17 Burst results for "Tech Intech"

"tech intech" Discussed on Advertising Stories

Advertising Stories

06:25 min | 2 months ago

"tech intech" Discussed on Advertising Stories

"Feel like gets even more than that. The the the work relationships can get such deep ruts in them and even more so than marriage And and these breakthrough conversations. Just they just totally obliterate those ruts. I think again because of that. Peer pressure in where people are witnessing. What's happening lifetime so it just instantly Breaks that that bad behavior and it gets people into a into much better at our place. Well i'm gonna. I'm gonna end this with an observation just made into my brain a business opportunity and then have a final question you've here. So here's the business opportunity Family retreats right. I was talking to a godson that i have who happens to. Luckily livingston beach california and i said How's it going. This guy used to travel three days a week in the green energy business and he said well i'm home. I haven't traveled since march and so his family lives together in a statement. I said how's it going. He's a great. Were all very happy. at the same time a couple of days ago i talked to a guy with twelve and sixteen year old and he said it's madness. Were killing each other. You know about fan family retreats. It's funny that you mention that because our own family has started doing. Zoom calls together every monday and this is my mom's side of the family and we have historically not spend much time together as we have on my dad's side of the family and we now every single monday there about twelve of us get together from three thirty to four thirty and just catch up about things so it's it has been just the sort of wonderful chance to connect with with people that i haven't spoken with an years. And you. can you control yourself or did you become the group leader. A you know i purposely take off my Lay breakthrough conversation hatton and let the conversation unfolded as it as it naturally will and of course because of that there there does tend to be one person that talks a lot more than others do in that bad behavior that i normally would would police when i'm running the conversation but okay maybe at point i will managing that better i think the zoom thanks giving it's probably too late to start that business but maybe a ho- hopefully next year we're not zooming thanksgiving all right last question there are tech problems and we have even just you and i we had a phone call or a zoom conversation one on one there might be a tech intech problem. How do you manage that when you've got thirty people involved in a universe and so can you ask that question homerton. My my husband is making coffee right. Now you know aside out. I interviewed The woman one of the women that runs a our partners which is a advertising agency. Search consultancy and i asked her. She's been a lot of zoomed type. Pitches and i said well. What about controlling the whole room in you know control concussion. Control and she said you know. It's very charming. Sometimes when you're in that situation which is generally really well managed and the kid runs in the background. And she said she said it just everybody laughs an humanizes everything. It does so. I'm a kind of a control freak. So i took that to heart i have. They will not be any children running through the audio portion of this of this interview So the question is had things go wrong. How do you help manage the tech a tech problem. That might happen in a group meeting. Yeah no absolutely things. Do go wrong. And and what. I always say is think about improv. So i i don't know if he knows for the famous saying behind improvisation he is. You don't say no but you say yes. And and there's no better tool for getting you into an improv state of mind than a tech failure so whether it is somebody who gets bumped off and is trying to get back in you know you just have to be honest and say oh my god you know this critical person who's talking right now just got bumped out and we need to make sure that we get them back in but just like anything that can happen lifetime. None of the more you can base up to it and laugh about it and make it sort of part of the human connection You know the better off you're going to be is there. A tech. do quote employer have the client employ. Whatever that word means of on sort of standby a tech person in case. There's a problem like who would solve the issue. Yeah you're better off if you can have one person be a tech person in whether that on your team or whether that's on the client side of things but having that one person who is dedicated to making sure that everybody is still connected on the person who's actually doing the breakout groups All of that can be immensely helpful so that you can really focus on facilitating the conversation and taking the notes and all the other things you need to do while that conversation is happening. Okay oh see da dogs and coffee. None of this is. We've humanized these humanized and yes we have. There are in human conversation. Okay thank you. Thank you peter. I'll see you in oregon sometime. I would love that. Be careful what you wish for as they say or thanks a million all right. Take care okay. Folks remember that this was number three and a four part series about how to use zoom skype. What other online meeting app you use. It ain't easy folks. Well it's not difficult but some people do it better than others. Subscribe to advertise stories see. Don't miss the next episode by the way. Thanks to billie eilish who allowed me to use her studio today. That's the story. see you soon bye. Well actually you'll hear me soon. That's how you say all right bye..

livingston beach hatton california oregon peter skype billie eilish
"tech intech" Discussed on Unchained

Unchained

02:20 min | 4 months ago

"tech intech" Discussed on Unchained

"Opportunity WanNa go grab some chests. Back to my conversation with Andreas and Dan. So Dan I was so curious this was something that I was you know kind of looking into before the show. So you know as he mentioned at a certain point when the block rewards stops, there will be a transition where miners will be compensated in transaction fees not in the block reward and the current amount that they earn is from fees is about nine percent of the block reward. and. So we'd have to see transaction fees, eleven x by a roughly twenty one forty, which is when the new bitcoins will stop being minted but I just wondered if we don't see. Like an increase in the amount of transactions that can at layer one than can transaction fees eleven x in that time or or will that require people to pay a lot more per transaction A great question and when I'm not sure how many people who are listening to listening to this work in Tech Intech we have something called are occupied by a key performance indicator in we use it as a calibration methods who coordinator efforts at a company and use that metric to define success. For example, they might be user sign ups or number of users trading at cracking, etc.. The. KPI. For this for what we're looking at right now, which the the question we're trying to answer is are transaction fees replacing the block subsidy in the block award. So our newly minted coins are the as those decrease is that value being replaced by the subsidy and so we can. We can calculate that would be a primary KPI so you could look at. Transaction fees over the subsidy transaction fees block divided by the subsidy and you brought up the that's at nine percent. If we look at that, historically, we make like a rolling sixty days to smooth it out a little bit and we look at this over time on a log curve. It's very much trending in the right direction where eleven x sounds like a lot. But bitcoin moves in really intense cycles where we've all seen it go from thousand, Ten, thousand or twenty thousand when that happens that means there's not an equivalent but a directional rise in transactions and transaction fees and we have seen the transit.

Dan I Andreas Tech Intech coordinator
"tech intech" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

07:04 min | 5 months ago

"tech intech" Discussed on Accelerate!

"Yeah. What's the word? That something might go learn something and actually try it and not do it the way they want it done I've different take on it might take. Let's think about let's think of a sports team people hate people eight Duke Blue Devils Basketball People Hate Ohio state football you WANNA know why? I only hate when they say voc but other sure I'm glad. Okay. But people hate those teams because they're good. That's why they hate them. No one ever no one hates. Come trump's no one hates like Wichita state basketball, right like unless you're like their rival right like in so. The the reason that they hate them is because they're good and I think that naturally if you gain traction in anything whether it's posting on link Dan or being a sales manager that's winning a lot of awards you get people angry in generally you get people angry because they're projecting their own frustrations onto you and. I think that's frustrating. I think that's where trolls come from I. think that's where a lot of these unknown people online saying really nasty things about people all the time comes from and I don't know I just refuse to participate in that sandbox. You know. I I, get out of that and I go plan another one. Yeah. When I thought that whole questions are missing misses the point which is that You know the primary source of of sales advice to sellers. Isn't coming from Lincoln and that's coming from sales manager. I mean if we have as. Insights research says we have fewer than fifty percent of reps making quota. Then the primary source, a questionable advice to our sellers is really coming from sales manager. Soon, we be torpoint about where we spend our our training dollar shouldn't we be doing more to enable our sales managers? As opposed to as opposed to worrying about what people published on Lincoln? I think I'm sorry. I don't mean to cut you off there and I just wanted to want to round that out like I think there needs to be a whole re imagination of who is a sales manager like Michael Jordan Great ballplayer terrible coach. Because naturally gifted in, it's like I know. So many salesman sales, people who become managers in when they go to explain. How they sell or why they tick or how they tick or why the works the way it works. It just doesn't. It doesn't translate. and. I think we need to re imagine is it top performers who always need to be sales managers because in my opinion I've seen. Middle performers who have good fundamental skills and good people, skills, and good coaching skills turn into be incredible sales, manager CEOS and so. In, so I think it's a re-imagined nation of the entire roll. Well. So how'd you imagine because I? Agree I mean I think that that there's a lot of things we need to radically rethink and sales I think that's one of them. because. I think that. For. Whatever reason whether promoting the wrong people whatever is is might current hypothesis on this as a if you look at Performing or excuse me improving sales performance as process. And every process has a rate determining step is I think the rate determining step in helping improve the performance of individual reps is the rate at which sales managers improve themselves. Yeah. I think that's probably true I don't I haven't given enough thought. To give you how I might reimagined it. But I think that we need to start thinking about what are and I know companies are thinking about this already. So don't don't let me. Suggest that they aren't but what are really the core fundamental skills that make a good manager? Not who is the best salesperson on my team and I in that I think the latter is how companies think most commonly. It's because of pressure, right? It's because oftentimes sales people they want to get out of the field they WANNA get they want to stop selling they. They WANNA, move into leadership roles because that's the traditional linear path to growth and. So I think they don't have another direction to go. So what you get is you get bottoms up pressure from the sales person saying I WANNA, move my career forward you get top down pressure from your CEO says, Gary, the best sales person on the team let's make him a manager right in here you are as a VP of sales or a cro you're stuck in between saying I duNNo. Gary Way of selling is going to translate very well you know. How do you? How do you start? How do you start as as that person has that executive with with an average tenure of sixteen months? How do you? How do you by the time to re imagine that role you know it has to be done across the entire industry, and so I don't have the answer but that's a frustrating challenge that I think about frequently well. But I think you touch on something though too is that so much of the so many of the behaviors that we adopt ask sales managers and so on at least in the star. Environment. Are Really. Driven. By fear. And so yes, the inability to change is really one of the critical points that's I think holding back sales. I've having a conversation with somebody last week who's done transplant research into. Sales, REP, productivity and not looking at activities productivity. But actually productivity from a dollar per hour generated our dollars, our sales time generated. And the Idea is that. Individual sellers today are probably actually less productive than sellers were thirty years ago before the. Revolution. It should not be that way at all. but I think we've we've said people are so afraid to change. then. We think there's been all this change. But we've had tact but I still contend. Sales is basically manage the way we manage sales hundred years ago. Yeah. Tech INTECH is. If you have a great sales team. And you put in really good tech, you have a better sales team. If you have a really crappy team and you put in good tech, you still have a really crappy sales team and so oftentimes like you know. Different Tech solutions are used as a band aid and they are used as a reason to not coaches hard or Right. Not right great emails or not learn how to do call prospecting and and I think we're tech really helps is when you when you're teaching the basics and the fundamentals and you have you know, Texas tech is like a house in south selling skills are like the foundation. You can only really build on top of a Sturdy Foundation I. Know It's an overused analogy, but you know it's a it's A. That's that's required in i. just think that too often, and again, I think it's because of fear I think it's like I just became a salesman and dry I gotta prove myself or is became a VP I got twelve months I'm fired two quarters in a row I. Miss I'm done in like I don't know I just think is in until someone takes a step back and says in by the way I think this is starting to happen with some of the stuff that happened we work and things like that I think efficiency. is starting to become more important I. think growth at all costs is going out the window and I think that growth at all cost mentality that's been around for the last however many years that's driven a lot of that fear and driven a lot of that that you know poor poor behavior. Okay. One other. Area I want to get into before we let you go. Is. You. Talk about salespeople billion personal brands..

sales manager VP of sales salesman Duke Blue Devils basketball Ohio Gary Way Wichita trump Lincoln Dan VP Texas Michael Jordan executive CEO
"tech intech" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

Front End Happy Hour

03:59 min | 10 months ago

"tech intech" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

"It's like Oh you've been working on for a while. We want to episode on Ember and and I. I thought it was hilarious. Because I'm like I am not aficionado. I'm not like I don't have anything to say. That like people care about but But I'm glad I did it. It was Super Fun and we had a lot of old fashioned on that episode of Johnny old-fashioned any episodes these are pitcher catcher. Yeah I made a pitcher. Was that the one. We use the keyword as Java. Scrip- I don't remember. I don't remember either on that one. That was dumb keyword though yeah the best keyboard by far was memory on the road so with Jaffer Hussain and that was once a week. memory on that episode like You know I really haven't drank a lot recently. Been trying to cut back and like we just saying every and we're dislike slamming back the whole time like poor guy yeah. We had some German beer that he wanted. I WanNa try that and there's like sweet summer child. This is not going to go. Well Great. Actually. It was a good episode entertaining for sure. Yes we've all been on a fair amount of episodes. What all do you enjoy about recording the podcast? What makes you continue as well Geo Location? What Yeah I was. I was also 'cause I can't be there. That's why can't be on the episode. I keep doing it because while it's a ton of fun hanging out my friends honestly. I've seen a lot of a few weeks and some people have seen in years now. Derek it's like. I forgot last time we on our last episode and we all got together. I'm like man I missed everybody and every time you know I don't really have that much to say and then we get together and talk for hours on nothing and we're just hang out in like the sweat friends do we. Just just shoot the breeze. And that's why I keep doing it and the other reason is well Ryan does all the work. We literally do nothing like we record. Ride is all over social media and all that and I feel bad every every month. I'm like I should help a bit more contribute. Then then I don't and Ryan Celo work so into you. Make It really easy to be on this this gloss wine one hundred hundred hundred years so. I didn't expect to be asked to be a panelist at all like after that episode. That was Super Fun. And then everyone's like. Hey she come in like do these more and I'm like yeah I will. Sounds like a really good time and definitely have made a lot of good friends from this and that to me like we don't want Jim was saying it's just nice to catch up with people that you care about and you have similar interests and you can easily about all these topics and everyone's interested in and it just feels good to like know that you have a front end community just with us and then also with like the greater community. I don't know it means a lot to me. And then I've had people reach out to me like through like Lincoln and other places they're like. Oh I really like you know listening and thank you so much and that means a lot to. It's like okay. I'm doing whatever this silly thing is that we're doing. It's helping somebody and that means a lot. Yeah I think for me. It's I'm going to continue doing it in love do because I'm having fun. Yes I do some extra work to get this thing out the door but a lot of it is because ultimately I like I have fun doing it with everyone but then also yeah. People are seeing value in it and so that is definitely always been motivating to is. Oh well people actually listen in care about this so I guess I should keep pumping this out for me. Outside of this podcast. I don't have a lot of friends that are tech INTECH.

Jaffer Hussain Ryan Celo Johnny Derek Jim Lincoln
"tech intech" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

12:11 min | 1 year ago

"tech intech" Discussed on Venture Stories

"From the story that everyone tells biotech is ruthlessly competitive. It's ruthlessly. Competitive and tech is too early right but but once you have a winner we do see them unseated every so often I thirty years yeah right facebook took Microsoft yeah yeah totally right but even something like Microsoft. It seemed like it was a monopoly for a while and then it seemed like it wasn't now one of the most valuable companies in the world world so it's still doing really well. Even though it's not a monopoly technically beyond I would say with bio you know the IP allows the model to exist as it is we need something radically different if we didn't have it and the protections are really not as strong as you think I will also say because of the influence of tack back the patent. Law has actually gotten significantly weaker so you can't do something like literally copy. Someone's exact molecule sure but you often don't need to do that to funds some of that acts pretty similarly and a lot of the patent law around things like half life extension or things like that. That's that's getting thrown out actually at a much higher rate and I'm Dan we we we have certain SEC- Pharma do a little bit less of that where they're making slight tweaks to drugs and then selling them still happen sometimes happens less than it used to because pat law has actually been weakened tech INTECH. We do think a lot about are we are thinking collectively about antitrust rights to you know how do you make it so someone can disrupt facebook or Google at some point but then also we're having this conversation about are these spaces somewhat public goods or some of the comments and how to that's right people are excited about. CRYPTO descend the possibility decentralizing control. What sort of the equivalent in bowsman one is energetic concern is not because it competitive but then also this concept of the comments or public goods at people think about that in biology or do they not think about Oh. I'd argue there are parallel conversations what's happening but but not quite that one thing that I hear a lot is like the government spends a lot of money doing pretty fundamental research how much money actually comes back to government airman from the output of that research. I think that's a very common complaint and who makes who capitalized that right so I would say that's one way in which parallel don't hear calls to like break up from a suitable companies because they have too much market power and if you just look at it objectively Muslim don't have much market in our the the total size of the pharmaceutical industries large but the toll number players is large. It's like dozens of companies and why aren't there monopolies expert expert yeah you start to see monopolies on the margins right you get the Strahl as you get the mind lands right like occasionally. Rarely you see those emerge judge and yeah. They use their pricing power to the fullest. They absolutely do but again. That's like how the system was deliberately built so I do think there there are those are those issues on the margin but they tend to be smaller. Things like the price of insulin has been going up really quickly really recently Guess what there's like a lot of different types of insulin you want them for somewhat different situations and we're starting to see more stories about that. When when something is vital in his widespread is insulin Oakland starts to have issues with pricing. That's when we're GONNA see politics to really hit this sector pretty hard. I think so no. I don't think there's a lot of talk about monopoly. There's a lot of talk about pricing power. Should the government be able to negotiate drug. Prices should be able to buy in bulk. Should we be able to import from overseas like these are all very real questions. There's about pricing. It's not about monopoly. One of the things we were talking about before we started recording. Is that the way different areas or would you would want other visas to think like q in terms of use. UC things was used indeterminate or determinate. I think when you introduced this concept yeah sure I am stealing stealing this from Teal and the ideas. Do you have a world view. That fundamentally believes that that that you can understand the world world right is the world determinate right. Can you figure out the ways system works. Can you modify it. Can you do this reliably or is it. Indeterminate right like biology complex system is extremely hard. We have all these unintended consequences. You don't know what's going on with every single piece of it due to radically radically different worldviews right and I basically think that most of the biotech field as it exists today and again. I think this is may be you know somewhat less true you know in the first wave of companies but like the current belief implicitly looking at how people in the space act is is that biology is fundamentally indeterminate that we cannot say things for certain that we cannot know if a drug will work that we cannot know what the effect of something will be until we test it uh and I think that is a pervasive worldview all the way from like how stuff gets funded to the basic research how the scientists think about it had the VC's structure their companies to like avoid this like all of it start to finish. I think that's the fundamental driving factor in why the sector looks like it does today and so what are some constraints from other would other people need to believe to come to that that view what is the crux of the difference yeah. I mean if you ask them. They would probably say that. I'm not indeterminate enough for the space right that like they've experienced this for decades. They've they've experienced. The losses experienced the surprises and the failures right and I think in the face of that it's really hard to believe on a deep level that they can actually predict things are now so I think it's more something like can can we either develop better tools in ways of analysis analysis in ways of thinking and things like that that will get us to better answers systematically lay right or do we need people to just be willing to sort of go more out on a limb mm-hmm right and something we don't see a whole lot of today in say more about the implications of that mindset with the two way more risk. We're more yeah. We would certainly see a lot more risk. I think we would see a lot more sort of seemingly crazy ideas. I think we'll see more complex interventions than are currently tested tested right. There's there's so much focus on like okay. We're going to keep the experimental group control group almost exactly the same. We're going to vary this one tiny piece orange look at the effects in a whole bunch of different ways and like that always gets you the same answer. It's a complex system. We saw some effect a bunch of unexpected stuff right. You don't see things like collies toxins which was done again like a century back. It was just a guy who took a bacterial sludge and injected into tumours and it occasionally cured them like but the funny thing is the. FDA actually allowed a couple of people to try this pretty recently right but like it was a hundred years ago we came up with the idea and despite seeing cancer cures it never developed into a systematic field of expiration used you stand on all this. I think I can flinched when you're making that analogy. I love it. Actually I think it's such a powerful framework recently. I have have come more around the belief that the very best people in biotech are much more determinate and certainly if you ask ask at the CMO's Eso's of many large farm as they do you their pipeline as a portfolio and they will not tell you that a drug will work with high certainty by in sort of the neonatal stages of working with Grad students a decade ago. I remember viewing the role indeterminate framework and I think one thing that kind of changed for me recently was viewing that Moore's linked to competent so somebody's expectation Asian at something will work a certain way being linked to their competence and less to General World View and I think the determinate people or the competent set off particularly won't work but they'll have a reason why you wouldn't you couldn't have known of framework for what they expect to happen. In a reason for why you couldn't have known own was something would work out in the first place so I basically the the most successful common people have more determinate worldviews than would expects and I think they're just many many many people in biotech who are not well trained or associate words with the idea that these words have proven causes behind them for example apple cancer or cancer model is assumed to be actually a cancer model in really the first person who created that mouse would've told you know it's real. Here's what I'm doing. It's an experiment for these reasons bananas all this kind of vocabulary that incorrectly implies we know what we're doing kind of passed on to the next generation but I think they're really good people can see through a little bit and really do understand what is meant by certain words that allows them to make better predictions yeah. I guess my experience has Ben. I ask people to make a prediction and they're just really really unlikely to be willing to give me any concrete number and and like I think I think this is true for people in general but you know these people are scientists right. They're testing the hypothesis for a reason and they wouldn't even give me a confidence interval about unlikely that hypothesis to be confirmed or not. I mean surely implicitly somewhere in there they they must have some idea that seem to have this like Stockholm Syndrome where they won't even like admitted mid it out loud. It's like putting those beliefs to the test even so far as like making an on the record prediction of what might happen pretty pretty rare there are some moving stories for example the founder of GPC ours being taken off h mind having support his lab on salary from being an emergency room doctor which make one more humble about predicting sort of scientific competence but that makes sense. I mean is that hat. Is that an example or counterexample the thing I'm talking about right I mean like he wasn't sort of believed in by the field but he was right right like I think I think that's like the rare example of of sort of when this thing works like it it was a guy who was who's crazy crazy and didn't have the faith of the field but he believed in vain and and he got a dumb right and he got approved. Yeah I mean Lina. I suppose one question is just like is there a way that we could enable that kind of person more or do you think were sort of making the right trade offs in terms of refund who do not fund and how how many of his category of person do you think exists empirically. They're not been that many right but as their impact ben sufficiently disproportionate that we should try. How do we think about non trained scientists investing in about many famous bouts. He's been scientists How do we think about this great. Scientists have this characteristic mystic which is that they bend over backwards in fines words to get at the truth and you need that in startup however that often comes with a huge reticence to even speculate on things that could be outside the realm of probability. I called scientists speak. It's a way of talking that what prefaces everything with a while. I don't believe what I'm talking about is probably isn't true but and it's a way of signalling to others in the scientific community that you really are quite competent because you're aware era of how much you don't know entrepreneurially that's very hard to translate over right and so if you look at many great companies they come with the pair you have the Bob Swanson and the her boyer so the person who can really Sullivan and take out the genetic..

facebook Microsoft Dan Lina SEC- Pharma Google pat law Oakland FDA Stockholm Syndrome entrepreneurially founder Ben Moore apple Bob Swanson Sullivan
"tech intech" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

Learn to Code with Me

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"tech intech" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

"A year and a half and as I I was working on that team that was collaborating with the other product teams at braintree. I started to gain interest in the devops space specifically with the tooling in the technologies. Is that the devops at brain she was creating on they were creating a lot of different micro services that automated the Development Life Cycle <hes> for the production team for the product teams at braintree and it really intrigued me with how the systems and the services that those teams were building in writing were really empowering the organization the move forward and build quickly iterative fast in that's when my interest interest in devops really sparked and so after having worked at Demo for <hes> a little over year like a year and a half I started to look around loosely at some other opportunities in Chicago <hes> that were more catered towards the devops face because I wanted to transition my path into devops and devops. I think over the last couple years has really ramped up but when I was gaining interest in it it wasn't a field or a role or a position that was quite desired yet or or that there were a lot of companies that were really putting a strict focus in a an emphasis on the devops culture so it was really hard for me to find a devops role that for Junior d'avray right like I was a pretty young my career at that time and I stumbled upon another company was a digital mortgage company who was starting to build the devops team and automate their development life cycle through devops principles and so I interviewed for that team and Luckily I got the position than it was the first I was the first <hes> engineer to be on that team and so that's kind of wear my <hes> devops like career started in where I got my first footing in devops and I worked for that got a little mortgage company for about a year and a half before I moved on to the company after that wow so changing. You're a little bit here. We're all these positions remote for the most part another one in Florida was in but were you going to office every day. How did some of these things look at braintree? I went to the office four days a week. We did get to work remotely one day a week <hes> so there was somewhat flexibility with remote culture and then at the digital mortgage company that I worked at afterwards I was remote three days a week. I went to the office on Mondays Wednesdays and then my the job after the digital mortgage company along with my current role now or full remote and a lot of people listening I know that's like their dream is to be fully remote for a lot of people outside of Tech intech everyone right. It's like greasy of so much flexibility of your working schedule but I'm sure it comes with challenges like especially as someone who was maybe more junior when you were starting off in some of these partially remote rolls what had like how have you've been able to manage your day working remotely yeah absolutely so I think <hes> yeah you're right. The remote culture in the remote perk is something that a lot of people crave the have but it certainly does come with its downsides on site in the challenges and I think one of the biggest challenges of remote work is the barrier of communication with your team or the teams other dependent on the work that you're doing you have to be a lot more diligent in your communication and almost over communicate everything that you're doing everything that all the problems in the roadblocks running into in order to keep a consistent workflow <hes> working remotely in another big challenge of working remotely is really having the.

braintree Tech intech engineer Chicago Florida three days four days one day
"tech intech" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"tech intech" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"And the Cambridge analytic stuff, you know, that stuck plummeted that calls for resignations, though is a giant, you know, new movement in Tim's of privacy a away when globally on its you to today, you know, year later, and it's using them as a high than ever stuck his high than ever. It's just like. In tech Intech quite specific detect people extremely forgiving in in the technology world, and broadly speaking, they it's not just it's not just the geeks who will talk about this stuff. And actually, the real world is very different. It's the opposite way round. And I think, you know, people just forgive companies because they just wanna his greatest I mean Ford survived the exploding Pinto. Worse than exploiting. No. You know, look at Boeing today. Like they're going through. That's interesting in south west announced it wants to buy a whole bunch of new seven thirty seven Max's. Yeah. I mean, there is figure that out figure that you're going to screw it up twice. All you're gonna screwed it. Of course, you. Would you fly seven thirty seven max? Right. And there was also that story about how lax they're basically they're testing it for the Dreamliner York Times big expose this Sunday on on from people working inside the factory Boeing elax. The processes are for building the Dreamliner that's a little that's actually a good illustration of the software. Agile software development thing. Which is I don't know if they're easing an agile methodology in Boeing or not. But they the reason that they started having stalling and out of control problems is they pushed a software. Eight is designed to make the plane more efficient move fast and break things. But not on airplanes. But notice Facebook doesn't say that they used to be their motto. They don't say that much anymore. But I think it really is at least tacitly the model motto of Silicon Valley move moves fast and broke democracy. So now, they can't say it anymore, right? Do you still that nice? One of the nice details in Fred Vogelstein story about Facebook. And in wired this week was story. Wow. Oh my God. It has so many great details, but there's one detail which is he sort of throws of side of these little tidbits that he picks up during reporting and one of them was well, they're not really saying move fast and break things anymore. But if you go to their headquarters, the WI fi password is still move fast. Totally gone. There is not totally over. This is an amazing story which recounts a lot of the stuff. We already knew. I mean, apparently Nicklaus Thomson, and Fred Vogelstein had been working on it for a long time. Jeff Jarvis city ran into. I it was Nicklaus at Davos two years or last year. He was writing the story then. And in fact, it starts in Davos, and the special Facebook, you know, sweet or hotel room they had in Davos, where they were planning the temporary headquarters where they were planning the it was more like a bunker one one that saw succession of tense meetings with the same tycoons ministers. Journalists who had agreed with George Soros when he said earlier. The owners of the well, I guess basically the Facebook stays are numbered. The owners of the platform giants consider themselves the masters of the universe. Soro said but affect their slaves to preserving their dominant position. I would agree. Davos is a good place to announce that their days are numbered that was a year ago more than a year ago. Let's talk we'll talk about Facebook. Because there's a lot to say about Facebook. This is a good. This is a good example of a company that as you pointed out earlier conservative almost anything black marks everywhere. We'll do that in just a little bit. I quit. A great panel Davinder hardware here from engage. It he senior editor there. Dylan tween, great to have.

Facebook Davos Boeing Nicklaus Thomson Fred Vogelstein Tim Max tech Intech Cambridge Jeff Jarvis George Soros senior editor WI Dylan Soro two years
"tech intech" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"tech intech" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Be more ominous coming out of Washington after the Nason went to bed thinking, we had a bipartisan spending Bill on the table to at least get the government through the holidays. Where today the President Trump has cleared his throat or as it were uses Twitter characters to toss a monkey wrench into it. House. Speaker Paul Ryan says he met with the president today in the long, and sort of it is that he refuses design anything in an envelope. That doesn't have a five million dollar. Check falling out of it. When he sakes it for his border wall. We just had a very productive meeting with the president the president forms that he will not sign the Bill that came from the Senate last evening because of his legitimate concerns for border security, but top Democrats say we all want border security, but a wall isn't the answer, and you can't hold the country hostage. They say to appease your political base. In minority leader Chuck Schumer says the conservative house freedom caucus is in Trump's ear telling him to veto the stopgap spending Bill to avert. A now tumors says these people don't have a strategy for the eight hundred thousand government employees working tech Intech trying to have a decent life much less than Christmas. Besides critics say I thought the president said Mexico was going to pay for the wall. Oh, it's a big mess down. There clock is once again ticking folks, midnight Friday, Trump says he'll take full responsibility for any shutdown. Meantime, speaker Ryan says you'll round up some more people, and they'll huddle up once more women come up with we will let you know. Well, as they say, well that didn't work out our. V Weinstein waltzed into a courtroom today hoping for a Christmas present from a judge. He was trying to get the judge to drop all charges against him. But the judge told him in no particular terms, Santa Claus has a long white beard and wears a red suit. I have neither see you. In march. Juliet Papa on the ten wins. Ring central Newsline, Harvey Weinstein is going to trial. We.

president Trump Paul Ryan Harvey Weinstein Chuck Schumer Twitter Nason Juliet Papa Washington tech Intech Senate Mexico five million dollar
"tech intech" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:22 min | 2 years ago

"tech intech" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"At at a tire company and also worked for the US tax court during the day, they're both very busy. But as your dad took the time to understand people. Can you tell us about that? Yeah. Dad, as I think someone said there was senior never met a stranger. So there's always people that would want to come up to always think that that person's different than me. And I'm going to figure out why. And how did that help you as a leader? I watched his impact in people's lives. And I thought I'm gonna I'm still trying to be that guy every day. How did you know that influence on people? St. unfortunate proof was his funeral. About four hundred four hundred fifty people at his funeral. That's a large funeral. We weren't expecting that crowd. But what else weren't you expecting? I wasn't expecting the broad. Band of people that were there from the cafeteria worker to the guard to the senior. Court the lawyers and judges all there because they just really loved Nate senior. How's that affected you in this business? You can't have a business without the people. And I truly believe that at our company that we are true. It's not more than a bumper sticker that we're really focused on our humans. Lots of individual time spent lots of shoe leather burned a lot of gas burned up as I go round. And visit and talk to our our folks, did you tell me earlier, did you tell us earlier that when you came to work for the company, you made sure that the CEO's profile is actually transparent on the web. You've actually published stuff about him in public stuff about his childhood because you wanted people to see that kind of organization they were coming to work for absolutely I truly believe that if you're going to be a part of an organization an organization feels like the person running it. So it sounds like you've got a lot of respect for folks that are senior starting with your dad yet a lotta respect for your dad, especially that's proven with the funeral. Sounds to me like it also transfers to your relationship with your boss, but it's like you don't see yourself. Superior to everybody in the team. It's like, you're counseling. You want? Everybody to a part of the team, absolutely participant leader. Carina? What are you thinking? Fifteen years old counseling. Other probably fifteen years old. Young folks, obviously, your dad was really influential who else outside of family was really influential for you. There was a very close the names, Greg. He was an army major and like dad, he was a very people focused guy. And and he was really my first true taste while dead had been in the military. He was my first taste of military officer at the time. So how is he influential in what you do today. I reflect back on Greg sitting me down and talking about military leadership and marrying that with my dad's. Leadership and that many people this elite you as an officer. But you want them to salute you for the guy in the uniform that what's on your shoulders. So that's how that ties in today. You don't see yourself above everybody else your partner. Yeah. Yeah. Talks about faith. You got you got a lot of respecting your blood. And I'm wondering if that came from being faith based. It clearly does. And did my folks weren't they were God fearing, they weren't necessarily practicing Christians. But later in life. I definitely made the decision and still today. I you made what decision to accept faith as a primary driver from my life. Give us an example of how you've done that. What do you mean? What's your involvement with the church L right now? I'm very active in the music ministry in the church, and I've actually spun off my own music ministry as well. Why why music ministry was that? Tell us about you. While I wasn't a sports guy always been a band. Geek. Then start singing right after my father passed away. I've been singing ever since. And so what are what have you learned from the church and being a Ban Ki thas anything to do with building this organization, which is now one hundred and ten people in twenty three million dollars. Were this paper says you're the chief operating officer. What did you learn that the church in the band helps you build this business and actually went and Marcellus trumpet players done some leadership? Work around this about the reliance on the group. Right. So if you're a jazz musician, you can't you can't stand up with a trumpet in which I played in high school. And while the crowd, you need the coretec, do you need the band, you need the support you need to be able to work together as a team and everyone needs to appreciate and give face to everybody on the team. So that's what the chief operating officer is all about it's like being in the middle of it. All and making sure to the teams there sounds like there's a pretty deep parallel between your band stuff in what you're doing in your business in your professional career. I hadn't thought of it that way. But yes, I do believe I really think that I'm other than that the business aspects of things, of course, to engage our employees and ensure that they're bonded to us as an institution. Yeah. That sounds like what your role was on the band too. Wasn't it? Yeah. It was from major in high school, and what was your role on the team back, then as it drum major in highschool lead the band. Down the field. Uh-huh. Sounds to me like you had the same role than if you've got now. And also the same thing you were doing working when you were fifteen David Mr Pirker, what do you think? No, I've I've really been listening to you before the written down this this passion for music. When leading the people what kind of things have you learned as band leader of the orchestra. How was that? Specifically helped you in taking your company as far as you have. I think it's focused on individual strengths and actually call it tagging up and at Sam getting their aspirations and their goals and not necessarily this mine, and then how can I apply them to whatever we're after? So either after performing this piece of music, can I use the drummer's specialties there or in our organization, how can I use the extrovert in the right place. I gotta use the introvert in the right place and not push them to places they don't necessarily want to go makes complete sense to me. So you're telling me that you're getting to know on one hand, there's the organization there's the goal for the team you're getting to know each of the individual players, and what their screen sarin using everybody for their strength. You did that in the band, and you're also doing that in the business. Yeah. I try to. I think we focus the in business in general too much on our weaknesses and try to fill our weaknesses. They are what they are. But I think we don't take enough advantage of our strengths. So, but that's where you're defueling understanding if people really comes into play. In fact, we were. Talking earlier, but you're being the counselor. The fact that you really get to know these individual people, so you're able to use every body Wisey for their strength. I guess they feel fulfilled. Also because they're doing a good job because it's their passion with being used for. I think so too. I think people feel that they're truly a part of something bigger. And appreciate it bigger than themselves. Everybody wants to do that. I think they feel valued. And and we never let them forget. It sounds to me like you're a master in the study of human nature. What's the website address for this in tech Intech LLC dot net? Let me that one more time..

chief operating officer officer Greg US tech Intech LLC Nate CEO partner David Mr Pirker Sam twenty three million dollars Fifteen years fifteen years one hand
"tech intech" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:16 min | 2 years ago

"tech intech" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Else outside of family was really influential for you. There was a very close friend the family's name names, Greg. He was an army major and like dad, he was a very people focused guy, and he was really my first true taste while dead had been in the military. He was my first taste of military officer at the time. So how is he influential in what you do today. I reflect back on Greg sitting me down and talking to me about military leadership and marrying that with my dad's. Leadership and that many people that salute you as an officer. But you want them to salute you for the guy in the uniform that what's on your shoulders. So that's how that ties into today. You don't see yourself above everybody else. Your partner. Yeah. Talks about faith. You got this. You got a lot of respecting your blood. And I'm wondering if that came from being faith-based it clearly does and did my folks weren't they were God fearing, they weren't necessarily practicing Christians, but later in life, I definitely made the decision and still today you made what decision to accept faith as a primary driver from my life. Give us an example of how you've done that. What do you mean? What's your involvement with the church L right now? I'm very active in the music ministry in the church, and I've actually actually spun off my own music ministry as well. Why why music ministry was that? Tell us about you while I wasn't a sports guy. I've always been a band geek. Then started singing right after my father passed away. I've been singing ever since. And so what what have you learned from the church and being banned geeked his anything to do with building this organization, which is now one hundred and ten people on twenty three million dollars. Were this paper says you're the chief operating officer. We what did you learn that the church the band helps you build this business and actually went and Marcellus trumpet player has done some leadership. Work around this about the reliance on the group. Right. So if you're a jazz musician, you can't you can't stand up with a trumpet in which I played in high school. And while the crowd, you need the coretec, do you need the band, you need the support you need to be able to work together as a team and everyone needs to predate and give space to everybody on the team. So that's what the the chief operating officer is all about it's like being in the middle of it. All and making sure that the teams there sounds like there's a pretty deep parallel between your band stuff in what you're doing in your business in your professional career. I hadn't thought of it that way. But yes, I do believe I really think that I'm other than that the business aspects of things, of course, to engage our employees and ensure that they're bonded to us as an institution. Yeah. That sounds like what your role was on the band too. Wasn't it? Yeah. Yeah. I guess it was from major in high school. What was your role in the team back, then as it drum major in highschool lead the band? Down the field. It sounds to me like you had the same role. Then if you've got now and also the same thing you were doing working when you were fifteen David Mr Pirker, what do you think? No, I've really listen to me before the had written down. This this passion for music. When leading the people what kind of things have you learned as the band leader of the orchestra. How is that? Specifically helped you in taking your company as far as you have. I think it's focused on individual strengths and actually call it tagging up and at Sam getting their aspirations and their goals and not necessarily just mine, and then how can I apply them to whatever we're after? So either after performing this piece of music. How can I use the drummer's specialties there in our organization, how can I use the extrovert in the right place? I gotta use the introvert in the right place and not push them to places they don't necessarily want to go makes complete sense to me. So you're telling me that you're getting to know on one hand there's the organization here's the goal for the team. You're getting to know each of the individual players, and what their screens are in using everybody for their strength that in the band, and you're also doing that in the business. Yeah. I try to I think we focus in the in business general too much on our weaknesses and try to fill our weaknesses. They are what they are. But I think we don't take enough advantage of our strengths. So, but that's where you're deep fuel and understanding of people really comes into play goes. That's in fact, we were. Talking earlier, but you're being the counselor. The fact that you really get to know these individual people, so you're able to use everybody Wisey for their strength. I guess they feel fill also because they're doing a good job because it's their passion with they're being used for. I think so too. I think if people feel that they're truly a part of something bigger and appreciate it bigger than themselves. Everybody wants to do that. I think they feel valued in them. And we never let them forget. It sounds to me like you're a master in the study of human nature. What's the website address for this in tech Intech LLC dot net? Let me that one more time. I n t e c l l c dot with Nick Copeland senior, vice president CEO of intake, you're on executive leaders radio with my coach, David Pretoria. Lord, the Parker and Karina door colliers international. We'll be back in a moment. Right after this break..

chief operating officer officer Greg tech Intech LLC David Mr Pirker partner Marcellus colliers international vice president CEO of intake Nick Copeland Sam David Pretoria Parker executive Karina twenty three million dollars one hand
"tech intech" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:38 min | 2 years ago

"tech intech" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Night at at a tire company and also worked for the US tax court during the day. They're both very busy. But is your dad took the time to understand people? Tell us about that. Yeah. Dad? As I think someone said there was senior never met a stranger. So there's always people that would want to come up to him. And he always think that that person's different than me. And I'm going to figure out why. And how did that help you as a leader? I watched his impact in people's lives. And I thought I'm gonna I'm still trying to be that guy every day. How did you know he had that influence on people? The unfortunate proof was his funeral. There's about four hundred four hundred fifty people at his funeral. The large funeral him. We weren't expecting that crowd. What else weren't you expecting? I wasn't expecting the broad. Band of people that were there from the cafeteria worker to the guard to the senior. Court the lawyers and judges all there because they just really loved Nate senior. How's that affected you in new in? How you built this business? You can't have a business without the people and Julie believed that at our company that we are true. It's not more than a bumper sticker that we're really focused on our humans. Lots of individual time spent lots of shoe leather burn a lot of gas burned up as I go round. And visit and talk to our our folks, didn't you told me earlier than did you tell us really are when you came to work for the company, you made sure that the CEO's profile is actually transparent on the web. You've actually published stuff about him in public stuff about his childhood because you wanted people to see what kind of organization they were coming to work for. Absolutely. I truly believe that if you're going to be apartment organization an organization feels like the person running it. So it sounds to me like you've got a lot of respect for folks that are senior starting with your dad yet a lotta respect for your dad, especially proven with the funeral. Sounds to me like it also transfers to your relationship with your boss, but it's like you don't see yourself. Superior to everybody in the team. It's like your council. You want everybody to a part of the team, absolutely participant leader Carina. What do you think? It's fifteen years old counseling. Other probably fifteen years old young folks. Obviously, your dad was really influential who else outside of family was really influential for you. There was a very close family names, Greg. He was an army major and like dad, he was a very people focused guy. And and he was really my first true taste all dead had been in the military. He was my first taste of military officer at the time. So how is he influential in what you do today. I reflect back on Greg sitting down and talking to me about military leadership and marrying that with my dad's leadership, and that many people to salute you as an officer. But you want them to salute you for the guy in the uniform that what's on your shoulders. Ties into today. You don't see yourself with everybody else to your partner. Yeah. Talks about this. You got a lot of respecting your blood. And I'm wondering if that came from being based it clearly does and did my folks weren't they were God fearing, they weren't necessarily practicing Christians. But later in life. I definitely made the decision and still today you made what decision to accept faith as a primary driver from my life. Give us an example of how you've done that. What do you mean? Which our involvement with the church L right now, I'm very active in the music ministry in the church, and I've actually spun off my own music ministry as well. Why why a music ministry was that? Tell us about you while I wasn't a sports guy. I've always been a band geek. Then started singing right after my father passed away and I've been singing ever since. And so what are what have you learned from the church and being a band is anything to do with building this organization, which is now one hundred and ten people in twenty three million dollars. Were this paper says you're the chief operating officer. What did you learn that the church and the band helps you build this business and actually went and Marcellus trumpet player has done some leadership work around this about the reliance on the group? Right. So if you're a jazz musician, you can't you can't stand up with a trumpet in which I played high school. And while the crowd, you need the coretec didn't eat the band, you need the support you need to be able to work together as a team and everyone needs to appreciate and give space to everybody on the team. So that's what the the chief operating officer is all about it's like being in the middle of it. All and making sure that the teams there sounds like there's a pretty deep parallel between your band stuff in what you're doing in your business in your professional career. I hadn't thought of it that way. But yes, I do believe I really think that I'm other than that the business aspects of things, of course, to engage our employees and ensure that they're bonded to us as an institution. Yeah. That sounds like what your role was on the band to wasn't it. Yeah. I guess it was from major in high school, and what was your role in the team back, then drum major in high school lead the band. Down the field. It sounds like you had the same role than if you've got now also the same thing you were doing working fifteen David Mr Pirker. What do you think? No, I've ever really been listening to you before the written down. This this passion for music. When leading the people what kind of things have you learned as the band leader of the orchestras. How is that? Specifically helped you in taking your company as far as you have. I think it's focused on individual strengths and actually call it tagging up and getting their aspirations and their goals and not necessarily just mine, and then how can I apply them to our whatever we're after. So either after performing this piece of music. How can I use the drummer's specialties there or in our organization, how can I use the extrovert in the right place, not gonna use the introvert in the right place and not push them to places they don't necessarily want to go makes complete sense to me. So you're telling me that you're getting to know on one hand there's the organization here's the goal for the team. You're getting to know each of the individual players, and what their screens are using everybody for their strength that in the band, and you're also doing that in the business. Yeah. I try to I think we focus in business in general too much on our weaknesses and try to fill our weaknesses. They are what they are. But I think we don't take enough advantage of our strengths. So, but that's where your fuel and understanding if people really comes into play. In fact, we were taught. Talking earlier about you're being the counselor. The fact that you really get to know these individual people, so you're able to use every Wisey for their strength. I guess they throw fulfilled. Also because they're doing a good job because they're passionate what they're being used for. I think so too. I think if people feel that they're truly a part of something big. And appreciate it bigger than themselves. Everybody wants to do that. I think they feel valued in and we never let them forget. It sounds to me like you're a master in the study of human nature. What's the website address for this in tech Intech LLC dot net? Let me know that one more time I n t e c l l c dot nagazine with Nick Copeland senior, vice president CEO of intake, you're on executive News Radio with my coach, David Pretoria. Lord, the Parker and community door colliers international. We'll be back in a moment. Right after this break..

chief operating officer officer Greg US colliers international CEO Nate tech Intech LLC Julie Carina vice president CEO of intake David Mr Pirker partner Marcellus Nick Copeland David Pretoria executive fifteen years twenty three million dollars one hand
"tech intech" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:41 min | 2 years ago

"tech intech" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"A time and dad toss tires by night at the a tire company and also worked for the US tax court during the day. So they're both very busy. But as your dad took the time to understand people. Can you tell us about that? Yeah. Dad, as I think someone said there was Nate senior never met a stranger. So there's always people that would wanna come up to always think that that person's different than me. And I'm going to figure out why. And how did that help you as a leader? I watched his impact in people's lives. And I thought I'm gonna I'm still trying to be that guy every day. How did you know he had that influence on people? The unfortunate proof was his funeral. About four hundred four hundred fifty people at his funeral large funeral isn't it? We weren't expecting that crowd. But what else weren't you expecting? I wasn't expecting the broad. Band of people that were there from the cafeteria worker to the guard to the senior. Court the lawyers and judges all there because they just really loved Nate senior. How's that affected you in new in? How you built this business? You can't have a business with people. And I truly believe that at our company that we are true. It's not more than a bumper sticker that we're really focused on our humans. Lots of individual time spent lots of shoe leather burned a lot of gas burned up as I go round. And visit and talk to our our folks, didn't you tell me earlier, then did you tell us earlier that when you came to work for the company made sure that the CEO's profile is actually transparent on the web? You've actually published stuff about him and publish stuff about his childhood because you wanted people to see what kind of organization they were coming to work for. Absolutely, I truly believe that if you're going to be apartment organization an organization feels like the person running it. So it sounds to me like you've got a lot of respect for folks that are senior starting with your dad yet a lot of respect for your dad, especially that's proven with the funeral. Sounds to me like they're also transfers to your relationship with your boss, but it's like you don't see yourself. Superior to everybody in the team your counseling. You want everybody to a part of the team. Absolutely. I'm a participant leader Carina. What do you think? It's fifteen years old counseling. Other probably fifteen years old. Young folks, obviously, your dad was really influential who else outside of family was really influential for you. There was a very close friend the family name is Greg. He was an army major and like dad, he was a very people focused guy, and he was really my first true taste while dad had been in the military. He was my first taste of military officer at the time. So how is he in Valencia in what you do today? I reflect back on Greg sitting down and talking to me about military leadership and marrying that with my dad's leadership in that way. Many people this elite you as an officer. But you want them to salute you for the guy in the uniform that what's on your shoulders ties on today. You don't see yourself with love everybody else. Your for yourself. Yeah. Talks about faith to give you got a lot of respecting your blood. And I'm wondering if that came from being faith-based, they've clearly does and did my folks warrants they were got fearing, they weren't necessarily practicing Christians, but later in life, I definitely made the decision and and still today I made what decision to accept faith as a primary driver for my life. Give us an example of how you've done that. What do you mean? Your involvement with the church L right now, I'm very active in the music ministry in the church, and I've actually actually spun off my own music ministry as well. Why music ministry was that tell us about you while I wasn't a sports guy always been a band. Geek. Then started singing right after my father passed away and I've been singing ever since. And so what are what have you learned from the church and being a band is anything to do with building this organization, which is now one hundred and ten people on twenty three million dollars worth of this paper says the chief operating officer. What did you learn that the church in the band helps you build this business and actually went and Marcellus trumpet players done some leadership work around this about the reliance on the group? Right. So if you're jazz musician, you can't you can't stand up with a trumpet, then which I played in high school, and while the crowd, you need the coretec, do you need the band, you need the support you need to be able to work together as a team and everyone needs to appreciate and give space to everybody on the team. So that's what the chief operating officer is all about it's like being in the middle of it all and making sure to the teams there. It sounds like there's a pretty deep parallel between your band stuff in what you're doing in your business in your professional career. I hadn't thought of it that way. But yes, I do believe I really think other than that the business aspects of things, of course, to engage our employees and ensure that they're bonded to us as an institution. Yeah. That sounds like what your role was on the band too. Wasn't it? Yeah. I guess it was from Adrian high school, and what was your role on the team back, then as a drum major in highschool lead the band. Down the field. It sounds to me like you had the same role. Then you've got now. And also the same thing you were doing working when you were fifteen David Mr. porter. What do you think? No I've ever really listen to you before the had written down. This this passion for music. When leading the people what kind of things have you learned as the band leader of the orchestra. How is that? Specifically helped you in taking your company as far as you have. I think it's focused on individual strengths and actually call it tagging up and getting their aspirations and their goals and not necessarily just mine, and then how can I apply them to our whatever we're after. So either after performing this piece of music. How can I use the drummer's specialties there or in our organization, how can I use the extrovert in the right place? I gotta use the introvert in the right place and not push them to places they don't necessarily want to go. It makes complete sense to me. So you're telling me that you're getting to know on one hand, there's the organization is the goal for the team for you're getting to know each of the individual players, and what their strengths are on using everybody for their strength. You did that in the band, and you're also doing that in the business. Yeah, I tried to. I think we focus in the in business in general too much on our weaknesses and try to fill our weaknesses. They are what they are. But I think we don't take enough advantage of our strengths. So, but that's your deep fuel and understanding if people really comes into play goes that. In fact, we were taught. Talking earlier, but you're being the counselor. The fact that you really get to know these individual people, so you're able to use every body Wisey for their strength. I guess they feel fulfilled. Also because they're doing a good job because it's their passion. What they're being used for. I think so too. I think if people feel that they're truly a part of something bigger and appreciate it bigger than themselves. Everybody wants to do that. I think they feel valued. And and we never let them forget. It sounds to me like you're a master in the study of human nature. What's the website address for this in tech Intech LLC dot net? Let me that one more time. I n t c l l c dot with Nick Copeland senior, vice president CEO of intake, you're on executive leaders radio with my coach, David Pretoria. The Parker, and but door colliers international. We'll be back in a moment. Right after this break..

chief operating officer Nate Greg officer US Valencia CEO David Mr. porter tech Intech LLC colliers international Carina Adrian high school vice president CEO of intake Nick Copeland Parker David Pretoria executive fifteen years twenty three million dollars one hand
"tech intech" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"tech intech" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"Hoping that they would make and they closed on the very first day of enrollment more than one hundred days out before the start a fall a year ago. And that's when we sort of realized that we were in the middle of I say a tornado it seems more like a hurricane now. But it's really it's really been fantastic. It's it's I just can't speak highly enough about all those different parts on Amazon its customers really been wonderful the engagement. There has been tested. It's great criterion. It'd be really pleased to be able to be a part of Cosmas bay part of it to Tricia to come to you. You're very focused, obviously on that workforce development piece for the for the community at large the impact of technology on jobs, the future of work. It's clearly that's a big focus view had a causes lock these impacts the way we prepare Luna's of the future for those jobs of the future. Yeah. You know that that's the sixty four million dollar question. Right. Like, how do we? Predict what the jobs are tomorrow. We're going to be. That's you know, that requires those you know, that are in the space to really look at the trends and see what's happening in the world of work and how how the college can participate in that. And and so about and I was saying about twenty ten so, you know, right about the time. I took over you know in this division. We saw a huge influx of tech companies coming onto the Westside of Los Angeles, which is right around where Santa Monica's situated, and that growth started within five years there were five hundred companies, and and then those five hundred thousand and so this area is as become known as silicon beach because it was, you know, area of boom, you haven't heard that expression of. Although I recently visited Santa Monica anything's a wonderful age. So it makes nothing but since. So so silicon beach started in Santa Monica, and is now grown to encompass just about everything in Los Angeles in Venice and other parts of Los Angeles. So when when we saw this growth, we started to engage been than industry from a high level from the president, you know, to the dean level just to really look at you know, what kind of businesses were going to the opening not which is already opening what we're going to be opening in the future. What kind of tech Intech? Here's a little bit different than in other areas. We have a, you know, a large ecommerce, you know, in social networking also growing here with Snapchat being headquartered here, so we saw the trend and really tried to sponde- to it and for being a community college. I think we did a pretty good job of attracting Amazon as Howard mentioned about four years ago. And really I think that would attract the down on his. Yes, Santa Monica has, you know, a great reputation, a great, you know, global brand, but it was really the the possibility of partnering with more than just one college. So the ability to scale the workforce and trying to get diverse population into the open unfilled jobs in the tech industry. So we've been keeping our I on the pulse in terms of the growth of the industry. But you know, we've got companies, you know, big companies like Hulu and snap and others like that. But I think that going back to your question, I think the the attraction to Santa Monica college. Also, besides having world faculty was the fact that we could bring the other nineteen community colleges on board..

Santa Monica Santa Monica college Los Angeles Amazon Howard Cosmas bay Hulu Luna Tricia Intech president Snapchat Venice sixty four million dollar one hundred days five years four years
"tech intech" Discussed on Startup Financial News

Startup Financial News

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"tech intech" Discussed on Startup Financial News

"On that today's episode. How are you markets performing once again, it's three forty seven pm here on east coast and Connie the Dow was up one point one two percent. The s&p is up one point two eight percent. And the NASDAQ is up two point two zero percent. So, ladies and gentlemen. Welcome back to the episode of SF, Hans startup financial news is my pleasure. Be back here with you on the program. And I am very excited today because we have a special guest or recurring us someone who has been on the program before he's spoken with us on a number of different topics. And we are now working on a few things together, which I'm very very excited about more on that in the weeks to come. But today, I want to introduce my good friend Dominic cod for thank you for coming back on the program folks may remember Dominic from some earlier episodes where we focused on blockchain, bitcoin and Dom. What? Well, you look down instead of introducing one. She say Hello to the people in introduce yourself. Okay. I guys Dominica good volume. So yoga, Maya Frenchaccent, Stephen. Against these fun axel anyway. So thank you to me as a guest against the pleasure. Always pleasure to be here. All but this jump into a today's to peak yet. But that's a I know w done some pre show, folks. Just so, you know, how this program works every time we have guest. There's always appreciate call. There's always appreciate meeting where we sit down. We have a chat. We kinda talk about what we're gonna talk about on the program with some loose bullet points today. The one thing that we couldn't get away from his much as we were trying to because you know, I've been feeding this horse for a while. Now, it's been a topic that has been brought up over and over again. But you know, it's been for lack of not being able to avoid this pun. Unfortunately, it's been kind of spooky October right for markets. That was a terrible plan on Halloween. But regardless, you know, realistically, speaking done, look, we've been talking on this program for months eighteen nineteen months about potentially correction that was going to happen for a number of different reasons. What we're looking at. Fundamentally tech Intech earning. So we're gonna talk about that in today's program. But we've seen an incredibly volatile stock market the last few weeks incredibly I mean, it's been unbelievable wild swings. I mean, we're up two point six two point two points. The NASDAQ down two point four seven last week. So what's your take on what's going on right now in public Mark, Lois? Oh, I don't think he's she'll pies effing. We all knew cycle. The last two years. I've been a booming Shamu on the buy side. Clearly, you should have made some nice profit, you know, nicely tones. So what's happening today expected the collision why because we have indicated on the in the kennel down and cut on the major significant event we have the primary coming up. So people are starting to beauty to be on age. You've always. Nothing change all if something changed. So these kids summon south Dante owes with Phil stinks to note is in the bottom things because we are getting into some still on the political landscape. He ends the US the signal teams do climates anti-national climate is tied the imbalance. We shaina now starting to be fair. We would be on not to to appreciate. And if you need to buy stuff today, you sure or two two big shades because you should expect a significant increase in pices in the near future. Why? Because most of the goods manufacturer. And sold in the United States comes from China on all wheel won't we'd love to see American mid pollute that we are long way to be able to do that. Because you need a measurable shift in in locating, the creating new manufacturing capability with two output with China has in America, an understanding the wage of liberal in China use America. So we have an issue we have acuity true as well. Come for me. All I knew easier via well the out walking. Citizen of this country. What he walks although is more positive than the standard. I I can people. Meaning we could be Richard big Lisi here and complacence we saw lifestyle. So that's no about of the titan dons, and we're going to get hurt every single one of us moving forward to all..

Lois Dominic cod SF United States China Connie Phil Richard big Lisi America Maya Frenchaccent bitcoin Stephen eighteen nineteen months two eight percent two zero percent one two percent two years
"tech intech" Discussed on Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"tech intech" Discussed on Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

"Now, for the first now, playing book underrated movies. We recommend get reviews of one hundred twenty five films are hosts love. You can order the book by clicking the banner at the top of our home page. This is the good state. My friend. You can follow now playing on Facebook and Twitter where we post announcements of new episodes and where the host post movie mini reviews links to our social media pages or available on our home page. We've been told to welcome strangers this you've ever known. One thing might be in into Scuds. Now, playing podcast is produced by Arne Carvalo, but they do exactly. A little bit of this. Now playing video game. Retrospective series is edited by Arne. I don't know how you do it. Can guess motivated. Now, playing credits read by Brooke into the opinions expressed now playing or those of the individual hosts, and may not reflect the opinion of in guns of media Inc. To bring you the truth, then guns media Inc is not affiliated with the motion, pictures reviewed or otherwise referred to here in all movie clips and music included in this podcast or the intellectual property of the respective copyright holders. They are included here for the purpose of review, and no infringement is intended anti Tikkun. Contraband you killed. Now, playing podcast is an exclusive trademark of in Gaza media Inc and may not be used without the expressed written permission of in Gaza media Inc, all rights reserved. So that was against the rules, not. Now playing is been gone. Some media production copyright twenty eighteen and no part of the show maybe reproduced repurpose or redistributed without the written permission of VIN guns of media Inc are too much. Smut boy. I can't. Show you can. I did. And making money stealing tech and tech and step. Say that one times fast Jin makes money stealing tech and test. Jin makes money stealing tech Intech and selling. Offense on a sofa with two women, and I keep thinking, it's that guy from two broke girls. It's isn't, but it really looks like it's distracting. So he beats, Brian. I keep wanting to say it's Bryan ferry, but it's Bryant fury. Roxie. Music's go into two totally different guys.

Gaza media Inc media Inc guns media Inc Arne Carvalo Jin tech Intech Scuds Bryan ferry Facebook Brooke Twitter Brian Bryant VIN
"tech intech" Discussed on Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"tech intech" Discussed on Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

"A lifetime of fame and fortune. Our story focuses really on none of that, but on Jin Kazama played by John FU a young man living in the slums with his mother. June played by Tam. Lin. Tomita Jin makes money stealing tech Intech and selling it to resistance members. But one time tech and soldiers discovered Jin's theft and kill the resistant members. Chins mom and presumably Jin himself, but Jin was out with his girlfriend. And so Jim survives the attack one of revenge on the tech Inc Jin defies his mother's last wishes and enters the iron fist tournament. He goes to an open fight, beats the champion fight. Ter- named martial law and is in the tournament and once in the journal that he becomes romantically involved with another fighter. Christie Monteiro played by Kelly Overton, but Jin really isn't interested in the tournament. He wants to meet the head of the tech Inc and kill him, and Jin isn't the only one with plans for hockey Mishra Ma. He actually son Kazuya played by Ian, Anthony. Dale is tired of waiting for the old man to die. He wants to run the company and seemingly kills his father in a coup to takeover Tekken and Kazuya also wants Jin dead because who should is kazoo bastard son and a competitor for his right to the tech Inc 'cause sends a Sassoon's after and rigs the tournaments against him. But Jin wins the tech and tournament Kazuya attacks himself and is about to kill Jin. But Christie helps them get the upper hand. And when the chips are down, Jin decides to have compassion and leave his revenge behind. He allows Kazuya to live. And having defeated Kazuya Jin is the rightful chairman of Tekken, but he says he doesn't want the job as credits roll to an after credit scene. Did you guys hang out for it? Oh God. No, there was. Yeah. I mean, barely tease guess what he is still alive. Something for the sequel. All right. And in nowhere in that plot summary, did you describe man with lionhead and in a suit and tie. Sadly that was not there, but we did get Yoshimitsu who was the predator looking dude in one of the games could turn invisible. And at one point, I think, became one of the alliens from pro. I mean, not in the movie, of course they couldn't afford that. But in the games, that's one thing that I picked up very quickly on in this movie is there's quite a few characters from the game that they could've used to brighten this movie up and give it a little bit more personality. Just left out. You know, Yoshi michiu like you said is probably the most interesting thing from the game that they brought into this movie him being. We're not quite sure if he's human or cyborg robot, but in the game he is cool. He's got special powers as a samurai and yes, some special moves, but we didn't see a whole heck a lot of them in this movie. I am going to defend their decision here. Yes, would I like this? Absolutely crazy panda. Polar tiger head fight game movie. I would not as the anime I saw, but I would like somebody to put that together that said with a budget of thirty million, I think they made the right choice to ground this, especially. Since the are focusing on the main thrust of all the games. All of this other colorful characters would detract from the main story here of the Mishra family here. I think I'd rather not have them do it then do really poorly Allah Goro from mortal Kombat. Imagine that with eight of them around Goro did not work out all that. Well, it was cute, but in twenty ten, I have much higher demands than I had in mid nineties. Sure. I guess what I'm getting at is I think maybe they missed a little bit of an opportunity because one of the vehicles they set up here in this movie is exposition of showing us how this tournament works via TV screens that are in bars or on the street or on billboards, and they're kind of giving us the history of this tournament with graphic overlays and stuff they could have thrown some of those characters in there. You know, like previously this champion defeated, so, and so just a little bit of fans. Service in there, I think was a bit of a missed opportunity..

Tomita Jin Jin Kazama tech Inc Kazuya tech Intech Christie Monteiro Tam Lin hockey Mishra Ma Goro Ter theft Mishra Dale Yoshimitsu John FU Jim chairman Kelly Overton
"tech intech" Discussed on FanBros

FanBros

14:06 min | 2 years ago

"tech intech" Discussed on FanBros

"Friendship. Had some cool moments, but streetfighter Capcom has kept street fighters name a live in one way or another. They weren't coming out shit, Dave, Dave, and tried to out tech Intech. And what e. x.. Never and actually wasn't even allowed to played more combat home. The only way I got play. It was when I want to. When I went to the movie theater and played it there. So do movie data's even while somebody is, do they even have arcade cabinets anymore. They have a few, but it's. There. It is. All right up next from beta Ray Jill. There are actually two questions here. The first being bang, boom, or drogue on. Who's being thankful from iron man's. He's a marvel dragon who wears purple shorts like the hulk. Yeah, tea at from doctors dragons. If if we're comparing dragons, I dunno gone from drought from game at their phones. He got murdered, like gimme finishing are still alive. Guarantees. I'm sure fuck outta here. To you, Matt. I'm going for dragon, the dragons TM, but out of those two. Fin faintest. He's much bigger and funnier. Sports. Second question. Okay. Second question is why doesn't she get more love see destroy that other one that I said before, man, they just had a really dope Shijo. Comic goes, incredible people that did not bite. I talked about it on comics. I copped. And she's an adventures now. There we go. She helped amd because getting, I believe she's she's game. Show her last solo run was good. I like. It was incredible. I guess the question of when you say when you guys asked questions like more love, like to what degree, so you're gonna be like as ubiquitous as an iron man or maybe that's why people feel like not to say that there's nothing, but it's like it's not enough love as much as I love show. I go back to the John burns. She where she was like the deadpool current age where she could see two four fall and telling them readers all this stuff like that. It was a great series. If you've ever check it out as Larry, it breaks audibles comics, it's just a really dove series. I love she, oh, Jennifer waters is, but I'm trying to think. And this is an honest, freshman, any characters, especially one where it's like, okay, you have miles Morales. He's not as popular as Peter Parker into story. But I guess even worse when it's like character who was a dude and in the woman version, captain marvel might be only one, but that's only because the ritual marville kind of faded out of its. He eighty. UV being you kick kick, the brother, the brother passed away for cancer. I know. I'm already know forecast comeback. We do so. Yeah. So I, I don't think there's many characters like I think it might be a problem with her name and that's why the last Seahawk run. They just called it home, but you know, I don't know. Maybe the reason why people don't even know what it was about. She hope, yeah, it's a win lose Seco. It's such a name that was very trash name. Maybe she needs a name there. What would you. What do you expect? It was derivative led by men. So. I know hocus Hoechst. Oh my God. Nobody already have. Hopefully they are not even really Toko. He's not even a whole hokey show drought a battle after. Ho kiesha. Never met frustration. Next question pitching me rolling they. Right. What was the last scary movie that really, really scared you at least gave you the Hebrew dis for me, it was the ending of drag me to hell. It caught me off guard. The Hobie was low key comedy after that. I cried throughout drag me to hell. That's one of my favorite movies. I that steer me at all. I thought it was hilarious. I actually bred to sprint to hereditary to new joint right now. I've not seen it the strippers pretty Stary. It's so super dart that I don't know if. Voiced me because it's kinda like just dart for no reason after a while. It follows me. It follows bugs follows the for that too. It's the same thing when I finished it. The movie stripped if one of site. Phil stark again, I don't feel yeah, because it is if I follow in, you know, it's not super dark at ends like where there's hope, but he just has that like, yeah, that bad. That one me myself personally, I don't really care for scary movies because I don't get scared by them. 'cause I, especially when something fantastical like I don't, I don't buy into it. So I'm more so sitting there laughing and finding the holes in it. It's when it's movies that try to dwell on like more psychological horror than batch when you got me, that's when I'm into it because it could potentially happen. But even still, I'm not really scared by those things. So I, I will say I rather enjoy psychological horror type. And for me, I, I don't. I haven't really watched mad, scary, movies like that in a while. But the last the last one that I will say really messed me up. Speaking of buying into it Blair witch project. I thought that it was. I was thinking of that because I bought into, I thought it was based on, oh, I don't know why, but we the way they promoted it. I remember if felt like it was documentary and that was the point, and it was a first time fout while at least the first time in a wide format, found footage was used as the primary driving way to make people think that it was real. Right. And that's funny. That's funny because I'm damn sure didn't. I didn't see it in theaters better. You know, even when it came out, I knew what it was all about signed already at that age rows into films, and I wanted to know how they're making. So I knew it was like whatever, but it's still steered to living life out because it's. The very end of that bugs me out, oh, those that are things that get me. It's like it's the hint of it early in the film where they're like, oh, she'll make you stand in the corner, and then you come around and timbre moves around. And that dude is standing in the corner and stuff. The bugs me out like because it's like, oh, it's the little things like the conjuring I thought was immensely Sterry up until about halfway through it. And then to start stuff starts happening to me personally, I'd have found a Larry of rolling, but it's a little things in that movie that got me at first. I think they're ring was scary. No. I sorta crawls out of the TV. I'm. Do that walk, which is doing that one of my God, I was laughing. Magic hour. This is America. Oh my God, I can't believe has done here. Idea for those listening and it before before we get off the topic, the first it. Oh, that that kind of a mess me you. I've never seen their original what? Yeah. You don't know about my story. I told him before. Yeah, I've told it before fan Bros. but I recently saw the original and even now as goofy as it is, it's still holds up and it has that really creepy bit that the new doesn't have a new one to ten. Just comedy, the new one. But it's comedy. And it was an ABC had the nerve to have it on tonight's. Yeah. No, it's really that even to this day. I was a kid I saw recently it's still holds up. There's stuff in it that the new doesn't where do where it has that more creepy, horror that darn wasn't eighties movie. Yeah, I believe that Jerry eighties movie HARA and I think it was everything's rusty 'cause they're supposed to be coming out with another when they're grown up. Right? That's why like. Like you watched of yours night when they were kids and the second night when they were adults bra and it cuts back and forth in between them both of them. So yeah, they and they didn't do that in a new it. So I'm looking forward to that. Next up. Next step comes from wit substance. They right. There's a report saying I, in fist of wheat grass is going to appear. I e taint Luke h two and here in iron fist to Netflix has to know the collective opinion is that the actor playing iron fist looks and seems more like porcelain 'thus iron-fist clown throughout the fenders. Why won't they cast this dude? It is painful to watch him act tough when I think my eighty year old grandma his, but with one hand. I got to say, I'm honestly, I think this is a, we got to get past us. They're not gonna recast them all to hate watching. You know, drove it up the charts. He's aren't fit for the foreseeable future as I'm one who loves Danny ran like that's one of my favorite characters, and I just don't care anymore. Y'all I, it's just not that serious. Like I, I'm not sure if he's going to be a Luke cage. I've watched the whole first season second season yet, but. You know, I mean, I agree with you. He's absolutely Coachella fist, but that said it's like, what are you going to do about it? They're not going to change. I mean, they know the collective opinion, but they also see the numbers and they're going to go with what the number saying. It has been. I mean, mentioned lots of hate watching drove them number ups. Now, if it was a complete catastrophic failure, then maybe we'd be talking to different story right about now, but it wasn't in fact that was the complete opposite. So they are not going to see a problem. They meaning Netflix Disney, they're not gonna see a problem. They don't see a problem with it number wise and they're gonna, keep it moving. Just remember, opposite of hate is, is opposite of love is not hate indifference because love in eight, have an equal amount of passion and for all of you who barely hated, there's a lot of people. This is probably more of a split decision. Then people want to care to admit because for all the the vehement opposition to Finn Jones, there are people who either like his portrayal or they don't care either way. So, yeah, I think it's as skewed because once again, Twitter is. Not the end all be all of public opinion. And that's something that on social, a lot of people have to realize yet it can drive stuff, but if the numb you gain insights on analysts from a variety of places from the views from the social, talk from the reviews and you get an aggregate. And once you understand where you're coming from, they've probably made the decision. Okay. There is backlash to this actor, but we we're doing enough positive in views and making money and and all those real categories that we, yeah, we can ride this out. Let's see what happens. They've already shot a bunch of stuff ahead and the way these these shows work. You can't just vivid him. You really can't end there that in twenty eighteen. So I don't know. I don't know which I want, but you know, show it with your views. Yeah, don't watch it. If you don't enjoy it, don't watch it. Don't sit there tweeting about it. Don't sit there hating on him and dragging through Twitter because it's just unnecessary and is not going to do anything because people like Jeff said, love and hate are the same thing. People will take, especially corporations will take the same way especially when you're watching or hate tweet in something because they don't. They're not gonna pay. It's see iron-fist one hundred thousand times. Oh shit. People talk about it. They're watching it. They did and they've Rhody in reverse, but are hoping. Are also Terrance Howard being territory not do that. But it did have a new. He started. He started new math in that money, and that's what happened there. And that's when bra. Or less. Okay. This is gonna be the last one. No one to fifteen rights are always here. You guys ask this is part of your rapid fire questions, but I would love to know your answers. What characters death affected you the most? My Hct minds is still optimism prime only movie to make me cry. I answered this when I was a guest way back in two thousand seventeen gonna. Is it. It's gonna. Is it. All that time ago chain? No, no, I think I think mine is still still solidified its it's era from final fantasy. Seven. I remember I wasn't even playing the game. I was watching my homeboy play, and we get to that scene where separate comes down from the rafters. Jokes are aver fucking bid section, and I saw the life leave. Aritz is bro. I was trumped as a mind you. I'm watching TV because back in the day, the PlayStation cut scenes were like four Cates. So. Gano, right? Right l. these polygons Apolo God's lit boy, but I'm watching as she thought I was like, yo she did deserve verse like fan separate, had nuclear heat with me. I was like, yo, how? How you still by reaction to bow? That was my reaction when Eric die. I was like. Oh my God. That immediately made me go cop PlayStation so I could hands up my own personal fade. Like when I beat him, he was that was like personal to me, like in the depths of my fucking sternum shit. So yeah. Yeah, it's still.

Twitter Netflix Dave Ray Jill Matt John burns Peter Parker tech Intech Seco hocus Hoechst captain marvel Larry amd Jennifer waters Morales Seahawk Finn Jones Terrance Howard Phil stark America