous counties under boiled water notices cities in the North Texas water Municipal District, Irving and Grand Prairie or ask to conserve water? You can check out a full list at WB AP dot com. Senator Ted Cruz is responding to backlash

Lewisville Mesquite Arlington Fort Worth North Texas Grand Prairie Irving Senator Ted Cruz WB
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

02:40 min | Last month

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"We don't know yet we don't know yet khloe but the you're twenty thirty four. I'm waiting for you. Dragonfly that talk okay so chloe. Let's say someone is listening and they're thinking you know what i i have a good idea for a talk. How will they know if their idea is good for the ted stage if they should even take the steps to submit a great question so i mean i think one thing that we tell people is to think about the difference between a topic and idea so a topic example might be something like we need to fix the opioid crisis. Like of course that's fascinating and most people would agree that. What's the idea within that. So an idea might take that step further like a specific angle that stems from the topic. with a unique message solution or insight so talk idea that actually became a talk from from that topic might be in the opioid crisis. Here's what it takes to save a life so we're actually hearing about you know the steps to potentially end this person by person. Okay got it. Now let's say a person has thought through all of that. They still think their ideas legit. What should they do. How can they get their idea to you and your team so please please spread the word if you know someone who has an idea we're spreading or if you are that person apply it's still open until the end of january so you can apply at go dot ted dot com slash idea. Search and winners will be invited to give. Ted talks either. Virtually person khloe. Sasha books is speaker. Development curator at ted khloe. Thank you so much for spending this hour with us. Thank you so much for having me. Thanks so much for listening to our show this week on ted's idea search and again for more information on how to submit your idea visit go dot ted dot com slash idea search and as always to learn more about the people who were on. Today's show go to ted dot. Npr dot org and to see hundreds more. ted talks. Checkout ted dot com or the ted app are ted radio production staff at. Npr includes jeff rodgers son as michigan. Poor rachel faulkner diba mohtashami james l. Tc howard katie monteleone. Maria paz gutierrez christina kala matthew ta and farah safari with help from daniel shchukin. Our intern is janet jong lee. Our theme music was written by rahm teen arab louis. Our partners at ted. Are chris anderson colin helms and a phelan and michelle quint. I'm a new summer odi. And you've been listening to the ted radio hour from npr..

janet jong lee jeff rodgers Maria paz gutierrez katie monteleone daniel shchukin chris anderson Sasha rachel faulkner end of january christina kala michelle quint Npr go dot ted dot com this week twenty thirty four ted radio Today ted james l. Ted
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:30 min | 3 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"I'm anew and for most kids around the country. School is officially out of session. But unlike other summers many kids and teens are stuck at home because of the coronavirus pandemic and so today we've got an episode for everyone. Kids adults parents teens. Go are all invited on this journey. Because we've invited a certain dad back on the show to share the coolest things he's learned over the years here on the ted radio hour topics to blow the minds of young and old and a mystery guest host. Can you please introduce yourself. It's the ted radio hour. Npr hello although guy welcome back thank you okay so guy not only were you the host of this show until you so graciously handed over the reins to me but you are also the host of rather podcast for kids right. Yeah it's called. wow on the world. It's a journey through real scientific research into sounds a little weird but It's like a cartoon for the ear. Where me and my co host. Mickey thomas go on journeys into space and back in time and Underwater and everywhere in between searching for incredible scientific discoveries. and it's this choi full wonderful experience for us and hopefully for the kids who listen to the show. Well that includes my kids and we sort of figured since you and i are both home with our children this summer. We thought it'd be the perfect person to come on and curate a special summer show for the entire ted radio hour family and you have so kindly brought four of your favorite segments that you did the years. How did you even begin to choose which segments you were going to bring to us. Well i think like you probably experienced their lot of ted talks that my kids love and on a really inspired by and then there's some that you know of course are sort of over their heads right but i really want to bring segments. That spoke to curiosity and the sort of the. Aw kids naturally have about the world and so that's how we kinda came up with this this collection and i will say i did feel that way About the first segment that you brought to us. This one is called. How do trees collaborate tell us about it. I love the segment so much So basically scientists for basically forever thought. That trees competed against each other for resources right for for water and son and nutrients and you know they figured that. The tallest trees in the forest were the strongest trees right and make sense. Might but suzanne simard the scientists that were about to hear from she totally changed the way that scientists. Now think about trees because it turns out they don't compete at all. In fact trees collaborate. They work together through this. This mysterious underground superhighway. There is an entire communication network happening under our feet. Let's listen forest ecologist. Suzanne simard had a hunch yes. That's right. She thought that trees could talk. Just imagine like when you're walking through the forest you. Might you hear the crunching of the twigs under your feet in the rustling of the but she thought what if there's more going on big chattering going on that. We can't hear the third attuned to each other now at the time. A team of scientists in england were wrapping up an experiment where they'd grown in the laboratory these pine seedlings together in little route boxes that you could see through. And the scientists took two of these pine seedlings. These baby trees that were in the same box in this aimed dirt and then they exposed one of these seedlings to a radioactive carbon dioxide gas carbon fourteen radioactive carbon. And what they found. Was that some of that radioactive gas. The carbon fourteen made its way into the second ceiling. You can visualize you could see. And so from this experiment. It seemed that somehow these two plants in the same dirt or connected. And i thought. Wow maybe this is what's going on in my forest. Maybe suzanne smart thought maybe all the trees in a forest or connected in a kind of network like our airport system or transportation system our social networks and maybe she thought all of this was happening underground when we walk through the forest what we see as human beings we just see these beautiful trees growing out of the ground but we don't see that they're actually completely linked underground in this superhighway. So suzanne decided to prove this underground network existed. She devised an experiment using some of the same radioactive gas geiger counter to measure it and a patch of birch and for trees. I figured the burcin effort would be connected below ground web. Suzanne pick up the story from the ted stage and i gathered my apparatus plastic bags and duct tape and shade cloth. A paper. suit a respirator. And then borrow some high-tech stuff from my university. The first day of the experiment. We got out to our plot and i pulled on my weight. Paper suit i put on my respirator. I put the plastic bags over my trees. I got my giant syringes and i injected carbon fourteen radioactive gas into the bag of birch. I waited an hour. I figured it would take this long for the trees to suck up the co two through photosynthesis senate down into their roots and maybe shuttle that carbon below ground to their neighbors. I went to my first bag with the birch. I pulled the bag off. Iran mike geiger counter over. Its leaves perfect. The birch had taken up the radioactive gas. Then the moment of truth i went over to the for tree. I pulled off its bay. I iran the geiger counter pits needles. And i heard the most beautiful sound.

Suzanne simard ted Npr mike geiger Mickey thomas Iran england
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:30 min | 3 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"I'm anew and for most kids around the country. School is officially out of session. But unlike other summers many kids and teens are stuck at home because of the coronavirus pandemic and so today we've got an episode for everyone. Kids adults parents teens. Go are all invited on this journey. Because we've invited a certain dad back on the show to share the coolest things he's learned over the years here on the ted radio hour topics to blow the minds of young and old and a mystery guest host. Can you please introduce yourself. It's the ted radio hour. Npr hello although guy welcome back thank you okay so guy not only were you the host of this show until you so graciously handed over the reins to me but you are also the host of rather podcast for kids right. Yeah it's called. wow on the world. It's a journey through real scientific research into sounds a little weird but It's like a cartoon for the ear. Where me and my co host. Mickey thomas go on journeys into space and back in time and Underwater and everywhere in between searching for incredible scientific discoveries. and it's this choi full wonderful experience for us and hopefully for the kids who listen to the show. Well that includes my kids and we sort of figured since you and i are both home with our children this summer. We thought it'd be the perfect person to come on and curate a special summer show for the entire ted radio hour family and you have so kindly brought four of your favorite segments that you did the years. How did you even begin to choose which segments you were going to bring to us. Well i think like you probably experienced minu. Their lot of ted talks that my kids love and on a really inspired by. And then there's some that you know of course are sort of over their heads right but i really want to bring segments. That spoke to curiosity and the sort of the. Aw kids naturally have about the world and so that's how we kinda came up with this this collection and i will say i did feel that way about the first segment that you brought to us. This one is called. How do trees collaborate tell us about it. I love the segment so much So basically scientists for basically forever thought. That trees competed against each other for resources right for for water and son and nutrients and they figured that the tallest trees in the forest were the strongest trees right and make sense might but suzanne simard the scientists that were about to hear from she totally changed the way that scientists. Now think about trees because it turns out they don't compete at all. In fact trees collaborate. They work together through this. This mysterious underground superhighway. There is an entire communication network happening under our feet. Let's listen forest ecologist. Suzanne simard had a hunch yes. That's right. She thought that trees could talk. Just imagine like when you're walking through the forest you. Might you hear the crunching of the twigs under your feet in the rustling of the but she thought what if there's more going on big chattering going on that. We can't hear the third attuned to each other now at the time. A team of scientists in england were wrapping up an experiment where they'd grown in the laboratory these pine seedlings together in little route boxes that you could see through. And the scientists took two of these pine seedlings. These baby trees that were in the same box in this aimed dirt and then they exposed one of these seedlings to a radioactive carbon dioxide gas carbon fourteen radioactive carbon. And what they found. Was that some of that radioactive gas. The carbon fourteen made its way into the second ceiling. You can visualize you could see. And so from this experiment. It seemed that somehow these two plants in the same dirt or connected. And i thought. Wow maybe this is what's going on in my forest. Maybe suzanne smart thought maybe all the trees in a forest or connected in a kind of network like our system or transportation system our social networks. And maybe she thought all of this was happening underground when we walk through the forest what we see as human beings we just see these beautiful trees growing out of the ground. But we don't see that they're actually completely linked underground in this superhighway. So suzanne decided to prove this underground network existed. She devised an experiment using some of the same radioactive gas geiger counter to measure it and a patch of birch and for trees. I figured the burcin effort would be connected below ground web. Suzanne picks up the story from the ted stage and i gathered my apparatus plastic bags and duct tape and shade cloth. Paper suit a respirator. And then borrow some high-tech stuff from my university. The first day of the experiment. We got out to our plot and i pulled on my weight. Paper suit i put on my respirator. Put the plastic bags over my trees. I got my giant syringes and i injected carbon fourteen radioactive gas into the bag of birch. I waited an hour. I figured it would take this long for the trees to suck up the co two through photosynthesis senate down into their roots and maybe shuttle that carbon below ground to their neighbors. I went to my first bag with the birch. I pulled the bag off. Iran mike geiger counter over. Its leaves perfect. The birch had taken up the radioactive gas. Then the moment of truth i went over to the for tree i pulled off its bay iran the geiger counter pits needles. And i heard the most beautiful sound.

Suzanne simard ted Npr mike geiger Mickey thomas Iran england
"ted" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

05:08 min | 5 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"It's the Ted Radio Hour from NPR I'm a new she's Emirati. In for the past couple of months while we've all been doing our part to keep ourselves and others safe. We've also had some time to think about what we value most. Walk through the woods near my home a few minutes walk away from. The village that I live in southern England and for a lot of US including Tom Rivet Karnak, it's planet. Beautiful Part Audi May. See the, light can. Tom Is an expert in climate change policy back in twenty thousand fifteen he helped bring together nearly two hundred countries to support the Paris Agreement, which was the UN deal to curb greenhouse gas emissions. But of course, right now, Tom's been spending his time closer to home one of the amazing things about this forest over the last few weeks of course, is that his deserted. Now. There's no one hand. For many of us, the pandemic marks, the first time, the whole planet having one shared experience. Maybe the first time we feel like we are one species and Tom says, this moment is an opportunity none of us who are alive right now have ever lived through anything like this. We are all facing one challenge, which is how we collectively going to deal with this moment. Now. The best outcome of this is that we as humanity remember we can no longer afford the luxury of feeling powerless. Like the rest of the World Ted Stage is now happening remotely. So Tom Karnak delivered his talk from those woods near his home. Right now, we are coming through one of the most challenging periods in the lives of most of us, the global pandemic has been frightening whether personal tragedy has been involved or not, but it has also shaken our belief that we are powerless in the face of great change. In the space of a few weeks we mobilized to the point where half of humanity took drastic action to protect the most vulnerable. Friday morning. The twentieth. By shift yesterday I came back into the emergency department full. We just like a war room in the respiratory report room. So many people are trying to figure out what a summit to take. Tired. Just been running unfortunately it's not over we're still going up. And so I'm still going back to work tomorrow. These people are caregivers and nurses who have been helping humanity face. Corona Virus Covid nineteen. Now. That's interesting because it shows that humans are capable of taking dedicated and sustained action even when they can't control the outcome. But leaves us with another challenge. The climate crisis. Because make no mistake. The climate crisis will be orders of magnitude worse than the pandemic. If we do not take the action that we can still take to avert the tragedy that we see coming towards us. There's a line in your tedtalk that kind of hit me like a brick wall where you warn us that the climate crisis will be worse than the pandemic. You know we're we're just so in the pandemic right now that it's hard to take the longer view on that. Make the case for why we Yeah I mean one simple answer to that question is that the climate crisis will be permanent. The pandemic is you know a major global emergency that we are right in the throes of right now but we will find a vaccine. We are learning about this virus all the time we are working on social measures to reduce its spread. We're working on back scenes those will take months or maybe years, but we'll come to that point and we'll come through it. World will return to some form of normality although will probably look quite different. In the climate emergency, the climate crisis if we allow ourselves to pass these tipping points. After which we begin to lose control of the climate system itself because certain things about the planet change like when the Sea ice reduces, it exposes the dark water underneath that dark water absorbs more sunlight which leads to more sea ice law. So you get these feedback loops where it becomes runaway. So you lose control of the climate system if we.

Tom Tom Rivet Karnak US NPR Audi England UN Paris
"ted" Discussed on The TED Interview

The TED Interview

03:38 min | 5 months ago

"ted" Discussed on The TED Interview

"It's called countdown that we're working together, which is exactly the counting down of those emissions, the mending of the of the curve. What intrigues you about about this initiative, what is different about it and what what, what are your hopes for it? Well many things I'm I'm very excited about it. The first is Chris. I think five Ted's climate countdown will do something. I have aspired to do for many years unsuccessfully, which is to take this conversation outside of the climate bubble. In order to reach the global targets we need to go beyond those of us in the climate community. The second reason is precisely that the opportunity I hope that this is really going to further the understanding that decarbonising our economy's. Certainly is a moral responsibility, but it is an economic opportunity and not the many projects that we are going to put their on stage will show that this is about people certainly, it's about planet, but it's also by prophet and that dot triple bottom line is exactly what we all need to pursue because one without the other is just not going to make it and the third thing that I'm very excited about. that. I really think that you have managed to position. Ted In the imagination of people people look to. Ted Talks and to Ted events to spark their imagination to spark their thinking to innovate. To to really get out of our Rut of thinking and move over to a different mindset to a different way of thinking about things and I think that's exactly what we need. We have to get out of our mental Rut and understand that this is really quite exciting and that we as human beings town for the first time in the history of humanity in the incredibly privileged position of having full power of designing our future. We have never had that power ever in the history of mankind humankind as my daughters would correct me. And that's what we have right now we are holding the pen in our hands and we can and we will. We're actually going to define a very, very wonderful future. One of the things that's been exciting Ted of the last few years is being the spread of these Fedex groups around the world who self organize and. We're applying this very much to this initiative is often framed as a problem that our political leaders have to solve and our job is to protest and get angry at them. It's also a problem that all of us have to solve. We've got really excited at the thought of having literally thousands of groups around the world engaging on this issue company by company city by city people often feel powerless about it and do feel this just overwhelming sense of dread but probably have more power than they know you know twenty organized employees in a company. Working with the C. Suite can actually get a lot done in terms of making the kind of bold for the long term decisions for that company about how to contribute to that. Beautiful. Carbon emission free future that we all audrey more. Christianity I have to have you and Tom and many many others engaged in helping frame. This initiative is unbelievably exciting. I guess I should say that a certain for this.

Ted Talks Fedex Chris Tom C. Suite
"ted" Discussed on The TED Interview

The TED Interview

05:54 min | 5 months ago

"ted" Discussed on The TED Interview

"You you have the skill to. Persuade other people even if they're not feeling it to take the optimistic science just as to go with it and to say imagine that other people are capable of doing more than you think they're doing. Now, what are you capable of doing that? You just did that repeatedly tell us what actually happened at Paris because a lot of people it's a puzzling agreement to to people people think of an international treaty as being you know these rules setup and has to abide by the and you know Kato. Paris didn't work that way and some people as a result of said, there was nothing legally binding as it's actually amounts to nothing. You believe strongly I believe strongly, it did not amount to nothing what what actually happened there. What do people agree to do? Well. First of all, it is legally binding at least it is legally binding in the hundred and eighty four countries that have ratified the Paris Agreement International Law. What has legally binding though is not is not to do specific things to make specific emission targets, but to agree to a process, is that right? Well, yes and no. So what is legally binding is the ultimate destination which we called the long term target of reaching a global economy that has zero net emissions by twenty fifty..

Paris Paris Agreement International
"ted" Discussed on The TED Interview

The TED Interview

01:44 min | 5 months ago

"ted" Discussed on The TED Interview

"Hello i'm chris addison to the ted interview. Today i'm re sharing with you. A conversation with christiana figueres from last december because it connects directly to an amazing event. That's happening this coming saturday. Ten ten twenty twenty. I really want ever understood into this to be part of that event. If you possibly can so cristiana has probably done more than anyone in the world to bring people together over the climate issue in harare the united nations. She was credited as the architect of the paris climate agreement which probably remains humanity's best roadmap into a hopeful future. And that's because she found ways to persuade people to change that assumptions about what was possible in this episode. We talk about this major new inish different ted which we just kicked off back then. When this conversation happened it's called countdown. it's global initiative to champion and accelerate solutions to the climate crisis. The goal is to build a better future by cutting greenhouse gas emissions in half by twenty thirty in the race to zero carbon world. a lot. safer tina faira. Frankly better for everyone. And now it's hard to believe it but despite a global pandemic and the most challenging year that many of us have seen in our lives. It's finally come together on ten ten twenty twenty saturday. We're kicking off with a virtual event that will be live streaming on. Youtube is going to be a global audience numbering in the millions. We've got some incredible speakers. Like prince william al gore and of course christiana figueres has self many others. Great artists use activists great scientists..

christiana figueres chris addison cristiana harare tina faira united nations paris ted prince william al gore Youtube
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:36 min | 8 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Sometimes, simple act of kindness toward another person. A, thank you. Complement of vote of confidence can have a much bigger effect than we realize and can even change the way we look at ourselves. And for Jacobs that kind of appreciation turned into a journey of a thousand. Thank us all for just a cup of coffee. I decide to go backwards so started with the Barista at Joe Coffee, which is coffee chain in New York where I go? And I thanked her, and she thanked me for thanking her. Would you say to her? You said Hey I just WANNA extra. Thank you for making my cup of coffee this morning. That's it I just rest my gratitude and I think she was pleasantly surprised because he doesn't get thanked all that often. So you after thinking the Barista I, guess you decided to meet with a guy named Ed Kaufman, who who works for Joe Coffee, so yeah I met at Kaufman who is the guy who goes around the world testing the beans tasting them and I loved that because he was so passionate about this brown liquid, and he taught me how to differentiate the tastes, because he would take a sip, and his face would light up, and he would say sensing honey, Crisp Apple, and able syrup in pineapple, upside down cake, and I love that idea of of savoring and appreciating. It's so tied.

Joe Coffee Ed Kaufman Jacobs New York Apple
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:36 min | 8 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Sometimes simple act of kindness toward another person. A thank you. Complement of vote of confidence can have a much bigger effect than we realize and can even change the way we look at ourselves. And for Jacobs, that kind of appreciation turned into a journey of a thousand. Thank you all for just a cup of coffee. I decide to go backwards so started with the Barista. Joe Coffee which is coffee chain in New York where I go? And I thanked her, and she thanked me for thanking her. Would you say to her? You said? Hey I just WANNA extra. Thank you for making my cup of coffee this morning. That's it I just rest my gratitude and I think she was pleasantly surprised because he doesn't get thanked all that often. So you after thinking the Barista. I guess you decided to meet with a guy named. Ed Kaufman who who works for Joe Coffee, so yeah I met at Kaufman. Who is the guy who goes around the world testing the beans testing them and I loved that because he was so passionate about this brown liquid, and he taught me how to differentiate the tastes, because he would take a sip, and his face would light up and he would say I'm sensing honey, crisp apple, and able syrup in pineapple, upside down cake, and I love that idea of of savoring and appreciating. It's so tied.

Joe Coffee Ed Kaufman Jacobs New York apple
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:52 min | 8 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Writer professional lifestyle experimenter. self-described curmudgeon I talk about I think in every everyone has the two sides the Larry David side in the Mr Rogers side, so the grumpy pessimist and the optimistic grateful side so many people have helped me to come to this night and I believe. I was born with a very strong. Larry David Side I was very good at finding things to be annoyed about and I think a lot of us are, if you hear a hundred compliments and a single insult, what do you remember the insult? Would you just take along with me? Ten seconds to think of the people who have helped you. Become who you are I was. Aware here that I have this negative bias. This Larry David side, but I wanted to bulk up the Mr Rogers side. Ten seconds of silence. I'll watch the time. It's not something that comes naturally to me and to most people I don't think it comes naturally. You have to cultivate this idea of gratitude. Whomever you've been thinking about. How pleased they must speed to know the difference you feel they've made. What what happened to you to say? Wait a minute I'm not. Appreciate people not. Being grateful. was, a Piff Neil. What was it? Well I. Think it was partly intellectually I knew the power of gratitude. There are tons of studies about how good it is for you. How helps ward off depression? You recover more quickly. You sleep better better. You're more generous. So, intellectually I knew like I should be grateful. But how do you do that and that's when? I decided you know what I'm going to try? This ritual at home where I'm going to try to say thanks to all the people who helped make my meal a possibility so I would I would. Say you know I'd like to thank the farmer who grew the tomato? Cashier who rang the tomatoes up at the grocery store? And, that's when my son who is ten very perceptively said. You Know Dad that's fine, but it's also totally lame, because those people can't hear you. They're not in our apartment. So if you really are committed, then you should go and thank those people in person. Aj. Jacobs picks up the story. From the Ted Stage. Now I'm a writer and for my books. I like to go on adventures. Go on quests so I decided I'm going to take my son up on his challenge. It seems simple enough and to make it even simpler. I decided to focus on just one item my morning cup of coffee. Well, it turned out to be not so simple at all. This quest took me around the world. I discovered that my coffee would not be possible without hundreds of people I take for granted so I would thank the trucker who drove the coffee beans to the coffee shop, but he couldn't have done his job without the road, so I would think the people who pave the road. And then I would think the people who made the asphalt for the pavement. And he couldn't do his job without the folks who drew the yellow lines on the road because they kept my truck driver from smashing into oncoming traffic. Splitting an atom because you can think the people who mixed the paint for the lines on the road, and then the people who made the machines to enable the paints to be mixed and the people who mind the iron to make the machines to mix the paint then. You can. There's lots of people think. Oh, it's never incident. I could have spent the next fifty years of my life, thanking people and I could have given a Ted talk that was about four hundred hours long, because yeah, that's what it made me realize how interconnected! Everything is how many people it takes. It doesn't take a village to make a cup of coffee and takes.

Larry David Side Mr Rogers writer Ted Stage Piff Neil Jacobs
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

07:40 min | 8 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Different parts of the light spectrum that we simply can't see with our human is so imagine. There's a stone wall somewhere in Italy that dates to the Roman period so roughly two thousand years ago, and you'd walk over a field and you wouldn't see it. Yeah, well that stonewall. STONEWALL, which may be under a meter, or so of earth it affects the overlain topography so the roots going down. They couldn't go as deep because they'd be stopped by the stonewall and so processing the satellite data, you can actually map out and see those changes we'll start seeing straight lines, and those straight lines form structures, which definitely aren't natural, so just as an example We got a hold of new satellite imagery for most of the pyramid fields and. What I what I started processing. It feels like cheating. You can see everything. How many sites are have you guys? found using pictures from satellites I'm at the point where I've lost count It is in the many thousands, but I don't know anymore. I believe we have barely scratched the surface in terms of what's left to discover. In the Egyptian Delta alone we've excavated less than one thousandth of one percent of the total volume of Egyptian sites. When you add to that. The thousands of other sites team and I have discovered. What we thought we knew. Pales in comparison to what we have left to discover. When you look at the incredible work that my colleagues are doing all around the world and what they're finding. I believe that there are millions of undiscovered. Archaeological sites left to find. Discovering them will do nothing less than a mock the full potential of our existence. When we come back, we'll hear more from Sarah about how her work can help us. All discover more about the planet we call. I'm a new summer. Roti and you're listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR, stay with us. He everyone just a quick thanks to our sponsor. Virgo summer is here and vacation is just drive away. Search thousands of nearby vacation rentals on Verb Oh to find your family private home all to yourself you can spread out chill out and feel that vacation feeling again together book them that makes the vacation download the verb virgo. APP, that's V. RB OH. I'm Gregory Warner with NPR's rough translation, so there's a holiday in the Netherlands where every year thousands of white folks where black face some people trying in that tradition, but in very Dutch way you talk you talk you talk you talk you talk until you reach consensus. Can you fight racism in a way that brings the whole country with you? That's on NPR's rough translation. It's the Ted Radio hour from NPR News Zimmer Odi and today on the show ideas for the whole family with my predecessor guy rise in addition to previously hosting this show. He is the host of the kids science podcast. Wow, in the world. Hey, Guy Hello. Before the break we were hearing from you and Sarah Park the space archaeologist about how many ancient sites she has already begun to uncover using satellite imagery. Let's get back to your conversation with Sarah. All right. I mean what you're saying. is we only know a tiny bit about our past? Is that true I mean is most of our history hidden? I would say yes. Because history is always written by the winners and yeah, people are living in places where they've always lived for thousands of years look at places like Rome and his tunnel, and Cairo those cities layers upon layers. Paul layers of of history so I think we've taken a lot for granted about who we are and where we come from, we think living in this very modern age with smartphones and Internet, and and sort of this whole world of knowledge at our fingertips. We know everything the more and more we delve into the past. The more we realized that we don't and that it has a lot of lessons to teach us for today. I wish for us to discover. The millions of unknown archaeological sites around the world by creating a twenty. First Century Army of global explorers will find and protect the world's hidden heritage, which contains clues to humankind's collective resilience and creativity. So how are we going to do this? We are going to build an online crowd source citizen science platform to allow anyone in the world to engage with discovering archeological sites and protect them. By creating this platform, we will find the millions of places occupied by the billions of people that came before us. Acknowledging that the past is worth saving. Mean so much more. It means that we're worth saving two. And the greatest story ever told. Is, the story of our shared. Human Journey. But the only way that we're going to be able to write it. Is If. We do it together. Thank you. I love that line. Re she says means that we're worth it to so great, so I have to ask, it's you could go on an archaeological dig the ancient civilization of your choice. Where would you go? I think I would want to do something like way way way back like early humans or like our even our human predecessors they were. Like creatures at least seven or eight million years ago, and that's what we know of and we've only discovered. The remains of like a teeny number of human like species, and so there's there's very little doubt that we have so many more to discover like hundreds thousands of species, and that would be amazing to go on one of those digs I wanna call Sarah and ask her. If I can go visit one of those places in Peru. She could hook me. Oh my God right. So cool all right, so we have talked about trees, dolphins and ancient civilizations before our final segment I wanNA talk to you guys about two words that we say every day, or at least we should say every day. Thank you two very simple words. Yes, that are incredibly powerful and a j Jacobs wanted to show how powerful those words were, so he took us all on a journey with him through gratitude. Do you talk to your kids about saying? Thank you like. Please all the time because I. Worry that. My kids say it, but I'm not sure that they totally mean it. Yeah I. Think it's natural. We all touch kids about saying, please and thank you. Please and thank you, but It has to be more than just saying. Please and thank you. It's about actually internalizing gratitude, which which is what Aj kind of describes in this in this talk. To practice gratitude you really have to. Slow things down and notice. Age as a.

NPR Sarah STONEWALL Sarah Park Italy Egyptian Delta Cairo Netherlands Aj Gregory Warner Century Army of Paul Rome Peru j Jacobs
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:50 min | 8 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Different parts of the light spectrum that we simply can't see with our human is so imagine. There's a stone wall somewhere in Italy that dates to the Roman period so roughly two thousand years ago, and you'd walk over a field and you wouldn't see it. Yeah, well that stonewall. STONEWALL which may be under a meter, or so of earth it affects the overlain topography so the roots going down. They couldn't go as deep because they'd be stopped by the stonewall and so processing the satellite data you can actually map out and see those changes we'll start seeing straight lines, and those straight lines form structures, which definitely aren't natural, so just as an example We got a hold of new satellite imagery for most of the pyramid fields and. What I what I started processing. It feels like you can see everything. How many sites are have you guys? found using pictures from satellites. I'm at the point where I've lost count It is in the many thousands, but I don't know anymore. I believe we have barely scratched the surface in terms of what's left to discover. In the Egyptian Delta alone we've excavated less than one thousandth of one percent of the total volume of Egyptian sites. When you add to that. The thousands of other sites team and I have discovered. What we thought we knew. Pales in comparison to what we have left to discover. When you look at the incredible work that my colleagues are doing all around the world and what they're finding. I believe that there are millions of undiscovered archaeological sites left to find. Discovering them will do nothing less than a mock the full potential of our existence. When we come back. We'll hear more from Sarah about how her work can help us. All discover more about the planet we call. I'm a new summer. Roti and you're listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR. Stay with us. He everyone just a quick thanks to our sponsor. Virgo summaries year end vacation is just drive away. Search thousands of nearby vacation rentals on Verb Oh to find your family private home all to yourself you can spread out chill out and feel that vacation feeling again together. Book them that makes the vacation download the VERB VIRGO APP. That's V rb Oh. I'm Gregory Warner with NPR's rough translation, so there's a holiday in the Netherlands. Where every year thousands of white folks where black face some people trying in that tradition, but in very Dutch way you talk you talk you talk you talk you talk until you reach consensus. Can you fight racism in a way that brings the whole country with you? That's on NPR's rough translation. It's the Ted Radio hour from NPR. News Zimmer Odi and today on the show ideas for the whole family with my predecessor guy rise in addition to previously hosting this show. He is the host of the kids science podcast. Wow, in the world. Hey Guy Hello. Before the break we were hearing from you and Sarah. Park these space archaeologist about how many ancient sites she has already begun to uncover using satellite imagery. Let's get back to your conversation with Sarah. All right. I mean what you're saying. is we only know a tiny bit about our past? Is that true I mean is most of our history hidden? I would say yes, because history is always written by the winners and yeah, people are living in places where they've always lived for thousands of years look at places like Rome, and his tunnel and Cairo those cities layers upon layers Paul layers of. So I think we've taken a lot for granted about who we are. And where we come from, we think living in this very modern age with smartphones and Internet, and and sort of this whole world of knowledge at our fingertips we know everything but the more and more we delve into the past. The more we realized that we don't and that it has a lot of lessons to teach us for today. I wish for us to discover. The millions of unknown archaeological sites around the world by creating a Twenty First Century Army of global explorers will find and protect the world's hidden heritage, which contains clues to humankind's collective resilience and creativity. So. How are we going to do this? We are going to build an online crowd source citizen science platform to allow anyone in the world to engage with discovering archeological sites and protect them. By creating this platform, we will find the millions of places occupied by the billions of people that came before us. Acknowledging that the past is worth saving. Mean so much more. It means that we're worth saving two. And the greatest story ever told. Is the story of our shared human journey. But the only way that we're going to be able to write it. Is If. We do it together. Thank you. I love that line. Re she says means that we're worth it to so great, so I have to ask. It's you could go on an archaeological dig the ancient civilization of your choice. Where would you go I? Think I would want to do something like way way way back like early humans, or like our even our human predecessors, they were human like creatures at least seven or eight million years ago, and that's what we know of, and we've only discovered. The remains of like a teeny number of human like species, and so there's there's very little doubt that we have so many more to discover like hundreds thousands of species, and that would be amazing to go on one of those digs. I WanNa Call Sarah and ask her if I can go visit. One of those places in Peru, she could Hook me Oh my God right. So cool all right, so we have talked about trees, dolphins and ancient civilizations before our final segment I wanNA talk to you guys about two words that we say.

Sarah NPR STONEWALL Egyptian Delta Italy Rome Netherlands Gregory Warner Peru Cairo Paul
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

08:10 min | 8 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"The show today ideas for curious thinkers of all ages and our guide on this hour is my predecessor Guy Ross. Hello, okay, so we just heard Suzanne Simard to tell us about how trees cooperate with one another, and it really gets you thinking about how all kinds of other beings may be communicating, which brings us to the next topic that you brought us. Dolphins Oh man. KINK around with Dolphin. Can't go wrong dolphins. I I learned about and dolphins like communicate through clicks right learn about this from the prisoner about to hear denise hosing. She has spent her entire life studying a very specific pod of dolphins in the Bahamas, and I, remember Malaysia remember seeing this Ted Talk in person and twenty thirteen. And I was totally blown away at the idea that one day we might be able to talk to communicate with not just with dolphins, but with animals like Dr Doolittle. Right I was. Fascinated by that story as a kid never that. And we are closer to that possibility today than ever before. I've seen lots of pictures of if you under water holding a camera. When you're down there. Does it feel like. It's almost like A. Just a better place to I, don't I don't do you get that feeling while you know. It's an immersion into a three dimensional world. The tides and the currents and the salt and the waves, and I mean. It all feeds into your understanding of what their world is like. Usually when I'm down there I'm like trying to follow behavior in make cameras on. It's actually mostly work really right. Denise hosing has been doing that work every summer. With this same group of Dolphins in the Bahamas see is just calculated recently for thirty five years. Breath thousand encounters in the water with the dolphins. Each of those a counters is about twenty minutes long so over one thousand hours of footage and. Data so yeah, it's a lot of data certainly for dolphins and the point of all that data of all that work is to help denise answer one question. Do they have a language. And if so, what are they talking about? A here's denise hurting on the Ted. Stage, now I'm interested in dolphins because of their large brains, and we know they use of that brainpower for just living complicated lives. But what do we really know about Dolphin Intelligence? We know that their brain to body ratio, which is a physical measure of intelligence, is second only to humans. cognitively they can understand artificially created languages. And they pass self awareness tests in mirrors and some parts of the world. They use tools like sponges to hunt fish. Now Dolphins are natural acoustics. They make sounds ten times as high and here's sounds ten times as high as do, but they have other communications signals they use. They have good vision, so these body postures to communicate. They have taste, smell, and touch and sound can actually be felt in the water, because the acoustic impedance of tissue and water's about the same, so dolphins can buzz and tickle each other at a distance. So decades ago, not years ago. I set out to find a place in the world where I could observe dolphins underwater to try to crack the code of their communication system. I will how? How do dolphins communicate to each other? Well, you know we can actually hear fairmount Their whistles are fairly audible to us. They have plex. They have burst pulses which are also. Packets of clicks. So. They have all these different cues, and they use body postures in combination with sounds that will basically communicate certain things to each other. This is total anthropomorphic station, but When you think of like when you see a dolphin animated or drawn and a kids book. They seem be smiling, but we should not interpolate that that means that they're happy all the time. Right Oh definitely. No, yeah, that is just a physical. Physical Cigna they have, going How do you respond? When other researchers say you know? Push back and say hey, like let's not do that. Let's not. anthropomorphized these creatures. You know you just keep doing your work, I think I. don't even think it's a discussion anymore. Honestly most of us that work with social mammals I think kind of move beyond that and just say well. It's a valuable tool for thinking about how they might think. Let's do the work, is it? Is it even we're to talk about Dolphin language, or or is, is it? Should we be talking about Dolphin Communication Yeah. We don't really usually talk about language because we don't have it yet. but thinking out of the boxes. Boxes you know it's like intelligence are other different kinds and types of intelligence. Are there different kinds and types of language I mean? We know there's tons of kinds of language with humans right, but one of the big things about language is that you can communicate about a different time and space right? Are they talking about the food? They're chasing. Are the eating, or are they talking about? Hey, let's go to the reef and a couple of days and meet up with this other group. You know we don't know and that's where. ANTHROPOMORPHIC can be a tool for thinking about how animals might be thinking. which brings us back to the Bahamas and a pivotal moment in Denise Hers Ings Years of work with Atlantic spotted dolphins there. It happened one summer because in the mid nineties. The dolphins did something they had never done with denise before. We just started noticing the dolphins were just start doing things. This is completely a wild right but we knew the individuals and they would start doing things like. Our Body posture in some cases mimicking rhythm of our sounds in the water. We were doing anything vocally. And we just Kinda thought. Would it be cool to see what we empower them? To communicate back to us. In the key to unlocking that communication. Turned out to be, play. Dolphins just like humans love to play games. Mostly with toys, piece of Robe, a bit of seaweed, anything can pull around in the water. Correct! So what kind of games do they like to play well, it's mostly called. Keep away. That is if they get the toy, then the ideas they like to be chased they like to let you get almost close enough to grab the toy, but then they speed off and that's the game. That's what they play with each other actually. The only question was had to use that play to crack the code. The code that would unlock the meaning behind the dolphins noises now one way to crack the code is to interpret these signals and figure out what they mean, but it's a difficult job, and we actually don't have a Rosetta stone yet, but a second way to crack the code is to develop some technology, an interface to due to a communication, and that's what we've been trying to do in the Bahamas and in real time. So we built a portable keyboard that we get pushed through the water and we labeled four objects. They like to play with the scarf ropes, guests them, and also had a bow ride, which is fun activity for open. And that's the scarf whistle, and these artificially created whistles. They're outside the Dolphin's normal repertoire. But. They're easily mimicked by the dolphins and I. Spent Four Years With my colleagues. Adam pack and Fabienne dealt four a working out in the field with this keyboard, using it with each other to do requests for toys while the dolphins were watching, and the dolphins get in on the game, they could point at the visual object, or they could mimic.

Bahamas Denise hosing denise Suzanne Simard Ted Talk Guy Ross Dr Doolittle Denise Hers Ings Malaysia Adam pack Fabienne
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:32 min | 8 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"I'm a new summer ODI, and for most kids around the country school is officially out of session, but unlike other summers, many kids and teens are stuck at home because of the coronavirus pandemic and so today. We've got an episode for everyone. Kids, adults, parents teens. You are all invited on this journey because we've invited a certain dad back on the show to share the coolest things he's learned over the years here on the Ted Radio Hour topics to blow the minds of young and old and. Mystery guest host. Can you please introduce yourself? It's the Ted. Radio NPR Guy Roz hello. Hello Guy, well back, thank you. Okay, so guy, not only were you the host of this show until you so graciously handed over the reins to me, but you are also the host of a rather popular podcast for kids right? Yeah, it's called. Wow, on the world. It's a journey through real scientific research, and it sounds a little weird, but it's like a cartoon for the ear where me and my co host. Mindy Thomas go on journeys into space and back in time and. Underwater and everywhere in between searching for incredible scientific discoveries, and it's this joyful wonderful experience for us, and hopefully for the kids who listen to the show. That includes my kids and we sorta figured since you and I are both home with our children this summer. Be The perfect person to come on and curate a special summer show for the entire Ted Radio. Hour family and you have so kindly brought for of your favorite segments that you did over the years. How did you even begin to choose which segments? We're going to bring us well. I think like you probably experience there lot of Ted talks that my kids love and on a really inspired by, and then there's some that you know of course are sort of over their heads right, but I really wanted to bring segments that spoke to curiosity and. The sort of all that kids naturally have about the world, and so that's how we kinda came up with this this collection and I will say I did feel that way about the first segment that you brought to us. This one is called. How do trees collaborate? Tell us about it. I love this segment so much So basically scientists basic forever thought that trees competed against each other for resources right for water and son, and nutrients, and they figured that the tallest trees in the forest where the strongest trees right it makes sense. But Suzanne Simard the scientists that were about to hear from she. Changed the way that scientists now think about trees because it turns out, they don't compete at all. In fact, trees collaborate. They work together through this mysterious. Superhighway, there is an entire communication network happening under our feet. Let's listen. Forest ecologist Suzanne. Simard had a hunch. Yes, that's right. She thought that trees. Could Talk. Imagine like when you're walking through the forest you, might you hear the crunching of the? Twigs under your feet in the rustling of the lease. But she thought. If there's more going on. Big Chattering going on that, we can't hear. That they're attuned to each other. Now at the time, a team of scientists in England were wrapping up an experiment where they'd grown in the laboratory. These pine seedlings together in little route boxes that you could see through. And the scientists took two of these pine seedlings, these baby trees that were in the same box in the same dirt, and then the exposed one of these ceilings to a radioactive carbon dioxide, gas, carbon, fourteen radioactive carbon, and what they found was that some of that radioactive gas, the carbon fourteen made its way into the second seedling. You can visualize you could see it, and so from this experiment. It seemed that somehow these two plants in the same dirt. Or connected and I thought wow. Maybe this is what's going on in my forests. Maybe Suzanne Samara thought maybe all the trees in a forest or connected. In a kind of network. Like our airport system or transportation system our social networks. And maybe she thought all of this was happening underground. When we walk through the forest, what we see is human beings. We just see these beautiful trees growing out of the ground, but we don't see that there are actually completely linked underground in this superhighway. Suzanne decided to prove this underground network existed. She devised an experiment using some of the same radioactive gas, a geiger counter to measure it and a patch of Birch and for trees. I figured the Burton. A for would be connected in a below ground web. Suzanne picks up the story from the Ted. Stage and I gathered my apparatus plastic bags and duct tape and shade cloth paper suit a respirator. And then I borrow some high-tech stuff from my university. The first day of the experiment we got out to our plot and I pulled on my weight paper suit. I put on my respirator. I put the plastic bags over my trees I got my giant Syringes and I injected carbon fourteen, the radioactive gas into the bag of Birch I waited an hour. I figured it would take this long for the trees to suck up the CO two through photosynthesis Senate down into their roots, and maybe shuttle that carbon below ground to their neighbors. I went to my first bag with the Birch I pulled the bag off. Iran my Geiger counter over its leaves. Perfect the Birch had taken up the radioactive gas then the moment of truth I went over to the for tree. I pulled off its bay. I ran the Geiger counter up its needles and I heard the most beautiful sound. It was the sound.

Suzanne Simard Suzanne Ted Radio Geiger Ted Suzanne Samara NPR Mindy Thomas Iran England
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:32 min | 8 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"I'm a new summer ODI and for most kids around the country school is officially out of session, but unlike other summers, many kids and teens are stuck at home because of the coronavirus pandemic and so today. We've got an episode for everyone kids, adults, parents teens. You are all invited on this journey because we've invited a certain dad back on the show to share the coolest things he's learned over the years here on the Ted Radio Hour topics to blow the minds of young and old and. Mystery guest host. Can you please introduce yourself? It's the Ted. Radio NPR Guy Roz hello. Hello guy well back, thank you. Okay so guy, not only were you the host of this show until you so graciously handed over the reins to me, but you are also the host of a rather popular podcast for kids right? Yeah, it's called. Wow, on the world. It's a journey through real scientific research, and it sounds a little weird, but it's like a cartoon for the ear where me and my co host Mindy Thomas go on journeys into space and back in time and. Underwater and everywhere in between searching for incredible scientific discoveries, and it's this joyful wonderful experience for us, and hopefully for the kids who listen to the show. That includes my kids and we sorta figured since you and I are both home with our children this summer. Be The perfect person to come on and curate a special summer show for the entire Ted Radio Hour family and you have so kindly brought for of your favorite segments that you did over the years. How did you even begin to choose which segments we're going to bring us well I think like you probably experience there lot of Ted talks that my kids love and on a really inspired by, and then there's some that you know of course are sort of over their heads right, but I really wanted to bring segments that spoke to curiosity and. The sort of all that kids naturally have about the world, and so that's how we kinda came up with this. This collection and I will say I did feel that way about the first segment that you brought to us. This one is called. How do trees collaborate? Tell us about it I love this segment so much So basically, scientists basic forever thought that trees competed against each other for resources right for water and son, and nutrients, and they figured that the tallest trees in the forest where the strongest trees right it makes sense. But Suzanne Simard the scientists that were about to hear from she. Changed the way that scientists now think about trees because it turns out, they don't compete at all. In fact, trees collaborate. They work together through this mysterious. Superhighway, there is an entire communication network happening under our feet. Let's listen. Forest ecologist Suzanne Simard had a hunch. Yes, that's right. She thought that trees. Could Talk. Imagine like when you're walking through the forest, you, might you hear the crunching of the? Twigs under your feet in the rustling of the lease. But she thought. If, there's more going on. Big Chattering going on that. We can't hear. That, they're attuned to each other. Now at the time, a team of scientists in England were wrapping up an experiment where they'd grown in the laboratory. These pine seedlings together in little route boxes that you could see through. And the scientists took two of these pine seedlings, these baby trees that were in the same box in the same dirt, and then the exposed one of these ceilings to a radioactive carbon dioxide, gas, carbon, fourteen radioactive carbon, and what they found was that some of that radioactive gas, the carbon fourteen made its way into the second seedling. You can visualize you could see it, and so from this experiment. It seemed that somehow these two plants in the same dirt. Or connected and I thought wow. Maybe this is what's going on in my. Maybe Suzanne. Samara thought maybe all the trees in a forest or connected. In a kind of network. Like our airport system or transportation system our social networks. And maybe she thought all of this was happening underground. When we walk through the forest, what we see as human beings, we just see these beautiful trees growing out of the ground, but we don't see that there are actually completely linked underground in this superhighway. Suzanne decided to prove this underground network existed. She devised an experiment using some of the same radioactive gas, a geiger counter to measure it and a patch of Birch and for trees. I figured the Burton a for would be connected in a below ground web. Suzanne picks up the story from the Ted Stage, and I gathered my apparatus plastic bags and duct tape and shade cloth paper suit a respirator. And then I borrow some high-tech stuff from my university. The first day of the experiment we got out to our plot, and I pulled on my weight paper suit I. Put on my respirator. I put the plastic bags over my trees I got my giant Syringes, and I injected carbon fourteen, the radioactive gas into the bag of Birch. I waited an hour I figured. It would take this long for the trees to suck up the CO two through photosynthesis Senate down into their roots, and maybe shuttle that carbon below ground to their neighbors I went to my first bag with the Birch I pulled the bag off Iran. My Geiger counter over its leaves. Perfect. The Birch had taken up the radioactive gas. Then the moment of truth I went over to the for tree. I pulled off its bay. I ran the Geiger counter up its needles, and I heard the most beautiful sound. It was the sound.

Suzanne Simard Birch Geiger Ted NPR Mindy Thomas Samara England Iran Burton
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Hey everybody it's minutia a quick note before we get started. The Ted Radio Hour team is now working from home. Maybe you are too because lots of things in our world are changing for all of us but we want you to know that we are working extra hard to keep bringing you great stories and big ideas each week. Some episodes we hope will provide a welcome distraction from the corona virus. And everything going on others like this. One will provide context to our new reality which a lot of US includes spending a lot of time online. Jesse no the show may sound a little different in the weeks to come since we're producing it remotely but our goal is to keep bringing you context kindness and stories that help you understand this weird world better so be well and enjoy the show. This is the Ted Radio Hour. Each week groundbreaking. Ted Talks our job. Now is to dream big delivered at Ted Conferences to bring about the future. We want to see around the world to understand who we are from those talks. We bring you speakers and ideas. That will surprise. You just don't know what you're GonNa Find Challenge. You have the acts ourselves like why's it noteworthy and even change you. I literally feel like I'm a different person. Do you feel that way ideas worth spreading from Ted and NPR? I'M NEW SUMMER. Odi and I think I'm a pretty good citizen. I am law-abiding I stop at Red Lights. I pay my taxes. I try to be nice to my neighbors. You probably do to. But what roles do we follow when we go online will none? There are no rules but maybe there should be because what happens on the Internet can have real life reprecussions so this particular example happened was the end of April..

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"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:59 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Stage. I started talking to neuro scientists and cognitive psychologists and what they told me was fascinating it turns out that when you get bored you ignite a network in your brain called the default mode so our body. It goes on autopilot while we're folding the laundry or we're walking to work actually. That is when our brain gets really busy. Here's boredom researcher. Dr Sandy man wants to start daydreaming and allow you to really wonder you start thinking a little bit beyond the conscious a little bit into the subconscious which allows sort of different connections to take place. It's really awesome. Actually totally awesome right. So this is my brain and FM Ri. And I learned that in the default mode that is when we connect disparate ideas. We saw some of our most nagging problems and we do something called autobiographical planning. This is when we look back at our lives. We take note of the big moments. We create a personal narrative and then we set goals and we figure out what steps we need to take to reach them but now we chill out on the couch also while updating a Google doc. Who are replying to email. The average person checks email seventy four times a day and switches tasks on their computer. Five hundred and sixty six times a day. I discovered all this talking to professor of Informatics Dr Gloria Mark. So we find that when people are stressed. They tend to shift their attention. More rapidly We also found strangely enough. We find that the shorter amount of sleep that a person gets the more likely they are to check facebook. Were in this vicious habitual cycle. What could this cycle be broken like? What would happen? If we broke this vicious cycle what if we reclaim those cracks in our day? Could it help us? Jumpstart our creativity. Maybe my listeners could help me find out we call the project board and Brilliance and Within Forty eight hours twenty thousand people signed by. Yeah I was like. Oh not a special snowflake. This is a thing. People are feeling this so one day. Take the APP that your thumb always seems to gravitate towards take it off your phone and observe what it feels like and then decide. Do you want it back on your phone? Cool go forward if you do. But do not let the tech companies decide as their decision making. Don't let that be the default which it very much has become. I think for consumers so how tens of thousands of people who signed up for the challenge. Some of them called her up because they started to realize that their relationship with their phone had kind of become co dependent the relationship between a baby and teddy bear or a baby. Banke or a baby that wants its mother's cradle when its done being held by stranger that's the relationship between me and my I think of my phone leg power tool useful but dangerous if I'm not handling it properly if I don't pay close attention I'll suddenly realize that I've lost an hour of time. Doing something totally mindless okay. But to really measure any improvement we needed data right. Because that's what we do these days so we partnered with some APPs that would measure how much time we were spending every day on our phone. And if you're thinking it's ironic that I ask people to download another APP so that they would spend less time on their phones. Yeah you gotTa meet people where they are but when the data came in it turned out that we had cut down on average just six minutes from one hundred and twenty minutes a day on our phones to one hundred and fourteen look amazing that you you got so many people involved and then looks at the data and turned out. The people just saved six minutes a day. Don't just sort of like like deflating right. I mean after all this effort people are only sixty six minutes a day. Which tells US something about ourselves? Yeah I mean well first of all it tells me that I have been trained to expect. Tax Returns Right. You know. We expecting huge numbers. And I I thought six minutes was nothing but when I went back to the scientists and researchers were who were advising me on this they I'm not joking. They laughed in my face. They were like who says six minutes isn't significant. And frankly like you know the fact that you got people to change their behavior at all over a week is extraordinary and listen to the stories because the stories will tell you so much more than any data can And that's what people told me. They told me stories about how they realize. They used to relax by playing their guitar and then they suddenly understood that they they hadn't played it in years or things bigger than that That people had sat down this thought. About what the family dynamics were and get to a better place in their relationship there were all these amazing stories that people told us and I thought you know what you're right. F The six minutes right. Get totally or like. Let's stop giving boredom such a bad rap. It actually is an extremely important human function that we are starting to just sort of breed out of our daily lives. And I I sort of look around and I see. There's lots of things like that Downtime eye contact conversations out loud where people stutter or make mistakes or take more than a quick. You know one hundred forty characters to figure out what they want to say. We've lost the capacity in many ways. I think for patients if we want to have excellent ideas the best ideas we need to let them take the time to take root and then blossom and that does not happen in a tap of a of an APP. We're humans we need. I'm and that's the one thing that our phones and it was more of that was me minutia. The new host of Ted Radio Hour talking to guy. Ross the old host Ted Radio Hour back in two thousand eighteen. You can see my full Ted talk on Ted Dot Com and we've got a new episode of the Ted Radio Hour for you coming this Friday..

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