38 Burst results for "Ted"

Fresh update on "ted" discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek

01:00 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ted" discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

"Season It's interesting too I love these kind of traditional kids toy shops or traditional retailers that are diversifying They've got an entertainment division that just released its first live action production as part of hallmark's Christmas movie lineup I've got to say we had a ton of stuff he's growing up It was something that my daughter really really loved But it's interesting just your daughter Or you too Carol Are you going to blow up your spot But you had some Bill today right I have to say I liked it I liked daddy Had some old ones a little collection And then she inherited them But it is interesting to see how they are more interactive in their stores And she talked a lot about the adult component of their business It's not just about kids Tim It's not I know I know everybody needs this stuff I'm blushing for everybody on radio You're listening to Bloomberg businessweek coming up We turn our attention back to our cover story in the Bloomberg 50 We'll dig deeper into our list of the year's most influential people and ideas This is where we get to talk about Brittany right Brittany and beam stalks And Ted Lasso That's right We're getting to it in just a.

Hallmark Carol Bill Bloomberg Businessweek TIM Ted Lasso
Sen. Rand Paul and Sen. Ted Cruz Are Right to Check Dr. Anthony Fauci

Mark Levin

01:42 min | 4 d ago

Sen. Rand Paul and Sen. Ted Cruz Are Right to Check Dr. Anthony Fauci

"Is Senator Cruz told the attorney general you should be prosecuted Yeah I have to laugh at that I should be prosecuted What happened on January 6th senator Do you think this song right there for a second Thank you rich First of all let's break that down His creepy laugh like a Batman villain aside First of all what the question of course is here you have a United States senator who is bringing up the fact that Anthony Fauci a member of the executive branch might have lied before Congress might have perjured himself before Congress Might have in fact totally American people Why So here's the legislative branch doing its constitutional job of being a check on the executive branch of government And instead of her following up and go well senator that's you know we're not talking about January 6th here We're talking about you and possibly now the accusation is that you lie to Congress about gain of function research You lied about the lab leak You lied about these things That's what they're arguing How do you want to respond to that No don't give me a giggle I'm gonna be a giggle like you've just tied up Robin and you're waiting for Batman to rescue him Answer the question This is their job Their job is to check the executive branch of government So what do you have to say to that Doctor Fauci But again Margaret brand is on his side He's the victim here right He's the victim And even though it's very very likely that Fauci did lie to Congress on multiple occasions about gain of function research which led to the virus in China being in that lab and maybe we could have very early on intervened in this whole thing She's willing to let that go because Fauci's a hero of the left And she is CBS So obviously you got to give the guy a pass

Senator Cruz Congress Anthony Fauci Doctor Fauci Margaret Brand United States Batman Fauci Robin China CBS
Fresh update on "ted" discussed on Stephanie Miller

Stephanie Miller

02:53 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ted" discussed on Stephanie Miller

"There's quite a bit of news of how Trump and people connected to him all seem to be I think Trump's told us about himself that he is Yeah he's a weary You let that but okay So the people that all have been pardoned by Trump they can be re imprisoned I am a traitor I know that and everyone that worked with you also general Michael Flynn was among two advisers involved in national security briefings for Trump during the late stages of his presidency in new CIA report details The type of questions that Flynn was asking and their information while he was secretly working for turkey As Hillary would say turkey Yes He most of Flynn's questions were on the Middle East and were quite tactical Turkey Yes He was not only serving on turkey's payroll He worked on turkey He worked diligently to hide it while serving as a top official and Trump's transition team So he was getting information from the United States of America to help himself benefit because he was working for as I've often asked in any of these people work for the United States of America Against all work for turkey Right Or Putin For instance Ted Cruz this is another story working as basically with Putin against the United States of America Putin is fostering the vision in America by backing extremist right-wing groups Cruz was asked about he said we're not quite there yet but maybe on secession Yes Right A one analyst said it's important to understand that the modern secession movement is not a product of lone star pride It's an idea that has been force fed into the American conservative movement by Russia That's why it was so bizarre to see Cruz duped by the texa movement backed by Russia As you recall bob Mueller indicted 13 Russians who were working with the Texas movement in 2016 to are you ready for it spread information about Ted Cruz during the presidential primary in order to help Donald Trump Ted Cruz seems to think that the job of the United States senator is to post on Twitter and own the libs but playing a culture working get people killed Cruz either does not know or does not care that this is exactly what Putin is trying to achieve And I don't remember this Remember after Trump was elected there was a cow legs at movement that fizzled out really quickly Yes But it was also Russian back It's brought to you by Russia Thank you Okay And maybe Turkey Right You just know that you found that You're going to keep playing I am Thanksgiving You know they've gone vegan and she thought she was going to get tofurkey and she said you brought turkey I mean really Well Bill was the one who wanted a tofurkey Because he is Right because he's because he's more heart healthy and they brought an actual turkey By the way I was right They Avalon was a great movie I was lauded for my impression You cut the toy key You cut the toy key Before we got here Okay Apple was Nobody's seen it Oh also I texted.

Donald Trump Turkey Ted Cruz Putin United States Of America Flynn Michael Flynn Cruz Texa Movement Bob Mueller Russia Donald Trump Ted Cruz CIA Hillary Middle East Texas Twitter Bill Apple
People Died on Dr. Anthony Fauci's Watch Compared to Sen. Ted Cruz

Mark Levin

01:27 min | 5 d ago

People Died on Dr. Anthony Fauci's Watch Compared to Sen. Ted Cruz

"This stuff Go ahead Lockdowns people talking about that Let's see what the information that we're getting in real time tells us He's on TV He doesn't have the data He doesn't have the substance doesn't have the facts and so all he's doing is shooting from the hip this is what he always Let's wait and see and that's why that's when we get the facts when I get more information But is that all he said on Sunday Now here he is on defaced the nation Cut 9 go Senator Cruz told the attorney general you should be prosecuted Yeah I have to laugh at that I should be prosecuted What happened on January 6th senator Wow he prepared for that one And what did happen on January 6th What did he do dummy You see how political this guy is What did he do I should be proud to say that what the hell Sounds like a cackling Kamala But the truth is nobody died on Ted Cruz's watch Ted Cruz isn't running the infectious disease operation in the national Institutes for health Wear a mask don't wear a mask We're two masks where goggles stay in your house hide under the table Wear a mask when you're taking a crap And I do this to do what I tell you I missed this science Come on out now The best guy at this has been Cuomo What What

Senator Cruz Ted Cruz National Institutes For Health Kamala Cuomo
Fresh update on "ted" discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek

02:02 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ted" discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

"Hey gotta ask you which we ask every leader of an institution or organization or company supply chain issues How rough is it for you guys Yeah you know we like so many toy industry people We do source from Southeast Asia and it has been a challenge and we're juggling containers and products and reprioritizing on a regular basis We did make a special note that we believe we have a robust really strong inventory position for the remainder of the holiday season We feel like that we have done our projections appropriately and really importantly particularly for that special experience in memory that people want to make in our stores We actually have enough bear builders which would be our sales associate To make sure to the best of our ability that everybody has that great build a bear moment That's Sharon price John president and CEO of Bilbao workshop She says hey they're going to be able to satisfy demand This holiday season It's interesting too I love these kind of traditional kids toy shops or traditional retailers that are diversifying They've got an entertainment division that just released its first live action production as part of hallmark's Christmas movie lineup I've got to say we had a ton of stuff he's growing up It was something that my daughter really really loved But it's interesting just your daughter Or you too Carol Are you going to blow up your spot But you had some builders right I have to say I liked it I liked teddy bears Had some old ones a little collection And then she had them But it is interesting to see how they are more interactive in their stores and she talked a lot about the adult component of their business It's not just about kids Tim It's not I know I know everybody needs this stuff I'm blushing for everybody on radio You're listening to Bloomberg businessweek coming up We turn our attention back to our cover story in the Bloomberg 50 We'll dig deeper into our list of the year's most influential people and ideas This is where we get to talk about Brittany right Britney and beam stocks And Ted Lasso That's right We're getting to it.

Bilbao Workshop Southeast Asia Sharon Hallmark Teddy Bears John Carol Bloomberg Businessweek TIM Ted Lasso Britney
Dr. Anthony Fauci Is Suddenly Running Against Sen. Ted Cruz for Something?

The Dan Bongino Show

00:48 sec | 6 d ago

Dr. Anthony Fauci Is Suddenly Running Against Sen. Ted Cruz for Something?

"Well it's Fauci You're supposed to be a scientist The guy can never act like a scientist Jim cub cut two we got time It's about 14 seconds Here's Fauci decided to become a full-time political actor What is he running against Ted Cruz for something Check this out Senator Cruz told the attorney general you should be prosecuted Yeah I have to laugh at that I should be prosecuted What happened on January 6th senator What is he in a primary for something He's running against Ted Cruz talking about January 6th Remember there we go we need duke We need Tony from rifle You're supposed to be a scientist a medical professional Can this guy get anything right every time this guy goes on the air He causes

Fauci Ted Cruz Jim Cub Senator Cruz Tony
Biden Administration Faces Threat From New COVID Variant

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:41 min | 6 d ago

Biden Administration Faces Threat From New COVID Variant

"Let's talk about the president's problems. The Republicans this weekend hit him pretty hard on the Sunday shows for promising to end COVID. Now we've got a crime. What do they do, Cenk? Doctor Fauci, whatever you think of it. And most of my audience doesn't think much is out of effectiveness. He's out of gas. And now he's fighting with Ted Cruz about January 6th. Do you see how that's not public health? I see that that is, I see that, yes, I see how a fight with Ted Cruz is not about public health. I think that I think to be honest with you, Fauci has decided his posture and he's going to at this point he's just going to let that play out to be honest, do that's my guess. But listen, I think this is going to be a major issue at the moment. I think that I don't think it's something that Congress is going to have to wrestle with, but you have Biden quoted back in the Trump administration saying the closing down borders is not the answer, not the silver bullet, stopping these things. So that is a very difficult thing to contend with at this point. And but I will say this, just as jobs numbers are beginning to look up, the economy seems to be in some respects picking up steam according to some estimates you're going to have this variant, which is we don't know the severity yet. But the administration, I think, listen, I think in some respect they're using this to try to boost boosters, right? I mean, I've gotten my booster. I think and I think that's their posture right now. Get the booster, add in protection. It's what you need to do. And that's where they've

Ted Cruz Doctor Fauci Cenk Trump Administration Fauci Biden Congress
Rashida Tlaib Endorses Prison Abolition Bill to 'Empty Federal Jails'

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:45 min | Last week

Rashida Tlaib Endorses Prison Abolition Bill to 'Empty Federal Jails'

"Will Rashida Tlaib? It was a very questionable individual. She believes we need to end federal prisons and open up all the jails and the criminals. This is now a stated policy position of the Democrat party. Now you might say, how could anyone possibly believe this? Will you see if you do not believe? That people are naturally inclined towards doing evil? Then you have to explain it away. And Rashida Tlaib believes that prisons are the reason why people do bad things. Again, you must go to college to believe such things as play cut 20. Yeah, again, I think that everyone's like, oh my God, we just release everybody. This one's. But did you see how many people are mentally ill that are in prison right now? No, I know, but the act that you don't actually release everyone, human traffic is. Oh, I know. Child sex that are mentally ill that have substance abuse problems. Why are you asking me about them? You're asking me about the traffickers trying to understand your proposal is sort of sweeping. It does release everyone. What? So sometimes I watch these clips beforehand. Sometimes I don't. Good for Jonathan Swan. I'm gonna text him after this. He's from axios. Tlaib, that's stupid? No, she's actually a I could see it immediately. I'm like, okay, now I know what I'm dealing with. And yeah, I'm just kind of a loss for words. What I was just watching there. She was admitting, like, of course, oh, I know. I'm gonna open up all the prisons, of course, obviously. The sex traffickers the murders, the arsonists, hey, you know what we need? Ted Kaczynski needs to be walking the streets again, according to Rashida

Rashida Tlaib Democrat Party Jonathan Swan Ted Kaczynski Rashida
Alejandro Mayorkas Allowed an Illegal Alien Allegedly Commit Fraud and Murder

Mark Levin

01:37 min | 2 weeks ago

Alejandro Mayorkas Allowed an Illegal Alien Allegedly Commit Fraud and Murder

"So Ted Cruz chews him up and spits him out Now it's Mike Lee's turn You know what a fan I am of Mike Lee Cut three go Like you're in Medina ulua who's a 24 year old Honduran man who has recently apprehended crossing the U.S. Mexico border where he fraudulently claimed to be a 17 year old He then ended up in Jacksonville Florida where a family took him in Days later he stabbed the father of that family to death He was a 24 year old not a 17 year old as he claimed There are people like him crossing and with the assistance with the approval with the facilitation in some cases of your department These things are happening That is inaccurate I am aware of the case that individual is being prosecuted There is an immigration enforcement detainer on that individual Did your department or did it not allow him in A senator I'd like to not comment on the details because not exactly a detail Did you let him in the country or not And the answer is yes everybody knows that he wants to hear it out of your mouth but listen to Majorca If I may senator there is a criminal case against that individual pending Whether or not that individual committed fraud and deceived our personnel is a question that may be relevant to the ongoing criminal prosecution and so it would be inappropriate for me to comment on a pending criminal matter at this

Mike Lee Ted Cruz Medina Ulua Jacksonville Mexico Florida U.S.
Alejandro Mayorkas Struggles to Notice Kids in Cages

Mark Levin

01:53 min | 2 weeks ago

Alejandro Mayorkas Struggles to Notice Kids in Cages

"Alejandro mayorkas is the secretary of Homeland Security In the course he doesn't believe in Homeland Security so there's an irony He was deputy secretary under Obama and he learned well under Obama His family Cuban immigrants but he doesn't seem to have learned a lot from them because Cuban immigrants are quite conservative They love this country At Ted Cruz put it to my orcas very very well and I'm going to let this play out without interrupting it It's about almost two minutes Cut one go How many children have been in the Biden cages and calendar year 2021 Senator I respectfully disagree with your use of the term cages Fun You can disagree with it How many children have been in the Biden cages I've been to the Biden cages I've seen the Biden cages How many children have you detained at the Donna tent facility in the cages you built told kids How many children have been in those cages A senator I can provide to you the following figure that when and let me say that when a child it's a simple question how many children have been in those cages I respectfully am not familiar with the term cages and to what you are referring There are enclosures in which they are locked in in which I took photographs and put them out because you blocked the press and didn't want people to see the Biden cages The secure facilities in which they are locked down in Donna that those facilities how many children have been in them Senators there are three types of facilities The Donna tent cages The Donna tent city Let's take the Donna facility How many children have been there That is a soft sided facility It is not Okay are you going to answer the question how many children have been in that facility I will have to circle back with you with the precise

Biden Alejandro Mayorkas Ted Cruz Barack Obama Donna Tent Facility Donna Tent Donna Facility Donna
Beto O'Rourke Steps Into Texas Gubernatorial Race Against Abbott in 2022

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:43 min | 2 weeks ago

Beto O'Rourke Steps Into Texas Gubernatorial Race Against Abbott in 2022

"The Democrats have an agenda to try to turn Texas blue. They keep saying it's going to turn blue. Big news today, beto o'rourke, he's back. Running for governor challenging Greg Abbott, let me get the dean of Texas talk show hosts responds to that big breaking news. For those who don't remember 2018, beto o'rourke came out of virtually nowhere in El Paso member of Congress and managed to excite enough Democrats that he came to within two and a half percentage points of Ted Cruz, our biggest conservative rockstar. That was 2018. This is three years later. What's different now? Well, one thing he's running for governor and not for the Senate, the other thing is three years of time passing. The questions become, does he still have the same kind of moths to a flame drawing power for Democrats that he had three years ago? I think the short answer to that is yes. Democrats are naturally thrilled by the notion of having a rockstar like beto, run for governor. But you know what other kind of group beto energizes? Conservative voters. Who for three years have had a good solid memory of how crazy he is on the Second Amendment. In deeply wrong he is on boarders and the economy. He is saddled with the albatross of Joe Biden in this gubernatorial race. And so in taking calls on the fly about it, this very morning, I found two types of voters who were stoked that beto is running. Democrats ready to vote for him? Republicans ready to vote against him, so the key question is going to be which is the larger group. I think beto finishes closer to Greg Abbott, presuming he's the nominee. He does have competition. He finishes closer to Abbott than any other Democrat would have, but do I think beto is going to be the next governor of Texas? I decidedly do

Beto O'rourke Ted Cruz Greg Abbott Texas El Paso Congress Senate Joe Biden Beto Abbott
The Activation of the Suburban Woman Voter Against This Regime Is a Stunning Turn of Events

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:23 min | Last month

The Activation of the Suburban Woman Voter Against This Regime Is a Stunning Turn of Events

"You look at Merrick Garland, you look at all the people testifying. You look at the Virginia governor's race, you look what's happening. They don't know how to handle a reignition of involvement and concern from moms and dads and parents that by the way, otherwise they might not have actually been the biggest Trump fans in the world. That's what's so interesting. Is that the activation of the suburban woman voter against this regime is a stunning turn of events. And it's just starting, by the way. And Merrick Garland and senator Ted Cruz got blessed some cross examining it. I think had the line of the day. Where he said to Merrick Garland, if I would have as a law Kirk for when rent quest put what you put in the memo as attorney general of the United States, I would have been laughed at and I would have been thrown out of the room. Escalation and violence, we actually read the national school board association memo. We're listed in the national school board association memo, turning point USA school board watch list. And we saw very early on, we weren't the only ones and credit to Tucker Carlson and so many other people, school board school board school boards, front lines, for the fight for liberty. Always peaceful, obviously, always being very respectful of the laws and the regulations, but you better believe you're going to complain. You're going to make some noise. You're going to use protected the First Amendment protected rights you have given to you by God not by government. To speak your voice to speak

Merrick Garland National School Board Associat Senator Ted Cruz Usa School Virginia Kirk Tucker Carlson United States
Episode 32: Top Five LPs From 2001 ...John's #4

Planet LP

01:46 min | Last month

Episode 32: Top Five LPs From 2001 ...John's #4

"Years old. it's survivor from destiny's child and i will tell you why because i'm glad you asked. This album has some of the rock to that. Maybe you wouldn't expect me to be as a rock guitarist to be. You know jumping towards this particular album but the title track survivor. Which you've heard on the radio. A lot is a great fine crafted pop song with beyond say and and the team there providing that three part vocal delivery they do so well there was a it was a michael jackson tribute tv show. That came out in two thousand one when destiny's child was kind of a relatively new act and they did a live version of boot delicious. Which with real guitars at three guitar players and drummer and you know porn section. And they of course the beginning of that song has that stevie nicks edge of seventeen a guitar part that they lifted but they played it so raw. Live and i remember watching beyond say looking at michael jackson taunting in nevada to boot. Alicia vol bang right adam. And he's kind of taken aback. Oh beyond say it but it was. It was powerful. And all i can say is. I didn't have the album until i saw that particular cut of that special with destiny's child doing booty leashes and i thought this song pretty rock. It's it's a rock and song. Yes it's a dance song assets movement or whatever you want to say but there's a rock sensibility to it. That made me love the band and of course gone onto become a huge beyond say fan she just an amazing artist in totality. But this shows her some of her rock and best and if you followed her career at all you've seen like when she's done live shows vegas residencies whatever. She has a full band four guitars full. Everything and generally they're mostly female. She hires musicians to back her up on tour. So there's just too much not to like about this record survivor from destiny's child my number full

TED Iheartmedia John Ted Planet Lp John Young Jeff Bezos William Shatner Vacaville Oklahoma City Twitter Facebook San Francisco California Amazon Apple Google Michael Jackson Stevie Nicks Alicia Nevada Adam Vegas
Kyrsten Sinema, the Enemy Within the Democrat Party

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:39 min | 2 months ago

Kyrsten Sinema, the Enemy Within the Democrat Party

"I'm joined by byron york. Who wrote yesterday about kristen cinema. The democrat marriage zona who does not agree with the largest that democrats want to spread around the country and in response. The new republic called her a traitor. The nation said how she is sold out the original story of kristen serve the senate's new super villain and then matt iglesias. Kristen cinema must be stopped. In the era of trump that would have been seen as a threat byron. Well done yesterday. I don't think the left is going to ease up though on their new. Michelle in coddle. In the new york times today calls her many names. That's right. I wrote it before. The new york times published the stories. That that simply. What's wrong with kirsten senna. Yep so as a matter of fact after the bathroom incident which occurred in arizona. she's flying back cinemas linebacker washington and. She's harassed on the plane About daca so i listen. I think the the remember there was a there was a period of time when resistance forces who are harassing Ted cruz they harass. Sarah huckabee sanders. Actually restaurant kicked her out and virginia And there were a people. Like maxine waters saying that anyone who supports trump should not find peace anywhere. You shouldn't be able to fill up your car the gas station. You shouldn't be abaya a gallon of milk at the grocery store without having to face the consequences of your political positions. Clearly that seems to be now directed at senator senator cinema.

Kristen Cinema Matt Iglesias Byron York Zona Kirsten Senna The New York Times Kristen Byron Ted Cruz Sarah Huckabee Sanders Senate Michelle Arizona Maxine Waters Washington Virginia Abaya Senator Senator Cinema
National School Boards Association Declares Conservative Parents to Be Domestic Terrorists

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:34 min | 2 months ago

National School Boards Association Declares Conservative Parents to Be Domestic Terrorists

"The national school board group wants biden to use a measure. That is supposed to be about spying on al qaeda isis and legitimate terrorists so it's an organization representing ninety thousand school board officials and they've now asked the white house to intervene against parents who oppose Virus restrictions and the teaching of racial ideology. The national school board association argued this week. That parents are engaged in domestic terrorism. You see that you're showing up to ask questions from your school board. You are a domestic. You are timothy mcveigh you are eric. Rudolph you are. Ted kaczynski the unabomber. You show up to ask questions about why your seven year old is learning graphically pornographic content while your eight year. Old is being forced to be segregate segregated based by skin color which is happening in atlanta. You show up and ask the question why. Crt you're the unabomber they've asked the white house to use the justice department the fbi and the department of homeland security against protesters and as even asked the white house to consider deploying the patriot act against parents and communities leaders who opposed mask mandates teaching of critical race theory

National School Board Group National School Board Associat Ted Kaczynski Biden White House Al Qaeda Timothy Mcveigh Rudolph Eric Atlanta Justice Department Department Of Homeland Securit FBI
New film 'Dear Even Hansen' is a misfire on just about every level

The Big Picture

02:58 min | 2 months ago

New film 'Dear Even Hansen' is a misfire on just about every level

"Let's talk about youth or at least an attempt at representing youth. I'm talking about the weekend's big release. Dear evan hansen which is in theaters on friday. Who where to begin. Amanda dear oven has what is. Dear of enhancing amanda. It is an adaptation of a tony winning musical which will come back to and it is about a young man named evan hansen. Who is having a very difficult time in high school going through some mental health issues some social anxiety issues and has been encouraged to write himself letters of you know like self belief and pas positive thinking one of these letters falls into the hands of another person and i just i'm gonna say because we need to talk about what this film okay. Another troubled student at the high school who then takes his own life and the parents of the second teen find the letter. That evan hansen has written to himself. They believe their son wrote this last letter to evan hansen before he killed himself and then assume that evan hansen. This tea and with no friends actually had a beautiful friendship with their now deceased child and the main character. Evan hansen goes along with it. And it's like yeah. He was my friend and invents a whole story and friendship and ultimately like a philosophy on how to live and connect with other people that becomes like essentially a hit. Ted talk on the internet and then he become something of a mental health advocate but really just sort of friendship at a community of care for other people a wellness figurehead popular on the internet. And and then things sort of unravel but for the most part no one is held responsible for any of the choices made in in the in the musical and the movie and then people sing songs about discovering themselves and it ends. That is the one part. I want to underline you. You just described the bones of the story very accurately and it's a musical. This story is a musical and so of course. The character is break into song as the story unfolds. I thought this was very troubling movie. A movie that really did not work for a variety of reasons. I think neither you. Nor i saw the show on broadway and so we don't really have a relationship to the show. It was a big hit and of course it. Was tony winning. But it is. Unnerving film is unnerving in a in a variety of

Evan Hansen Amanda TED Tony
Rep. Ted Deutch Strikes Back at Rep. Rashida Tlaib's Anti-Semitic Comments

Mark Levin

02:06 min | 2 months ago

Rep. Ted Deutch Strikes Back at Rep. Rashida Tlaib's Anti-Semitic Comments

"Our country must suppose selling weapons to anyone anywhere without human rights law compliance The Israeli government isn't a part time regime not my words the words of Human Rights Watch and Israel's own Human Rights Watch organization bed sullen I urge my colleagues Please stand with me and so reporting you how much time do I have rich Ted deutsches a sort of moderate rather wimpy Democrat not a Florida And even he had enough of this Cut 13 go But mister speaker I can not I can not allow one of my colleagues to stand on the floor of the House of Representatives and label the Jewish democratic State of Israel in apartheid state I reject it today this caucus this body the House of Representatives will overwhelmingly stand with our ally the State of Israel in replenishing this defensive system If you believe in human rights if you believe in saving lives Israeli lives and Palestinian lives I say to my colleague who just besmirched our ally then you will support this legislation may have 15 more seconds 30 seconds Is recognized for an additional 30 seconds Mister speaker we can have an opportunity to debate lots of issues on the House floor But to falsely characterize the State of Israel is consistent with those Let's be clear It's consistent with those who advocate for the dismantling of the one Jewish state in the world And when there is no place on the map for one Jewish state that's anti semitism And I reject that

Israeli Government Human Rights Watch Organizatio Ted Deutsches Israel House Of Representatives Florida House
Dan and Sean Davis of the Federalist Discuss the 'Narrative Game' of the Liberal Media

The Dan Bongino Show

01:45 min | 2 months ago

Dan and Sean Davis of the Federalist Discuss the 'Narrative Game' of the Liberal Media

"When you and I want to make an argument about taxes for example like the whole tax the rich thing At least we know the data And we can articulate a strong economic case why you know we like or don't like a policy The left can ever do that You see these new tax the rich calls from AOC and the buffoons out there And they did you ask people how much do the rich pay the top 1% And they never know You see this with voter ID two Ted Cruz called out Richard blumenthal up on the hill yesterday in the Senate about voter ID being racist asking him why the minority turnout in his state that doesn't have voter ID Wasn't as good as it was in Georgia where there is voter ID They just never know anything It's all euphemisms word games lies and manipulation And we don't do that You're right yeah They're entire game is the narrative It's something that we should have been included on back during the Rolling Stone UVA rape hoax thing from Sabrina Ruben early who just kind of manufactured with the help of an activist there the story out of whole cloth that never actually happened in your recall she referred to herself the reporter Rolling Stone is a narrative journalist That her purpose was to further particular narratives And any more the narrative is the whole game and that's why CNN and MSNBC and Washington Post New York Times and big tech why they are all so focused on making sure that nothing that can crack the wall of their narrative that can crack the dam and have actually facts coming through Can ever see the light of day because they don't care about the fact they care about power and their ability to maintain power is based on their ability to force a narrative into our eyes and ears and prevent any other competing narratives from ever coming

Ted Cruz Richard Blumenthal Sabrina Ruben Washington Post New York Times Senate Georgia Rolling Stone Msnbc CNN
What's Happening at the US Border Is an Insane Crisis

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:08 min | 2 months ago

What's Happening at the US Border Is an Insane Crisis

"What is happening at our border is an insane crisis anybody with a modicum of common sense knows that you do not let people into the country unless you know who they are this is so basic. Anybody who doesn't get this is really foolish. And you can't even listen to them because this is really basic. You don't let people into the country unless you know they are whether they should be let into the country. There are people all around the world to come to this country. We can't simply let people in. We have a process that has been thrown in the garbage. We have total chaos. If our borders are not safe. We are not safe. And what do we need a tragedy. Do we need another nine eleven to happen before people say. Oh yeah you know you were right. We should've kept her eyes on that ball. What's going on. Ghanistan is a scandal. Yeah and we're is the pushback from the republicans. You got like a handful. Republicans pushing back. They should all be pushing back. I mean we. Have you know you mentioned democrat on one hand you could mention. You've got ted cruz. You've got josh. You've just got a handful of folks out there Devon nunez who are

Ghanistan Ted Cruz Josh Devon Nunez
Netflix Wins Big at the Emmys

The 3:59

02:07 min | 2 months ago

Netflix Wins Big at the Emmys

"The emmys were last night and netflix. Dominated the show we look at what series one and wide net flicks is the king of tv right now. I'm oscar gonzales filling in for roger. Chang and this is your daily charge. Joining us is seen at senior reporter. Joe salzman welcome joan. Thank you all right. Well let's break down the show last night be who are the big winners in and one who who won. Let's put it that way. Well we're talking networks slash service. Netflix As you noted was the true winner of last night it one more emmys than any other network at one more enemies than the next two companies combined and it was the first time in years that hit that it outright beat. Hbo and the number of wins at tied. Hbo once in two thousand eighteen but really hbo has been the king of any statues perennially for for years. It was also the most emmy wins that any net tied cbs way back in the pre Streaming pre cable dominance era. Cbs one forty four emmys in one ear. And that's the most up until the only network. That's one that many up. Until this point. So in terms of the companies i wanna flex was was clearly out ahead and then partly. That was because of some of netflix is shows the crown one At tied with the queen's gambit for the most emmys first single program they both want eleven and then among others you know there are a lot of standouts from scrappy your upstarts from apple d. Plus for example ted lasso. They're sort of sports workplace. Fish out of water comedy series won seven awards total Including big awards for comedy series and three acting awards last night so it was a big night for streaming services and a big night for some Buzzy rituals that may be people hadn't heard of before

Netflix Oscar Gonzales Joe Salzman HBO Chang CBS Joan Roger Emmy Ted Lasso Apple
Netflix Rules the Emmys, Topping HBO as Winner of Most Awards

The 3:59

01:50 min | 2 months ago

Netflix Rules the Emmys, Topping HBO as Winner of Most Awards

"All right. Well let's break down the show last night be who are the big winners in and one who who won. Let's put it that way. Well we're talking networks slash service. Netflix As you noted was the true winner of last night it one more emmys than any other network at one more enemies than the next two companies combined and it was the first time in years that hit that it outright beat. Hbo and the number of wins at tied. Hbo once in two thousand eighteen but really hbo has been the king of any statues perennially for for years. It was also the most emmy wins that any net tied cbs way back in the pre Streaming pre cable dominance era. Cbs one forty four emmys in one ear. And that's the most up until the only network. That's one that many up. Until this point. So in terms of the companies i wanna flex was was clearly out ahead and then partly. That was because of some of netflix is shows the crown one At tied with the queen's gambit for the most emmys first single program they both want eleven and then among others you know there are a lot of standouts from scrappy your upstarts from apple d. Plus for example ted lasso. They're sort of sports workplace. Fish out of water comedy series won seven awards total Including big awards for comedy series and three acting awards last night so it was a big night for streaming services and a big night for some Buzzy rituals that may be people hadn't heard of before

HBO Netflix CBS Emmy Ted Lasso Apple
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

02:40 min | 11 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"We don't know yet we don't know yet khloe but the you're twenty thirty four. I'm waiting for you. Dragonfly that talk okay so chloe. Let's say someone is listening and they're thinking you know what i i have a good idea for a talk. How will they know if their idea is good for the ted stage if they should even take the steps to submit a great question so i mean i think one thing that we tell people is to think about the difference between a topic and idea so a topic example might be something like we need to fix the opioid crisis. Like of course that's fascinating and most people would agree that. What's the idea within that. So an idea might take that step further like a specific angle that stems from the topic. with a unique message solution or insight so talk idea that actually became a talk from from that topic might be in the opioid crisis. Here's what it takes to save a life so we're actually hearing about you know the steps to potentially end this person by person. Okay got it. Now let's say a person has thought through all of that. They still think their ideas legit. What should they do. How can they get their idea to you and your team so please please spread the word if you know someone who has an idea we're spreading or if you are that person apply it's still open until the end of january so you can apply at go dot ted dot com slash idea. Search and winners will be invited to give. Ted talks either. Virtually person khloe. Sasha books is speaker. Development curator at ted khloe. Thank you so much for spending this hour with us. Thank you so much for having me. Thanks so much for listening to our show this week on ted's idea search and again for more information on how to submit your idea visit go dot ted dot com slash idea search and as always to learn more about the people who were on. Today's show go to ted dot. Npr dot org and to see hundreds more. ted talks. Checkout ted dot com or the ted app are ted radio production staff at. Npr includes jeff rodgers son as michigan. Poor rachel faulkner diba mohtashami james l. Tc howard katie monteleone. Maria paz gutierrez christina kala matthew ta and farah safari with help from daniel shchukin. Our intern is janet jong lee. Our theme music was written by rahm teen arab louis. Our partners at ted. Are chris anderson colin helms and a phelan and michelle quint. I'm a new summer odi. And you've been listening to the ted radio hour from npr..

janet jong lee jeff rodgers Maria paz gutierrez katie monteleone daniel shchukin chris anderson Sasha rachel faulkner end of january christina kala michelle quint Npr go dot ted dot com this week twenty thirty four ted radio Today ted james l. Ted
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"On So because of the pandemic The disney parks have let go of tens of thousands of workers. Yeah twenty eight thousand. What are your thoughts on that. They have two hundred thousand employees. They let twenty eight thousand go laid him off. Twenty thousand two hundred thousand pretty significant by out of your workforce not one of those people was in management and they had also very quietly acted to make sure that the management structure could keep compensation packages intact. Now i understand. The revenues have been eviscerated but just know that from twenty seven to twenty thousand nine hundred eighty years. The company had made eleven and a half billion dollars in share buybacks. A share buyback is when a company buys shares of its own stock. They do that to drive the price up and to make shareholders happy it also has the nice ansari benefit of making the ceo and other people who are compensated in shares. Happy as well. No one could have seen the pandemic coming. No one could have said. We're gonna be hit by this thing. But anyone could have foreseen that something bad would have happened for which you should have cash so. This company went from historic profitability and the happiest shareholders on earth to less than a year later laying. Twenty eight thousand people and pleading poverty. Okay so let's talk about what you would like to see happen. I mean we started this episode. We see a crash course in the depression in the nineteen twenties and understanding what radical changes came out of that with the government with the way we think about money. And i just wanna ask you. We've had now a century of these lessons. Do you think we need another moment. Where we have a reckoning and say you know we need to fix the system. Let's set up a better way of doing this. So what i want to see happen is if i'm a ceo. And i know that some of my workers are on food stamps or going food pantries. I want to be ashamed of myself. i want other people to feel shame on my behalf. The fact that that's not happening says that the ceo considers himself to be of a class and even a species different and distinct from the people. Who do the hardest work at the company. The billionaires in this country have gotten much much much richer in the pandemic on the taken advantage of what people needed. I was hoping the pandemic would force us all to say. Oh my god now. I see it. Look at the way we're treating the people who do the essential work you know and the opposite kind of happens you know the bay zossen everyone else kinda double down on the old behaviors and and what do you. How do you respond. If one of them says well you know. I hear you about wanting to provide more of a safety net to are least well paid employees but abigail. I gotta run a company here and you just don't know what it takes to survive in this market. What do you say to that what i say. Is there humans working in your company human beings. They have all the same needs and desires that you have. You have to treat them with the dignity you would wanna be treated with yourself like. That's just the starting point. Then go make all the prophet. You wanna make. But if your business plan starts with exploitation and you can't make get to profitability without doing that then you need to go get another business plan if you really care about your employees jeff bezos. I'm talking to you right now. You should pay them well and maybe make less money and make sure everybody else is making more. They're your fellow human beings after all. All they want is licensed dignity. That's abigail disney by the way shortly after we tape this interview. Disney announced that they're laying off another four thousand workers. You can find abigail. Full-time at ted dot com. Thank you so much for listening to our show this week about a century of money to learn more about the people who were on it go to ted dot. Npr dot org and to see hundreds more. Ted talks checkout ted dot com or the ted app are ted radio production staff at. Npr includes jeff. Rodgers son is michigan. Poor retail faulkner diba mohtashami james de la hussey jc howard katie. Monta leon maria paz gutierrez christina kala and matthew kutai with help from daniel shchukin. Our intern is faira safari special. Thanks this week to williams snow for providing a voiceover. Our theme music was written by rahm teen arab louis. Our partners at ted chris anderson colin helms in a feeling and michelle. Quint newsom roti and you have been listening to the ted radio hour from npr. This message comes from npr sponsor. Three am who continues to expand production of the respirators frontline workers need globally and is on track to supply two billion by the end of twenty twenty more at three m dot com slash covid. Three m science applied to life..

abigail abigail disney depression jeff bezos ted dot james de la hussey howard katie Monta leon maria paz gutierrez matthew kutai daniel shchukin Disney ted chris anderson colin helms Rodgers Npr Ted Quint newsom roti jeff michigan
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:30 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"I'm anew and for most kids around the country. School is officially out of session. But unlike other summers many kids and teens are stuck at home because of the coronavirus pandemic and so today we've got an episode for everyone. Kids adults parents teens. Go are all invited on this journey. Because we've invited a certain dad back on the show to share the coolest things he's learned over the years here on the ted radio hour topics to blow the minds of young and old and a mystery guest host. Can you please introduce yourself. It's the ted radio hour. Npr hello although guy welcome back thank you okay so guy not only were you the host of this show until you so graciously handed over the reins to me but you are also the host of rather podcast for kids right. Yeah it's called. wow on the world. It's a journey through real scientific research into sounds a little weird but It's like a cartoon for the ear. Where me and my co host. Mickey thomas go on journeys into space and back in time and Underwater and everywhere in between searching for incredible scientific discoveries. and it's this choi full wonderful experience for us and hopefully for the kids who listen to the show. Well that includes my kids and we sort of figured since you and i are both home with our children this summer. We thought it'd be the perfect person to come on and curate a special summer show for the entire ted radio hour family and you have so kindly brought four of your favorite segments that you did the years. How did you even begin to choose which segments you were going to bring to us. Well i think like you probably experienced their lot of ted talks that my kids love and on a really inspired by and then there's some that you know of course are sort of over their heads right but i really want to bring segments. That spoke to curiosity and the sort of the. Aw kids naturally have about the world and so that's how we kinda came up with this this collection and i will say i did feel that way About the first segment that you brought to us. This one is called. How do trees collaborate tell us about it. I love the segment so much So basically scientists for basically forever thought. That trees competed against each other for resources right for for water and son and nutrients and you know they figured that. The tallest trees in the forest were the strongest trees right and make sense. Might but suzanne simard the scientists that were about to hear from she totally changed the way that scientists. Now think about trees because it turns out they don't compete at all. In fact trees collaborate. They work together through this. This mysterious underground superhighway. There is an entire communication network happening under our feet. Let's listen forest ecologist. Suzanne simard had a hunch yes. That's right. She thought that trees could talk. Just imagine like when you're walking through the forest you. Might you hear the crunching of the twigs under your feet in the rustling of the but she thought what if there's more going on big chattering going on that. We can't hear the third attuned to each other now at the time. A team of scientists in england were wrapping up an experiment where they'd grown in the laboratory these pine seedlings together in little route boxes that you could see through. And the scientists took two of these pine seedlings. These baby trees that were in the same box in this aimed dirt and then they exposed one of these seedlings to a radioactive carbon dioxide gas carbon fourteen radioactive carbon. And what they found. Was that some of that radioactive gas. The carbon fourteen made its way into the second ceiling. You can visualize you could see. And so from this experiment. It seemed that somehow these two plants in the same dirt or connected. And i thought. Wow maybe this is what's going on in my forest. Maybe suzanne smart thought maybe all the trees in a forest or connected in a kind of network like our airport system or transportation system our social networks and maybe she thought all of this was happening underground when we walk through the forest what we see as human beings we just see these beautiful trees growing out of the ground but we don't see that they're actually completely linked underground in this superhighway. So suzanne decided to prove this underground network existed. She devised an experiment using some of the same radioactive gas geiger counter to measure it and a patch of birch and for trees. I figured the burcin effort would be connected below ground web. Suzanne pick up the story from the ted stage and i gathered my apparatus plastic bags and duct tape and shade cloth. A paper. suit a respirator. And then borrow some high-tech stuff from my university. The first day of the experiment. We got out to our plot and i pulled on my weight. Paper suit i put on my respirator. I put the plastic bags over my trees. I got my giant syringes and i injected carbon fourteen radioactive gas into the bag of birch. I waited an hour. I figured it would take this long for the trees to suck up the co two through photosynthesis senate down into their roots and maybe shuttle that carbon below ground to their neighbors. I went to my first bag with the birch. I pulled the bag off. Iran mike geiger counter over. Its leaves perfect. The birch had taken up the radioactive gas. Then the moment of truth i went over to the for tree. I pulled off its bay. I iran the geiger counter pits needles. And i heard the most beautiful sound.

Suzanne simard ted Npr mike geiger Mickey thomas Iran england
"ted" Discussed on The TED Interview

The TED Interview

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on The TED Interview

"Hello i'm chris addison to the ted interview. Today i'm re sharing with you. A conversation with christiana figueres from last december because it connects directly to an amazing event. That's happening this coming saturday. Ten ten twenty twenty. I really want ever understood into this to be part of that event. If you possibly can so cristiana has probably done more than anyone in the world to bring people together over the climate issue in harare the united nations. She was credited as the architect of the paris climate agreement which probably remains humanity's best roadmap into a hopeful future. And that's because she found ways to persuade people to change that assumptions about what was possible in this episode. We talk about this major new inish different ted which we just kicked off back then. When this conversation happened it's called countdown. it's global initiative to champion and accelerate solutions to the climate crisis. The goal is to build a better future by cutting greenhouse gas emissions in half by twenty thirty in the race to zero carbon world. a lot. safer tina faira. Frankly better for everyone. And now it's hard to believe it but despite a global pandemic and the most challenging year that many of us have seen in our lives. It's finally come together on ten ten twenty twenty saturday. We're kicking off with a virtual event that will be live streaming on. Youtube is going to be a global audience numbering in the millions. We've got some incredible speakers. Like prince william al gore and of course christiana figueres has self many others. Great artists use activists great scientists..

christiana figueres chris addison cristiana harare tina faira united nations paris ted prince william al gore Youtube
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"You gotTA. EEG. Love Him? He always has this ability to take something as mundane as saying. Thank you and turn it into like. A Journey and I do feel like during the pandemic so many more of us have really begun to be more appreciative and grateful to the people who do bring us all the things we need every day. The essential workers in the grocery store I have definitely been making sure to say thank you more, and like I now have a slightly creepy habit of waving and smiling it every year. That passes me when I go for a walk I want. To the world. I mean I totally agree. I think it's sort of forced us to really reflect on on this idea of showing gratitude and what I love about g Jacobs is he says you know gratitude isn't about being optimistic, or you know single. The world is great all the time. It's actually forces you to to really actually reflect on the world because when you show gratitude, you really kind of understanding the process that it took for people to get you the things that make your life better or more joyful in in this instance, and the science is real. We did an episode on my kids show while in the world about this about gratitude, there's a there's a study out of the University of Montana that showed how express gratitude to yourself and to others it actually increases. Your happiness has been proven by science, and it's such a wonderful idea. You know not not just to be thankful not to just sit down and say I'm thankful for this and can for that, but if you can actually think the. Who may not even know that they improve your life? It's incredibly meaningful, not only to them, but but to you as well Yes, it is I want to say a huge. Thank you to you guys for coming back on the show for sharing your favorite ideas for the whole family and I have to say listeners have been very very welcoming to be, but if they're missing you, where can they find you these days? They can find me on how I built this and on well in the world, and I just wanted to thank you for taking the show, and making it even more incredible and wonderful, and just a joy to listen to it's it's awesome means a lot. Thank you guy. That's my Ted Radio Hour predescessor Guy Ross. He is now the host of the podcast well in the world with Mindy Thomas and the show how I built this and kids. If you WANNA learn more about all the ideas that guy and I talked about. We have got some really cool activities for you at Ted DOT NPR dot. Dot Org plus you can watch all the talks that guy mentioned here to you got to see the dolphins owing grownups, you can always see hundreds more ted talks at Ted, dot com, or on the Ted APP, and now I need to show some gratitude and thank our hardworking production staff here at NPR, which includes Jeff. Rodgers Saunas Michigan. Poor Rachel Faulkner Diba Mohtashami. James Hussey JC Howard. Katie Monteleone Maria. Pause Gutierrez Christina Kala and Matthew Cloutier with help from Daniel Shchukin our theme music was written by Rahm Teen, Arab Louis Our partners at Ted are Chris, Anderson Colin Helms Anna, Phelan and Michelle quint. Rhody and you've been listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR. She was thinking about Billy Ocean singing Caribbean Queen Carribean Queen. James! One. No. Sign..

Ted Guy Ross NPR James Hussey Caribbean Queen Carribean Quee Rachel Faulkner Diba Mohtasham University of Montana Billy Ocean Katie Monteleone Maria TA g Jacobs Gutierrez Christina Kala Mindy Thomas Rodgers Rhody Michigan Rahm Anderson Colin Helms Anna JC Howard
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Sometimes, simple act of kindness toward another person. A, thank you. Complement of vote of confidence can have a much bigger effect than we realize and can even change the way we look at ourselves. And for Jacobs that kind of appreciation turned into a journey of a thousand. Thank us all for just a cup of coffee. I decide to go backwards so started with the Barista at Joe Coffee, which is coffee chain in New York where I go? And I thanked her, and she thanked me for thanking her. Would you say to her? You said Hey I just WANNA extra. Thank you for making my cup of coffee this morning. That's it I just rest my gratitude and I think she was pleasantly surprised because he doesn't get thanked all that often. So you after thinking the Barista I, guess you decided to meet with a guy named Ed Kaufman, who who works for Joe Coffee, so yeah I met at Kaufman who is the guy who goes around the world testing the beans tasting them and I loved that because he was so passionate about this brown liquid, and he taught me how to differentiate the tastes, because he would take a sip, and his face would light up, and he would say sensing honey, Crisp Apple, and able syrup in pineapple, upside down cake, and I love that idea of of savoring and appreciating. It's so tied.

Joe Coffee Ed Kaufman Jacobs New York Apple
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Writer professional lifestyle experimenter. self-described curmudgeon I talk about I think in every everyone has the two sides the Larry David side in the Mr Rogers side, so the grumpy pessimist and the optimistic grateful side so many people have helped me to come to this night and I believe. I was born with a very strong. Larry David Side I was very good at finding things to be annoyed about and I think a lot of us are, if you hear a hundred compliments and a single insult, what do you remember the insult? Would you just take along with me? Ten seconds to think of the people who have helped you. Become who you are I was. Aware here that I have this negative bias. This Larry David side, but I wanted to bulk up the Mr Rogers side. Ten seconds of silence. I'll watch the time. It's not something that comes naturally to me and to most people I don't think it comes naturally. You have to cultivate this idea of gratitude. Whomever you've been thinking about. How pleased they must speed to know the difference you feel they've made. What what happened to you to say? Wait a minute I'm not. Appreciate people not. Being grateful. was, a Piff Neil. What was it? Well I. Think it was partly intellectually I knew the power of gratitude. There are tons of studies about how good it is for you. How helps ward off depression? You recover more quickly. You sleep better better. You're more generous. So, intellectually I knew like I should be grateful. But how do you do that and that's when? I decided you know what I'm going to try? This ritual at home where I'm going to try to say thanks to all the people who helped make my meal a possibility so I would I would. Say you know I'd like to thank the farmer who grew the tomato? Cashier who rang the tomatoes up at the grocery store? And, that's when my son who is ten very perceptively said. You Know Dad that's fine, but it's also totally lame, because those people can't hear you. They're not in our apartment. So if you really are committed, then you should go and thank those people in person. Aj. Jacobs picks up the story. From the Ted Stage. Now I'm a writer and for my books. I like to go on adventures. Go on quests so I decided I'm going to take my son up on his challenge. It seems simple enough and to make it even simpler. I decided to focus on just one item my morning cup of coffee. Well, it turned out to be not so simple at all. This quest took me around the world. I discovered that my coffee would not be possible without hundreds of people I take for granted so I would thank the trucker who drove the coffee beans to the coffee shop, but he couldn't have done his job without the road, so I would think the people who pave the road. And then I would think the people who made the asphalt for the pavement. And he couldn't do his job without the folks who drew the yellow lines on the road because they kept my truck driver from smashing into oncoming traffic. Splitting an atom because you can think the people who mixed the paint for the lines on the road, and then the people who made the machines to enable the paints to be mixed and the people who mind the iron to make the machines to mix the paint then. You can. There's lots of people think. Oh, it's never incident. I could have spent the next fifty years of my life, thanking people and I could have given a Ted talk that was about four hundred hours long, because yeah, that's what it made me realize how interconnected! Everything is how many people it takes. It doesn't take a village to make a cup of coffee and takes.

Larry David Side Mr Rogers writer Ted Stage Piff Neil Jacobs
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Different parts of the light spectrum that we simply can't see with our human is so imagine. There's a stone wall somewhere in Italy that dates to the Roman period so roughly two thousand years ago, and you'd walk over a field and you wouldn't see it. Yeah, well that stonewall. STONEWALL, which may be under a meter, or so of earth it affects the overlain topography so the roots going down. They couldn't go as deep because they'd be stopped by the stonewall and so processing the satellite data, you can actually map out and see those changes we'll start seeing straight lines, and those straight lines form structures, which definitely aren't natural, so just as an example We got a hold of new satellite imagery for most of the pyramid fields and. What I what I started processing. It feels like cheating. You can see everything. How many sites are have you guys? found using pictures from satellites I'm at the point where I've lost count It is in the many thousands, but I don't know anymore. I believe we have barely scratched the surface in terms of what's left to discover. In the Egyptian Delta alone we've excavated less than one thousandth of one percent of the total volume of Egyptian sites. When you add to that. The thousands of other sites team and I have discovered. What we thought we knew. Pales in comparison to what we have left to discover. When you look at the incredible work that my colleagues are doing all around the world and what they're finding. I believe that there are millions of undiscovered. Archaeological sites left to find. Discovering them will do nothing less than a mock the full potential of our existence. When we come back, we'll hear more from Sarah about how her work can help us. All discover more about the planet we call. I'm a new summer. Roti and you're listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR, stay with us. He everyone just a quick thanks to our sponsor. Virgo summer is here and vacation is just drive away. Search thousands of nearby vacation rentals on Verb Oh to find your family private home all to yourself you can spread out chill out and feel that vacation feeling again together book them that makes the vacation download the verb virgo. APP, that's V. RB OH. I'm Gregory Warner with NPR's rough translation, so there's a holiday in the Netherlands where every year thousands of white folks where black face some people trying in that tradition, but in very Dutch way you talk you talk you talk you talk you talk until you reach consensus. Can you fight racism in a way that brings the whole country with you? That's on NPR's rough translation. It's the Ted Radio hour from NPR News Zimmer Odi and today on the show ideas for the whole family with my predecessor guy rise in addition to previously hosting this show. He is the host of the kids science podcast. Wow, in the world. Hey, Guy Hello. Before the break we were hearing from you and Sarah Park the space archaeologist about how many ancient sites she has already begun to uncover using satellite imagery. Let's get back to your conversation with Sarah. All right. I mean what you're saying. is we only know a tiny bit about our past? Is that true I mean is most of our history hidden? I would say yes. Because history is always written by the winners and yeah, people are living in places where they've always lived for thousands of years look at places like Rome and his tunnel, and Cairo those cities layers upon layers. Paul layers of of history so I think we've taken a lot for granted about who we are and where we come from, we think living in this very modern age with smartphones and Internet, and and sort of this whole world of knowledge at our fingertips. We know everything the more and more we delve into the past. The more we realized that we don't and that it has a lot of lessons to teach us for today. I wish for us to discover. The millions of unknown archaeological sites around the world by creating a twenty. First Century Army of global explorers will find and protect the world's hidden heritage, which contains clues to humankind's collective resilience and creativity. So how are we going to do this? We are going to build an online crowd source citizen science platform to allow anyone in the world to engage with discovering archeological sites and protect them. By creating this platform, we will find the millions of places occupied by the billions of people that came before us. Acknowledging that the past is worth saving. Mean so much more. It means that we're worth saving two. And the greatest story ever told. Is, the story of our shared. Human Journey. But the only way that we're going to be able to write it. Is If. We do it together. Thank you. I love that line. Re she says means that we're worth it to so great, so I have to ask, it's you could go on an archaeological dig the ancient civilization of your choice. Where would you go? I think I would want to do something like way way way back like early humans or like our even our human predecessors they were. Like creatures at least seven or eight million years ago, and that's what we know of and we've only discovered. The remains of like a teeny number of human like species, and so there's there's very little doubt that we have so many more to discover like hundreds thousands of species, and that would be amazing to go on one of those digs I wanna call Sarah and ask her. If I can go visit one of those places in Peru. She could hook me. Oh my God right. So cool all right, so we have talked about trees, dolphins and ancient civilizations before our final segment I wanNA talk to you guys about two words that we say every day, or at least we should say every day. Thank you two very simple words. Yes, that are incredibly powerful and a j Jacobs wanted to show how powerful those words were, so he took us all on a journey with him through gratitude. Do you talk to your kids about saying? Thank you like. Please all the time because I. Worry that. My kids say it, but I'm not sure that they totally mean it. Yeah I. Think it's natural. We all touch kids about saying, please and thank you. Please and thank you, but It has to be more than just saying. Please and thank you. It's about actually internalizing gratitude, which which is what Aj kind of describes in this in this talk. To practice gratitude you really have to. Slow things down and notice. Age as a.

NPR Sarah STONEWALL Sarah Park Italy Egyptian Delta Cairo Netherlands Aj Gregory Warner Century Army of Paul Rome Peru j Jacobs
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"The show today ideas for curious thinkers of all ages and our guide on this hour is my predecessor Guy Ross. Hello, okay, so we just heard Suzanne Simard to tell us about how trees cooperate with one another, and it really gets you thinking about how all kinds of other beings may be communicating, which brings us to the next topic that you brought us. Dolphins Oh man. KINK around with Dolphin. Can't go wrong dolphins. I I learned about and dolphins like communicate through clicks right learn about this from the prisoner about to hear denise hosing. She has spent her entire life studying a very specific pod of dolphins in the Bahamas, and I, remember Malaysia remember seeing this Ted Talk in person and twenty thirteen. And I was totally blown away at the idea that one day we might be able to talk to communicate with not just with dolphins, but with animals like Dr Doolittle. Right I was. Fascinated by that story as a kid never that. And we are closer to that possibility today than ever before. I've seen lots of pictures of if you under water holding a camera. When you're down there. Does it feel like. It's almost like A. Just a better place to I, don't I don't do you get that feeling while you know. It's an immersion into a three dimensional world. The tides and the currents and the salt and the waves, and I mean. It all feeds into your understanding of what their world is like. Usually when I'm down there I'm like trying to follow behavior in make cameras on. It's actually mostly work really right. Denise hosing has been doing that work every summer. With this same group of Dolphins in the Bahamas see is just calculated recently for thirty five years. Breath thousand encounters in the water with the dolphins. Each of those a counters is about twenty minutes long so over one thousand hours of footage and. Data so yeah, it's a lot of data certainly for dolphins and the point of all that data of all that work is to help denise answer one question. Do they have a language. And if so, what are they talking about? A here's denise hurting on the Ted. Stage, now I'm interested in dolphins because of their large brains, and we know they use of that brainpower for just living complicated lives. But what do we really know about Dolphin Intelligence? We know that their brain to body ratio, which is a physical measure of intelligence, is second only to humans. cognitively they can understand artificially created languages. And they pass self awareness tests in mirrors and some parts of the world. They use tools like sponges to hunt fish. Now Dolphins are natural acoustics. They make sounds ten times as high and here's sounds ten times as high as do, but they have other communications signals they use. They have good vision, so these body postures to communicate. They have taste, smell, and touch and sound can actually be felt in the water, because the acoustic impedance of tissue and water's about the same, so dolphins can buzz and tickle each other at a distance. So decades ago, not years ago. I set out to find a place in the world where I could observe dolphins underwater to try to crack the code of their communication system. I will how? How do dolphins communicate to each other? Well, you know we can actually hear fairmount Their whistles are fairly audible to us. They have plex. They have burst pulses which are also. Packets of clicks. So. They have all these different cues, and they use body postures in combination with sounds that will basically communicate certain things to each other. This is total anthropomorphic station, but When you think of like when you see a dolphin animated or drawn and a kids book. They seem be smiling, but we should not interpolate that that means that they're happy all the time. Right Oh definitely. No, yeah, that is just a physical. Physical Cigna they have, going How do you respond? When other researchers say you know? Push back and say hey, like let's not do that. Let's not. anthropomorphized these creatures. You know you just keep doing your work, I think I. don't even think it's a discussion anymore. Honestly most of us that work with social mammals I think kind of move beyond that and just say well. It's a valuable tool for thinking about how they might think. Let's do the work, is it? Is it even we're to talk about Dolphin language, or or is, is it? Should we be talking about Dolphin Communication Yeah. We don't really usually talk about language because we don't have it yet. but thinking out of the boxes. Boxes you know it's like intelligence are other different kinds and types of intelligence. Are there different kinds and types of language I mean? We know there's tons of kinds of language with humans right, but one of the big things about language is that you can communicate about a different time and space right? Are they talking about the food? They're chasing. Are the eating, or are they talking about? Hey, let's go to the reef and a couple of days and meet up with this other group. You know we don't know and that's where. ANTHROPOMORPHIC can be a tool for thinking about how animals might be thinking. which brings us back to the Bahamas and a pivotal moment in Denise Hers Ings Years of work with Atlantic spotted dolphins there. It happened one summer because in the mid nineties. The dolphins did something they had never done with denise before. We just started noticing the dolphins were just start doing things. This is completely a wild right but we knew the individuals and they would start doing things like. Our Body posture in some cases mimicking rhythm of our sounds in the water. We were doing anything vocally. And we just Kinda thought. Would it be cool to see what we empower them? To communicate back to us. In the key to unlocking that communication. Turned out to be, play. Dolphins just like humans love to play games. Mostly with toys, piece of Robe, a bit of seaweed, anything can pull around in the water. Correct! So what kind of games do they like to play well, it's mostly called. Keep away. That is if they get the toy, then the ideas they like to be chased they like to let you get almost close enough to grab the toy, but then they speed off and that's the game. That's what they play with each other actually. The only question was had to use that play to crack the code. The code that would unlock the meaning behind the dolphins noises now one way to crack the code is to interpret these signals and figure out what they mean, but it's a difficult job, and we actually don't have a Rosetta stone yet, but a second way to crack the code is to develop some technology, an interface to due to a communication, and that's what we've been trying to do in the Bahamas and in real time. So we built a portable keyboard that we get pushed through the water and we labeled four objects. They like to play with the scarf ropes, guests them, and also had a bow ride, which is fun activity for open. And that's the scarf whistle, and these artificially created whistles. They're outside the Dolphin's normal repertoire. But. They're easily mimicked by the dolphins and I. Spent Four Years With my colleagues. Adam pack and Fabienne dealt four a working out in the field with this keyboard, using it with each other to do requests for toys while the dolphins were watching, and the dolphins get in on the game, they could point at the visual object, or they could mimic.

Bahamas Denise hosing denise Suzanne Simard Ted Talk Guy Ross Dr Doolittle Denise Hers Ings Malaysia Adam pack Fabienne
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"I'm a new summer ODI and for most kids around the country school is officially out of session, but unlike other summers, many kids and teens are stuck at home because of the coronavirus pandemic and so today. We've got an episode for everyone kids, adults, parents teens. You are all invited on this journey because we've invited a certain dad back on the show to share the coolest things he's learned over the years here on the Ted Radio Hour topics to blow the minds of young and old and. Mystery guest host. Can you please introduce yourself? It's the Ted. Radio NPR Guy Roz hello. Hello guy well back, thank you. Okay so guy, not only were you the host of this show until you so graciously handed over the reins to me, but you are also the host of a rather popular podcast for kids right? Yeah, it's called. Wow, on the world. It's a journey through real scientific research, and it sounds a little weird, but it's like a cartoon for the ear where me and my co host Mindy Thomas go on journeys into space and back in time and. Underwater and everywhere in between searching for incredible scientific discoveries, and it's this joyful wonderful experience for us, and hopefully for the kids who listen to the show. That includes my kids and we sorta figured since you and I are both home with our children this summer. Be The perfect person to come on and curate a special summer show for the entire Ted Radio Hour family and you have so kindly brought for of your favorite segments that you did over the years. How did you even begin to choose which segments we're going to bring us well I think like you probably experience there lot of Ted talks that my kids love and on a really inspired by, and then there's some that you know of course are sort of over their heads right, but I really wanted to bring segments that spoke to curiosity and. The sort of all that kids naturally have about the world, and so that's how we kinda came up with this. This collection and I will say I did feel that way about the first segment that you brought to us. This one is called. How do trees collaborate? Tell us about it I love this segment so much So basically, scientists basic forever thought that trees competed against each other for resources right for water and son, and nutrients, and they figured that the tallest trees in the forest where the strongest trees right it makes sense. But Suzanne Simard the scientists that were about to hear from she. Changed the way that scientists now think about trees because it turns out, they don't compete at all. In fact, trees collaborate. They work together through this mysterious. Superhighway, there is an entire communication network happening under our feet. Let's listen. Forest ecologist Suzanne Simard had a hunch. Yes, that's right. She thought that trees. Could Talk. Imagine like when you're walking through the forest, you, might you hear the crunching of the? Twigs under your feet in the rustling of the lease. But she thought. If, there's more going on. Big Chattering going on that. We can't hear. That, they're attuned to each other. Now at the time, a team of scientists in England were wrapping up an experiment where they'd grown in the laboratory. These pine seedlings together in little route boxes that you could see through. And the scientists took two of these pine seedlings, these baby trees that were in the same box in the same dirt, and then the exposed one of these ceilings to a radioactive carbon dioxide, gas, carbon, fourteen radioactive carbon, and what they found was that some of that radioactive gas, the carbon fourteen made its way into the second seedling. You can visualize you could see it, and so from this experiment. It seemed that somehow these two plants in the same dirt. Or connected and I thought wow. Maybe this is what's going on in my. Maybe Suzanne. Samara thought maybe all the trees in a forest or connected. In a kind of network. Like our airport system or transportation system our social networks. And maybe she thought all of this was happening underground. When we walk through the forest, what we see as human beings, we just see these beautiful trees growing out of the ground, but we don't see that there are actually completely linked underground in this superhighway. Suzanne decided to prove this underground network existed. She devised an experiment using some of the same radioactive gas, a geiger counter to measure it and a patch of Birch and for trees. I figured the Burton a for would be connected in a below ground web. Suzanne picks up the story from the Ted Stage, and I gathered my apparatus plastic bags and duct tape and shade cloth paper suit a respirator. And then I borrow some high-tech stuff from my university. The first day of the experiment we got out to our plot, and I pulled on my weight paper suit I. Put on my respirator. I put the plastic bags over my trees I got my giant Syringes, and I injected carbon fourteen, the radioactive gas into the bag of Birch. I waited an hour I figured. It would take this long for the trees to suck up the CO two through photosynthesis Senate down into their roots, and maybe shuttle that carbon below ground to their neighbors I went to my first bag with the Birch I pulled the bag off Iran. My Geiger counter over its leaves. Perfect. The Birch had taken up the radioactive gas. Then the moment of truth I went over to the for tree. I pulled off its bay. I ran the Geiger counter up its needles, and I heard the most beautiful sound. It was the sound.

Suzanne Simard Birch Geiger Ted NPR Mindy Thomas Samara England Iran Burton
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

08:40 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Pleasure and avoiding pain the ability to approach things. That are good for you and avoid things that are bad for you is fundamental to survival and in our modern day society trouble telling. The difference can be labeled as a mental illness. If I was having car trouble and I took my car mechanic. The first thing they do is look under the hood but with Mental Health Research. You can't just pop the hood with the press of a button. So this is why we do experiments on animals specifically in my lab mice to understand the brain. Well we need to study brains okay. So how does she do this? And and where does she do? The she has a lab so she is working out in California using a technique called upto genetics So in every ted talk like there to be a tab of vocabulary. Words will be tested on this late. We'll be the vocabulary word here. So algae have this light sensing Gene Right Gene tells them when to migrate up and down in the oceans remember the oceans and so the light hits it and the algae now oh let's go get more light so we can make more food. You can put this gene into other cells and one of the cells that they put it in is neurons. Those are the core cells of your brain. So when you shine a light on the neuron it either turns on or off and by controlling the neuron you can then control the mind the way. I think of optics. Genetics Is that. It's almost like building a remote control so my understanding is with Kay. It's it's a way to manipulate mices brains to turn certain areas on or off and then see if you if you mess with them physically those little mice brains. Has it change their behavior? Is that a really simplified but simplification of what works good. So she's she's working with mice. She's working with light and she studies. How our brain gives rise to emotion related behavior like people who struggle with anxiety that some of the things that she's trying to figure out how nice help us figure that out. Pretty anxious don't you think so? Mice have this behavior where they kind of you know generally stick to the corners And kind of hide themselves from that big bad world of of predators. But if you shine a light into their brain in a certain way they default to a more kind of exploratory behavior where they go out into the open a bit more now. Obviously a mouse life requires a bit of both But just by shining a light on these neurons. You're able to flip the switch of that behavior and drive the mice either out into the open or allow it to kind of follow. Its natural behavior and can hide in the corner. This is the elevated plus maze. It's a widely used anxiety test that measures the amount of time that the mouse spends in the safety of the closed arms relative to exploring the open arms. Mice have evolved to prefer enclosed spaces like the safety of their burrows but to find food water mates. They need to go out into the open. Where they're more vulnerable to predatory threats. So I'm sitting in the background here and unbought the flip the switch and now when I flip the switch and turn the light on you can see. The mouse begins to explore the open arms of as more and in contrast to drug treatments for anxiety. There's no sedation. No locomotor impairment just coordinated natural looking exploration so not only is the fact almost immediate but there are no detectable side effects. Now when I flip the switch off you can see. The mouse goes back to its normal brain function and back to. It's corner when I was in the lab and I was taking these data. I was all that myself and I was so excited so excited when these quiet screams how why was I so excited. I mean yeah. Theoretically I knew that the brain controlled the mind but flip the switch my hand and see the mouth changes behavioral state so rapidly and so reverse ably. It was really the first time that I truly believed it. You know as a scientist. This is the moment the moment where you get. It's uncharted and then you just heard it right there. That's right. What is the significance of her being able to turn on and off these behaviors? Well it starts to tease apart. What is kind of inherent inborn behaviour? What and what is Conscious behavior and where those borderlines are. Now obviously this is just mice and we're not shining lights to control people's brains as of yet But this is helping us understand how the kind of physical architecture of a brain then gives rise to these behaviors that we look at as evidence of a mind so when you call someone like Kaitai. She seems like someone who you know. She's thinking about humans. She wants to change the way that they're treated. She wants to help them. Essentially so is when she gets the call from you. Is she ready to go to explain this in Layman's terms or is that something that Wo- you know these papers that are published and reviewed by their colleagues and peers turning that into something that is not only educational but also entertaining is? It's a real. It's a journey. It's a slog I would even say having given a Tedtalk it's hard. Well it depends on the person. Sometimes you get to work with the Real Jim K. was a real gem. Your Real Jim It's part of the reason I have a job or sometimes I feel like my job is translation in large part. Taking a scientific jargon a word like up to genetics and translate that into something that everybody can understand. And it's super important that everybody understand these things because science is kind of building the world around us these Endless frontiers of discovery. That's what gave us the IPHONE. That's what gave us all the things that were coping with in our in our day to day lives and science will determine the world we live in in the future so understanding this and translating this for for everyone I think is crucial super important and I think just even walking around in your day to day life. I mean just after our conversation I'm made of Stardust Rocks Camille live What else there's a part of my brain that makes me want to have chocolate at four. Pm Or is it my mind. We're not sure yet. And there are species living at the bottom of the earth that that my imagination cannot fathom what they look like. And I think you know as we're bombarded minute after minute hour after hour with the headlines and we're we're thinking about running around as humans on earth it's important to reconnect with the wonder of the planet that we live on. That's right and the wonder of the universe that we find ourselves and it is these minds of ours that enable us to kind of look out there and be curious and find answers. David Yellow Ted's science curator. Thank you so so much thank you. That's David Yellow. He is Ted's science curator. Thanks so much to him for sharing his favorite talks and taking us into uncharted territory. You can see all the toxic David mentioned at Ted Dot. Npr Dot Org. You can see hundreds more. Ted Talks at Ted DOT COM or on the ten our production staff at NPR includes Jeff Rodgers Sanaa's Mesh comport Rachel Faulkner Deeb Motor Sham. James Delo Hussey JC Howard Katie. Monteleone ON RIA Gutierrez Christina. Kala here Brown end. Hannibal on IOS with help from Brent Bachman and Daniel Shchukin. Our INTERN IS MATTHEW. Klay and our theme music was written by Rahm Teen Arab. Louis our partners at Ted Chris Anderson Colin Helms Anna Phelan and Michelle Quinn. I'm newsom Roti and you've been listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR..

David Yellow Ted Jim It Ted Talks Mental Health Research Ted Chris Anderson Gene NPR Ted Dot RIA Gutierrez Christina California James Delo Hussey Klay INTERN Hannibal David Yellow scientist Kay
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Hey everybody it's minutia a quick note before we get started. The Ted Radio Hour team is now working from home. Maybe you are too because lots of things in our world are changing for all of us but we want you to know that we are working extra hard to keep bringing you great stories and big ideas each week. Some episodes we hope will provide a welcome distraction from the corona virus. And everything going on others like this. One will provide context to our new reality which a lot of US includes spending a lot of time online. Jesse no the show may sound a little different in the weeks to come since we're producing it remotely but our goal is to keep bringing you context kindness and stories that help you understand this weird world better so be well and enjoy the show. This is the Ted Radio Hour. Each week groundbreaking. Ted Talks our job. Now is to dream big delivered at Ted Conferences to bring about the future. We want to see around the world to understand who we are from those talks. We bring you speakers and ideas. That will surprise. You just don't know what you're GonNa Find Challenge. You have the acts ourselves like why's it noteworthy and even change you. I literally feel like I'm a different person. Do you feel that way ideas worth spreading from Ted and NPR? I'M NEW SUMMER. Odi and I think I'm a pretty good citizen. I am law-abiding I stop at Red Lights. I pay my taxes. I try to be nice to my neighbors. You probably do to. But what roles do we follow when we go online will none? There are no rules but maybe there should be because what happens on the Internet can have real life reprecussions so this particular example happened was the end of April..

Ted Ted Conferences US Jesse Red Lights NPR
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:59 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Stage. I started talking to neuro scientists and cognitive psychologists and what they told me was fascinating it turns out that when you get bored you ignite a network in your brain called the default mode so our body. It goes on autopilot while we're folding the laundry or we're walking to work actually. That is when our brain gets really busy. Here's boredom researcher. Dr Sandy man wants to start daydreaming and allow you to really wonder you start thinking a little bit beyond the conscious a little bit into the subconscious which allows sort of different connections to take place. It's really awesome. Actually totally awesome right. So this is my brain and FM Ri. And I learned that in the default mode that is when we connect disparate ideas. We saw some of our most nagging problems and we do something called autobiographical planning. This is when we look back at our lives. We take note of the big moments. We create a personal narrative and then we set goals and we figure out what steps we need to take to reach them but now we chill out on the couch also while updating a Google doc. Who are replying to email. The average person checks email seventy four times a day and switches tasks on their computer. Five hundred and sixty six times a day. I discovered all this talking to professor of Informatics Dr Gloria Mark. So we find that when people are stressed. They tend to shift their attention. More rapidly We also found strangely enough. We find that the shorter amount of sleep that a person gets the more likely they are to check facebook. Were in this vicious habitual cycle. What could this cycle be broken like? What would happen? If we broke this vicious cycle what if we reclaim those cracks in our day? Could it help us? Jumpstart our creativity. Maybe my listeners could help me find out we call the project board and Brilliance and Within Forty eight hours twenty thousand people signed by. Yeah I was like. Oh not a special snowflake. This is a thing. People are feeling this so one day. Take the APP that your thumb always seems to gravitate towards take it off your phone and observe what it feels like and then decide. Do you want it back on your phone? Cool go forward if you do. But do not let the tech companies decide as their decision making. Don't let that be the default which it very much has become. I think for consumers so how tens of thousands of people who signed up for the challenge. Some of them called her up because they started to realize that their relationship with their phone had kind of become co dependent the relationship between a baby and teddy bear or a baby. Banke or a baby that wants its mother's cradle when its done being held by stranger that's the relationship between me and my I think of my phone leg power tool useful but dangerous if I'm not handling it properly if I don't pay close attention I'll suddenly realize that I've lost an hour of time. Doing something totally mindless okay. But to really measure any improvement we needed data right. Because that's what we do these days so we partnered with some APPs that would measure how much time we were spending every day on our phone. And if you're thinking it's ironic that I ask people to download another APP so that they would spend less time on their phones. Yeah you gotTa meet people where they are but when the data came in it turned out that we had cut down on average just six minutes from one hundred and twenty minutes a day on our phones to one hundred and fourteen look amazing that you you got so many people involved and then looks at the data and turned out. The people just saved six minutes a day. Don't just sort of like like deflating right. I mean after all this effort people are only sixty six minutes a day. Which tells US something about ourselves? Yeah I mean well first of all it tells me that I have been trained to expect. Tax Returns Right. You know. We expecting huge numbers. And I I thought six minutes was nothing but when I went back to the scientists and researchers were who were advising me on this they I'm not joking. They laughed in my face. They were like who says six minutes isn't significant. And frankly like you know the fact that you got people to change their behavior at all over a week is extraordinary and listen to the stories because the stories will tell you so much more than any data can And that's what people told me. They told me stories about how they realize. They used to relax by playing their guitar and then they suddenly understood that they they hadn't played it in years or things bigger than that That people had sat down this thought. About what the family dynamics were and get to a better place in their relationship there were all these amazing stories that people told us and I thought you know what you're right. F The six minutes right. Get totally or like. Let's stop giving boredom such a bad rap. It actually is an extremely important human function that we are starting to just sort of breed out of our daily lives. And I I sort of look around and I see. There's lots of things like that Downtime eye contact conversations out loud where people stutter or make mistakes or take more than a quick. You know one hundred forty characters to figure out what they want to say. We've lost the capacity in many ways. I think for patients if we want to have excellent ideas the best ideas we need to let them take the time to take root and then blossom and that does not happen in a tap of a of an APP. We're humans we need. I'm and that's the one thing that our phones and it was more of that was me minutia. The new host of Ted Radio Hour talking to guy. Ross the old host Ted Radio Hour back in two thousand eighteen. You can see my full Ted talk on Ted Dot Com and we've got a new episode of the Ted Radio Hour for you coming this Friday..

Ted Dot Com Ted Dr Sandy man Ri researcher facebook Google US Dr Gloria Mark professor of Informatics Banke Ross
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Finally this hour that idea from Galileo. That math is a language. Well it doesn't really matter whether you're a mathematician or a musician knowing the language which now I feel like I might vocabulary increased and so therefore able to communicate my ideas. Even Better Drummer Clayton Cameron and says studying math actually gave him a new confidence in how he played music. I'm going to share a story about by confidence and sitting down knowing that if I do a certain thing it's gonna be motor certain feeling. Yeah if done right so I'm playing at the Hollywood bowl with James Brown and I've been told that By the musical director Cranston bride. He said look. You Know Clayton James Drummer. You know Mr Brown's drummer and you know he's he created this genre of music. So chances are he may not like anything you play and I said well you know I'm a professional. I've been around and I you know I understand that. So I talked to a couple of drummers friends of mine that played with James Cystic. Get some inside. Listen to the record that James Brown. I've done it was a jazz record. Soul on top nineteen sixty nine but he never performed any of them so I there's one song called September song that had a a booby. Oh It's Oh no to get back to UH. That was kind of like what was happening at the time when she has gotta sit down so I said well I'm Gonna I'm GonNa bring up a little bit. I'm going to kind of do a little different beat on it. And I had put a special snare up and and then I've worked on this little groove to do more on since that was the grew so we get to the rehearsal where playing and in crystallography calls off the song and James Brown has the pickup and the the lyric is. Oh it's into the group. I'm into my now remember. It's been told to an embedded in my head that James Brown is not going to like anything you play. Yeah after we played that group James Brown turned around and said now that was Falke so anyway so that kind of stuff you know once you get into the numbers and you understand that gave me the confidence to sit down and go. Oh I know what that is. The numbers are there in Cameron. You can watch his talk. Ted Dot COM for model they Hey thanks for listening to our show this week solving for x numbers shape the world production staff. NPR includes Jeff Rodgers. Bachman Megan Kane Neva. Grant Chris Bender Rev with help from Daniel Shchukin. Pardoned Goodwood is our intern in the front office. Eric Newsham in Porsche Robertson. Magus partners Ted Chris Anderson Jude Cohen Intern trip and Janet Leigh Guy Roz. And you've been listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR. The forecast from the trauma and trauma..

James Brown Clayton Cameron Clayton James James Cystic Ted Chris Anderson Jude Cohen Bachman Megan Kane Neva intern NPR Chris Bender Hollywood Eric Newsham Janet Leigh Falke Daniel Shchukin Porsche director Jeff Rodgers
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Do you like Algebra yes. I love. L. Dot why. Because it's beautiful how I keep hearing here mathematician so it's beautiful and then you like CD's movies but these crazy scrawling on a chalkboard. It is kind of Nice actually but but I still don't get it. I think that's a matter of temperament. There's some people to whom mathematical proof appears as a thing of beauty. It speaks of a higher truth. It speaks of a harmony to to knowledge the fact that it works at all let alone that we can understand. It speaks to a larger category of existence and knowledge Terry Moore you can see his full talk. Y is x the unknown at Ted Dot. NPR DOT ORG kinked tax. So we're going to be hearing a lot of these drumbeats throughout the show. Today they are the work of Clayton. Cameron I'm a provocateur of rhythm. Planes drummed for a few musicians. You might have heard of including Frank Sinatra Dean Martin. Sammy Davis Junior and here with Tony Bennett uncover anyway. We asked Clayton to do some of the music on the show today and to talk about an idea from his Ted talk doc an idea. He calls a rhythmic Arithmetic basically it's a way to understand how numbers and rhythm intersect and idea. That had never really occurred Clayton until he moved next door to a mathematician and we were talking and I'm no mathematician okay by any stretch of the imagination however He said something to me that I never forgot. He's he he said. You know. Those are really some beautiful numbers like so. Were you just talking talking. Like a beat or song or something. And he's like there's a beautiful numbers absolutely And I said wow. I said if you're at a certain level with math I guess guests they could be beautiful numbers and Then I had a conversation. One day with a friend of mine is incredible drummer musician named Marvin Smitty Smith. I said Marvin is a track you do. I said there's no way you could be thinking about this music way. I'm thinking about it because you make it seem so simple hot and some Marvin set will i. I just think in cycles. And then he didn't have to say another word I knew exactly what he meant. And so Between numbers are beautiful. Oh and you know I just think in cycles from my friend Marvin. All these things started coming together. He started noticing like these cycles of numbers in the rhythms. That you've even playing for years absolutely not watch this. I'M GONNA I'm GonNa play something Two different even Lee spaced Beats One will be three. Rian won't be too so we have one two three one two one two three one two so I'm going to give you a different sound. Only my left hand. I'm a little play. Just two beats in within the same space of time so we have one.

Marvin Smitty Smith Ted Dot Clayton Sammy Davis DOT ORG Frank Sinatra Tony Bennett Marvin Terry Moore Rian Cameron Dean Martin NPR
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

07:20 min | 2 years ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Their passion and I feel like that can be an intimidating and almost cruel thing to say to people at times because first of all if somebody has one central powerful burning passion. They're probably already following it. Because that's sort of the definition of passion is that you don't have a choice if you don't which is a lot of people have one central Burning Passion and and somebody tells you to follow your passion. I think you have the right to give a finger because it just makes you feel worse and so I always say to people. Forget like if you don't have a an obvious fashion forget about it. Follow your curiosity because passion is sort of a tower of flame that is not always accessible and curiosity is something that anybody can access any day. Your curiosity may lead you to your passion or it may not it may have been for. We're quotes nothing. In which case all you've done your entire life is spend your existence in pursuit of the things that made you feel curious and inspired a national be good enough in a lot of ways. That's sort of been a metaphor for what we do on the show because it's really about watching a lot of Ted talks wchs and and just getting inspired by an idea and then building a show around around that idea Wanting and to know more about what he said. I'm going to assume that there are some people who just think because you have interviewed all these amazing people people and had so many hard conversations about so many topics that you must have internalized a lot of the lessons that they bring you too you too these interviews from their talks and that maybe I don't know maybe you're like a super better person in some way because you can I mean am I going to go through transformation guy I guess is what I want to know I mean yes yes. Of course I think what I've learned even from you talking to people who just so inspiring to me that I have so much admiration for is that we are all flawed and complex right every single one of us right every single one of us us can be unkind unforgiving But what I I. I love this idea that we also change a lot We had we had Dan Gilbert on his he. He's a professor of psychology at Harvard. And he he did a lot of research into how our personalities really changed profoundly over the course of our lives. We don't think that's the case. But what he has shown is that more or less every ten years who we are our personalities. Our values change a a lot. Most of us can remember who we were ten years ago but we find it hard to imagine who we're going to be and then we mistakenly think that because it's hard to imagine it's it's not likely to happen. Sorry when people say. I can't imagine that they're usually talking about their own lack of imagination and not about the unlikelihood of the event event that they're describing. The bottom line is time is a powerful force. It transforms preferences reshapes our values. It alters is our personalities. We seem to appreciate this fact. But only in retrospect only when we look backwards do we realize how much change happens in the decade. It's as if for most of us the present is a magic time. It's a watershed on the timeline. It's the moment at which we finally become Ourselves human beings are works in progress. That mistakenly think they're finished. The person you are right now is as transient Enzi and as fleeting and temporary as all the people. You've ever been the one constant in our life is changed. I love that because I think that you could argue that. Over the course of our lives we become increasingly sort of better versions of our previous self which I hope is true because I You know like I think most people I am still at work in progress and I hope you know hope you are hope. Most most people listening are to That's lovely so Any words of wisdom for me as I go forth Do's and don'ts yeah I mean. I think I think you already do this. And I'm I'm just GONNA double down on the Lisbeth Gilbert's advice but it's follow your curiosity so you have this opportunity to really follow it in any direction to go down any rabbit hole to have conversations with people who have thought really deeply about their ideas. Some of them are simple. Some of them are more complicated but But there's almost no idea that in my view isn't worth at least hearing out and I think you know one of the ways that you've been such a great host. Is that you have modeled for listeners. How to be curious about ideas you've shown them that if you just keep digging ask the next question or keep going or pull a thread? You might find something extraordinary. Certainly unexpected something that may be unlocks a door that you didn't even know was there and I think that that has been the pleasure and joy of listening to this show for the last seven years so thank you. That's very nice. Thank you thank you for saying that. It's been it's been amazing and I can't wait to hear to hear what you do with. I can't wait to go. This is the height of the party. F- cards over. We're having fun. Let's go nice. Good stay memories. Hey thanks for listening to episode on wisdom in Hindsight this week and thank you for being such an amazing community listeners. It's been an absolute honor guide past seven years. I won't be far. You can still hear me on how I built this world world and wisdom from the top and if you WANNA find out more about who is on the show this week go to Ted Dot. NPR Dot Org and to see hundreds more. Ted Talks Checkout Ted DOT COM or the tap production staff at NPR includes Jeff Rodgers Sanaa's Michigan poor. Rachel Faulkner Diba Mohtashami James Delicacy. JC Howard Katie. Montolio Maria Paz Gutierrez and Christina. Kala with help from Daniel Shchukin our journeys Kierra Brown grab our partners at Ted Chris Anderson Colin Helms and the Phelan and Michelle Quinn and a special thanks to Newsom Rhody you can hear new episodes of the show with Manouche rush starting in the spring. Garages and you've been listening to ideas worth spreading right here. I'm Ted Radio Hour from NPR.

NPR Ted Ted Talks Ted Dot Ted Chris Anderson Dan Gilbert professor of psychology Rachel Faulkner Diba Harvard Montolio Maria Paz Gutierrez Lisbeth Gilbert Ourselves Howard Katie Michigan Jeff Rodgers Sanaa Kierra Brown Newsom Kala Daniel Shchukin
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"On the show today wisdom in hindsight and as I mentioned earlier this is my last new episode and after interviewing hundreds of incredible speakers for this show. I'm going to switch around to the other side of the table. And if you don't mind pass the MIC on to the next host of the Ted Radio Hour Mnuchin Maruti. Hello Oh oh hey. Hey how are you. I'm good. I'm good yeah Are you how do you feel. I feel oddly. Calm right would you should. Yeah that's it's great. I know I think means grownup now guy. Yes I think this this great okay. So you're wrapping up your last episode Assode Guy and I Kinda WanNa turn the tables and ask you what strikes you about the last seven years. What are some some of the ideas the people that you will take with you as you go into the next chapter yeah I mean I think that that throughout the seven years I've been the host of the show every interview is like it's a a journey and every interview is extremely meaningful right like I interviewed you. You're on the show and I remember our interview and it was so it was so great and you were so kind and and funny and warm and generous with your ideas. Thanks and so every interview is like it's Consolo weird but it's like a a a whirlwind romance. I fall in love with everybody. I interview for that power and yet you you kind of have have to because I am there to to bring the to help that person bring their idea out into the world. Because I think that's an idea worth hearing that hopefully hopefully will give our listeners. Something to take with them. They're so many of these conversations hundreds of these conversations that have been those experiences They're few that I really come back to a lot We had this episode that we did on memory and we are invited Daniel comment on. He'd given Ted talk about memory and When I interviewed him he had just returned from Switzerland and I said how to go and he said it was wonderful it was it was amazing and I said Oh that sounds great He said but we left. We left a day early. I I said Oh no what happened. He said Oh no no. We decided to leave a day early because we were having such a good time and I was confused at that point right without well. Why would you leave advocation a day early and then began this conversation about memory and my wife and I both decided not to so you decided to cut short your vacation station just to make sure that you wouldn't? You wouldn't mess it up that we wouldn't ruin the memory. I mean you know you might have had a great day absolutely. Wow depending how you look at it. This could be a mistake. It really depends how much weight you want to give to the kind of memory you. Why does that happen? I mean why. Why do we remember ember things based on what happened at the end of the peak in the end? Yeah actually I think there is a good evolutionary reason for this. You know if you were to design an animal and you were economizing on. How complicated the brain of that animal would be? You might say. Well I want the animal to store the pecan. He can to slow the end. And how long the episode was really doesn't matter what matters is how bad with a threat and and whether the story.

Assode Guy Maruti Ted Switzerland Daniel