17 Burst results for "Taylor Van Zeiss"

"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:36 min | Last week

"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

"Access. Democrats, Tim kaine, of Virginia, and kyrsten sinema, Arizona teamed up with Republican Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska on the measure. Abortion rights would be protected federally up to viability, and even passed that point if the mother's life is in danger. Viability nor the woman's life being in jeopardy is defined as a doctor would be the one to determine those things. The proposal comes weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court voted to overturn roe versus wade, the decades old decision which legalized abortion in the U.S.. If you get hit with COVID-19, how long are you contagious? If you use president Joe Biden's recent relapse as a case study, it's easy to see how confusing the guidelines can be. Joel achenbach has taken a closer look for The Washington Post and spoke with Taylor van zeiss. Joel, before his relapse, The White House was out in front saying that they've done more than the CDC requires to make sure that the president wouldn't infect anybody. And yet here we are, what are those CDC guidelines in the first place? Well, first of all, the guidelines are under review and they're going to put out some new ones. I don't think they're going to change the key guideline for exiting isolation. This is the one that we really focused on in this new article, which is right now it says, you need to isolate for 5 days and then you can come out of isolation. The problem is that's just an average and approximation of the period of time when you're likely to be most contagious. And for a lot of people, yeah, if you isolate for 5 days and come out, you probably won't give it to someone else except that the research shows people keep shedding virus on average until about day 8. They're less infectious in those later stages, but even that is an average. People can go ten days, 12 days, 13 days, and still be shedding virus. So the best way to know is to take a rapid test and get a negative result, which is what happened with President Biden last week. He had two back to back tests that were negative and then he had his event in a rose garden. He said, hey, I'm back. And what's the CDC's position on testing after infection? Because I know like for our company, for example, if you get sick, you need to test before you're going to be allowed back in the building. Does the CDC have that position too? No, the CDC says, well, you might want to take a negative and take a test and if it's positive, you need to extend your isolation to ten days. But they don't specifically recommend it. It's a bit of a puzzle, many of our expert sources who we talked to said, this is weird because it's a direct piece of evidence about how you are not still infectious as opposed to this timeline guidance, which is just an average. The reason the CDC isn't pushing for everyone to get a negative test has to do with their concern that not everyone has the opportunity to have those kind of tests, because not everyone has access to the test. And a lot of people, they need to be back at work or they need to be taken care of family members or other duties they have. And I think they felt like the guidelines they put in place last December during the omicron wave, they didn't want to change them again. And so we'll see what they come up with next. But this is definitely a point of tension between the CDC and many people in the infectious disease scientific community. And when those updates come out, we know we'll be able to find them online at Washington Post dot com from jollof and Baku's

CDC kyrsten sinema Joel achenbach Taylor van zeiss Tim kaine Lisa Murkowski Susan Collins President Biden U.S. Supreme Court Joe Biden wade Maine Alaska Washington Post Arizona Virginia Joel White House U.S. jollof
"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

06:56 min | 2 weeks ago

"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

"Infected with COVID-19 at a time when we're seeing a surge of the BA four and BA 5 omicron sub variants. They're doing well. We had a lot of work done going to continue to get it done. And in the meantime, thanks for your concern and keep the faith is going to be okay. Justin Finch is covering it for ABC News and spoke with Taylor van zeiss. Justin, what's The White House saying today about the severity of the infection and the president's prognosis? The White House is essentially saying here there are reasons here to be relieved by the diagnosis as it stands right now. The president's symptoms are said to be mild runny nose, a dry cough, some fatigue so far, but he is working from The White House today, making calls and having Zoom meetings. He last tested negative on Tuesday of this week, giving you a sense of how quickly they saw turned. He's also now taking the antiviral packs lovit to help minimize his symptoms. They're saying that this kind of happened this morning with his test for COVID-19, testing positive. If he had some symptoms yesterday, they said feeling tired after that speech he gave in Somerset, Massachusetts and also having a restless sleep and given that he was tested and that test was found to be positive. The vice president here also testing negative as well today. Both she and the First Lady traveling today and wearing their masks as part of their protocol here. But the real message, The White House has kind of attached to this is the importance of everyone being aware of their symptoms and of course the transmissibility of these sub variants now across the country. And what can you tell us about who the president may have been exposed to? Where this may have come from and who he may have exposed. That's what a real big question at The White House briefing just where this could be traced to. The White House at this point not exactly giving us that triangulation, but we have to price in here. The amount of travel the president has done just recently to Massachusetts just yesterday and before that going abroad to the Middle East. And so some questions have arisen about cliff that have happened in between any of those trips. The White House saying they don't have the answer to that just yet, but our contact tracing at The White House as well. But we know that was a concern as the president was going to the Middle East last week. We know the president is on pax lovid now to treat this. But he's in his late 70s, and by the time many of us get to that age, we're probably all on some prescription or another. Does he have to take any other considerations for his health or other issues that he has held with his own health? The White House saying that that appears to be his major concern here is his age just by being 79 that puts you in a whole other level of concern medically about this disease. We do know that he is fully vaccinated. And twice boosted his most recent booster shot back on March 30 fairly recently, and these are all things that are working in his advantage here because of that full vaccination and boosting protocol here. We do know that the president has had some medical issues in the past, but they have said The White House. His doctors at the biggest concern right now is his age, was helping him in this case though, is that he does have that full vaccination and also catching this early. ABC's Justin Finch with us on northwest news radio, Justin, thank you. That's Taylor van zeiss. The Supreme Court is declining a request from the Biden administration on prioritizing select immigrants for deportation, but will here arguments Brian shook has more. The Department of Homeland Security wanted to prioritize deportation for immigrants who it deemed a threat to national security with other immigrants being less of a priority. Texas and Louisiana filed lawsuits over the policy saying it conflicted with the law with the Supreme Court agreeing. They did agree, however, to hear the case and review the policy in December. I'm Brian shook. Your stock charts dot com money update on northwest news radio. Alaska Air Group reported more than $1 billion in revenue in June. It's best month ever. The leading airline at sea tac international airport also exceeded Wall Street expectations in its second quarter, with both earnings and revenue surpassing estimates as travel begins to open up. Seattle has become one of the most popular cities in the U.S. for Liv work play apartments, or rental communities that include residential office and retail space. The city will soon have 9500 apartments in mixed use communities, according to data firm rent cafe. Many of which are designed to appeal to millennials. The Dow gained 162 points to close at 32,037. NASDAQ also rose one 62 and the S&P 500 gained 39. This is rob Smith with northwest news, radio. I'm announcing today that I will be proposing a significant expansion of our criminal justice training commission to offer is western unity on Ukraine starting to unravel. Hungary wants more not less natural gas pumped in from Russia. These are your world headlines from ABC News. After meeting his Hungarian counterpart in Moscow, foreign secretary Sergey Lavrov says Budapest request to purchase additional amounts of Russian natural gas will be considered immediately. Hungarian government is seeking an additional purchase of 700 million m³ of gas, replenished inventories before winter. Italy's prime minister has resigned after his ruling coalition fell apart and the country's president is all parliament, which paves the way for new elections. And the European Central Bank has raised interest rates for the first time in 11 years by a larger than expected amount. Joining steps already taken by other major central banks to target high inflation. I'm Tom rivers at the ABC News foreign desk in London. The historic he gripping the nation has turned tragic in Texas ABC's janae Norman explains. Pete alerts stretching from coast to coast. Initial numbers show Texas breaking another all time record for peak electricity demand Wednesday, reaching nearly 80,000 megawatts. It's the 11th time. They've broken that record this summer. Sadly, Dallas county reporting the heat related death of a 66 year old woman who they say had underlying conditions. Northwest news radio traffic from the dubin law group traffic center. East bong highway 5 22 Tribeca it's looking a lot smoother on your drive from four or 5 to two, it'll be 18 minutes. Seattle west found 5 20, the off ramp is closed to east Rowan oak street for road work beginning at 9 o'clock tonight,

White House Justin Finch Taylor van zeiss Brian shook ABC News Massachusetts Justin Middle East runny nose northwest news radio Biden administration cough Alaska Air Group Somerset sea tac international airport Supreme Court ABC Department of Homeland Securit
"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

06:10 min | 3 weeks ago

"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

"Someone who can help. Lenny Bernstein is covering it for The Washington Post and spoke with Taylor van zeiss. Lenny, this has been in the works for a long time now, what happens on Saturday if a person in or adjacent to crisis calls or even texts 9 8 8. Right. The FCC mandated this two years ago and it's taken a lot of preparation and they're finally ready to bring it out on Saturday. Basically the only thing that really changes for the user is instead of dialing 802 7 three talk, you're going to have a simple 9 8 8. That's what you would do if you were in a mental health crisis. Someone you know was in the mental health crisis, it's just a lot simpler and a lot easier. Imagine if you needed an ambulance or a police officer. And you had to dial a ten digit number instead of 9-1-1. It's the same idea. They want you just to have that easy access. And how busy has the national suicide prevention lifeline been in recent years. And what is the expected impact of the 9 8 8 switchover? So it has been busy. There are some places that can not handle the demand. And there are 14 backup centers around the country that those calls roll over to. There was a good story in The Wall Street Journal that calculated that one out of 6 people hang up without ever even reaching anybody. So I believe it's been 3.6 million in the last year. They are expecting that to more than double. Is there funding to ensure long-term success of the 9 8 8 program? There is funding. I'm not sure we should say yet that it's going to ensure the long-term success. The federal government through SAMHSA has put about 280 million in Congress allocated another 150 million, but what everybody says is that we need so much more spending in the field of mental health. We need mobile crisis teams. We need places where you can take people who are having a crisis that isn't a jail or an emergency room that there is going to need to be a lot more spending in this area in general. And then as I mentioned, there are those places that yet can't keep up with the demand and those states are going to have to pony up money to get those crisis centers up to where they need to be. And that leads into my final question as far as a consistent standard of care across the country because if a caller dials into 9 8 8 or gives a text, say, from the Seattle area, are they going to be able to access the same resources as someone in Chicago or Dallas or New York? At the moment, I would say the answer is no. If you call in in one of the places like Tucson, Arizona that is beautifully staffed and the person on the phone can't resolve your crisis, they will send someone to your door. If the person who comes to your door can't resolve your crisis, they will take you to a special mental health center. That does not exist in a lot of places around this country. The person on the phone, very often can resolve the crisis, particularly if it's suicide, there's a threat and they need to separate you from something that will do you harm or you need to separate talk you through a crisis. That happens most of the time. If you need follow-up care, that's where it gets to be very different depending on where you live. You can read much more online at Washington Post dot com. Remember the old number for the national suicide prevention lifeline that still operating today 802 7 three 8 two 5 5. It's going to remain active indefinitely 9 8 8 launches Saturday. Lenny Bernstein with us on northwest news radio Lenny, thank you. That's Taylor van seiss. Your stock charts dot com money update on northwest news radio. Stocks posted broad and sharp games today with investors buoyed by news of stronger than expected June retail sales and some positive earnings. The Dow Jones industrials rallied 658 points, the S&P 500 rows 72, and the NASDAQ composite moved up 201. Benefiting from rising interest rates and strong trading results, Citigroup this morning reported second quarter earnings and revenue that beat expectations. The bank posted a profit of more than four and a half $1 billion on revenue that rose 11% from a year ago. Investors cheered the results as city shares soared 13%. That's your money now. In less than two months, four people have drowned in Chilean county, and many others have been rescued from lakes and rivers where the water is cold and running fast. Carlene Johnson has a warning from the sheriff's office. If you've been to leavenworth and perhaps floated the Wenatchee river, you know how fun it can be. You're gonna hit The Rock. Yeah, it's getting but right now the river is colder and higher than typical for this time of year. We're really encouraging people, even if they're good swimmers to always wear a life jacket when you're on the water with these cold temps and fast moving waters, you can cramp up quickly and not be able to make it to shore. Rich Magnus said, with shalan county emergency management, says this week's drowning of a 46 year old Tacoma woman in leavenworth is the fourth already since the end of May. Right now we're experiencing real hot temperatures over here and so a lot of people are recreating on or near the water. We've had some Sunday 5 water rescues and unfortunately one of them ended up in the death. Magnus says, even those who think they are good swimmers, especially on the river, should always wear a life jacket, carlene Johnson, northwest news radio. For what it's worth, I'm Brian Clark, disheartening news for younger adults who like to drink, moderately, a large global study finding even that carries health risks. I found that moderate alcohol consumption, which in this study was defined as approximately two drinks per day, which is relatively the maximum that we recommend from the CDC, was associated to an increased risk of harm for those under the age of 40 compared to older age groups. But ABC medical contributor doctor Darien Sutton offers this caveat when looking at younger age groups, there

Lenny Bernstein Taylor van zeiss Lenny Washington Post SAMHSA FCC Taylor van seiss The Wall Street Journal Chilean county federal government Carlene Johnson Tucson Congress Seattle Dallas Arizona
"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

05:00 min | 3 weeks ago

"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

"Fastest pace in 40 years. It's just as true today as it was a month ago. Rachel Siegel is covering it for The Washington Post and spoke with Taylor van zeiss. I hate to be repetitive because that is the exact line I use a month ago, but what do the June numbers show now? And what are the primary drivers? You know, it's a story that I wrote a month ago as well and I'm sure that it's not a reminder that many people need about how expensive gas has become groceries rent. An enormous driver of the most recent inflation report were energy and gas prices. That's a pretty direct line from Russia's invasion of Ukraine. And we're seeing that now take up an even larger share of the overall inflation data and that obviously trickles down to just about everything that people spend money on. The money they have to pay to get to work, everything in between. Was there any sign of improvement from the May numbers to the June numbers? There really wasn't. You really have to squint and maybe turn something upside down to try and find any sort of good news in this report, more broadly in the economy. There are some positive signs that the housing market, for example, is starting to cool off, but home prices aren't reflected in this inflation report. We also know that over the last couple of weeks, gas prices have come down from the highs that we saw in the middle of June, but I wouldn't necessarily say that that suggests big moves for the July report either. Well, yeah, I was just going to bring that up because I know at least my own gas tank was a little cheaper to fill up today than a week ago. But at this point, what's the expectation for action from the fed because they've got a meeting this month and I assume we're going to be talking about another rate increase, right? Yeah, so we're definitely talking about another rate increase and over the past couple of weeks, the fed has been setting the expectation that they could do another three quarters of a percentage point hike. It's the same size of a hike that they did at their June meeting. And all expectation is that they would act just as forcefully in July. I'm certainly keeping my ears out to whether or not they start to send out any signal that they have to move even more aggressively. I'm not seeing that overwhelmingly today, but the signal is obviously that they have to act swiftly and they have to ask people to act forcefully. When you look at these reports that come out, whether it's the CPI numbers or fed report or whatever. How long in your mind should it take for us to get an idea to know if their strategy of raising interest rates is successful at lowering inflation. At one point do we say, all right, throw up your hands. Let's try something else. Yeah, it's a really difficult question, especially because interest rates and really all of the fed's tools, they work with a lag and they work with a lag that takes time to fill through the entire economy. That's a really big problem if you're trying to assess progress in real time and the fed has made clear that that's what they're looking for too. They can't necessarily close out the end of the day saying, well, we think we're going to start to see progress in a couple of weeks of good enough for us. They also need to see real tangible progress, but their tools a don't work that quickly and be there so many forces in the economy that are really pushing in the other direction. Rachel Siegel with us on northwest news radio, reported for The Washington Post covering economics. You can find the report, all kinds of charts and graphs to look into as well online at Washington Post dot com. Rachel, thank you. That's Taylor van zeiss. Your stock charts dot com money update on northwest news radio. Office vacancy rates in the Seattle area rose slightly in the second quarter to 10.19%. The vacancy rate has now risen 8 of the last ten quarters, according to commercial real estate firm cuter Matthews, which caused the Seattle office market unsettled and volatile. Foot traffic is dropping at Starbucks as inflation takes hold. Data firm place her AI says visits to coffee chains in general is now below quick service restaurants for the first time all year. One factor may be that Starbucks has raised prices three times since October. The Dow lost 208 points to close in 30,773. NASDAQ and the S&P 500 both lost 17 points. This is rob Smith, but the northwest news radio. The government of a Texas county where 21 people were killed in a school shooting are hoping for a special session on guns. Uvalde county commissioners approved a resolution today, making the request to governor Greg Abbott. It specifically says Texas should raise a legal purchase age of a semi-automatic long gun to 21. The shooter who opened fire inside rob elementary in May bought to rifle shortly after his 18th birthday. A former CIA software engineer was convicted today in New York in the biggest theft of classified information in the agency's history, ABC's Erin koterski as more. The jury in Manhattan federal court found Joshua schulte guilty of leaking a trove of CIA cyber espionage tools known as vault 7, published by WikiLeaks, the material exposed how the CIA hacked into iPhones, Android devices, and smart televisions of private consumers, schulte who defended himself called the government's case of political witch hunt after someone stole their crown jewels. Prosecutors called schulte and angry

Rachel Siegel Taylor van zeiss fed Washington Post Ukraine Russia cuter Matthews Starbucks Seattle Uvalde county governor Greg Abbott Rachel rob Smith rob elementary Texas county AI CIA
"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:42 min | Last month

"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

"The coronavirus pandemic isn't done with us. The new BA 5 version of the omicron variant shows a knack for evading antibodies and reinfecting us. Joel achenbach is watching it for The Washington Post and spoke with Taylor van zeiss. Julia caught a professor at Scripps research who says that this is the worst version of the virus we've seen. Why does he believe that's the case? So yeah, so this virus, this version of this sub variant, BA 5, it has a lot of mutations in it that allow it to escape the immune immunity we have either from being previously infected or from vaccination or both. And so it's not a totally new virus, obviously, but if you've been boosted and in fact, or if you've had a previous case, you're still vulnerable to getting infected again with BA 5. That's the problem. Now, when Eric topol, the professor says it's the worst version of it and arguably no, when we the virus first showed up two and a half years ago, that was the worst version because we had no immunity to it at all. It would never abide to never seen it before. We didn't have vaccines yet. We're in this dance with the virus right now where it keeps mutating in response to our immune system. And the result is a lot of infections and a lot of reinfections people who are getting excited for the second or third time. Do we know yet how widespread the BA 5 variant is in the United States or is that data just not there? We do actually have an idea of the percentage of cases right now that are being caused by BA 5. It's a majority. It's a little bit over half according to the latest CDC estimate, which always runs a week or two behind. So I think that the latest news we hear is that most cases are BA 5 or there would be a four, which is almost the same. It has the same spike protein as BA 5. So these two together are driving the wave of cases and the real question is how many cases are there? I mean, how many people right now are getting infected with the virus. That is a really interesting situation because people are testing at home and they're not reporting the results of the tests or they're not testing at all. They don't want to know if the thing that they are suffering from at the moment is COVID. So but the exports are telling us that it could be half a million people right now infected with the virus, which is a very large number. That's a big wave of cases. And it's why anecdotally, you probably know people who have had COVID in the last few weeks. Yeah, I can think of two or three names just off the top of my mind right now. Why is BA 5? So adept at reinfection. Do we know that yet? Well, we know the specific mutations on it that kind of alter the structure or chemistry of the spike. And there are some other parts of the virus that are also a little bit different, which may be part of that kind of slippery nature of it. It's not been Supernatural. It's just evolution. I mean, evolution happens in the virus is constantly making copies of itself and eventually it lands on a recipe or just to random mutations of the amino acids. It lands on a version that does a little better in terms of infecting people or replicating in their cells. The new version is BA 5 Joel achenbach reporting on it in The Washington Post and you can read more online, including about why this may impact our calculus around developing new boosters for the COVID-19 vaccine. You can find more online at Washington Post dot com. Joel, thank you

Joel achenbach Taylor van zeiss Scripps research Eric topol The Washington Post Julia CDC United States COVID Joel
"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:32 min | Last month

"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

"Connected stay informed this is northwest news radio 1000 FM 97 7 This week's soccer's governing body announced Seattle will be one of the host cities when the World Cup comes to North America in 2026 So what exactly are we in for when the beautiful game's biggest event comes to the northwest Stephen Goff is following it all for The Washington Post and spoke with Taylor van zeiss Seattle hosted the goodwill games back in 1990 the MLB All-Star Game in 2001 and will have the All-Star Game again in 2023 but this is the FIFA World Cup What are we and other North American cities in for Well World Cup is without question that the sporting event in the world You will expect thousands of visitors into Seattle depending on which teams are sent there We won't know those match ups until some 6 months before the tournament actually takes place But it's a party like no other And it brings together countries people cultures and the highest level of soccer you'll see And lumen field is a great stadium for soccer That's where the sounders play and Seahawks as well obviously Countless athletic facilities around here for practices too but how much infrastructure and security needs to be built up before an event like the World Cup The big project for Seattle will be putting grass down on the stadium temporarily And that is not done a week or two in advance That's done That's done several months in advance World cups are only played on grass As you know Seattle's stadium is artificial turf as are many of the stadiums that were selected for the World Cup grass is mandatory There's also issues with width American football stadiums fields are much narrower than soccer So in many cases they'll have to knock out some seats some corner areas I'm not sure of the specifics of Seattle but that might be there Seattle certainly has plenty of hotels Airport great highway system There will be upgrades to security obviously any time you have a big event whether it's a World Cup or a political convention but no stadiums need to be built or training sites need to be built So I think Seattle's in a pretty good place And finally with The Washington Post you've been covering soccer for the post for years but D.C. didn't get the nod this time around The nation's capital of course They've got an MLS team and NWSL team lots of college teams too How rare is it for a host nation not to get a match in the capitol That's very rare for a capital city not to get a It's only happened twice in those head asterisks next to them Bond Germany West Germany in 74 because of Berlin situation and then Tokyo didn't have it in 2002 but they had three stadiums around Tokyo that were used So really this is the first time And Washington's big issue was the big NFL stadium where the commanders play just was not suitable for World Cup They tried to save the bid by pairing up with Baltimore and playing the games in Baltimore which is just an hour north but that didn't get it across the finish line Unfortunately Washington and the Washington region will not have any World Cup games in 2026 Well you're invited to Seattle I've got a pull out couch that's got your name on it Steven I'll be there All right Stephen Goff with us on northwest news radio reporter for The Washington Post covering soccer and the World Cup comes to Seattle in 2026 That's Taylor van seiss Your stock charts dot com money update on northwest news radio Wall Street's turbulent weekend with another vulnerable session today the index is ending mixed in this one The downed industrial slipped 38 points the S&P 500 edged up 8 and the NASDAQ composite leaked 152 for the week those indexes all recorded significant declines More confirmation that the U.S. economy has started to slow down The government says its index of leading economic indicators declined in May by four tenths percent matching the April dip likely a response to high inflation rising interest rates and a slowdown in home building Peacock today scheduled a late summer premiere date for a new series starring Bill Nye The unscripted 6 episode series on the streaming service.

Seattle soccer Stephen Goff World Cup Taylor van zeiss The Washington Post NWSL sounders FIFA MLB Seahawks North America Tokyo Washington Baltimore West Germany football Taylor van seiss D.C. MLS
"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:50 min | 2 months ago

"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

"Will soon be eligible for COVID-19 vaccinations If all goes as expected children under 5 will be able to get their shots as soon as June 21st Lina's son is covering it for The Washington Post and spoke with Taylor van zeiss We're not just talking about one vaccine option both the Pfizer and Moderna shots are on the table here what still needs to happen So we have a lot of action that is coming up in the next week or so And if all goes as expected to vaccines one by Moderna and the other by Pfizer and its German partner bio in tech will be authorized by the FDA and then recommended by the CDC and then be available for docs and others to give to kids by June 21st All right and this is the day care age group those not old enough public schools some not old enough for masks and I imagine just from my own group of peers there's going to be some pretty strong demand for those who've had child care issues over the last couple of years How strong nationally is demand expected to be for these shots for younger kids Well right now the experts predict that the initial uptake will be modest Based on what they have heard from parents and what the polling has showed I think the polling has showed that something like maybe 18% of parents say that they would get their kids vaccinated in the first month when the vaccines are available But the track record is such that with the other vaccines uptake usually does increase as parents here from their peers and remember this is the only group of people in the United States who haven't been able to get a shot So among the parents who are really desperate to get their kids protected so they can go on vacation and send their kids to camp and child care and many many other things Those parents I think are quite eager and many people have been waiting For adults at least the mRNA vaccinations seem pretty similar Pfizer versus Moderna I got Moderna my wife got Pfizer We both felt a little chrome after the second shot and here we are now Are there more differences though when it comes to young kids and these vaccines and maybe the effectiveness The Moderna regimen is two doses given four weeks apart for children 6 months through 5 years old It was shown to be 51% effective in preventing illness in children in the young age group between 6 months and two years And 37% effective in children two to 5 years old The Pfizer shot is a three shot regimen And the second dose is given three weeks after the first one and then the next shot the third shot comes two months later We don't know what the final efficacy of that vaccine is yet but in early analysis which is likely to change suggested it was 80% effective against symptomatic illness So one is two shots One is three shots And people might choose one or the other but there's pluses and minuses to both There's enough supply and there's enough money for all of the kids vaccines for every kid who wants a shot for the little kids a little less kids But if every adult wants to have a shot of any sort of updated vaccine for the fall there is not enough money the U.S. government says to get those ready We'll be keeping an eye on your coverage lean us on with us on northwest news radio reporter with The Washington Post and you can find Lena's coverage online at Washington Post dot com Thank you That's Taylor van seiss Your stock charts dot com money update on northwest news radio.

Pfizer Moderna Taylor van zeiss Lina Washington Post CDC FDA United States U.S. government Taylor van seiss Lena
"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:38 min | 2 months ago

"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

"It all seemed to catch Washington D.C. by surprise Rachel Siegel is covering it all for The Washington Post and spoke with Taylor van zeiss Rachel you and I have spoken several times in recent months about inflation back in March of 2021 We even spoke about ballooning used car prices and the fear of inflation at the very least was on our radar How did D.C. go from saying this was all temporary to everything short of the sky is falling today It really is remarkable to think back not seems like super long time ago but really wasn't There was such a missed message from officials at the Federal Reserve at The White House over what inflation would turn out to be whether it would be temporary whether it would spread to other parts of the economy And the used car examples takes us right back to when it was thought that inflation would be more limited to parts of the economy that were hit hard by the pandemic or by supply chains Now it's clear that that really turned out to be completely wrong It was hard for policymakers to see through confusing data and to make sense of it in real time It means that now they're really having to catch up to inflation look very different from what they expected in March of 2021 So back in February March April of 21 who was sounding the alarms what were they saying There were a couple exceptions and there were some voices that were very loud in saying that inflation would turn out to be a really overwhelming source over the economy One of the most notable voices is Larry summers who was one of the top economic advisers in the Obama administration Specifically pointed to the size of the American rescue plan as going to something that was going to overwhelm the economy that it was going to infuse so much cash so much spending that they were just going to be nowhere for all of that money to go Now even economists who acknowledge that they themselves were wrong in predicting inflation say that Larry summers argument wasn't entirely you know the reasons that he gave are totally matched the world that we're living in now but there were certainly voices who pushed back against a lot of the conventional thinking at the time Now that was also a time before the war in Ukraine It was before even the delta variant of COVID came around and now we've got omicron version three or four or whatever We're Jerome Powell and Janet Yellen the heads of the fed and treasury respectively Are they viewed as just being wrong from the get go or did the equation just change too much for their strategy I think that they're viewed as being wrong now but all with the benefit of hindsight And I think that even some of the sharpest critics of Jerome Powell or Janet Yellen or others in the administration with the fed are now made the best decisions that they could with the information that they had at the time is really such an unprecedented situation to have a pandemic overlaid with we to the virus that make it difficult to read the labor market overlaid with supply chains from around the world that are also responding to different ways of the virus And at times the information that officials were looking at was actually wrong one of the main things that the Federal Reserve looks at to judge the strength of the economy is how many jobs are being added every month And government data vastly underestimated the number of jobs that were coming back online last summer These are all things again that are much much clearer with hindsight but we're essentially looking through the fog when officials had to make very consequential decisions So what's the strategy now All of this being present in hindsight at this point what's happening moving forward with economic policy So now the sudden reserve has increasingly acknowledged that they have a lot of catching up to do Jerome Powell and President Biden actually met in the Oval Office today and agreed that inflation was the top economic priority for all policymakers But it's unclear if how quickly the fed could catch up and whether even a more aggressive and steady series of interest rate hikes over the course of the year are going to be enough not only to lower inflation but to help claw back some of the areas in which prices and high prices have become even more embedded in the economy Rachel Siegel with us on northwest news radio economics reporter for The Washington Post you can find Rachel's work online at Washington Post dot com Thank you That's Taylor van seiss Your stock chart dot com money update on northwest news radio The Wall Street saw choppy session to start the short and week the majors bouncing back and forth across the unchanged line before settling lower the Dow off over 200 Stocks fell following President Biden's meeting with fed chair Jerome Powell this afternoon The White House unveiling a three part plan to battle inflation Conference board report shows a modest drop in consumer confidence in me Lynn Franco who's the senior director of economic indicators of the conference board said surging prices and interest rate hikes would continue to pose downside risks to consumer spending Home prices continue to climb even despite rising mortgage rates the S&P core logic case schiller index for March showing a 20.6% annual jump in home prices And shares of Amazon putting in their best performance in.

Jerome Powell Rachel Siegel Janet Yellen fed Washington D.C. Taylor van zeiss Rachel Larry summers Obama administration Washington Post President Biden D.C. White House Ukraine treasury Taylor van seiss Oval Office Lynn Franco Rachel
"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

06:08 min | 2 months ago

"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

"Wasn't perfect for Boeing's starliner capsule made it to space docked with the International Space Station and returned to earth However nobody was in the capsule and it's not clear when it will be ready for a crude flight Christian Davenport is covering it for The Washington Post and spoke with Taylor van zeiss Landing and reentry seem to go just fine but take us back to when the starliner ran into problems when in the test flight did that happen Yeah there were some problems on its way to the International Space Station after launch where two of the thrust thrusters at the spacecraft uses to get it on that path toward the space station And to get on the correct orbit sort of we're cut short sensors on the spacecraft sense of problem cut down those thrusters but the good news is they have backups there is redundancy another one kicked in immediately and they were able to get on the correct orbit right to the International Space Station As it got closer there are these smaller thrusters that the spacecraft uses to position itself Again they had a couple of problems with those but still were able to dock successfully And as you mentioned they came home just fine And the whole point of the flight though is a test is to see how the spacecraft performs without astronauts on board It's autonomous They wanted to get out all of the kinks before they put NASA astronauts on board And they were able to troubleshoot those problems and still do it successfully and now they're looking for that crude flight though you're right We don't know when it's going to be just yet Just as a layman with a little experience working on a little motorcycle and some cars it seems though these are significant failures still but is the whole test considered a failure or a success if a booster goes out or a thruster goes out I think they consider this a success because they achieved all of the objectives that they wanted to do This spacecraft was launched It got to the International Space Station that did some maneuvering actually around the station to test it It approached and then stopped and about the space station came back home plunged into the atmosphere the heat shield held As it came through the atmosphere there were temperatures about 3000° the parachutes deployed fine So they see this as yes some issues They're going to have to go back look at the data see if they have to make any changes before they put astronauts on board but that was again the point of the whole flight I mean it was a test they want to have a test without problems without any astronauts on board so that by the time they fly astronauts it goes smoothly and they're going to go back and culturally fix these things before they put crews on And from what you saw and what's been reported does this at least indicate that Boeing fixed that long list of other problems that hit the starliner since that failed test back and I think it was 2019 like December 2019 Yeah no that's right Absolutely This was their third attempt to do this slight the first one was in December 2019 They had a software problem So the spacecraft didn't even get to the International Space Station Then they were trying again last summer and they didn't even get off the ground There were some spouse that were stuck in the service module All the indications are the software in particular very well You don't know what the thruster problems were exactly if they were related to any kind of valve issues that are going to look at that But they were able to launch it again The good news is it docked with the station and came home but they're going to look in troubleshoot all of those issues before putting the astronauts on Christian Davenport with us on northwest news radio covering the space industry and intergalactic business for The Washington Post you can find his work online at Washington Post dot com Christian thank you That's Taylor van seiss Your stock charts dot com money update on northwest news radio Tech shares led stocks to strong gains today The S&P 500 rows 79 points the Dow Jones Industrial sleeps 516 and the tech heavy NASDAQ composite soared 306 or 2.7% Shares of Amazon jumped 4% while Microsoft gained 1.3% Mixed quarterly results out of Costco after today's closing bell the warehouse club chain matched expectations with per share earnings of $3 four cents exceeded projections in terms of revenue $52.6 billion but came up a bit short with same store sales Also reporting after the close gap posted a decline in first quarter sales and slashed its full year profit guidance The retailer said business was particularly weak at its old navy chain In response gap shares are tumbling in after hours trading That's your money now I'm Jim chesko northwest news radio An actor who had a major role in one of the greatest baseball movies has died Bill Schwartz remembers the man who played shoeless Joe Born in Newark New Jersey in 1954 Raymond Alan leota abandoned an orphanage and adopted by a local couple fittingly leota would become a central figure in a sports movie with a powerful message about family It's definitely about a father and son relationship And they don't make many movies like that for guys and it's really emotional It really is There's a lot of guys would cry when they saw that And I've had a lot of people come up to me and say you know because of that movie they play with their kids more You know that time goes and you're busy working and before you know it you know time's up and the cradle That's ray leota during a 2009 interview with American Film Institute Talking about his portrayal of a talented but infamous baseball player from the early 1900s What a story it'll make Shoeless Joe Jackson comes to Iowa Joe Jackson was part of the 1919 black Sox scandal several ball players from the Chicago White Sox conspired to fix the World Series Build it and he will come as the famous line based on WP kinsella's novel shoeless Joe The 1989 film field of dreams starred Kevin Costner as an Iowa farmer who builds a baseball park in the middle of a cornfield attracting the ghosts of baseball legends Great concealer.

International Space Station Christian Davenport Taylor van zeiss The Washington Post Boeing NASA Jim chesko Bill Schwartz Joe Born Raymond Alan leota leota Costco Amazon baseball ray leota
"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:23 min | 2 months ago

"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

"Stay connected stay informed This is northwest news radio 1000 FM 97 7 According to one Silicon Valley CEO the office as we know it is over and hybrid work is an ideal either Airbnb CEO Brian chesky believes more workers will opt for relocating or traveling instead of coming into an office Danielle abril is covering it for The Washington Post and spoke with Taylor van zeiss Cesky being the head of a travel related company certainly has some interest in promoting working and traveling but what kind of changes has he implemented for Airbnb employees So earlier this month chesky rolled out for Airbnb A new work policy that really allows workers to work and live anywhere in the country And the biggest differentiator for Airbnb here is that they're not adjusting pay Based on where people live or where people are working from And they're also allowing workers to work in more than a 170 countries for up to 90 days each place So really providing a lot of flexibility for what they expect the future of work to look like For me though that would seem like it would cause a headache for work visas or at least tax filing Absolutely So one of the things you told us was part of the reason they're doing that 90 days limit at least on the international travel is for tax and other administrative issues There are some tax issues related to the individual that could come into play if you're hopping around cities and what that means for taxes So for the individual and possibly the company there could be some implications but Chucky is a firm believer that the future of work is based around flexibility And that that's sort of the new way to compete for talent Airbnb has a little bit of an advantage here They're built on the idea of finding a place to stay or work So why does Brian chesky think that this could work for companies outside of his own Well like I said I think we're in a really interesting time where employees have a lot of leverage employers are really struggling to get the talent that they need to do their jobs And over the last two years employees really learned that they can do their jobs remotely and do it well Most companies we've talked to have not only learned that their employees did a good job remotely but sometimes even better and were more productive in balancing their work and their lives in this new environment So with that you basically said look we can't undo what's been done Workers now see that they can do their jobs from anywhere as employers we need to enable that future if we want to be competitive for the best talent and also bring in a diversity of talent from different communities Finally is Airbnb going to completely get rid of their office spaces or is there still going to be a purpose for the office When we ask you if that meant you know are you going to get rid of your offices or unicorns and down He said no we're just going to figure out a way to redesign them for the future And that means changing the office from sort of a one use case model where you have your desks and your meeting spaces and work gets done at the office to.

Airbnb Brian chesky Danielle abril Taylor van zeiss chesky Cesky Silicon Valley The Washington Post Chucky headache
"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:58 min | 3 months ago

"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

"Stay connected stay informed This is northwest news radio 1000 FM 97 7 This week we may see the 1 millionth American death from COVID-19 According to federal health data nearly 190 million in this country have been infected by COVID-19 at least once Now scientists are hoping to study people who have avoided getting the highly contagious virus for over two years Katie shepherd has taken a closer look for The Washington Post and spoke with Taylor van zeiss Katie you profile a nurse anesthetist who may fit the bill of somebody with a genetic advantage over the virus Why is Bevin Strickland so unique So bed in situation is really interesting because she volunteered as a nurse in Queens in New York City in April of 2020 when that area of New York City was the epicenter of the pandemic and vaccines hadn't been created yet to prevent COVID infection So she was exposed really consistently over the 6 weeks that she volunteered as a nurse there And she said she was often taking her mask off just to connect with patients who are really frightened at that time when COVID-19 was still a really new disease and we didn't know that much about it and people in the hospital were really really sick And so she was coming in very close contact with people who had the virus and somehow she managed to never contract the virus She was tested every week while she was volunteering Never had a positive result And that's a very uncommon reaction to consistent and pretty severe exposure to the virus And you interviewed Christopher Murray the director of the institute of health metrics and evaluation at UW here in the Seattle area Why does he believe that people like Bevin are so rare So his institute has come up with a model that estimates how many people in the United States have had COVID-19 at some point whether they got tested and knew that they were infected or maybe had a very mild case or an asymptomatic case And they estimate that as many as 76% of U.S. residents had the virus at some point since the start of the pandemic in 2020 And that leads just a very small percentage of people who haven't had the virus And then within that group of people who haven't had the virus sometimes those people haven't had the virus because they've been very very careful in their boarding virus So that probably accounts for a good number of the remaining people who haven't had the virus And that just leaves a very small group of people who possibly have some kind of genetic predisposition that makes them resistant to the virus naturally And so once the genetic versus behavior question is answered what do researchers hope to do with this data when they dig down and find the genetic differences among us Is scientists do find a gene that is helping some people avoid infection that could point researchers in the direction of potential drugs that could help keep other people who otherwise would be susceptible to virus from catching the virus at all or it might help treat people who do get sick and make sure that they don't get very sick with the virus And they're looking for what in the genes of these people might be protecting them is it because they have a gene that makes their cells a little bit different so that the virus can't bind to certain receptors that allow the virus to infect other people who have a different genetic makeup and if they can find the mechanism by which these people are avoiding infection they might be able to develop therapies to help other people Okay you shepherd with us on northwest news radio reporter for The Washington Post and you can find all of Katie's work online at Washington Post dot com Thanks for joining us today That's Taylor van seiss.

COVID Katie shepherd Taylor van zeiss Katie Bevin Strickland Christopher Murray New York City institute of health metrics an Washington Post Bevin Queens U.S. UW Seattle Katie Taylor van seiss
"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:48 min | 3 months ago

"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

"O'Shea at the editor's desk our executive producer Bill O'Neill I'm Brian Calvert sitting in for ELISA and Rick this evening It's a story for keeping an ear on for you thousands of more texts to and from former president Trump's chief of staff after the 2020 election have been released those texts from the phone of Mark Meadows are proving to be an essential evidence for the House committee investigating the January 6th insurrection Theo Meyer is covering the story for The Washington Post he spoke with Taylor van zeiss earlier today Theo dozens of members of Congress are tied up in these texts now give us an idea of who's included and what they've said in this most recent trove Yes of course Some of these members of Congress are one two we already knew were deeply involved in the events leading up to January 6th and the attack on the capital as well as the broader efforts after the election to try to cast doubt on the outcome People like congressman Scott Perry and others Others are sort of less known representative Brian Babin for instance texted Mark Meadows on December 30th 2020 dens and some Republicans may well try to short stop our objection efforts hoping to VT sticks with us with a link to a news article So we only have a small section of the complete trove of text messages that were obtained by CNN Could these texts lead to members of Congress being subpoenaed for questioning by the House committee Because I think as I recall up to this point that hasn't really happened Yes Lawmakers while they have subpoenaed others they have been reluctant to subpoena sitting members of Congress to come and testify before the committee There are multiple issues there but one is simply one of timing the committee is trying to wrap up this investigation ahead of the midterms this year So I think we're locked into take on a fight that could drag on for quite some time in trying to compel testimony when they have already collected a great deal of evidence And short of subpoena is there anything that this House committee could do to try and compel testimony from these holdouts Because at the very least we know they're implicated in the conversations leading up to the 6th Well they could certainly ask more lawmakers to come and talk to them voluntarily But I think aside from issuing subpoenas and leading into that fight it would be difficult for them to force their colleagues to comply I think another hurdle here is questions about the extent to which they want to go after setting lawmakers as opposed to people like Meadows himself of course who is no longer a member of Congress no longer a government employee at all And who have gone after more aggressively Reporter Theo Meyer covering for The Washington Post speaking with Taylor van Sykes a little bit earlier today Former president Trump must start paying a daily fine today until he complies with a subpoena we get details from ABC's Aaron koterski One day after holding former president Trump in contempt a judge here in New York filed a written order that assessed a $10,000 daily fine starting now It will continue the judge said until he satisfied Trump is no longer in contempt of court The judge said Trump willfully disobeyed his order to comply with the subpoena issued by the New York attorney general's office as part of a civil investigation into how Trump valued his real estate assets Trump turned over no documents and the judge said no details that would show he even bothered to look ABC News New York At 6 20 your stock charts dot com money update here on northwest used radio A rough day for investors with the major index is cratering anywhere from two and a quarter percent to 4% The S&P 500 slid 121 points the Dow Jones industrials tumbled 809 and a tech heavy NASDAQ composite plunged 514 points A day after the announcement that Twitter had reached an agreement to be acquired by Elon Musk for $44 billion Shares of Tesla the electric carmaker founded by and run by Musk are tumbling today The stocks get a 12% perhaps amid concerns that Musk might have to borrow against his Tesla stock holdings to fund the deal as well as worries about potential distractions for him as he tries to reshape Twitter That's your money now The news.

Mark Meadows Theo Meyer president Trump House committee Congress Bill O'Neill Brian Calvert Taylor van zeiss Scott Perry Brian Babin The Washington Post ELISA Shea Theo Rick Taylor van Sykes Trump Aaron koterski CNN
"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

06:19 min | 3 months ago

"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

"Is giving Ukraine another $322 million to help fight Russia ABC's Marcus Moore reports French president Emmanuel Macron was able to hold off a challenge from far right nationalist Marin le pen with her anti immigration and anti NATO policies and ties to Russia there was a real fear that a le pen victory would upend European unity and the fight to save Ukraine but instead Macron after a tight race was able to win a decisive 59% of the vote overnight President Biden tweeting his congratulations noting France as a key partner in addressing global challenges and saying he looks forward to our continued close cooperation The German Chancellor describing Macron's victory as a quote vote of confidence in Europe while here in Paris Macron's supporters telling me they do feel a real sense of relief even though we did see some protests here overnight as was expected but le pen really did put the world on notice appealing to voters here with her populist policies earning 41% of the vote That is the best finish by the far right ever in a French election in le pen says that in and of itself is a victory What would you buy with $44 million Well if your Elon Musk you buy Twitter Rachel luhrmann is covering it for The Washington Post and spoke with Taylor van zeiss Rachel what can you tell us about the details of this deal to buy Twitter Yeah So you know Elon Musk put in this bed a little bit more than a week ago and at first it seemed like Twitter's board was going to reject it But after he kind of outlined how he would pay for the deal they announced it today So as soon as it gets finalized he's going to be in control of Twitter And as you report these negotiations started yesterday lasted into at least the morning hours today Does anybody really know other than the signatories on this deal when this would close You know it's hard to say because it depends if regulators need to get involved at all It shouldn't be a super long close That company is saying it's going to close some time this year but it's unclear exactly how long it will take What about what changes for Twitter once Elon Musk signs his name on the dotted line Do we know how he wants to change the company Kind of a $1 million question Elon Musk has said that he really wants to promote free speech that believe that if tweets are kind of exist in a gray area then he would lean toward keeping them up online That's got some critics concerned about how much content moderation he might potentially walk back but he also said that he didn't have all the answers for what that would look like And he hasn't announced any firm plans on it It's interesting to note though that he's not going to be just an owner he's also a massive content provider with 83 million followers A lot of those followers have been interested in his other projects like Tesla SpaceX The Boring Company Do we know if he's going to take a more hands off role at those other ventures Good question It does seem like he like many billionaires we're seeing these days He's very interested in space and Tesla has been kind of his baby for a long time So I think it's sort of unlikely that he's going to step back from Tesla and SpaceX But as you know he has a lot going on So it kind of depends how involved he decides to get in Twitter Will he just be an owner Will he be an executive We're not sure yet Some people really didn't want him to buy Twitter though and there was that poison pill strategy that would cut other investors something of a deal so they could buy shares at a lower price and stave off a Musk buyout What ended up killing that plan or is that not released yet Yeah so the poison pill was sort of a way for the board to make it more difficult for Musk to buy Twitter but once he came out with this financing plan that said oh I'm going to get loans for the roughly half of the deal and then I'm going to use my own equity to finance the other half It seemed to lend some credibility to it So we think that might be one of the impetuses for the board reconsidering or kind of taking another look at the offer Elon Musk will own Twitter if this is all approved and pushed through and reporting on this in The Washington Post is Rachel luhrmann who's joining us on northwest news radio Rachel thank you That's Taylor van seiss Your stock charts dot com money update on northwest news radio The popular shops at Burlington fashion outlets has sold for $9.5 million Four of the 5 biggest tenants Nike Lululemon coach and Pendleton previously announced that they would all be closing their stores on the property which opened 30 years ago Seattle based PCC community markets says it now has 102,000 members a 13% increase from 2020 PCC operates 16 stores in the Seattle area and is planning a new store in the Madison valley neighborhood The Dow gained 238 points to close at 34,049 NASDAQ rose one 65 and the S&P 500 gained 24 This is rob Smith with northwest news radio Did you gain weight during the pandemic Denise Whitaker got some expert advice on how to lose it Steven perron executive director for AARP magazine says it really comes down to when you're eating protein He tells me the average American dinner is filled with more protein than our bodies can process And that's a very unhelpful way to eat because our bodies need about 25 to 30 grams of protein at any given time once we're in mid life In order to make and hold on to muscle Parin tells me the average American needs to spread those proteins out throughout the day He said they tried this with a panel of 100 volunteers Over the course of 12 weeks he says some of those volunteers lost as many as 12 pounds It's easy He says to add protein to a meal too for instance if you're someone who likes to have oatmeal with breakfast that's a great choice Don't give it up but he says add some Greek yogurt a protein smoothie or some cottage cheese that you're getting protein in with that fiber A top infectious disease expert calls the ruling to strike down the mask mandate a real challenge The U.S. public is done with the pandemic even though the virus is not done with us And we have to recognize that in public health Doctor Michael lost her home.

Macron Twitter Elon Musk Rachel luhrmann Marcus Moore Emmanuel Macron Marin le pen President Biden Ukraine Taylor van zeiss Rachel Russia Tesla SpaceX The Washington Post Tesla NATO
"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:07 min | 5 months ago

"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

"Old companies mRNA COVID vaccine sales could top $19 billion in 2022 and a pair of small biotechnology companies claim their tech was hijacked to create the vaccine Yasmin Abu taleb is following the story for The Washington Post and spoke with Taylor van zeiss What are these companies And what are their claims against Moderna So these companies are called arbutus and Jenna van There are two small biotechnology companies And what they're alleging is that Moderna and fringed on a patent that they had for a technology that they say was key to Moderna's vaccine being successful It's something called lipid nanotechnology particles and it basically allows the mRNA to make its way through the body safely And they say that this is key to the Moderna's vaccine working and that Moderna infringed on their patent because they don't pay them royalties They don't have a license to use the technology for this vaccine According to the lawsuit could the Moderna vaccine have been completed so quickly without this technology They say it could not have the Moderna vaccine was completed very very quickly basically over a January weekend and it got into the phase one clinical trials extremely quickly in record time for a vaccine And they're saying this would not have been made possible without Moderna's use of their technology And what does this mean for consumers who might need another shot of Moderna or a booster Is there a risk of vials being pulled from the shelves Or is this just going to be kind of a bottom line financial hit if it goes the wrong direction for Moderna Fortunately there's not going to really be an impact on consumers from this lawsuit It's often novel pharmaceutical inventions go through these years long patent sites and this is probably what this is going to be as well And the company says that it intentionally didn't file this lawsuit until now because they didn't want to disrupt the process of shops going into arms But the vaccine has of course been wildly successful has made billions of dollars And they feel that they are entitled to some share of that whatever the courts determine is fair given that they say the vaccine could not have been made possible without their technology which they say took them years of painstaking work to develop And this isn't.

Moderna Yasmin Abu taleb Taylor van zeiss Jenna van The Washington Post
"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:48 min | 6 months ago

"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

"Our northwest news time now 6 36 COVID may be here to stay It will always be at crisis levels perhaps not and we may not get to that point or we may get to that point soon according to The White House reporting on this in The Washington Post is Brittany shamas who spoke with Taylor van zeiss Brittany what has Jeff science The White House coronavirus response coordinator said about that crisis designation this week Yeah so he actually said during a news briefing yesterday that the U.S. has made tremendous progress in the battle against COVID-19 and that it may soon be entering a time where it's not a crisis anymore but really something that we kind of manage with the tools available Among those tools were the tests that the federal government sent out all the free masks to pharmacies as well Has The White House said anything about how those strategies could play a role in future outbreaks or was that maybe just a one time effort Yeah so you know they were talking a lot yesterday emphasizing the importance of testing moving forward and trying to figure out how to make sure tests are so widely available even as the demand recedes as the threat of on The Crown appears to be receding So they're in this planning process right now where they're trying to figure out from manufacturers and testing industry how can we kind of ensure that we have these tools available for people when they are needed moving forward the emergence of potential new variants or whatever the pandemic kind of throws at us in the coming months Spring and summer travel and vacations are right around the corner for a lot of the country Did The White House yesterday talk about how long mask mandates are going to continue on planes and other federally regulated modes of transportation So they didn't get into specifics about that but the director of the CDC did say that updated guidance was coming soon She didn't commit to a specific timeline on that but she said that the CDC is looking at this and they're going to have updates and she also emphasized that some of these recommendations are going to be based on hospitalization numbers Community by community So basically aimed at ensuring the burden on local hospitals isn't too heavy and that they can operate functionally Finally a lot of us recall that the omicron variant of COVID mutated outside of the United States is there an effort in the near future to either from the U.S. or from vaccine manufacturers to vaccinate and treat the rest of the world You know yeah that's something that the World Health Organization and U.S. health officials have emphasized is being really important in ending the pandemic that it can't just be every country for itself but that all countries need access to vaccines And so I think that's something that the U.S. and the World Health Organization and other kind of wealthier countries are trying to work on and so I believe the U.S. has been the leader and actually distributing vaccine doses to other countries that might have more difficulty accessing those doses You can read more from Brittany online at Washington Post dot com about what The White House said this week and also about a new effort from BioNTech to help build new labs in parts of Africa using shipping containers to try and help distribute vaccines there Brittany thank you That's Taylor van seiss And 6 39 so let us talk about all that's happening in sports as the kraken try to cool the Jetson Canada more from Bill Schwartz in this Beacon plumbing sports update Winnipeg Manitoba where the kraken tried to start the road trip with a victory good first period for the visitors with a power play goal from Vince Dunne and follow with another tally called by Everett Fitz you on root.

White House Brittany shamas Taylor van zeiss Brittany Jeff science U.S. The Washington Post CDC federal government World Health Organization Taylor van seiss Bill Schwartz Africa Manitoba Canada Vince Dunne Everett Fitz
"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

06:42 min | 6 months ago

"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

"Is suspended avocado imports from Mexico over threats made against an inspector reporting on this in The Washington Post is Laura Reilly who spoke with Taylor van zeiss Laura what happened here and why are avocado imports halted It's kind of cinematic So the only Mexican state that can legally sell avocados into the U.S. is Mitchell akan And there's been it's been boom times for avocados We all know this We've talked about the toast We've seen this huge surge in consumption in the U.S. So their growing avocados in other states in Mexico and their sneaking them in the michoacan so that they can be legally sold into the U.S. Well a USDA inspector saw some avocados and said wait those don't look like they're from Mitchell con they look like they're from puebla and basically put the kibosh on this whole thing And receive death threats So the USDA said you know what We're not going to put our people at risk We are going to shut this down And so as of the 11th which I think is that last Thursday Thursday Friday They shut down exports of avocados from Mexico to the U.S. So we're really going to start seeing a shortfall in the next two or three days because about 80% of the U.S. consumption of avocados are those that come from michoacan And as you report the price of avocados was already at a record high ahead of the Super Bowl Sunday parties When it comes to our shopping carts we've rarely need an avocado right now how much more are we going to have to pay in the weeks ahead if we can find them Well I think it could be significant and for those restaurants that lean heavily whether we're talking about chipotle or any of the other Mexican national restaurant chains You're going to see some price tags there as well So it's not just at the grocery store It's in food service And then we have So Super Bowl is number one in terms of avocado consumption And Cinco de Mayo is number two And that's coming up just 6 weeks away So it's definitely a crunch but it may be an opportunity for the Dominican Republic Peru and Chile which also grow avocados to figure out how to pull some strings and get some to us really quickly and maybe develop a new market for their product And what about our domestic supply of avocados Are those just not grown much in the U.S. anymore Well California and Florida are the two big growers Florida has the other kind not the Hass avocado but they're all kinds of different The green skin one But California's acreage partly because of water constraints and partly because of development Acreage has dramatically plummeted in recent years And so it really is eating is taking up less and less of our total consumption Finally there might not be a great answer for this but we at my house just started cooking with avocado oil for those derivatives of avocados way down the line are we going to see a strain on that before much longer as well That'll take a little longer because a lot of that is shelf stable and is already in the pipeline and so there's more of that just in the works When you're talking about a super we've all had that experience where it's like it's too hard It's too hard Oh it's rotten So it's very very ephemeral the fresh product So we're definitely going to give us give ourselves a little bit more time with those other with oils and other products that are derived from them Laura Reilly with us on northwest news radio reported for The Washington Post You can always find Laura's coverage online at Washington Post dot com Thanks for the time today Your money at 20 and 50 pass the hour on northwest news radio Money at 20 and 50 passed the hour here on northwest news radio Here's rob Smith from Seattle business magazine Washington has almost 277,000 job listings Good news for the 216,000 people in the state who receive unemployment benefits A study by career board lent also says Amazon is the number one company in the country for job seekers It's a quad based growth or Costco is the only other local company in the top 25 2021 was a record year for Seattle's industrial market Thanks to ecommerce and third party delivery Collier says Amazon's fast delivery times are driving competitors to increase the number of warehouses near population centers to keep pace The Dow gained 422 points to close at 34,989 NASDAQ rose three 48 and the S&P 500 gained 69 This is rob Smith with northwest news radio A COVID vaccine for the youngest children has been put on hold the FDA meeting to discuss emergency authorization of the vaccine was supposed to happen this week it's now postponed until further notice Medical reporter Liz bonus spoke to doctor Steve fagans and Megan ranney Pfizer was expected to ask for expanded emergency use authorization for a two dose vaccine for children ages 6 months through four years old Now Pfizer says it expects to have a three dose data by early April Public health providers say however this doesn't mean the vaccine is not safe or that it doesn't work In pediatric you've got a vaccine that's got more safety data than the vaccine in history So you have a lot of safety data Which really looking for is vaccine efficacy based on your deaths You see the dose compared to older children was lowered in this younger age research group to ensure its safety That's common in research groups that change by age Unfortunately it looks like that decreased dose decreased the effectiveness of the vaccine a little bit which is why they need the three shots instead of just two Two to 5 That did not mount the what is thought to be a protective antibody response So Pfizer has said now it will postpone the request for emergency use authorization in all children ages 6 months to four years old will it continues to collect data in this age group the company is not pulled its application and those supporting this delay say it's an effort to be fully transparent that way when it is expanded the information needed is there to support this decision I know how incredibly frustrating and disappointing this is for parents of those under 5 kids The process works that these vaccines will not be approved until we are sure that they are both safe and effective Now this is the only age group for which there is not yet an emergency use approved vaccine and while the risk in this.

Laura Reilly U.S. Taylor van zeiss Laura Mitchell akan Mexico The Washington Post USDA puebla rob Smith Florida California Mitchell Dominican Republic northwest news radio Peru Chile Pfizer Seattle Liz bonus
"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

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04:44 min | 8 months ago

"taylor van zeiss" Discussed on KOMO

"As early as next year Russia could begin a military offensive in Ukraine That's according to interviews and a U.S. intelligence document obtained by The Washington Post Shane Harris is covering it for the post and spoke with como's tailor van syce Shane Russia regularly positions their forces for political gains but Ukraine knows well that Russia is willing to use force and capture territory like we saw on the Crimean Peninsula or some years earlier in Georgia What are Russia's intentions this time Do we know Well the intentions appear to be that vitamin Putin according to officials we've spoken to is definitely setting the stage for an invasion of Ukraine Should he choose to do it That doesn't mean that he's determined to do it And administration officials have been very public about saying they don't know if he's made that decision But he's putting all of those pieces in place The troops plans to swell up about a 100,000 reservists according to U.S. intelligence and pre positioning tanks artillery and other equipment really kind of setting the stage for an invasion which he could do effectively at a moment's notice Ukraine is not yet a member of NATO the U.S. and other member nations then would not be obligated to defend Ukraine What could be done to persuade Russia to back off I think what the administration has in mind right now are sanctions both targeting individuals close to Vladimir Putin But importantly Russia's access to the international financial system The most punishing sanction that the U.S. could take would be in concert with allies to kick Russia out of what's known as the swift system This is the international transaction system used for moving money all over the world That would almost be effectively like financially blockading Russia And they have some Putin has said that he would view that as perhaps one of the most aggressive things that the U.S. could do So that would be kind of at the high end But we're not really talking I think about a military response here And I think Vladimir Putin understands that there is very little appetite certainly for the U.S. to become military and engaged Should he push into Ukraine That does not mean he won't meet resistance from Ukraine of course and they have a formidable armed forces But you're not going to see I think European I was peeping into then go fight with Russia And we're talking about this a day before President Biden is expected to have a video call with Vladimir Putin and Secretary of State Antony Blinken has already met with his Russian counterpart has The White House said if mister Biden will address this with Putin He absolutely has they have said that We expect that the president is going to deliver a very forceful message to Vladimir Putin on Tuesday But I think that there is room here for negotiation as well The White House has been signaling that to two leaders get together not merely for the purpose of the president threatening Vladimir Putin He is there to see what accommodations I think they might be able to make That's going to be a long and tough process They plan they've said for a very detailed long call tomorrow I expect we'll see some signs If there are any signs of progress they will be quick to put them out But they don't think that Biden is there necessarily to deliver only ultimatums although I think he needs to get the point across as his aides have been that U.S. would consider an invasion of Ukraine to be a red line that would meet with significant consequences Shane Harris with us on news from The Washington Post where he's a national security reporter and covering the latest U.S. intelligence assessment of Russia's troop buildup on the border with Ukraine You can read more online at Washington Post dot com Shane thanks so much for taking time with us today That's como's Taylor van zeiss A new poll is showing a majority of Americans oppose overturning roe versus wade According to a new Harvard caps Harris poll 54% of those polled say they opposed leaving abortion laws to the states the results come less than a week after the Supreme Court listened to arguments in Dobbs versus Jackson women's health organization That case involves a Mississippi law that bans abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy posing one of the biggest threats to roe V wade in many years The survey of nearly 2000 registered voters was conducted from November 30th through December 2nd Your money at 20 and 50 passed the hour on como news And now your como propel insurance money update Early signs that the omicron coronavirus variant is causing milder illnesses than initially feared gave U.S. stocks a big lift today Blue chips pacing the solid advance the Dow Jones Industrial Average rallied 1.9% 647 points to be exact while the broader S&P 500 leads 1.2% Travel related to stocks like airlines and cruise companies posted sharp gains also Expedia sword 6 and three quarter percent and Boeing leap 3.7% The U.S..

Russia Ukraine Vladimir Putin U.S. Shane Harris van syce Shane Putin Washington Post Crimean Peninsula President Biden Secretary of State Antony Blin como mister Biden White House NATO Georgia Taylor van zeiss Biden Shane