35 Burst results for "Tech Reporter"

California Voters Pass Prop 22, Exempting Uber, Lyft From Reclassifying Drivers

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

04:18 min | 3 weeks ago

California Voters Pass Prop 22, Exempting Uber, Lyft From Reclassifying Drivers

"When zoom in now on the most expensive ballot measure in California history, and that's prop 22. It overwhelmingly passed here in California with 58% of the voters in favor of keeping ride share drivers labeled as independent contractors. And this proposition sought to exempt companies like Lift uber and Gord Ash from a state law that would have forced them to pay for the drivers healthcare their unemployment insurance. Other benefits basically treat them like regular workers. My guy's IQ is here. Now. He's the New York Times Tech reporter and author of the book, Super Pump. The Battle for the Battle for Uber. Welcome Back, Mike. Hey, Thanks for having me great. Tohave. You okay? So what do you make of this? They spent a ton of money to get this carve out from 85. It appeared to win. What does this mean that I'm I think it's it's pretty clear that, you know, spending a ton of money in a election on a really huge issue. Ballot measure seems to work, You know, I mean, as you alluded to in the intro, this is one of the most, if not the most expensive sort of campaign into passing. Ah, proposition in California's history. Uber lift and Gord Ash had earmarked. You know, upwards of $200 million on, you know this sort of marketing blitz, essentially positioning. Prop 22 as a way to support drivers when, in fact, it's really, really print basically really supportive of uber's existing business model where you keep them sort of contractors, So I think there are a number of things that went into it, including how the proposition was crafted what the language looked like. And what the sort of campaign male around it. Look, look right. So voters were may be confused by the messaging, basically saying that this would protect drivers. What did drivers want? Do we know? Yeah, And I mean, that's a fair sort of caveat. I don't think it was unilaterally that that people think that drivers should be employees necessarily. I do think it's actually pretty split. There are a number of of drivers who do believe that being considered a full time employee is the right thing for the amount of time they spent driving on the APP on DH. That's a strong Ah, it's a smaller but strong contingent of people. And then what Uber likes to say a lot. And really a lot of these companies is the vast majority of the people who were driving on the platforms are very part time just sort of do it on their off time. And this would be sort of unfair for them if they had to reclassify, so I think it's still mixed. But you it is probably fair to say that there are a lot of people who don't do it. Super super hardcore legs. Um, like the other contingent of people who are very vocal for those, And does this do anything to the larger law? 85 does it, weaken it in any other way? Sure. Well, I think there's a few things one. This is a carve out for thes particular good companies, But I do think it's sort of sets the groundwork for if there is a later challenge if there's potential reform around 85 in general, you know, especially if this is sort of proving Teo to people that they don't you know that this sort of classification isn't wanted. I do think that The other point I'd make is that away this built this proposition was designed. It's very hard to toe roll it back. I think you need a much larger degree of consensus to roll back than you otherwise would normally and that was very intentional. So it seems like the gig Cos they're pretty safe, at least for the future. Right, And they can use this in other states, right? They can point to this as ah, warning to other states. Yeah, 100 per cent. I think that the California has been the sort of harbinger of things to come. And you know a lot of the folks that the companies were basically saying, we need to nail this down here, so it's not used as a blueprint for the rest of the country. And conversely, that's what they're there seeming to do right now, basically. Like Isaac Newyorktimes Tech reporter and author of the book Super Pumped The Battle for Uber Mike. Thank you. Hey, thanks for having me again.

Gord Ash California New York Times Mike TEO Isaac Newyorktimes
Facebook Prepares for Possible Election Unrest in U.S.

WSJ Tech News Briefing

07:36 min | Last month

Facebook Prepares for Possible Election Unrest in U.S.

"We're just a week away from the election. Millions of people have already voted early either in person or by mail but campaigns and state election boards are preparing for the final get out the vote push that will hopefully culminate in a decision next Tuesday. We say hopefully because there has already been a lot of talk about a contested election and what could happen if it is contested. We report that facebook is preparing for that possibility and also for possible civil unrest after the election potentially having to calm election related conflicts by deploying internal tools designed for elections in other countries in countries that are considered at risk like sherline, Ga and Myanmar. Our. Tech reporter Jeff Horwitz has been writing about this with his colleague see the Roman and he joins us now hey jeff. All right. So Jeff, you spoke with people familiar with these measures at facebook. Tell me about these internal tools that facebook is preparing to deploy. Sure. So important baseline here is that facebook has a lot of controls that they don't talk about very much over the distribution of content on the platform. A what appears in newsfeed what content succeeds at how much succeeds. Now, it's not to say that that's Mark Zuckerberg a you know to terminate which facebook posts are going to successful but just some sort of general tuning up the platform and how it distributes content can make a big difference and in a number of countries you mentioned Sri Lanka and me and my. To start. Out with. Basically. Countries where facebook believes there is a serious risk of atrocities election-related violence things like that. That platform might contribute to its developed some tricks to attempt to calm the platform and hopefully com real world activities based on on platform activities. and. That's kind of the prospect of deploying them in the United States is kind of the that's the thing that we were writing about. So can you tell me a little bit about some of the specific tools we're talking about violence, but we're also talking about misinformation. So what kind of things could they potentially be doing? Sure. So inside the company people talk about the big levers like naming the things that you change and that really sort of have substantive in noticeable impact on the way that information flows across the platform. One of them is just overall limitations on variety by which I mean, the speed at which content can accelerate. Across the platform whether it's a really cute animal video or whether it's Mitt. Incendiary misinformation. Facebook has done with some success in the past is basically put a pretty strict cap on it, and in other words, slow everything down a little bit doesn't mean that you're punishing any particular content or anything like that. Just basically you're taking. Your slowing things down and you're GONNA make make it so that things that might have just. Been World in terms of how much attention they get get a little less attention they'll still get. Nobody's GonNa get censored, but it's just simply going to slow down the platform and that's something they find is. Obviously detrimental to the discovery of really hot content a good in the sense that it it gives the time company more time to react to problems on the platform and it's Sort of suppresses more incendiary stuff. So that's a big one of the tools. What about filters I mean we know that facebook has talked a lot about how it's trying to prevent violent content from getting on its platform are they going to be tightening the filters in some way to watch out for that stuff? Yes again that's going to be a pretty broad thing. Right it's not looking out for particular types of content so much as it is that facebook operates. it has what it, what it calls classify, which are basically algorithms that determine what type of content side particular post is and. Some of the classified can be fine tuned so that if you lower the threshold for how likely it is that facebook's computers believe that a piece of content is potentially inflammatory. If you lower that bar, you'll catch more content. Now, you also catch more content that isn't a problem to alongside but the idea is that at a time when people make. Get into civil unrest street violence as a result of conflict on the platform. Maybe. It's okay to be a little stricter. How does this compare? How is it different from some of the content restrictions that facebook and other social media companies have put in place ahead of the election, the restrictions on political ads for example, how does this fit into that bigger scheme? One thing that's very different here is that the sort of blackout for new ads? This is something facebook plans to just considers it to be prudent policy. The measures that we wrote about the emergency break glass at risk country type tools. These are things facebook would only break out if things are really really bad So one of them is kind of kind of planning here are rules. The second one is. These are the emergency tools that facebook could deploy in the event vic. The election gets out of control and I think some of the folks who spoke to me mentioned it seems prudent facebook would be considering all of these things. It constantly uses these tools in varying degrees. It's just that this would be using them to a particular effects when it really matters. You know facebook has been criticized for regulating content in the past Is there any question here about whether or not? These measures could also elicit some controversy? Yes. So I I've spoken to. One of the consultants that actually talked to facebook about these tools in Sri Lanka the Department of them there. And I mean there you had people who were beaten buildings that were set fire to as a result of a viral piece of misinformation about spurt of supposed- genocidal campaign against. Buddhists. It was just completely fictitious that was spread heavily their platform and other text based chat services, and so there tend to be most useful in places where the rule of law is weak. That's kind of been traditionally the way they've thought about this. But I think overseas in Myanmar and Sri Lanka and in Ethiopia where people have died, it becomes a hard thing to make the case that sort of the same free speech centric approach Mark Zuckerberg has espoused in the US and I think that the US tends to like just culturally really make sense you know it's difficult to way. You know you're right to say something on a platform versus somebody else's right to live and come up with A. A couple answer but again, I mean it kind of is a question of imbibe I have beholder whereas the US at with things like this be necessary. Could they even be necessary and facebook has an answer that question right? These are tools that. It, you know in a world that mark, Zuckerberg and none of us ever WANNA see We might see some of It's not announcing that we will see them. All right, our tech reporter, Jeff. Roberts thank you so much for joining me. Thank you.

Facebook Jeff Horwitz Mark Zuckerberg Tech Reporter United States Sri Lanka Myanmar GA Roberts Ethiopia
U.S. Judge Halts Trump's TikTok Ban, Hours Before It Was Set To Start

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:32 min | 2 months ago

U.S. Judge Halts Trump's TikTok Ban, Hours Before It Was Set To Start

"Well tiktok lives in US apps stores at least for another day, a federal judge in Washington, sided with the company last night blocking President Trump's order that bans the video sharing app the trump administration. Let's remember caused the APP a national security threat and it's fighting in court to Block Tick Tock Chinese parent company Bite, dance from operating the APP in the US either by banning it outright or forcing a sale to a domestic buyer, we NPR tech reporter Bobby. Allen here morning Bobby Morning David Okay. So what is this court decision? What does it mean? So the judge put the brakes on a ban that was going to. Like you said, prevent any new downloads of Tiktok that was supposed to take effect at midnight Sunday and the judge didn't explained his rationale for the ruling. But TIKTOK lawyers argued in a hearing just over the weekend that shutting it down would be like shutting down a modern version of the town square. They said that's Kintu silencing speech and there sure is a lot of expression on Tiktok David I mean it's the fastest growing in the world. You know it has some hundred million users in the US. So all those users can now breathe a sigh of relief they can keep posting their lips thinking and other ridiculous videos. For now, that since such an important relief for so many people going for these these times of isolation. You Save for now that's important. Right? I mean this. This might not be the final word at all. Net. Yeah, exactly. So this is a breather for Tiktok buys them time before there's a more extensive hearing on trump's ban, and in the note here that the White House is not backing down from that band but as is winds its way through the courts. There's one very important date and that is November twelfth. That's when Tiktok has to find American buyer or disappear for real in the US Tick Tock, was hoping that the judge would also push back that date, but the judge said, no, we're sticking to the November Twelfth Day. When we heard so much about that potential deal was supposed to keep Tiktok live in the US for good. What what's the latest there? Yeah. There was hope at one point you know parties were racing towards an agreement, but then things sort of went south pretty quickly. trump gave the green light to software company Oracle to take a stake in Tiktok and Walmart was going to be a major investor. But then over in Beijing Bite damps which owns tiktok said, hey, hey, not so fast we don't WanNa lose control of the biggest. APP. To ever come out of China. So talks have stalled but you know the parties having given up. They're still discussing how they can maybe resolve this, but the stakes are so high David for Tiktok I mean, even a temporary ban could mean ninety percent of tiktok users will quit and join the competitors you know in in light of this happening many other apps have cropped up that see opportunity here trying to take you know the users who you maybe think Tiktok might go away and hope that they jump over to their platform. What about this basic question bobby. Is Data safe on Tiktok if we're using the United States yeah. This is at the very heart of the debate. You know the trump administration says, having a Chinese owner creates a national security risk since China's government has unfettered access to private business in the country, and there is a consensus among experts that that's a real concern but the particular threat from Tiktok that's lot shakier. The White House has never offered ironclad evidence that can definitely get its hands on the data of Americans and Tiktok says it's shielded because none of the data is stored on Chinese soil. And most of its data on Americans is encrypted. That's said David None of those assurances are cooling the heat from the White House. All right, this journey continues NPR's. Bobby. Bobby thanks so much for covering it. You gotta thanks David.

Tiktok Bobby Morning David United States Donald Trump White House David None China NPR Washington Beijing Bite Tech Reporter Allen President Trump Kintu Walmart Oracle
Turns out, the people who work at Facebook are fighting just as much as the rest of us

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:23 min | 3 months ago

Turns out, the people who work at Facebook are fighting just as much as the rest of us

"Out the people who work at facebook are fighting just as much as the rest of us from American public media. This is marketplace tech I'm Ali would. FACEBOOK is feeling the pressure to deal with election disinformation this week, the FBI uncovered a new Russian propaganda campaign targeting the twenty twenty election facebook announced. It would block new political ads for a week before the election on Thursday it said it would take down videos in which the president urged people in. North. Carolina to vote twice, which is illegal and activist asked facebook to ban event listings like the one that encouraged people to arm themselves and go to Kenosha. Wisconsin to confront protesters two people were shot and killed in Kenosha. So how does it feel to work at facebook right now, Ryan Mack is a senior tech reporter at buzzfeed. He says, the company has an internal communications platform called workplace and it is full of debate. Imagine what's going on on your facebook feed right now and that's happening exactly in the same way internally at facebook where there's more than fifty thousand police at have access to this thing. People are mad. There's other side as well in some cases. Defending the gunman in playing devil's. In In. So this is kind of devolved into this back and forth where Zucker actually stepped in earlier this week. and Said, look we need to have more discussions. We're GONNA. Movies into certain groups, but you're not gonNA be able to. Post openly argumentative things on our platform and the funny thing about workplaces at things also trend on workplace as well. So you can see when when things trend and so these things that get a lot of engagement because of the arguments often trend at the top which then creates this positive feedback loop where where people an arguing more and seeing it more and yeah. So it's it's it's not pretty. So, you're saying that facebook has an internal facebook. then. Mark. Zuckerberg has stepped in to police. The irony is hurting me in the head right now. He's announced kind of these new ways of looking at content. It remains to be seen what they actually do. There are hundreds if not thousands of groups on workplace and so imagine that you're at home all day you're cooped up you WANNA talk to your colleagues you WanNa be in the mix Were places where you're hanging out right for people who haven't been facebook I mean it's like entering to city a dreamy bubble, right? It's a city it like every wall is covered with art all the conference rooms have cute names. There's like redwood growing in the middle of their. Outdoor Park. There's the roof garden. A barber, you have a barbecue shop. Bikes repair shop. Yeah. Right. An and all, and they're balloons all over the like it's your face. Booker Verse Serie You. Know I mean it's like it is a lovely place to be, and I wonder if that's your thing you now that you have people at home like sort of like snapped out of it a little bit. If that you know if you were watching Mark Zuckerberg screen instead of in a room with all of your friends and fellow believers. Would it change your perspective a little bit. Does. Eliminate some of the the experience of working at facebook. It's actually really funny. 'cause we get these So before all hands meetings, facebook employees up vote questions of what they want to ask. Mark. Zuckerberg for the week and some of the questions like when are we gonna get like a snack budget for home? Are we gonNA like how do we get? How are we gonNA improve our lives at home and they were actually bonuses given to employees at trying to improve homeworking situations. They have disability to watch and send out you know some of their thoughts on what's going on as it happens whereas like if there was no pandemic, they were in the office, it'd be most of them would be watching this remember park. I guess the other question is, do you have a sense of how many people? ARE THAT UPSET BECAUSE They don't seem to be having huge impact. So it's interesting. FACEBOOK has these internal surveys. One of the questions in there as you think, facebook is making the world a better place. Right after the company did not take down the infamous looting shooting post from Donald Trump, you saw like twenty, twenty, five percentage point drop. That is facebook's data showing their employees are. Not Believing in that mission anymore at least or at least this one incident caused leave not mission. Would you say they have a chance at making that internal change. One of the things here that people have to realize that the power lies in the hands of Mark Zuckerberg he. Has Decision Making power because he made maintains majority voting control over the company. We look back at the walkout, for example, at the beginning of June in the company released a statement and said like we hear you kind of thing but like. Mark Zuckerberg really do anything to change how the company operates think so in like. It's up to him basically, what happens on the platform Ryan Mack is a senior tech reporter at buzzfeed.

Facebook Mark Zuckerberg Kenosha Ryan Mack Tech Reporter FBI Wisconsin ALI President Trump Carolina Donald Trump Zucker Outdoor Park Booker
Trump Administration Imposes Deadline For TikTok To Be Sold

Up First

02:48 min | 4 months ago

Trump Administration Imposes Deadline For TikTok To Be Sold

"Chinese company that owns tiktok is under a little bit of pressure from President Trump and is considering selling you the president says, he thinks tiktok is a threat to US security even given the company kind of deadline by set a date of around September fifteenth at which point is going to be out of business in the United States. Now, over the weekend president trump talked to the CEO of Microsoft, which is a potential buyer here NPR's tech reporter Bobby. Allen is with us this morning. Hi, Bobby Hey Rachel. So take a step. Back, Bobby, why does president trump have an interest in tick talks US operations in the first place? Well, trump never mentions TIKTOK without saying China to talks parent company. Bite dance is based in Beijing and trump says that means tiktok could be harvesting the private data of millions of Americans and sharing with the Chinese Communist Party now whether that's really happening is up for debate but trump, it's black or white right? It's took talks either stays chinese-owned and will be banned or the APP is bought by an American company like Microsoft and can stick around. Right. So No L. Mention this Microsoft CEO talk with President Trump over the weekend about the possibility of requiring Tiktok but that's rather remarkable. Right? Like why did the CEO of a private company feel the need to run this by the president right and that's because the trump administration including trade adviser Peter Navarro has been peering on Cable News and saying the White House does not trust Microsoft. And while it looks like right now that Microsoft has won back the confidence of the White House. The company just really wants to make sure absolutely has the blessing of the administration before trying to take Tiktok over and a big part of Microsoft's pledge is to ensure that no TIKTOK data ever leaves Americans shores. Yes to your question. The president getting intimately involved in a private company merger talks is not typical but talk right in APP known for dance challenges and Prank Videos. No last finding itself as the latest political football in Washington is dealing with just that. Can we close by talking about the business end of this like what's in it for Microsoft to buy Tiktok? What do they get out of this potential? So we hear the word Microsoft when we think of the company many people still think of windows, right? It's not exactly the hippest image in the world, but Microsoft does own xbox. It's one actually one of its most successful businesses and there's a lot of crossover potential between gamers and tiktok users not to mention bringing on tiktok would allow Microsoft to go toe to toe with facebook. Which sees talks huge popularity and is pretty envious.

President Trump Microsoft Tiktok CEO Bobby United States Chinese Communist Party White House Allen NPR Tech Reporter Beijing Peter Navarro Facebook China Washington Cable News
Trump Administration Imposes Deadline For TikTok To Be Sold

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:42 min | 4 months ago

Trump Administration Imposes Deadline For TikTok To Be Sold

"TIKTOK has on the market president. Trump says, he's giving the company that owns the video sharing up a month to sell it, or if not, he wants to talk banned in the US I, sent a date of around September fifteenth at which point is going to be out of business in the United States. Over the weekend, the president spoke with the CEO of one potential buyer Microsoft to explain what's going on with the future. Of TIKTOK, we've got NPR tech reporter Bobby Allen with us this morning. Hi, Bobby Tae. They're just take a step back, explain why president trump is so interested in tiktok right now. So trump doesn't talk about tiktok without talking about China, and there is a reason for that tiktok parent company Bite. Dance is based in Beijing and trump says that means tiktok harvesting the private data of millions of American citizens and sharing it with the Chinese Communist Party now wasn't that's really happening is up for debate. There's no conclusive evidence that it is, but trump views it as a black and white issue to talk either stays Chinese owned, and we'll be banned or the APP is bought by an American company like Microsoft, like you mentioned and it can stick around. So we mentioned this in the intro that Microsoft's CEO actually sat down with President trump over the weekend I mean is. The CEO of Microsoft feels it's necessary to actually vet this potential purchase with the. President. Yeah. Because the walls have been closing in on Tiktok for some time, the president has been threatening economic sanctions against Tiktok. Other members of the trump administration have been talking about other ways to basically ban Tiktok from the United States completely and Microsoft spied opportunity here. Microsoft said. Well, let's see if we can acquire the American assets of Tiktok and The do that they need to get the blessing of the trump administration. So I think Microsoft CEO just wants to be one hundred percent sure that trump is not going to try to. And challenge the acquisition because that's the last thing you want when you make a huge merger like Microsoft is looking to do with Tiktok. So from the from a business point of view, bobby wood, a tick tock acquisition I mean is that a good buy for Microsoft? Yeah, it would be huge. I mean Microsoft already is a one point, five, trillion dollar company. Right. I mean they absolutely are a global powerhouse, but not really has Microsoft isn't really known for being on the leading edge of social media platforms for young people. Many people. Still when they think of Microsoft, they think of Windows, the operating system, not exactly the hippest image in the world, but Microsoft also owns xbox. It's one of its most successful business lines in fact, and there's a lot of crossover between gamers and tiktok users not to mention bringing on to talk with allow Microsoft to go toe-to-toe with facebook, which has been looking at Tiktok and has been pretty envious. So envious that facebook has announced a copycat service that sounds a lot like tiktok. So in addition to all this Tiktok is also wrapped up in a big court case. Can you explain what that's all about? Right. So as the focus has been on Tiktok Washington troubles, another problem has been quietly brewing in federal court There's a massive class action lawsuit about allegedly stealing data from users, and the crux of sued is about whether Tiktok has been sending data about American. To China, the lawyers claim they have proof of this, but it does still have to be proven in court tiktok lawyers though say, yeah, the APP captures and stores all sorts of data as all APPS DO, but they're not giving any of it to Chinese authorities at least that's what Tiktok says.

Microsoft Tiktok Donald Trump President Trump CEO Tiktok Washington United States Bobby Allen Facebook China Bobby Tae Chinese Communist Party NPR Bobby Wood Tech Reporter Beijing
Creating TV shows on an iPhone

Talking Tech

05:36 min | 4 months ago

Creating TV shows on an iPhone

"This pandemic, we're seeing so many TV people recording from home and you're probably wondering how doing this. How are they recording on an iphone in reaching the broadcasting? Facility, we've got rich to mirrow here. He is tech reporter for Channel Five. Ktla in Los Angeles and he remotes first TV stations all over the country and he's. GonNa fill us in rich. How you doing I'm doing fantastic. Let me just first say a I think it was like my little personal dream to go live from my home for all of my stand in one place, and do five hours of live shots every morning for all these TV stations, and I thought. Wow, wouldn't it be more efficient for me to just have a home studio and do it from there? Well now I've been forced to do that, so my little dream has become. Become a reality, but I'll tell you it's been kind of a nightmare because it's not very easy, and if you've been watching me on TV folks that have been seeing, it have seen kind of an evolution of me going live from home. Because KTLA's been fantastic, they said hey do what you need to go live from home. Whatever and get the equipment you need thankfully as tech person. I have a lot of the equipment that I need to do this, but the bottom line is at this point. You only need a smartphone, which is the IPHONE and some software and a microphone, and so we've used to piece of software at KTLA. One is called. And the other is call TV. You and both of these things work in the same way. They take a signal from your phone, and they broadcast it back to home base, so it's kind of like using skype, but it's managed by the TV station, so they can manage in the quality way better than what you would get on an off the shelf product. Does that make sense does? The, let's let's go through. Let's go through the process, so you're doing the morning show it's seven. Oh five and they cut to. They say okay. We got rich with his tech segment. Now now you're sitting in Los Angeles at home and you've got the IPHONE. It's ready to go. Take me through the process. Yes, so when I get up in the morning, it's. It's Kinda like it's. It's like lighting up a little studio so in my spare bedroom which I've used to be the kids playroom I cleared it all out, which actually has been very bad, because the echo has been the biggest issue with the studio, and the problem is normally, and this is the other issue that I've run into normally when you're setting up a home. Home Studio. What do you do you figure out what you need what you have and what you have and you order the rest on Amazon. It's there the next day. Well. Guess what during Kovic Times? You can't just get next day delivery from Amazon so it has been a challenge to set up a home studio because I can't order the products that I need so. So, what I have here is a ring. Light that I used to use for live shots when I used to do like a podcast from home like facebook. Live so I i. Put that up and the ring. Light is kind of a big circular light that goes around my phone. My iphone sits in there and then underneath the iphone i. have another Tripod with A. An ipad on it and actually went to best buy and bought the Tripod Mount for that jobe amount, and then for that I've been using that as kind of a to watch KTLA and to also use as a teleprompter and so I. Did experiment with the Tele prompting APP as well? I didn't think it looked good on TV. I thought my eyes were a little shifty. So for me. It's easier to actually just kind of memorize some of my lines and read them off the script when we go to video which you called voiceover. But the microphone has been tricky. I've tried a lot of different microphones. A lot of the reporters at home are using. either. The apple included ear buds, and those work, really well Otherwise you have to kind of put a microphone into your phone, which is not very easy because professional microphones don't connect to the iphone unless you have a conduit, so I've been using a board I used for my podcast to connect the microphone into the phone, so it's gone very complicated Jefferson. A? What microphone you connecting theoretically into the phone? While so right now I'm using Oh my gosh. I have to look at my my headphones. Hang on. Audio Technica, and so this is an audio technica. It looks like one of the microphones that sports caster would use. It has the microphone that sticks out, but also the nice big headphones so with that I can hear what's called IFP so the other tricky part of this whole situation is that it's not like a video call where you can not worried you have. What's the return from? TV In my ear, so I have to be able to hear what the anchors are saying to me in my ear and. It gets really complicated. That's usually what we call be. We have this little cable that runs to a box that we listen to the programming of the station on, and when you're there live. Obviously you can hear the anchor talking to you, but when you're out in the field, you have to connect to an I've be box, and that's also another challenge, but these programs like I mentioned the. And the TV you, they allow you to pipe in the programming. Cheer IFP. I'm getting a little in the weeds year for the consumer audience. It's okay, do you? Do you pick up those programs in the APP store or are they Do you get up some other way we'll see? These programs are something that the TV stations pay a lot of money for it because they come associated with receiver so when I actually am broadcasting I'm broadcasting. Allied receiver we have at Ktla

Ktla Home Studio Los Angeles IFP Tech Reporter Audio Technica Amazon Facebook Kovic Times Jobe Apple Jefferson
"tech reporter" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

01:59 min | 5 months ago

"tech reporter" Discussed on Today in Focus

"<Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> ooh! That <Speech_Male> was Julia <Speech_Music_Female> Carrie, Wong. <Speech_Female> We <Speech_Female> wanted to do this episode <Speech_Male> with her. <Speech_Female> Because <Speech_Female> the amazing <Speech_Female> piece, she wrote <Speech_Male> about what she <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> has gone through. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Do look <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> up at the Guardian <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Dot. com, <Speech_Female> it's title <Speech_Music_Female> is the hate facebook <Speech_Female> fosters <Speech_Female> destroys lives. <Speech_Female> Here's what <Speech_Female> it did to me. <Speech_Female> And while <Speech_Female> you're bad, do read <Speech_Female> all of her <Speech_Female> brilliant reporting <Speech_Female> on their stretching <Speech_Music_Female> back <Speech_Music_Female> years. <Speech_Music_Female> We went to facebook <Speech_Female> about this episode <Speech_Female> and a spokesperson <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> side. We are <Speech_Female> making progress keeping <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> activity off our <Speech_Music_Female> platform. <Speech_Female> We've found over two hundred <Speech_Female> and fifty white supremacist <Speech_Female> organizations <Speech_Female> and removed <Speech_Female> four point seven million <Speech_Female> pieces of content <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to organize <Speech_Female> hate globally <Speech_Music_Female> in the first quarter <Speech_Female> of twenty twenty <Speech_Female> over ninety <Speech_Female> six percent of which <Speech_Female> we found before some <Speech_Music_Female> reported it. <Speech_Female> This is an increase <Speech_Female> from three months earlier <Speech_Male> when we removed one point, <Speech_Female> six million posts <Speech_Female> over eighty <Speech_Music_Female> nine percent of which <Speech_Music_Female> we found before someone <Speech_Music_Female> reported to us. <Speech_Female> We are committed <Speech_Music_Female> to keeping hate of <Speech_Music_Female> our platform. <Speech_Music_Female> FACEBOOK <Speech_Female> also said <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that they remove any <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> content that celebrates <Speech_Female> defense <Speech_Female> or attempts <Speech_Female> to justify the Holocaust, <Speech_Female> or mocks <Speech_Female> Holocaust victims <Speech_Female> or accuses <Speech_Female> them of lying about <Speech_Female> the atrocities <Speech_Female> or hate against <Speech_Music_Female> Jewish people in <Speech_Female> any way. <Speech_Female> They said that <Speech_Female> they had commissioned an <Speech_Female> independent human <Speech_Music_Female> rights impact assessment <Speech_Female> into <Speech_Female> the role of their services <Speech_Female> in Myanmar <Speech_Music_Female> that have been published <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in two thousand <Speech_Music_Female> and eighteen. <Speech_Female> They said the progress <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> was being made <Speech_Female> across five key areas, <Speech_Female> including accountability, <Speech_Female> improving <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> enforcement <Speech_Female> of content <SpeakerChange> policies, <Speech_Music_Male> engagement, trust <Speech_Music_Female> and transparency. That <Speech_Female> set today. <Speech_Female> This episode was produced <Speech_Female> by Serena <Speech_Female> Boxing. <Speech_Female> Sound design <Speech_Female> was by Axel Kukuchi <Speech_Female> The <Speech_Female> executive producers <Speech_Female> on coal. Jackson <Speech_Music_Female> and Phil <Speech_Music_Female> may not. <SpeakerChange>

No Apple live event this year likely

Talking Tech

03:21 min | 5 months ago

No Apple live event this year likely

"All Right! It's almost September in for a tech reporter like myself enrich dimuro. We've been covering these apple events. Every September really excited about seeing new iphones and what we're being told is for the first time this year. No that it's GonNa be virtual just like The developer's conference was recently, and it got me to thinking rich. What are we missing by by having? Basically a TV, show online well. The first thing we're missing is the hands on with the gadgets after their announced, and so, what normally happens is apple goes on stage. They throw a whole bunch of stuff up on the screen. Do a couple of Demos, which is all great, but then the journalists get to go. Go to a separate room and actually have some hands on time with this stuff where you can really see what's going on. You can see the nuances and the software how the engineering is of the hardware and understand what this product is going to look like for the usually two or three or four weeks before it hits store shelves and I think that's that's very valuable especially when it comes to reviewing products and we're definitely going to miss out on that this year. I just don't think it's the same to have to watch the TV show for two hours which which we would do anyway, so the iphone event is the biggest event of the year. HANDS DOWN NO QUESTION I. Would always tell you it is, but nothing happens. They're the IPHONE. Stuff really happens but I gotta I gotTA. I gotTA wonder. Ww See I saw the headlines, but it was not the same now of course, iphone, ww or two different kind of events. This is a developer's conference, so it's not as big consumer thing, but it just didn't hit like an iphone event would when you say. Absolutely, not no, of course not and the sad part is you're right, but they did announce a lot of interesting things that I think we might have seen like especially with the car key stuff like they probably would have had a BMW, or they might have been doing private drives with some journalists to show off that new feature because what happens is there is the headline that gets placed on all the newscasts on that day in all the newspapers and all the websites. Websites, but then there's a trickle of secondary headlines and little inside scoop that these journalists and with W WDC. We really didn't see that because nobody like I, said everyone sort of had the same access, and it was weird and I think that apple did a pretty good job of of commanding some of the news after that, but not the same way with the iphone and the differences. You've got every single reporter that's local to their company and their station and their outlet. Hands on with these devices, and of course that's what's GonNa play because they all have their own followers. They've all got their own viewers and listeners, and that's really what they wanna see. They WANNA see their person with the new device. Well. We're not going to do it this year, but my perdition is September fifteenth. Tuesday for the event I could be wrong. We'll see and analysts. Oh, you've got a date prediction. And and the analysts I've spoken to predict the first week of October four new phones with the top of the line phone, being ready for five G., the Super high speed wireless service that is slowly rolling out.

Apple Tech Reporter Developer Reporter BMW
Apple reopening a handful of stores this week

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:28 sec | 7 months ago

Apple reopening a handful of stores this week

"Well the first apple store in the U. S. re opened today in the Pacific Northwest hers come mostly Romero the only apple store in Idaho has re opened in Boise with stores in three other states set to open this week Jefferson Graham is a tech reporter for USA today you're gonna see employees with a facemask Stevens his social distancing and you're gonna see temperature checks for customers before they can walk in the door Alaska Alabama and South Carolina are the three other states with stores scheduled to open on

Romero Idaho Boise Jefferson Graham Tech Reporter USA Stevens Alabama Pacific Northwest Alaska South Carolina
"tech reporter" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

03:44 min | 8 months ago

"tech reporter" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Older users alternately entertained and annoy everybody with their new video chat habits it's a story by Sarah Needleman tech reporter at the Wall Street journal Sir how does house party say compared to zoom it's sort of like the opposite exams as soon as very popular within businesses and schools and you you know you set up a chat and you buy a select number of people and that's that this is a little bit different what's unique to house party is it's like almost like hang out in a dorm room you're you're just sort of popping in and out of these chats and once you you know let you log in with a friend one of their friends might join the call so you may not be connected to one of their friends but they can jump in and just like a you know a house party in real life people just kind of go in and out of rooms it's the same sort of concept so explain that a little more if you're friends with someone you could join in their chat even say if you weren't invited and it's a completely different group of their friends than you might normally associate with right if your if your friend as long as it's not locked we you can lock and make a private but if you're having a public a chat with a friend and you you see your friends on it you can join with whoever they're talking to us on this is not so once you're connected to one person you can get into a room that may have as many as six other people that you don't know besides the one friend that is yours about parents putting in what you're on that's on that front so yes also parents led a long and they realize that you know they'll see their child is on so they'll join a call and nexeo they're on a call with their their son or daughter and their child's friends too and so in this one example of a guy just pops in and all that that to his son's chat that the sons friends are like who is this man they don't let it know it now and he's like and the father's life so which one of you is my son's girlfriends and he's like oh my god please please somebody are saying but once he explained to his friend this is my dad he just alot of hearts party we're connected now and they're like okay we're we speak with Sarah Needleman tech reporter at the Wall Street journal her pieces called house party was the video app for kids now quarantined parents are putting in how about the the irony of some of the kids in your story complaining about how loud the parents are or how often they use house party so I mean before all those pandemic there so many parents who would give their children grief over the amount of time they spent on screens yeah you're you're on the phone too much or make a make a too many apps calls on social media too much whatever and now the the parents themselves are obsessed with this happened there using it to make you know social calls on the good happy hours on it or just chatting with their friends so this was one teenager I spoke to Alan pyro he was like my mom's on it all the time she never did video conferencing before and now she does it more than I do and he said it was giving out him and his brother a headache they just for like stopped at the end and so they're just really chatty and this other team was telling me about her mom that is costly holding these how house party happy hours and she keeps saying come on the video so she like potter head and and this is our moms friends and she's like okay I don't know what to say to these people like I and then she just kind of slowly walks away because she doesn't want to be part of the conversation and she was like you know house party was something for me it's for my teens it's weird seeing my parents do it Sarah Sarah Needleman tech reporter at the Wall Street journal six minutes now in front of the hour on this weekend.

tech reporter Wall Street journal Sarah Needleman
"tech reporter" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

03:43 min | 8 months ago

"tech reporter" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Younger generation the older users alternately entertained and annoy everybody with their new video chat habits it's a story by Sarah Needleman tech reporter at the Wall Street journal Sir how does house party say compared to zoom it's sort of like the opposite is in his room is very popular within businesses and schools and you you you set up a chat and you buy a select number of people and that's that this is a little bit different what's unique to house party is it's like almost like hang out in a dorm room you're you're just sort of popping in and out of these chats and once you you know want to lock in with a friend one of their friends might join the club so you may not be connected to one of their friends but they can jump in and just like a you know a house party in real life people just kind of go in and out of rooms it's the same sort of concept so explain that a little more if you're friends with someone you could join in their chat even say if you weren't invited it's a completely different group of their friends than you might normally associate with if your if your friend as long as it's not locked we you can lock it make a private but if you're having a public attack with a friend and you you see your friends on it you can join with whoever they're talking to us on the site so once you're connected to one person you can get into a room that may have as many as six other people that you don't know besides the one friend that is yours parents putting in what you're on that's on that front so yes so parents Monday long and they realize that you know they'll see their child is on so the join the call and nexeo they're on a call with their their son or daughter and their child's friends too and so in this one example of a guy just pops in and all that to his son's chat but the sons friends are like who is this man let L. and L. and he's like the father's life so which one of you is my son's girlfriends and he's like oh my god please please somebody are saying but once he explained to his friends this is my dad he just alot of hearts party we're connected now and Hey we're we speak with Sarah Needleman tech reporter at the Wall Street journal her pieces called house party was the video app for kids now quarantined parents are putting in how about the the irony of some of the kids in your story complaining about how loud the parents are or how often they use house party so I mean before all those fantastic there's so many parents who would give their children grief over the amount of time to spend on screens yeah you're you're on the phone to live there making making too many calls you're on social media too much whatever and now the parents themselves are obsessed with this happen they're using it to make you know social calls on the good happy hours on it or just chatting with their friends so this last one teenager I spoke to Alan pyro he was like my mom's on it all the time she never did video conferencing before and now she doesn't more than I do and they said it was giving out him and his brother headache they just for like stopped at the end and so they're just really chatty and this other team was telling me about her mom that is costly holding these how house party happy hours and she'd say come on the videos a few like plaster head and this is our moms friends and she's like okay I don't want to save these like I and then he just kind of slowly walks away because she doesn't want to be part of the conversation and she was like you know house party was something for me as for my teens it's weird seeing my parents do it Sarah Sarah Needleman tech reporter at the Wall Street journal six minutes now in front of the hour.

tech reporter Wall Street journal Sarah Needleman
"tech reporter" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:43 min | 8 months ago

"tech reporter" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"The corona virus pandemic ramps up workers might be wondering what rights they have if or when the higher ups request that they return to the office one of the most pressing questions is can your boss actually force you to work during a pandemic W. brown consumer tech reporter at USA today has been sampling expert opinion Dalvin what's the answer obviously your boss can't ever make you work but you can certainly face repercussions if you have certain jobs for deciding not to come in in the wake of corona virus which as we all know has has thickened thousands of people and killed thousands of others so yeah I I think at one of the most alarming thing sue was that people you know there's tons of people who say they aren't ready to go back to work citing it it's saying that it's too soon in the wake of corona virus do you find that the laws vary by state yeah they've it the laws vary by state there is there are certain locales that are sort of hot spots for corona virus who have issued guidance or or mandates that people stay and if you're not an essential worker and then essential workers or or defined generally as people who provide services whose services are now are absolutely necessary in the wake of coronary so yeah people who work at certain restaurants or the grocery stores those people in in a lot the area's half tech come to work or are expected to come to work there states that haven't issued guidance surrounding coronavirus those.

tech reporter USA corona
How do I work from home? Tips from the experienced

WSJ Tech News Briefing

12:04 min | 9 months ago

How do I work from home? Tips from the experienced

"Friday night. It's normally date night but not right now. Since the current virus outbreak social distancing has made dating nearly impossible keyword nearly our tech reporter. Georgia wells will join us to explain how people are using tack to try and find that special someone but first congratulations. You've made it to the end of another week of work from home to celebrate as per usual. We're inviting our senior personal tech columnist. Joanna Stern back to share another one of her work from home tech tips. Hey Joanna I'm here again. We're excited you don't ever sound excited. May I mentioned that? That's just I think that's my personality. Okay but I am genuinely deep down. I am excited to be here. Okay okay anyway. That's not the tip for the day. What is today's tip? Yeah so I saved this tip for the end of the week because it's a couple of tips in one and it requires a bit of work. But all of these tips have to do with your. I don't want to say crappy. Say a curse word but your home. Wifi INSERT ADJECTIVE THERE. About how you feel about your home. Wifi usually. It's not very good but there are some things you can do. And right now we are at a moment where our home networks have never been taxed so much and that is a lot from this streaming video and that is a lot from the video chatting but it's also all of the other activity of people in your house doing things on the network so I have a couple of tips about what you should do. The first one which is kind of a cop out. It's just don't use Wifi at all. So if you can plug in directly to your router get an Ethernet cord. Get a dangle that you can connect your laptop hard part here. Is there sold out everywhere? So best of luck to all of you. Survival of the fittest. You might have it in that box of cables that you have in your closet or in your basement or yes under your bed. Do you probably have the Ethernet Cord? Which is Great? Those have not changed in one million years. You probably don't have the dangle took it up into your laptop probably have a USB laptop. Maybe you had an older or laptop with the regular. Usb issue is that the laptops no longer have ethernet. Jacks so right. Good luck to you. I can't really help on that. But then comes the issue of most people don't want to be chained to their routers and they want to be around their house using. Wi Fi and best hip for people. And this is a good thing to do this weekend. Can you move your Wifi router to the center of the House to the area where you're using it the most for most people that's GonNa be the living room and a kitchen area? Chances are there's a reason your routers in the basement. It was installed there with a by your Internet service provider. And there's not much you can do but try this. It's always a decent solution. My biggest tip is figuring out if you need a new router and I have a couple of tips of this in my column but the biggest thing you can do is walk around your house running speed tests. Us speed test dot net. That's a website or you can download the APP and run the tests and see if there are pockets of the house where you're not getting as good signal and not not as good coverage. Chances are that is probably because your Wifi router is a little bit old and didn't have great range. I'm recommending that people if you have if you've had a Wifi router for around five years or more it's probably time for a new one. These get they. They don't get better every year but every three to five years they take some pretty big leaps and the gadgets. You have get better WIFI chips in them. And those WIFI chips need better routers to take advantage of the faster speeds all of that. You're probably wondering what route or do I recommend. I recommend the euro and you could buy the era by itself. Its Own box which is ninety nine dollars. And that's one router that you have in your house probably like the router you have right now or you can make the euro into a Mesh network system and this is something that has completely changed my life. This is one router and then you can buy these extra routers that you put around your house to create basically a blanket of Wifi for the entire house and it's pretty amazing you can get wi fi in places you thought were complete dead zones forever so yes. I'm suggesting you buy some things. But you don't have to buy them unless you follow the tips to see if you need them. Gotcha I mean and to be clear. We get zero kickbacks. We're not in any kind of business relationship with our. This is just based on your research and reporting your recommendation. Absolutely all right. That is a great tip. I know a lot of people are going to be Trying to work on their WIFI systems over the weekend. So thank you so much for that. We had also put a call out for our listeners to ask US questions or leave us their own work from home hassles challenges. What you've been listening to some of these. Tell me. Have you learned anything this week. I've learned so much this week and I want to encourage more people to call in because we are here for you. But you're kind of here for us too because they bring so much joy to us some of these comments and these these messages are not only funny. But they're insightful. So please call in. I'll give that number in a couple of seconds but I like this call. We got a lot from Jeremy. He's a student at the University of Minnesota where classes have been pushed completely online. Like everything else right now. I work from home. I have is not to do your work and your bed because you associate that place with sleeping and it makes you a lot more less productive and especially at University of Minnesota all online. It gets really difficult to God's side when it's cold and it's hard to find a space but even if it means getting your kitchen or your living room just take those online classes or do your work outside of your bedroom. That was a great tip from Jeremy. Doman are Joanna. If people want to reach out to you to share their own work from home tech tips or ask questions how should they reach out they should either email me at Joanna dot stern at wsj.com or they can leave us a message at our work from home? Tech hotline number is three one four six three five zero three eight eight excellent and we will be putting that number as we have all week in our show notes and the description. So you don't have to rewind and write it down you can just scroll into your APP and see it right there. Doing thank you so much. Have a great weekend all right after the break. Our TECH REPORTER. Georgia wells will be with us to tell us about some of the creative ways that people have used technology to keep dating in the age of social distancing. That's coming up next. We see breakthrough medicines getting to patients in record time at Emerson when issues become inspiration. Creating a better world isn't just a result. It's a responsibility. Emerson considerate solved. Sh- I've a little poem to share with you. All roses are red violets are blue. We're staying inside and social. Do that comes to you. Courtesy of our producer. Amanda llewellyn social. Distancing has changed almost every aspect of our lives these days going to the gym shopping at the grocery store and of course dating because now that those restaurants bars are closed which are the most popular date locations. People are having to find new ways to try to meet their special someone or just stay by themselves all the time. They don't WanNa do that. So they're using tack of course here to explain our tech reporter Georgia Wells. She is in San Francisco. Georgia thank you so much for joining us from very safe social distance of three thousand miles away. Thank you for having me are. A So Georgia dinner. Movie date not going to happen in the foreseeable future. What are people doing instead? Dating APP usage is through the roof. People are doing face timing. They're turning to dating APPS. The video function on dating APPs as also getting a lot of us and people are also trying to watch movies at the same time where they press play simultaneously and then do banter over text message as a way of kind of progressing their relationships while still maintaining the safe distance so I haven't been on dating APPS for awhile. Dating APPS now have video functionality. Some do and those that do are seeing a huge surge in usage prior to this pandemic the video futures weren't as popular a lot of people viewed them as almost as much work as meeting up in person and also. You didn't get to see the person but now there's this kind of obvious use case so there's an APP called say alot. They saw two hundred and fifty percent increase in video. Date sessions in the past two weeks swear they also saw spikes of usage and cities after there were corona virus local hotspots announced then the usage of the video date function would spike so people were basically canceling their real life dates. And saying okay. Let's just meet up on video. Exactly wow okay. So that's a huge jump. Are we seeing specific areas? Where this is happening more New York Montreal. Toronto Denver Los Angeles in particular. San Francisco wasn't on the list at the time. But I imagine it's probably now on the list so I can imagine that video chatting is at least better than just like texting right. At least you're seeing the person in real life or you're seeing them virtually whatever you're seeing them. What are people that you're talking to? How are they finding this? Is it harder to actually figure out if you like someone using video chat instead of meeting up? Yeah there's also a lot of etiquette associated with video chatting and so in the past people often with like give each other a heads up if they're going to video chat maybe someone would wanna put makeup or put on do their hair and put on the outfit and so chatting with the woman in San Francisco the other day. Who's this on the call with this guy who she hopes to meet up with? They couldn't meet out. They did a phone call and then out of the blue. He video chatted her and it was a really shocking moment. She said it was also maybe the new normal video chatting the also the singles. I've been chatting with say that there's a lot of pressure involved because they want to progress their relationships but they also don't want to like make expectations crazies for if they ever do get out of this shelter in state and if they ever can meet up that puts a lot of pressure on the person if they've already chatted with him for hours and hours and hours and also video chatted for hours and hours and hours and then what happens when they finally get to see each other but thanks to the pandemic all of these like norms are now at the window. People are lonely and so people wanna connect more than ever. What is this? What does that mean for the relationships? That are forming. And they're gonNA figure this out but people don't seem to have figured it out quite yet. Are you talking to anyone who is kind of making the quarantine a reason to get together? A lot of people are using it as a pickup line. I don't know if it's necessarily a reason to get together but like I've heard people saying things like didn't you know. Alcohol Kills Corona Virus. Come over to my place or you'd be worth sheltering in place together or funny lines like that. My sense is they're just using that as an excuse. There've been jokes like are they going to be quarantine babies and nine months i. Maybe I don't know but also people are looking for direction on this and it's hard so the dating apps have put up these kind of pop up. Psa's if you will but say like wash your hands off and maintain social distance but for people who aren't already in shelter in place it can be hard to know like what does that actually mean and so New York City's Mayor Bill de Blasio last week with telling people if you are feeling sick. Don't go on a date or if your data's feelings don't go on a date but now that a lot of places are in shelter in place that probably that advice is probably mood because people probably can't meet up at all aright tech reporter Georgia wells stay safe sheltering in place. Thank you you too. And that was your tech news briefing.

Tech Reporter Georgia San Francisco Joanna Georgia Wells Joanna Stern University Of Minnesota Jeremy Emerson Joanna Dot Corona WI Mayor Bill De Blasio New York City Amanda Llewellyn Wsj.Com
#canceleverything = adios tech conferences. Now what?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:16 min | 9 months ago

#canceleverything = adios tech conferences. Now what?

"Nearly every tech conference or trade show over? The next? Few months has been cancelled postponed or gone virtual only on Wednesday the massive video game trade show e three was cancelled that was scheduled for June. The National Association of Broadcasters canceled its April meeting in Las Vegas and that follows south by Southwest Mobile World Congress in Barcelona and facebook and Google developer conferences. The Tech Industry Love High Profile Product announcements and big flashy trade shows. So much so that some believe this could be a chance to scale back. Connie Guglielmo is editor in chief for C. Net. She told me that small companies though still need big trade shows facebook Microsoft Google Apple. I mean they can drive attendance to whatever event they want hold. They can put on a party and everyone will come. Those events are more into maybe some of the smaller companies are the up and comers because you know you might WanNa plan to invent an invite a lot of people. But if you're not well known you know. Getting the attention is very difficult. So now they lose a platform if the trend continues to move away from these big shows that they have relied and counted on to try to get the attention of reporters and analysts and even investors. But do you think you know? Let's take the case of something like South by southwest conference. Is the business. Have some of these events just gotten too big when you're faced with a situation as we are now you have to come up with alternate solutions but I also think this is an opportunity when tech can step in and shine so if you can figure out how to re map those events and make them more accessible to more people you could have perhaps and even more interesting or compelling event? This is the time to show some creativity and I think tack affords us the means to do that especially with a live streaming and webcasting. You know technology I agree I mean. Could this also be a good time to reevaluate the relationship between journalists and these companies? You know you might get an from facebook and then you come down and you spend an entire day and you get a bunch of free food and presents. That could go away right right. I don't think anyone else needs a facebook. Bagger look we live in a world of information overload and so what are people looking for it? They're looking for more meaningful content. That they feel that they can invest the time in and get something meaningful back. The the conferences as you say have evolved over time. I mean I think my very first conference was a comdex in Atlanta. And that's the first time I ever came across. People dressed up as showgirls showing off hard drives. I mean it's kind of ridiculous when you think about it. We've had that model as the basis for these conferences for years and years. So if this does a reset that's all for the good. Yeah I mean. Is there a sense you know? Certainly these companies spend huge amounts of their comparatively tiny marketing and travel budgets to go to events like this. Do you know of any alternatives for them so again with mobile world. Congress being cancelled in Barcelona just a month ago. We see that would have sent a typical crew of anywhere from five to ten people to cover that show. We're hearing from those companies individually. It's now harder work for them to get her attention and to really stand out It's one if you come across something and see it. And it peaks your curiosity you know as a tech reporters holding something in your hand is always more interesting than reading a paragraph an email about it and trying to visualize how can make a difference and so we are hearing a lot more people Via you know traditional email or social media networks trying to get our attention but it is not the same as actually seeing something. I think more people might go to video and start doing their own video press releases and many product demos to try to get the attention of their constituents whether that's reporters are investors or customers just because they don't have that platform or are not going to be able to have that plot platform it doesn't look like for the foreseeable feature. Yeah and you almost wonder you know for some of these big companies. They'll say we realized the ES might be a bit of Zombie. Conference or maybe. It doesn't need to happen but they're obviously is still value in connecting face to face right or maybe the chance to become a breakout star absolutely absolutely. I mean I remember going to siggraph which is a computer graphics. Show in the very you know at the very early started the personal computer industry which kind of dates me but this was in the late eighties and early nineties. That's the first place that I heard of John. Lasseter and his little three D technology called render man which was powering. Pixar which was then bought by Steve Jobs and has gone on to create some of the most compelling animated films in the history of animation and so those conferences especially if they're you know if their niche in a way that allows all of the experts in that area to come together. I talked about cigarettes as graphics or I say is Cybersecurity Defcon black cat. Which happens over the summer in Las Vegas is all about cybersecurity and hacking those shows serve a purpose in bringing those communities together and you can do some of that online but it definitely has a different tenor and flavor. If you can't get those thought leaders in the together because as you know when you're talking to someone you know serendipity happens and you might have an ideal or you can make a connection. Oh look there's someone so across the room. Let me introduce you to them. And so that kind of you know. Just off the cuff again. I call it serendipity how you do that if you don't have people in that physical space. I mean that's something. I think that a lot of times people are trying to figure out right now. Connie Guglielmo is editor in chief at C net what other conference that was canceled week because of Corona virus the council on Foreign Relations Roundtable to discuss corona virus

Facebook Connie Guglielmo Editor In Chief Las Vegas Barcelona Southwest Mobile World Congres National Association Of Broadc Microsoft Google C. Net Bagger Developer Pixar Congress Atlanta Steve Jobs Lasseter
2020 coronavirus outbreak in Hong Kong

Bloomberg Markets

05:43 min | 9 months ago

2020 coronavirus outbreak in Hong Kong

"Radio significant is the disruption from corona virus fears is been one of the big questions that people are trying to grapple with the price in the market as we came out a scenario in which there could be some sort of downturn recession not recession temporary V. shaped U. shaped joining us here Shelly banjo Asia tech reporter for Bloomberg had been living in Hong Kong right now where you're living were camped out in our parent my parents house in Dallas Texas okay so it can you give us a sense before you decided to leave of what it was like in Hong Kong as the fear of coronavirus world in sure so how come you think is a really interesting case because if you look at it right now the cases are actually quite lower percentage wise compared to China and so it seems like a lot of these draconian measures are working and yet it's not it's not the greatest place to want to be right now so a few weeks ago we Bloomberg shut down their offices as well as well as many other businesses our schools are closed and we have an eighteen month old child and so we decided you know what it's very difficult to be in a tiny apartment with a young child when playgrounds and play rooms and things like that are close so we decided to go to Dallas and I stay with my parents for a little while okay and can you give us a sense before that of just sort of the fear factor people staying inside of it it sounds like restaurants where they opened was everything just sort of closed he had the time there were a fair amount of grocery stores and and restaurants that were open but it was right around then we started seeing people do runs on toilet paper that was like a really big thing in Hong Kong people started a rumor that there wasn't enough toilet paper and then everybody rushed and you'd see lines outside of the pharmacies every single morning as soon as they opened up and got a new shipment in for hand sanitizer masks and things like that okay so looking forward can we get a sense of how quickly things have come back online and how much of a template this is for what we can expect potentially here if it continues to spread the schools are still closed and a lot of businesses are still close some of the businesses have kept open throughout this entire thing it grocery stores are still being stocks you know people can now get toilet paper again so people are happy about that life goes under what about when it comes to technology production what it what it was you know that was one of the big questions with manufacturing and supply chains so it's a completely different story in in mainland China where most of the production is the lot of the supply chains have started slowly opening up again slowing you know slowly adding production workers but they're nowhere near acted passively or you know bringing their workers over and they've reopened factories but they need to quarantine their workers for a few weeks to make sure that as they travel to wherever the factory is from their hometowns that they haven't contracted the virus so the fact that affect your production is still you know not you know normal so there's been a lot of criticism around the Chinese response to the coronavirus lack of transparency numbers changing how does the response from the trump administration compare well I think that the trump administration had a fair bit of more time to kind of decide what the response was going to be so you know I think that it is something important to take care to take seriously you know you get a lot of questions like is this panic or people panicked but you know what this is a really important thing to take seriously and so I don't think it's a panic at all all right and going forward I just it's based on how quickly things are sort of getting back to normal with in Hong Kong does it give you optimism a sense that things can come back online pretty quickly or does it give you a sense of of sort of a little bit of an ominous sense going forward I think Hong Kong is still in a holding pattern I don't think things are starting to come back online yet and so until other schools open businesses won't open until businesses won't open you know everybody's kind of working from home and productivity does slow and so I think the uncertainty has driven a lot of people out of Hong Kong all together and so the a has a big expect top relation in Hong Kong I think a lot of those people are gone and aren't going to come back so because of that we're planning on going back right now so we'll see that one I don't know yet when and what about your ex Pat friends a lot of people I know left in an argument that I don't know I can back just because I think that this is certainly is going to happen again he had to Hong Kong has a specials circumstance of dealing with the protest for the last six months before that and so the economy has really is in a recession and it's hard to see mainland Chinese tourists coming back it's hard to see you know tourism just generally coming back and you know people who are living there we don't want to be there and you know they but if businesses close and shut down there and people are not gonna have jobs and they're not gonna be able to go out and spend and it's hard to see how Hong Kong's economy comes back in the short term assignments it is great to see you in person however unfortunate under the circumstances hi Shelly banjo is a tech reporter for Bloomberg news normally based in Hong Kong here in New York City or with

How health officials and social media are teaming up to fight the coronavirus 'infodemic'

WSJ Tech News Briefing

07:11 min | 9 months ago

How health officials and social media are teaming up to fight the coronavirus 'infodemic'

"You're like most people. You've probably been googling corona virus in the past few weeks a lot. The only problem is you can't believe everything you read on. The Internet. Misinformation about the virus is being circulated online especially on social media platforms despite tech giant's efforts to stamp it out our tech reporter. Sebastian Herrera has been looking into this. And he's here to explain what's going on Sebastian. Thank you so much for joining us all right so Sebastian. What kind of posts are we seeing? Cropping up around the corona virus. So there's all kinds of posed from different on different platforms. Probably the biggest example is the claim that the current buyers was engineered in a lab that basically it was you know scientists made it up and and that's how the out began. We've seen that on facebook. We've seen that on Youtube on twitter. So this is like a conspiracy theory. Exactly there's a conspiracy theory about how the virus started and besides that what we're seeing on for example facebook pages or twitter's a lot of kind of fear mongering in terms of you know saying everything from exaggerating the amount of deaths to you know all kinds of things of what goes into the virus. The virus is a mix of you know rat poison others such things and so it's it's kind of a really rich reached a pretty Fringe level and what? Are you said that you're seeing these kind of posts on facebook I know that we were. We've been seeing things on Youtube. What are Google and facebook and other tech giants trying to do to get rid of this misinformation or to Limit this misinformation on their platforms? So the big platforms twitter facebook. Google and Youtube. They have all gone pretty similar. Pass in terms of when people search for Corona virus. It goes the first searches are usually by credible health organizations a lot of the first continuously from for example the World Health Organization and they're basically making those searches more those organizations more relevant within searches. That's the biggest thing and then facebook twitter Google Youtube they have talked about taking down misleading content. That they're monitoring it says it. Has You know people all over the world that monitor this at all times and actually one of the posts that we examined in our story. Facebook flag fact checkers flagged it as a post that was not factual basically So those are the kind of different things that they're doing it how they're handling you so they're really pushing back against this. But how is this misinformation? Still being circulated if you think about the amount of groups and just people that are on on facebook along the that's billions there's been so many groups that have been created Just to put information up but a lot of times comment or in the articles that they post they're putting Not Factual Information. It's almost like you know. The tech companies takedown posed or monitor pose. Just others come up because it's just the nature of the beast of just. It's almost like just a nonstop kind of system in a vacant shared on one. You know website. People linked through a different website answers. This never ending kind of stream of people posting things commenting on things any kind of like a cycle that feels itself since the Internet is so obviously widespread ambig- big. It's everything from on. What people would classifies fringe sites such as four Chan to find ways to funnel itself to be platforms like facebook us to some experts who said that they think what we're seeing in these big on. These big sites is basically. Just the tip of the iceberg and experts actually said that this kind of information could more damaging than false news or fake news around like political discourse. Why is it so dangerous when you see misinformation about something like this virus? What could the impact of this be? Yes so the experts that I've talked to. They made some interesting points in terms of you know when it comes to health related issues For example if if somebody's putting a post op that is discussing the death rate at a much higher rate than it actually has been that will cause people to freak out and make misinformed decisions. Whether it's about their hells than it could be consequential in that way but also what has been happening is people to selling products like pills online Promoting these kinds of health products. That aren't really gonNA make a difference in terms of this virus. It can get dangerous in that way so I think what the experts were that I talk to. We're trying to highlight is. It's not just like somebody is putting out an ideology. It's that they're trying to scare people into certain things or That's been president. Online is price gouging so We've seen items online. You know be sold for example with face mask enhance sanitizer. He's told that much higher values than Than you typically see so. It's just the way you know. People taking advantage of the situation and either selling products at higher prices or pointing people to their websites that they run where you know they a conspiracy theories and so it's kind of a situation advantage of so we don't usually do this but just a quick. Psa as people are going online to look information about the colonel virus. Obviously we're vetting Oliver sources. We're putting up reputable information. Where else should they be looking for? A reputable information about the virus so again the World Health Organization has been one of the if not the leaders of providing factual information about how many cases there are. How many deaths there are they. Have you know maps if you go to their website? That live news organizations. That's you know that's the source of their lying on as I mentioned a lot of the tech platforms have tried to make their information be surfaced higher So you know definitely a major health organization like that is is big the CDC in the United States is obviously another big organization So official sources like that you know are always going to be more reliable than random people putting posts up on social media comments or friends. She sharing certain things and the WHO actually created an account on Tick Tock To report and then put information about the virus so even if people aren't tick talk they can get some reliable information

Facebook Sebastian Herrera Youtube Twitter World Health Organization Tech Reporter Google Corona CDC United States Chan President Trump Oliver Official
Mike Bloomberg's campaign is polluting the internet

Reset

07:53 min | 9 months ago

Mike Bloomberg's campaign is polluting the internet

"Taylor Laurenz Tech reporter at the New York Times. You are one of the most online people I know and lately I've been going online and seeing a lot of one person and that person is Mike Bloomberg. I've been seeing him in my twitter timeline. I'm seeing him on my instagram feed. I don't follow Mike Bloomberg. What is going on here? Why is he all over social media? Right now yeah well you know. After entering the presidential race. He's really tried to make a splash for himself In the media so he's been obviously buying lots of television ads also buying lots of ads across the Internet and that doesn't just mean banner ads Oliver Websites but also sponsored content on a lot of our favorite. You know mean pages and influence our accounts. And he's been essentially paying these people post memes and messages viral videos on his behalf. I am curious about instagram part. Especially because I feel like that has been the most visible controversial element of this Bloomberg add by. What do those look like? Can you tell us a little bit about the Bloomberg memes on Instagram? Yeah Aso the sort of medium campaign that dropped across a lot of the biggest accounts like Fuck Jerry Moist Buddha tank Sinatra. These are names. You may or may not be familiar with but they have millions of followers on Instagram. And what they did is postponed essentially fake looking. Em's between themselves and Bloomberg where Bloomberg would say funny kind of relatable things like I have a billion dollars. Can you make me look cool? And then the members of pretend to respond through this fake. Dm Like yes. Or No. Or I'll think about it. All of the posts had the caption. You know sponsored content but even so you know people. People like thought that they were fake. Yeah some people's keep damning me like are these real. Yeah it's like it is really fake looking especially because of what he saying right like I have a billion dollars. There was the one about like having a car with Lamborghini doors a level of self awareness and irony that I don't think the real Bloomberg has ever displayed. Yeah exactly very self aware and very much like playing into how he's uncool you know boomer And what about twitter? So he's definitely also making a big splash on twitter. What's his twitter presence like? He's just been posting on it in this very during just away He's been calling people out he's been doing the whole brand twitter thing where you like quote tweets and dunk on them. He's been doing that to donald trump attempting to kind of clap back. But you know they also posted this what people were calling a doctored video this video. That was kind of remixed from the debates to make it look like Bloomberg. Were saying you know. Has anyone else started like a business? I'm the only one Chevy started a business. Is that fair and know? Attempted to make it look like all. The other candidates just sat there in silence. They played crickets in the background in reality. That's not what happened the debate at all and it's actually kind of a funny video which is slightly disturbing. Mary Internet very video. It's very like I mean people make those things about trump all the time But I think to see it as sort of like sponsored content. That video also went out across a bunch of Munich counts so to see these. We Macau's that are being paid to essentially distribute. This highly edited video. That a lot of people won't know is edited Is Yeah I. I can see why that would really concerned people. Yeah right like seeing Bloomberg. Come off really well in this debate. That people in the no no he did very badly in. It's an effective tactic here but completely skewed from reality. Yeah and it's also I mean it's blatant misinformation. And when you think about you know what a Lotta people on the left have criticized trump for You Know Bloomberg is essentially leaning into sort of some of the worst aspects of that So I understand the criticism I think on Bloomberg side you know. He's essentially leveraging a lot of marketing tactics that have been used for a long time in the corporate world These types of viral sons videos. You know very active twitter presence paired with influence or marketing on instagram. I mean this is just like marketing one. Oh one for a lot of corporate brands But it is. It's just kind of jarring to see it leak into the political realm. And who are the People? Who are actually behind these memes on instagram and twitter. Who are the ones that are creating this content for the Bloomberg campaign? I'm so essentially. It's you know people from a couple of different groups One is Jerry media who most famously runs the account fuck Jerry Their CEO and one of their creative directors is involved with the campaign. It's also a bunch of people from brand fire which is another kind of influencer marketing collective and doing things media which is a media company that owns a lot of other big large accounts like middle-class fancy white people. Comes things out so those Mimi counts really appeal to the millennial vote And then in terms of like you know his actual team. He staffed his digital team with a ton of people from the tech industry themselves so people that are intimately familiar with these platforms hiring from places like facebook and Snapchat. So you know. On all sides he really has the best of the best in terms of digital talent Also because he can afford to pay them an exorbitant amount of money and he's promised them jobs through November no matter what the outcome of his campaign which no other political campaign could ever do that. So I think that's also why he's managed to attract some of these people. He was also just working with average people to essentially do digital what he called digital canvassing. I think other people would have other names for it where he's basically paying people twenty four twenty five hundred dollars a month To like text all of their friends about him and Post about him on their personal social media accounts so he's kind of engaging in a lot of tactics With a lot of sort of cross sections of different people. So what is the ultimate goal here with the Bloomberg campaign in hiring these younger folks to pass around memes and working with you know the tanks tra- people and other big influencers mean the goal with all of this is just generate attention online? It's to make a splash Bloomberg has entered the race late. He's not even on the ballot yet you know. He just participated his first debate recently. So he's just trying to get in people's heads you know. He's trying to establish himself as a front runner and viable candidate And the best way to do that is to get people talking and I think that that you know. He's very successfully done that It's it's also like he doesn't have to play by traditional rules. He has so much money that he can kind of do whatever he wants and so. I think that's also why you see him. Embracing really bold strategies that frankly other political candidates would probably shy away from because they don't have the resources to necessarily see it through in the way. Bloomberg can we're when we can just dump tons of money see if something works doesn't work dump tons of money elsewhere So he doesn't have to be quite as strategic. I think you know some of the other campaigns and I mean talking about dumping tons of money and whether or not it works. What's the response been to these mutants. Yeah the response has been positive. Negative Obviously there has been a huge amount of people online. Who think it's Hilarious and funny and love it? Um and then you have the other people who think it's you know the death of democracy so it doesn't really matter it doesn't really matter what people think the point is is that people are talking about him that you know. He's he's being talked about as a viable candidate. That's the only thing that matters so in that way it

Bloomberg Twitter Mike Bloomberg Instagram Donald Trump New York Times Tech Reporter Oliver Websites Lamborghini Chevy Jerry Their Facebook Macau Mary Internet Munich Mimi
Amazon Opens Cashierless "Go" Supermarket

WSJ Tech News Briefing

07:37 min | 10 months ago

Amazon Opens Cashierless "Go" Supermarket

"You might have heard of Amazon. Goes stores the stores where you walk in. Pick up what you need and just walk right on out. No cashiers necessary on Tuesday. The ECOMMERCE giant is expanding its cash cheerless technology with Amazon go grocery in Seattle and it might even be looking to license. The technology to other retailers here explain is tech reporter Sebastian Herrera Sebastien. Thank you so much for joining us. Okay so this is an Amazon's first. Cashier Lewis Store. What's new about this one? If you've been inside of a regular Amazon go store you know. That's not very big. You can walk pretty quickly. This one felt much bigger in. It is much bigger. It's about five times much bigger than the usual go that they've been rolling out since two thousand eighteen. It's got open produce items. You can go pick up an apple a tomato potato and baggage just like you would add another grocery store and the product variety in general has really been expanded in terms of pet supplies toilet paper other household products meats cheeses and. What's really been updated was new to me was definitely the produce section seeing just open produce. That's not package is definitely new within that store. Yeah let's talk about that. How have they solved that with technology? So it's interesting because if you go inside of an Amazon go store. Mostly items are packaged. You can pick up a can of soda or Sandwich. And they're all in one by one kind of items and basically what they did with produce is their pricing them a per item basis and your regular grocery store. We're all used to like weighing our produce items and cost being determined by that what they did is they price them operating bases so they basically took the same concept of when somebody grabs an item the system the cameras the shove sensors recognizes item by item and counts it in into your basket that way. The challenge there with produce is that unlike a can of soda where Sandwich or whatever it might be. That's package the size varies a lot more. You know between potato two potato tomato tomato. What they were able to accomplish was that their algorithms their machine learning systems got good enough with with the cameras to recognize Those type of items individually Especially if you know a Lotta people pick up you know Tomato or a lettuce whoever might be and we feel those produce products or Avocados Whatever it might be So they were able to. You know account for people you know picking up putting back all that with with those kind of produce items. Gotcha and then. How does that work for customers? They put everything in a basket and then are they. Put everything in a bag. Or how do they just walk out with it? So when when you've if you've ever been to an Amazon go store and most people have him because they're they're only in four major. Us cities but what you do. Is You scan on Amazon? Go APP to enter the store once you scan the APP you pass through the gates to Go inside and at that moment you become recognized by Amazon and it system as a three D object. That's you know basically the whole system's falling you around the store so anytime you pick up an item by the time that you leave all the items that you've picked up where there's produce or household products anything that you that it sees you leaving with inside you know inside of either. You're a bag or if you just carrying your hand the moment that you walk out of the store through the gates again charges you then and you know. It's able to calculate the person that entered the store in that account to what they picked up. They've done this. You know since two thousand eighteen with the smaller stores and they've just been able to figure out enough to the confident that it will work in larger size Store so one of the things that you're reporting on is that Amazon is thinking about licensing. This cashier list technology to other retailers. This feels like a big step away from Amazon kind of used to disrupting retailers. And keeping all of its Info for itself. You're so Amazon. Has BEEN IN TALKS WITH RETAILERS. That include either Sports Arenas or other convenience stores inside of airports Those type of smaller format retailers that could potentially use the technology inside of inside of their spaces and even possible that it could you know extend beyond those kind of smaller stores to you know to bigger retailers and basically what Amazon is doing. Is it building this technology for its own stores but it's looking To how to monetize that because these stores are really expensive to run. You know groceries of low margin industry typically so Amazon's looking to monetize basically their system and it's not very different than what Amazon competitor doing which is the exact same thing Licensing or trying to license their technology with with retailers and. They're looking at Soviet avenues to do that. So you could see and it's likely that you see down the line Those type of partnerships form. It is interesting because you know with Amazon. They've for a long time. Been as you said disrupting the retail business. And so it. It's kind of like a an odd turn for them to be looking to you. Know work with retailers. But at the same time they have been doing that in other ways whether it's punishes with Coles or rite aid in terms of package delivery returns and stuff like that and. This is another way that they're looking to do that. Potentially I mean it's almost like they're testing it out in their own stores to prove that it works right exactly something that struck me when I was talking to the executive who who runs Amazon go was that he said that the what they figured out what this technology can go beyond this ten thousand four. Hundred Square foot store that they're opening. He said it could go five times as big ten times as big. Didn't really put a that much of a limit on it and what they're doing with Amazon go grocery is they're they're basically saying we can now fit a a store. This is with this technology. And it's going to you know work and potentially down the line. We could see bigger stores. I think it's very possible that down the line. You see this kind of technology not only in small footprint stores like seven eleven type of stores More of their convenience stores but in in larger retail spaces and Amazon's not the only one that that's trying to accomplish the other startups trying to do the same thing there's already some partnerships with regional grocery stores and some tech startups that are trying to compete with Amazon. That future is very much kind of happening right now. and it'll be interesting to see. Just yeah five years down. The line is the average grocery store you know. GonNa have this technology. Maybe it's not gonNA completely Become the norm. But but certainly you're expecting to see more and more of it. Excellent Alright Tucker partisan jousting Harare. Thank you so much for joining

Amazon Lewis Store Sebastian Herrera Sebastien Tech Reporter Seattle United States Sandwich Harare Apple Sports Arenas Coles Executive
Why Political Texts Are Blowing Up Your Phone

WSJ Tech News Briefing

00:16 sec | 10 months ago

Why Political Texts Are Blowing Up Your Phone

"Candidates have been sliding into your DM's more than ever politicians are turning to texting to get the word out. But are they allowed to do that? Turns out it's a bit of a legal gray area our politics and tech reporter. Emily Glazer will join us to

Emily Glazer Tech Reporter
Facebook Delivers Long-Awaited Data to Outside Researchers

WSJ Tech News Briefing

05:55 min | 10 months ago

Facebook Delivers Long-Awaited Data to Outside Researchers

"This whole story starts back in twenty eighteen and it was part of a project called social science one. Tell me a little bit about this initiative. What was the goal? Sure it came out of Great interest after the two thousand sixteen presidential election in studying misinformation and sort of intentional misleading of users and polarization on platform and being able to research what facebook impact is on society at large. You can't do that unless you have access to. Really good data about how people use the platform and there's only one entity in the world that has good access to data about how people use facebook and that's facebook so facebook agreed to give some of its data to these researchers. Yeah and this was pretty novel other companies. Google for example have said they're going to kind of wait and see how this whole facebook thing panned out before deciding whether they wanted to engage something similar but facebook decided that they were going to support this outside completely independent entity that would receive a vast amount of data about what people were sharing on the site. That was GONNA be the first sort of beachhead for this project. Then they were going. Then that organization was to be able to distribute it to researchers who could then run independent truly independent no oversight from facebook research projects on it and go public with their conclusions when they felt do. So so what were some of the things were they just looking at the? Us elections or were they looking at other things as well. No this was global. So in Taiwan researchers were looking at civic participation and facebook the influence there in Chile. They were looking at how facebook had affected the country's twenty-seven elections There are sort of more broad research topics on just how misinformation spreads generally and kind of a just a whole range of topics that were very broad. All mostly election focused but but very focused on that so facebook agreed they were going to share this data. Researchers had projects lined up. They thought they were going to get the data within a couple of months that was in two thousand eighteen. What happened yeah? So and all. This was premised on outside funding from a whole bunch of philanthropies. That sort of thought this was going to be moving along at a pretty pretty fast clip. What happened is lawyers? Probably basically there were a whole bunch of privacy concerns that arose partly due to GDP are in Europe the Europe's Data Privacy Law Partly due to facebook settlement with a the FTC and the concern ones that kind of precisely because facebook had gotten in trouble over the cameras. Analytica stuff and with data being used for authorized purposes off the platform. It couldn't afford to mess up again in terms of privacy when it was working with researchers this time and so this was a really painfully slow process and it turns out. Facebook was actually less good at just technically offloading data to researchers than it thought in the first place and it also had to pioneer with some outside researchers ways to alleviate privacy concerns. It's called differential privacy. It's pretty technical and there's no way you want me to explain that. So where are we now and I guess. The big question is. Is it even relevant to be researching the two thousand sixteen election or the two thousand election in Chile? Now in twenty twenty when we've got maybe different rules different regulations in place on a whole new election to be looking at. I think that I mean from the. Us point of view right. The most relevant thing would be twenty sixteen. Maybe the two thousand eighteen midterms And the data doesn't go back. The facebook offering doesn't go back to two thousand sixteen But I think broadly the answer is yes the level to which researchers understand who is using these platforms how they're using the platforms. How polarization and political parties interact with these platforms. What context Kent succeeds. What's behind misinformation? These are kind of universal and broad questions and ones that no one has a particularly good answer to right now. I mean we all have sort of vague theses but outside the company. No one has the data to study them. Well kind of broadening out you said that other companies were looking at this as a test case and trying to determine whether or not they might share information in the future. This is taken a long time. You said lawyers got in the way. Is this one of those situations where we can say? Oh well they've ironed out the kinks and next time when someone wants to do a project like this is GonNa be way easier or oh. They've realized how tricky it is. And this is going to be much harder for researchers to access to this kind of data in the future. That is an open question. Facebook is very much pitching this as you know it. It was painful. It was brutal but you know what we did it. We hit our initial goal. And we're committed to doing more So good for them in terms of general public access to data whether anybody else is going to view this whole process as having been a success though is and particularly whether anybody any other of facebook's competitors is GonNa view it that way is an open question I think partly that also depends on what comes out of the research to I mean if facebook has put a great deal of time two years and I believe twenty full time staff members efforts plus some money eleven million dollars. Facebook says into producing something that is going to result in a lot of research about how facebook is problematic for society. I don't know if anybody is going to want to follow in their footsteps and there is a possibility. That's what's going to be happening here. Yeah that would be a hot potato tech reporter Jeff Warwick thank you so much for joining us. Welcome

Facebook Chile United States Google Tech Reporter Europe Taiwan FTC Kent Jeff Warwick
Facebook to Pay $550 Million to Settle Facial Recognition Suit

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:05 min | 10 months ago

Facebook to Pay $550 Million to Settle Facial Recognition Suit

"About a decade ago. FACEBOOK started automatically tagging people whose faces its algorithms had recognized in our load photos at the time. It seemed like magic but this week facebook has agreed to pay five hundred fifty million dollars over claims that tool violated privacy rights the settlement is in Illinois which has strict laws protecting biometric data facebook revealed the settlement agreement at the same time as its quarterly financial central results. This week and they by the way showed that revenue was up twenty five percent to twenty one billion dollars at the end of last year for today's quality assurance. We have have Natasha Singh a tech reporter for the New York Times to explain what this settlement means so Illinois has the toughest biometric privacy law in the united. It states there are only three states. That have these kind of laws. And so by metric privacy pertains to your fingerprints or facial scans for facial recognition and and so in Illinois. The law says that companies can't collect that kind of information like facial data for facial recognition without getting written permission from someone and also they can't collect the data without telling somebody how long they're gonNA keep it and so facebook users in Illinois sued facebook facebook saying that it had collected their facial information and had not obtained there kind of affirmative optin permission and had not told them how long that facebook it was gonNA keep it Facebook says that these claims are not true but facebook said that it's settled this lawsuit because it was going to drag on and take up too much resources and it was better for everybody in the stockholders if they settled a lawsuit. Do you think the size of this facebook settlement might serve as a warning to other companies denise who considering this sort of technology it feels like maybe when facebook introduce things like facial recognition they were just looking at fun ways of using it and maybe some of the other implications are now coming to the lights if you think about a face print right it's like the facial equivalent of your fingerprints and you might wanNA use your fingerprint for fun ways but we kind of viscerally know Oh that your fingerprint has all kinds of implications in its unique so even the notion of facebook turning on facial recognition by default for fun things. This is problematic first of all Illinois but also to a lot of people who are concerned that the problem with facial recognition is that it can be used to identify people without their knowledge college at a distance and so it implicates your ability to be anonymous both online and in public. Do you think this will see companies. Basically defaulting to just not collecting acting any data like this the risk of it somehow being regulated in the future. Certainly I think companies that are having similar technology and they have Illinois when users must be thinking about it right because if you think about like doorbell camps which are spreading everywhere. Will Your Doorbell camera is GonNa Take images of people people and it's used for facial recognition right so that like it can recognize your babysitter so that they can come in in Illinois. You need consent for stuff like that. And so what does that mean for all kinds of vices that collect ambient biometric data I think we don't have the answer to that. I think that companies now because of the size is of the facebook settlement are going to have to think about what they're Illinois plan is. I can't imagine that they WANNA have one set of software for Illinois and another for the rest of the country. First of all you know that's just from a business perspective inefficient but second of all you know you don't want people in other parts of the country. Say Will you turn turned that offer Illiinois why you turned it off for us. And so we're seeing for example with the California Privacy Law that our number of companies Microsoft apple have said we're going to honor the rights under the California Privacy Law for everybody in United States. It feels like when we talk about these privacy stories we talk about you. Know the value of your privacy or the value of your day turn. It's always very hard to put a number on that. Do you think things like this Illinois settlement a starting to move in that direction and putting a dollar value on these things. So Oh I think the notion that there's a trade and you're trading your data for you know services and so you're giving up some of your privacy is the Silicon Valley framing that you're getting value for data but when we think of a trade you know what you're giving up and what you're getting but when you give up your data you have no idea how it's GonNa be used. It can be used perennially for all time for all kinds of purposes which you didn't give it and I would argue that it's not a trade. It's not fair trade and I would also argue that Data is not property in Europe. Security and privacy your fundamental human rights and we think of other fundamental human rights like the right of free speech. She wouldn't say I'm trading my free speech for facebook services so this notion that we're treating our right to privacy for services I think is just a problematic framing. That's Natasha Singh Tech reporter reporter for the New York Times. According to the Chicago Tribune a Federal Court judge must approved facebook settlement and then members of the class action filed claims for part of the money.

Facebook Illinois Natasha Singh California Privacy Law Tech Reporter New York Times Europe Chicago Tribune United States Federal Court Microsoft Reporter Apple
"tech reporter" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"tech reporter" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"Softbank who's one of the biggest victims shedding about nine billion dollars in market value. He is what you've ac-. Oh, DARA culture shock. He had to say shortly after the chace opened on Friday. You can't pick. When you go public that you can't control company building service and bringing in happy consumers all over the world. So we're going on what we can't control. We raised a lot of capital to invest to grow for many many years that's focused on that familiar. Joined by bags Asia tech reporter Pavel. Live from Tokyo. Pavel great to have you with us. Thank you so much for joining. So he Adare culture, shall he talking about focusing on the business that what I'm trying to work out. And probably what a lot of people are trying to work out as well. Yes. Number one. We don't want to focus too much on day one of trading, but how much of that share price reaction was down to just the Malkin environment. And how much was down to genuine concern about business model? I think the appointed should not be huge for anyone who is following Newburgh story decorated accompanied released a lot of data and were fairly up front about the challenges. They face China work their way towards profitability, and so it's play out in pre market negotiations. As the the early indications were for demand to for depression, a higher the derange in as the days were on with oh advise actually towards the bottom. And so in that sense, the drop on the first day is not a huge surprise. And it's also dramatically in relevant terms mean if you wanna see a an example of a disaster debut, look just so banks own telecom group, which started off with the city percent drop when it went public in December here in Japan. Okay. Interesting Neil, Dwayne global Sasha's that investors who is interested in the Lhasa saying pops marquess finally reached the level where it's not going to tolerate companies that sippy on postal don't have an actual date when they become visible. What do you think is performance actually means for the pipeline of IP is that coming behind it? It really he how you can make that conclusion. I mean in the contract game might be that this is a this is a simple of one and then outlier in a sense of just it's tremendous scale and the amount of attention. That's been paid to it up. Until now, it's it's a bit of a controversial stock. I guess that will be really tested later on when we were company that sort of a very similarly aggressively investing in scale and putting profitability of for years down the road, and would no clear path to ability to be honest be tested when those companies publican Haniel companies life flag, and others that that have a very different business model, and you know, and and they probably have prospects that differ widely from that of Hoover and other ride hailing company. Can we talk about the damage facade Bank? One of the biggest victims, you know, wiped about nine billion dollars. Market value from the shareholder. Softbank Masayoshi Soanes also announced plans for a second vision fund. Pavel. What does Uber small debut mean for the prospects of another hundred billion dollar fund? Right. I'm sure there's a lot of investors scratching their heads that the shares have been down for two days in spite of a stellar fourth-quarter earnings surprise stars stock split. In fact. Book that two point eight billion dollar gained from delegation Uber. The more worrying prospects for for so thank investors is a bit more terminent linkage between Bancshares and Uber shares. And there's some connection to that. In the past example, so closely traded away sprint has Alibaba. Biggest stakes h too early to tell what is but no longer term consequences. I mean, so thank has made tremendous best and right, hailing, a go, go beyond Hoover have six DD all in grabbing phone has estimated that through his portfolio companies so companies controlled by ninety percent of the right? Haley markets and the way individual perform in the future is a big deal. Thanks. Asia tech Povey Alpi. Thank you for joining.

Pavel Haniel companies Asia Hoover Softbank Tokyo Softbank Masayoshi Soanes tech reporter China Japan Malkin depression Newburgh Povey Alpi Haley Lhasa Alibaba Neil sprint Sasha
"tech reporter" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"tech reporter" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Drizzle and thirty seven degrees. Now in Colorado's morning news. Facebook is debut in a new smart device for video chatting called portal and portal, plus it's a camera and display that allows you to video chat through Facebook messenger. It also includes a smart camera get this that can follow your movements. Let's get into the product Washington Post at tech reporter Jeffrey Fowler. Good morning, Jeffrey good morning. So what's the reaction been to these devices? Well, I don't think it's been great. At least the tech set. Look. I mean, no surprise Facebook's bad and a lot of trouble over the last few years for privacy, practices and data practices, and and and in getting hacked. So the the idea of putting a camera in your home? That's connected to Facebook creeps some people out. I get it creates p creeps people out Jeffrey, but I'm astounded aren't you astounded by the the the fact that people seem to a good percentage of them don't care and willing to share more of their privacy considering everything that you laid out with the breaches. You know, it's true that we're in this moment where I think people are sort of waking up to what we've actually been doing. And how much we've been allowing companies like Facebook as well as Google and others to tracker lives and collect data about it. And you definitely see that Facebook's realization about in how they kind of designed this product. They you know, they made some choices that that seemed like they were. Pretty smart in terms of privacy. It's just fundamentally a question of trust. Who do you trust Facebook that they're going to keep up with their promise? Well, Jeffrey, let's talk about this as a business model for Facebook. And whether competitors are going to be watching this and possibly being forced to jump on his well, depending on the reception from consumers. Yeah. Yeah. So this is the first piece of consumer hardware from the social network site. A Facebook sorta whole new kind of area for them to get into you reselling gadgets right for two hundred or three hundred fifty dollars, and these this guy in particular is similar in ways to gadgets, you can get from Amazon Amazon echo show, smart speaker with a screen, but you can also use for making calls catching up with family and doing stuff. Google also has has products that are in this space. So so, yeah, it seems like the consumer tech industry is very interested now in getting sort of replacing the the home phone line with the camera and the screen video video chatting more part of our lives. All right, Washington Post reporter Jeffrey Fowler, a lot going on right here. Thanks so much for the information. You bet. I was gonna say seven fifty five money news. Now, we check in.

Facebook Jeffrey Fowler Google tech reporter Washington Post Colorado Washington reporter Amazon three hundred fifty dollars thirty seven degrees
"tech reporter" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"tech reporter" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is npr news it's k q e d news i'm tara siler after months of protests from employees google has decided it will not seek another contract for its controversial work providing artificial intelligence to the us department of defense project maven is the name of the pilot program launched last year the idea is to take a i and use it to analyze video footage collected by military drones more than a thousand google employees signed a petition against involvement in the project and many others quit cake acuity silicon valley editor tanya moseley talk with gizmodo tech reporter kate conger who's been covering the story since the beginning she asked conger why google employees were so upset by the pentagon contract google that feel that the company should not be involved in any pentagon business whatsoever they feel really strongly that google just shouldn't be in business with the military at all there are other ways that have specific objections to this program particularly around using a are you in this context just sort of the environment that we're in right now there are a lot of people who have a lot of concerns with the current administration and so i think that kind of informs the feeling of not wanting to be involved there's also i think for google irs a really strong sense of identity with the company you know people really feel like they're a part of google and it's a part of who they are and there's the longstanding informal motto is don't be evil and i think that those people feel like this project and military work in general are just sort of the antithesis of what they stand for and there's a lot of conversation about you know how what are the ethical principles that we want to put in place before we arrive at the day where is really deeply intertwined in everything that we do speaking to the sheer number of employees that google mobilized in this effort does this speak to maybe a larger shift and a change around labor organizing in the tech industry here in the silicon valley i mean one of the the things that has been really unique to me about this story is we're starting to see a little bit.

tara siler tech reporter google npr us editor tanya moseley kate conger pentagon
"tech reporter" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"tech reporter" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Well i mean it was beautiful but i am always just so fascinated as the tech reporter on this show do not laugh don't worry about her the fact that this woman came up with a way of making violin doing three d printing violin her story is truly amazing even begin can you go back a minute i actually haven't watched that one so please tell me that's a woman that's from omaha and i she is she's she's many things she's a professional violinist who like since she was a teenager played with like rod stewart mannheim steamroller like she's this like virtuoso violin a little sideline she's a neuroscientist also computer programmer fellowship feel really adequate also is one of these people that she's called a sinister i stumbled over that word but it means she has the the neurological condition called sinister which means that like you see colors when you hear sound wow so sh like she has a particular color that she sees the note a and a particular color see never heard of that i know that listening to music is like watching like an animated painting so she also is very passionate about music programs in public schools because that's where she says she got her start and a lot of public school music programs are experiencing underfunding right and funding issues but they are getting stem grants and so they have these three a lot of schools have these three d printers and so she was like well why don't we help them print their music program so she.

tech reporter omaha rod stewart
"tech reporter" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"tech reporter" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"The age of twenty one forty seven minutes after news broke of that high school shooting in parkland florida the posters on the anonymous chat board eight chan had devised a plan to bend the public narrative to their own designs at red start looking for jewish numerology and crisis actors the washington post says voices from this dark corner of the internet quickly coalesce around the plan of attack and that was used details gleaned from news reports and other sources to push false information about the massacre at stone men douglas high school on february 14th it's a story by tech reporter drew har well drew what have you found in the day after the shooting at people together online and we did of how people were talking about what had happened and you can he on committee and sort of french websites they start running over these kind of conspiracy ideas of false flag then crisis actors kind of building their own side narrative that has no basis in reality but that they're they're all going on to and you can see from those fringe boards it evolved into something that is suddenly on twitter suddenly on youtube and and at the at a certain point it was at the top of but one of you know the youtube trending list with one of the videos that people were being um on this you know incredibly the prominent for video hey so um we we were able to trace click how this viral lie took off and it really says something about how the internet allows these crazy ideas he people with really damaging um you know takes on what has happened allows them to kind of control all the conversation to insert a misinformation and to the platform to noble shape their narrative of how we think about these really huge event i couldn't believe that as you pointed out it was less than an hour after the news broke of the shooting that this stuff started to appear what kind of conspiracies were floated by the way yeah but by that point it was some of the hallmarks of any time there's a shooting sort of conspiracy minded people go to these things like false flag operations that it was a fake to drive us to uh you know some idea like guncontrol and that.

chan washington post tech reporter twitter youtube douglas high school twenty one forty seven minutes
"tech reporter" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"tech reporter" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"A smart move tech reporter elizabeth we see at usa today's been sampling opinions elizabeth what are you hearing it we currently had issues around gun control when we've had shootings in the past this one seems to have more legs of course we can never know when you come back in two weeks and we'll see where things stand but there's been much more pressure on companies to end financial relationships with enough sources rifle association than there has been in the past and we see multipple companies most of these there there's simply a deal where members get some sort of discount so it's not a huge loss on the part of the nra but the question is does this show any sort of seachange in public opinion and how companies are going to deal with it in the burning expertise i spoke with said they didn't see a huge upside for companies to come out strongly for the nra because there the numbers would show you that a majority of americans at least support some sort of gun control and also in it's important to remember that these companies are looking at at millennials they're looking at generations e as not only their customers but also potential workers and that demographic tend to have a different view of guns gun owners have been gun control than in older demographic and so companies are having to balance their current customers with who is that they weren't to appeal to one turns a midsize cutting the ties to the business relationship seemed strange because as you referenced it didn't really amount to much other than some discounts for nra members which is also weird because is not nra members were turning these crimes exactly it it though let me to a certain extent it's a cosmetic it shows that a company is is more in tune with what it presumably thinks is the majority of its customers eight interesting in the most important thing i thought of this just in terms of finance with delta air lines which has uh a dealing georgia were they were getting a chunk of cash from the state of and it would have been up to two um millions in tax deals and now we've got the lieutenant governor georgia saying if you go through with this and cut your ties with the nra and.

tech reporter nra georgia usa two weeks
"tech reporter" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"tech reporter" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Of the day so of course cryptocurrencies they'd definitely captivated all of us this year but what about the technology underpinning bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies here with more on what tech giants are doing about blockchain's julie verheijin is been tech reporter at bloomberg news in our bloomberg 1130 studios high high enquiries here today with us the whole family so what are they doing via go right now i know i know fairly close together in michigan to so basically neighbors as anyways so a lot of tech companies are sort of dabbling and you'll hedging in it for now i focused on some of the social media giants like facebook and twitter and then also the cloud companies like amazon gugel ibm microsoft and you know obviously it's different use cases for each of them but things that the blockchain's does which when i tried to basically destroy blocked and it's like a fancy spread there's encryption there's decentralisation that goes with it did a ledger right yeah every transaction that's ever done it's recorded right kind of follow it right right right and right now it's a little bit clunky it slower than what would yeah so a lot of them the reason that sold late this is true and all the coding and stuff that goes along with it but anyway so amazon web services hasn't seen much of a threat yet just because of that clunky nece and the lack of adoption so far but part of the thing with you know a lot of worries about big tag is that you know if you went on the block chain instead of amazon web services is taking a back until like this decentralised focus you have more power to yourself rather than giving it to this thirdparty entrusting them with you know all of this data that could be like customer accounts or whatever it is that they're storing on these platforms and then to that same point in the the decentralisation mark zuckerberg when he wrote that i think it was january fourth you wrote like a big letter on his facebook you know his goals for the year and one thing that came up was cryptocurrencies and encryption and talking about how this could actually help people feel more comfortable in terms of decentralising things and.

blockchain julie verheijin tech reporter michigan facebook microsoft mark zuckerberg bloomberg twitter amazon ibm
"tech reporter" Discussed on With Friends Like These

With Friends Like These

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"tech reporter" Discussed on With Friends Like These

"Questions from thirdlove's fit finder quiz it takes sixty seconds and you can do it from the comfort of your own home no awkward fitting room scenarios whatsoever try thirdlove bras it is so comfortably look you might forget you wearing it i mean that you might there that comfortable and if you don't agree returns exchanges are easy and free so again in my listeners can get fifteen percent off this is a great time of year to get fitted and be free of bad fitting bras so go to thirdlove dot com slash friends and find that perfectfitting bra again that's fifty percent off your first purchase thirdlove dot com slash friends hi i'm honoree cox and welcome to with friends like these today's show i'm gonna give you desert first usually i kind of do the lighter segment second and the more serious one first but doing the opposite today today first for going to have kd into topless she's a senior tech reporter for buzzfeed news and sheet are going to talk about uh the paul brothers frequent listeners to the podcast may remember this cussin' i had about logan paul and his controversial video in the ways that he is like donald trump over continuing that uh investigation into how the paul brothers may or may not resemble the trump phenomenon with katie and after katie i am talking to jimar tisby he is the president of the witness a black christian collective he's the cohost of the podcast past the mic and i'll just warn you right now it gets real jesus he up in here.

thirdlove tech reporter donald trump katie president kd buzzfeed logan paul fifteen percent fifty percent sixty seconds
"tech reporter" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"tech reporter" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Hello that would mimic breathing and it was supposed to be for you to hug while you went to sleep and it was so relaxing and peaceful everyone sort of loved it and yeah i don't know i thought it was nice garage and all the energy you would have saved from not having to extend your arm for that selfie thinks he winds up the over taylor ends a tech reporter for the daily beast thanks so much thank you so much williams's plan i told you about refunds when you look out if they all have gotten a good night's entertainment and go ahead get the dance spare swimming they don't even try in his thai tarifi abuses through diku release the carter canister ellen works just as well as by term leave the war new meaning dan i could talk about real news it's full liam here on movie friday's they're gone all liam all the time back there in the control room i love it refer what do you think i love it where it was good cop bad cop in their from a movie i didn't hear i i don't know if i heard crawl i hope i did i hear crawl somebody i'm not getting a thumbs up about curl nobody seen that movie they should not see it reproduce mon film critic for news day here with us good to have you refer you got the new liam niece in movie the commuter coming up a got some liam niece in trivia for you don't answer now if you're going to answer this back at the end i want you to listen to this classic this ever so classic liam niessen line would i do have a very particular set of skills skills acquired over a very long career skills the mcneil nightmare for people like you if you let my daughter cho now that'll be the end of it i will not look for you i will not pursue your task is to complete that famous classic liam neeson line rafer hold onto that.

selfie taylor tech reporter liam cho williams liam niessen liam neeson
"tech reporter" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"tech reporter" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The mass market is going to feel like they need especially at the current price point to alex interestingly obviously talking about how wearables are slowing down and it seems smart speakers are the thing this year and could surpass wearable sales but again i wonder if there's a similar question there of whether they will they will continue to dominate the market as they are right now i think it's interesting with the speak it because the home call it home port has been delayed becoming next year speaking to something we know about this they were saying that what when they were the first developing the home port they saw some of the lessons they load from the watch and that they had not got a great message in terms of who should be buying this thing they gradually shifted and realize its fitness device that's how we should marketed and so with the home but what they're doing is like this is a music device none of whom automation device or there there is something you will be able to do with it it isn't music device and so they is interesting see the relationship between the two products and obviously the interested to see how the hump does it was supposed to be here in time for the holidays it will not be coming out early next year to a lot of competition as well from cacao home and amazon echo okay alex web are apple calmer tech reporter thanks so much nickel paran analyst at marketer thank you as well sticking with gadgets with 2017 coming to an end big tech companies are still fighting to win your hearts and wore notably your wallets so just what were the biggest offerings this here from apple amazon and goupil bloomberg tech smart kurman look back at the year and consumer tech jim pack here for new tech products can all the big players are now vying for every part of your life kubo is no longer just a search confident arizona's more than a retail channel and apple more than ever is going for the high end we're all trying to fight to be your number one and they're releasing more and more products are safeguarded to teach of their ecosystem apples one for the high end central part of your life.

amazon tech reporter analyst arizona apple alex
"tech reporter" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"tech reporter" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Details of the work tech reporter mark so this is part of apple's billion dollar plunged fun to invest in manufacturing in america obviously this has come on the heels of president trump and his proclamations about everything eating to be manufactured in the us so they're investing three hundred million dollars in a texasbased company called an historic they make eliezer is that they can put in a bunch of different products from the air pods the little black circles these inside they are pods those are lease or shooting interiors they know three in your ears sin you take the ninety years they stop playing you put them back they continue playing its eliezer used for face id so can recognize your face so it's an extremely important component for apples in seeing a string of product it's currently in the iphone other currently using sensors like it dennis are makes in the iphone 10 now they're going to be investing in a pursuit of sort of going to put a chokehold on that market of sensors can use them in other products down the road how many jobs are they creating lots of jobs what's happening here is with the three hundred ninety million dollars in asare is going to be able to reopen the plant in texas that had previously shut down until you will to rehire bunch of people to work at the facility will this alleviate any supply chain challenges could question in in in a sense here because the amount of money that three hundred ninety million dollars is going to ensure that that amount of money is invested in those components that apple will need they're gonna be able to work years ahead on them right now this tech is being used in the the animal gene technology as well explain that which are cold the loser's beeston face the replicate with the antimony so if you have an iphone ten kids scan your face it knows it to you then the sensor the lasers could also be used for animal g so it knows your facial structure that you're opening your mouth if fear smiling shaking your head but like i said it's also used for the air pas as well so there's broad applications for the tech team wednesday saying that the.

apple us eliezer iphone texas tech reporter america president dennis shut down supply chain three hundred ninety million d three hundred million dollars billion dollar ninety years
"tech reporter" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"tech reporter" Discussed on KOMO

"For the washington post and she spoke with kamo's charlie harger shit banned is a big discovery event that basically what it is it's an app that you can open when you hear a thought on that you either don't recognize and like or a you know you hear it in your district that song by after you can hold your phone up cute cute that song in italy listen kit for a little bit and then it should be able to identify and so this has been around for a number of years i didn't realize a eighteen years is win the company was first founded back in 1999 yeah then around for quite a while and it's one of the really first major applications we saw as a i you know in a in a product and of course that the hot trend right now in silicon valley but you know for consumer product get used widely it sort of one is the first applications if that we saw and what's the word on the street how much did apple pay to acquired those ziam company neither apple marshes and more confirm a number by a tech reporter that it with a four hundred million kill four hundred million dollars at leased according to some reports so why would apple wants suzanne well if there are a couple of reasons i think um one is that apple is looking at artificial intelligence as sort of a battleground right we see you budel is stepping up its efforts there particularly uh you know amazon microsoft all those companies are really looking at artificial intelligence as a way to um kind of help people uh help their customers improve their lives and also you know whoever has been bashed a assistance can the tend to stick the claim to to the most customers apple with a little bit behind in this respect in terms of uh you know at least in terms of products that we've seen them released dishes and gives them an opportunity there um apple all foods and so it's very heavily on music in the past couple of years with the launch of apple music and so there are some um he'd have some synergies there some ways that they can help each other that uh actually make this acquisition would make a.

washington post kamo tech reporter apple artificial intelligence suzanne four hundred million dollars eighteen years
"tech reporter" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"tech reporter" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"O talk radio back of investigative tech reporter nick built in the hunt for this guy's shorter started over white one peak chill on verte a young kid who worked for icfy a customs enforcement agency you start to take a shoe v up at claughton hall law enforcement got their arms around this thing yeah so it started interesting because it started for um uh for almost by accident um you know the got when i was reporting the book i got there visit all the different places um uh that the male comes into the united states can and it comes on regular claims sometime is that uh you know back next to your luggage and so on on at a flight from amsterdam and and then and i got to follow the there was one thing hills pills it's started the whole thing that was the eighteen they think the character geoghegan's and he worked for the department of homeland security and he was a a new be only been on the job a couple of months and they found in another guy found up the pill that came in a package ramp to them turned out that the ecstasy in an could really put their in perspective this tiny pink pill the mail facilities where the mail it sorted and there is there multiple fulfill sizes big you know and they're they're stacked with their almost like they look like the the and seen that the raiders la stark and and it um and they find is pill and they start the fake they go to the person's house would order not with how they first learned about the silk road and they almost didn't believe it was real it was like how can anyone be so brazen to start a website where you can buy and sell drugs of the internet and um and so on this started one aspect of the of the investigation and then there are other people of the country by the department you know i arrest the department of homeland security easily be a fbi that all started at their own separate cases um what such dramatic about the story and even if you don't have it ends that nothing because the trauma really isn't the.

nick law enforcement united states amsterdam geoghegan fbi tech reporter claughton hall raiders