20 Burst results for "Tate Gallery"

"tate gallery" Discussed on Giles Coren Has No Idea

Giles Coren Has No Idea

09:01 min | 8 months ago

"tate gallery" Discussed on Giles Coren Has No Idea

"Tuesday's times pay from. Page off galleries, museums and cinemas will open culture life England. Is this restart with museums, art galleries and cinemas able to be open from July, the fourth, which is also in the news today so. The piece that you're going to ride his Oh. God. I'm going to have to be cultural again. There's a with no eight again I'm going to have to be. Full stop because I have literally never seen you inside the museum or not. To Reopen Ray, I can do my once every decade trip. So you can make. A stand around in front of Crappy Square things on the wall that nobody no jobs have painted over the years. That took a bit like things but mostly ballot. I love his use of quash I love his impress Kiro that he's used his Chianti, look at the way, he's done his pepper daily. Al Ragu his impasse. Cure screw this. May worse to dignify an art form that people can't read. No I'm not going to freaking Gadarene yeah tool. Caitlyn, close, who knew they were hotbeds of disease cinemas on the other hand. You come out with Kelvin even when there's no covert. Yes, just sitting there being from spat on by people. I can get. From spending a western hot. Dogs are available. Okay so. You can do a fun piece just like that about Philistine. You're a moon Philistine. Am Not a Philistine that is not the point of this. How do you have to stand in front of the painting? The other people to think that you. Aren't thinking about your lunch. Could go to the busiest painting I'm. Going to take you guys down in front of the most popular slightly less. Retired at the corner of the room and watching turn like blame each other there are people are so. They can't smell fast I so right. Now I think maybe I think. MAYBE THIS IS A. Museum 's I. Don't mind a museum. Basil, being there and I like the fact that still could stop wait a minute, but we have only ever museums. Whitney set back all the plunder from the imperial beard to Alice based Russian around basically what a museum is large covet space for your children to run around when it's raining, you take the path. Oh the parks! Reporting, we'll go to the natural. Museum! and run around the around much, because there's all these stupid dinosaurs, the dinosaur from South America so I. Send it back because the Venezuelans making us, and that means great, and not that the British Museum the main thing about. The rain yeah having hydro. Pizza in delicious pizza. Monitoring. Street. And then you get into the British Museum and you can't really play because there's all those Greek-egyptian. The marbles as will the Greek, the Egyptian stuff and this sort of tombs and heliotrope would have. She was called nine. Nicotine that's the one exception is in the museum, but anyway those those people and there's all this stuff in the Ben in bronzes from Nigeria we go back, send them all back to the places that they came from so and then put in swings and slides children because that's. The Bar and a good restaurant because when they reopen restaurants I because the critic people in. Hey, when I think about this also in the same time with all this. Britain is open for business bonanza. Reduced the thing from two meters to one two plus. The new measurement about its. Bombing. About doesn't mean anything how leap forces plus. Coming nine ten. Anyway. So the point is restaurants. Can restaurants function with the low density population? They need to have most of them probably not but. Give all the imperial clutter back to the. Countries. They came from African. He's it's catching up the big buildings. Kensington send it back to where it came from. Yeah, because that's that's what the people in those democracies now want us to do. Expunge are embarrassing. Send back the statue of every single person from before eighteen hundred. Because even if they didn't own slaves, they probably someone who didn't just put as street food in their put make it to protect goes on earth called for probation. We'll just put whatever kind of fish and chips. And Corners Pastis Yup. In the British Museum instead of it will be stupid. Boring exhibits same goes to take gallery. They very big spaces massive massive turbine engine which I saw in my last visit to him about seventy years ago I. Think know we have only ever been to art gallery your museum because we were finding things to do without children. Ever over I, wanted for a story to look at hogarth o the roast beef with Old England. Which is in the tate gallery to right about it. You must have been thirty five. No, it's twenty. Off The thirty. Fuck off on museum. That's how it's. Famously famously famously people who live in London. Don't get any of the cultural things and so i. Think! That's you call. It into Ben's music woken up slightly. I. Call. These a very few Greeley street free stuff could go on could meet. We could move you diner armored street feast all those. Accident Gathering places for young people under the umbrella of the London Union which I may or may not actually has. Other street food. Carnival type spaces are available, but then don't make any money from it. So Tuesday Times page three. Virgin and NASA team up to sell space space shuttles. Is this Sean Connery Story? They're teaming up shows last night and now in. A very glasses of. Wine. OKAY SO VIRGIN NASA up to sell spe which version? The funny. Company Virgin Virgin is it. Chris whitten running Brian Cox. No, it definitely is by name and Cook. Okay! The idea that. Up, with Virgin. In had sex. You become useless at space physics. That's the point because that's your point. Astrophysics, this subject for virgins. That's that's why virgin and that's teamed up. I have so much respect pushing for this really unfunny line of thing with no one listening to your laughing or anything. I think bennies and I thought he was laughing, but I think he's listening to music on his headphones. Yeah, is this is this? Is someone else's? Okay so virgin accent team up to sell space station trips Virgin. Galactic has joined forces with NASA and we'll solicit and train private paying passengers for trips to the international space. Story Virgin in. My God I mean what what did you miss out basically burgeoning? Private individuals can train and visit the ISS which the International Space Station, but. Bit An average of two hundred and fifty miles above earth. So there are some there are some points in the ocean in the middle of the ocean where you can be further from land than you aw from the IRS. That is my fun fact for today. No I didn't make it up because Jason Fox as number. One found Jason Fox from. Wins was doing a podcast and he wrote the Atlantic and he said at certain points out in the Atlantic. You are closer to the international space. Station then you ought land. Muscles well, it was a podcast. I can't see. Because I. Okay, but you almost think fine. Okay, so the Persia. I told the person might be fun done that. That's a good question. You might have to just just use that as a pig for space story, it's not like virgin. Have Gone ahead of. Moss company something like that. Virgin after the team up space trips, so it's your brochure to is the story that you can on hundred Cuomo because they don't want you there and you can't go to Greece because you can't get. Space to the International. Space famous difficult. I mean in the space easy. Yeah up in the polls exactly hard. You have to wear a space where. Are they now down? To Preston. You have to have your own oxygen supply. You could do might a space you could. You could do tourist board for the International. Space Station welcome to the. It'll basically be like on holiday to Tottenham Court road station. I mean that's what it looks like the kind of long tubes and like. I don't know if it's just it sounds to me like absolutely how but? Virgin Galactic does not yet have the capability to fly passengers to orbit, but has developed sub orbital book ships on which tourists will be able to experience g forces and fled in zero gravity, but what I normally get, but will they can. Be, available very funny. Thank you of the experience. You get by one hundred forty nine am five on the way to wherever the. I got like four of the stories. On the times on Tuesday page seventeen I love this story, okay? I I just love story.

British Museum Virgin NASA Virgin Virgin Virgin Galactic Space Station Ben International Space Station Jason Fox Atlantic Tottenham Court road station Al Ragu Kiro Ray South America tate gallery Sean Connery Caitlyn London
Picasso painting attacked at Tate Modern

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Picasso painting attacked at Tate Modern

"An arrest in the case of of a of a call so painting that was vandalized in London this happened at the Tate gallery where authorities say the nineteen forty four painting bust of a woman was torn by twenty year old Shaquille Massey he was denied bail and has another court date on January thirtieth no word on a motive the painting is valued at more than twenty six million

London Tate Gallery Shaquille Massey
Man charged after Picasso painting damaged in London gallery

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Man charged after Picasso painting damaged in London gallery

"Three and arrested in the case of avocado painting that was vandalized in London this happened at the Tate gallery where authorities say the nineteen forty four painting bust of a woman was torn by twenty year old Shaquille Massey he was denied bail and has another court date on January thirtieth no word on a motive the painting is valued at more than twenty six million

London Tate Gallery Shaquille Massey
"tate gallery" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"tate gallery" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"The time and we will give us twenty two minutes we'll give you the world afternoon forty one degrees it is one forty on this Tuesday December thirty first time Susan Richard and here's what's happening we are just hours away now from ushering in a new decade a live report coming up from Times Square I handful of female and my PT employees is suing the department saying it failed to protect their rights as nursing moms president trump blames Iran for the attack on the U. S. embassy in a rock and a twenty year old held without bail for allegedly damaging a twenty six million dollar Picasso at the Tate gallery in one to ten ten when Jackie with the rain this afternoon into this evening then clearing for the ball drop forty seven degrees today end date Gelman talks to the media for the first time in months and feels good about the direction of the team devils islanders are playing this afternoon the Rangers play tonight in Edmonton this is Joan Doniger at Bloomberg so how do you do it the former head of Nissan and Renault escape house arrest to Japan Wall Street closes twenty nineteen with big games inspite of what it's doing today the Dow down thirty nine the nasdaq up only seven wins news time one forty one traffic and transit here's my Levinson here's what you need to know about the bridges and tunnels start to get a busy right queen's found at the white stone bridge just about a ten minute delay if you can choose the Throggs neck bridge and still sing delays on the queen's down arcade bridge I was do that earlier crash on the Grand Central parkway right now the fifty ninth street bridge probably give me your best bet at the lower East River crossings outbound broken bridge a little bit slow across the spam man bridge wings work bridges are doing much better over the Hudson River crossings no complaints inbound George Washington bridge less than ten minutes upper and lower levels out and is also moving well and less than ten minutes invaluable the Lincoln and Holland tunnels we do have those continuing closures in Times Square for new year's eve thirty seven fifty seventh street to remain shut down between six and eighth avenues right now checking the website how we not too bad of a ride pretty much from end to end and we have an earlier crash on the FDR south bound over by the third Avenue bridge Madison Avenue bridge rather that has been cleared out of the way now traffic up to speed on my a levels in our next report one fifty one on ten.

white stone bridge FDR Holland East River Japan Gelman president Madison Avenue bridge Times Square George Washington bridge Hudson River Throggs neck bridge Susan Richard Levinson
"tate gallery" Discussed on This Week In Video Games

This Week In Video Games

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"tate gallery" Discussed on This Week In Video Games

"We have trained lawyer is <hes> pulled out. Direct used to be a film critic for teletext back in the day so the all of this to say hey. There isn't really a set way or set person who who would be good at this. Oh welcome in games. I think what you bring is diversity of experience and diversity of background that i think any studio would be grateful for and i know that what we make better because we have some people who already interested in in the depths of medieval history <hes> and i'm really interested in drag and quick coach and all of that feeds into what we do <hes> said yeah if there were a message for anyone it's we're all welcome here. <hes> and they're plenty voice to get into games. I found one particular opportunity virginity because i've met someone at a conference with games when we chose ten generally attending at someone who is working at tate gallery like i honestly that was a complete black though i ended up at that conference conference <hes> but that's how i met the person who gave me the job <hes> so my message if he wanted to get into games comes particularly is to meet people as much as possible go. Oh to the games events talk to the development teams. <hes> go to industry conferences read the industry websites <hes> an immerse yourself in it because the beauty of modern social media and web culture is that it's all played out in front of you for you to get involved with you just have to find it enjoin and toby. What about you yes. Melissa hanover how to spell circuitous route into the industry gains have been hugely important me my whole life and <hes> it was it was a very much a pipe dream. When i was younger the i would love to work in the industry at some point in some way but but <hes> when i was like sixty and trying to decide what i was going.

Melissa hanover tate gallery toby
Samsung's 'The Frame' TV: Spotify of Art?

WSJ Tech News Briefing

05:17 min | 1 year ago

Samsung's 'The Frame' TV: Spotify of Art?

"Better faster greener super micro resource-saving server and storage systems with intel zeon scalable processors reduce the cost and environmental impact of your enterprise infrastructure learn more at super micro dot com. This is tech news briefing. I'm tanya boost does reporting from the newsroom in new york a television manufactured by samsung known as the frame and called by many eddie spotify of art is digitally bringing masterpieces into the living room museum speed the future but first these headlines google issued new guidelines limiting employees discussion of politics and other topics not really to work a major shift for the company that has long long prided itself on open debate and freewheeling internal culture alphabet inc said in a public memo that staffers should avoid spending time debating matters unrelated into their jobs among other discouraged behavior a google spokeswoman said quote this follows a year of increased incivility and our internal platforms and we've heard that employees want clearer clearer rules of the road on what's okay to say and what's not walk technologies trumpeted its first high end a i processor the chinese telecom giant's latest attempt to challenge silicon valley's advanced technology the ascend nine ten designed to crunch. The massive amounts of data used to build a._i. Algorithms is available immediately. The chip advances while always goal of curbing reliance on american tech kolding up the palm sized ascend nine ten at an event at weiwei's headquarters deputy chairman eric su declared it as quote the industry's most powerful a._i. Processor and quote a federal appeals dell's court froze a ruling that qualcomm had committed an array of anti-trust violations a boost for the chip maker that allows it to maintain its business practices for the time being the court court decision is a setback for the f._t._c. which had sued the company citing an illegal monopoly that harmed smartphone manufacturers and rival chip producers to his ruling found. The company leveraged its dominance smartphone chips to force manufacturers to pay high royalty rates for qualcomm intellectual property qualcomm argued its business practices were justified justify. The journal says the court action isn't a definitive reading of the merits of qualcomm appeal but indicated the company has a fair shot at winning coming up as museums meet the future were introduced with the new spotify of art better faster greener super micro resource-saving server and storage systems with intel veon scalable processors reduce. The cost and environmental impact of your enterprise infrastructure learn more at super micro dot com samsung has struck digital art agreements with the tate gallery in london the prado in madrid the van gogh museum amsterdam westerdam's among others. The latest deal sees its unique television. The frame landing at the royal museum of fine arts in belgium as part of the new agreement samsung samsung display twenty two of the belgian galleries flemish masterpieces on its frame. T._v.'s isabelle van who necker managing director at the museum has more. We are participating dissipating into some some initiative because we think technology has a lot of possibilities to spread our heritage in another way india museum so we some some frame we can bring the artwork into the living room of the people and hope that they will afterwards want to to to visit the museum and see the authentic work intern. We're seeing some comparison with the digital methods that the likes of spotify made popular johann von camping out samsung tv lifestyle project manager explains its subscription based so you have to formulas in a way you be u._p. Eater five a month and you have unlimited access so i always personally i call it the spotify of arts so you pay five hundred a month. You have unlimited <unk> access to all the artworks that are in there more than one thousand two hundred artworks or you can also decide to pay a one time fee for one on artwork and then that will cost you twenty euros more on the actual technology sensor measures the lightning in your living space ace and based on these results. It's adopts the back light of the hill so it would really look like a real picture because of you would show this picture on on another tv. You will always have the feeling you are looking at the t._v. Isabel van acker is back to talk to museums of the future. There are a lot of challenges for museums is because the museum of tomorrow and we have to think about it before you had only physical museum. Today we have also digital museum if people are used to to have after digital images and we have to develop this whole digital museum today and accessibility is one of the important challenges as as well. That's it for the tech news briefing reporting from the newsroom in new york. I'm tanya bustos. Thanks for listening.

Samsung Qualcomm Spotify Intel New York Van Gogh Museum Amsterdam West Royal Museum Of Fine Arts Google India Museum Tanya Bustos Isabel Van Acker Dell Weiwei Deputy Chairman Belgium Tate Gallery Eric Su Intern
"tate gallery" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

15:56 min | 2 years ago

"tate gallery" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of protests of the Guggenheim museum in New York back in February during an exhibition by the photographer NAN Goldin, the four hundred thousand shouting about the estimated number thought to have died in the US after becoming addicted to prescription drug Oxycontin, Oxycontin was produced by perje farmer, and that firm allegedly linked to the very wealthy Sackler trust, which sponsors the Guggenheim museum. Then gilding herself as it happens is a former Oxycontin added well, the sector trust to Nuys any direct connection to the drug, but the protests have had an effect. The Guggenheim says it now no longer is taking Sackler donations, nor in fact is the Tate Gallery in London, the British art critic and broadcaster serotonin United has been reflecting for the BBC on how this scandal has fed into a well established history of cash and corruption in the arts Is everywhere in the world the Vienna. The seventeen National Gallery non golden has south announced that she would withdraw from a planned retrospective of her work at the national portrait gallery, unless it refused million pound donation on offer from the family. The Sackler donation was indeed dropped it remains to be seen. How many other institutions might follow? The has also been a demonstration at the British Museum last month. Protesters' invaded the central hall. The opening of an exhibition on a Syrian culture cooling out its main sponsor BP for what they claimed was it involvement in the carving up of the Iraqi oil industry after the two thousand and three war. It's environmental record. And it's rolling climate change. The thorny relationship between culture and the money that supports it is not new think of the battle of tobacco sponsorship in sport. Those old days of billboards plummeted with cigarette. Brands around Formula one race tracks and football stadiums alone gone, but it took time pressure and government action to bring it about politics as ever is in bedded in all of this. The only way galleries and museums can bring in extra revenue these days is to mount superstar editions which pulling punches and raise profile such blockbusters Costa fortune crowdfunding ballot of art lovers wouldn't come close. But that Honey to the sponsorship wing of many big companies ways to soften what could be a problematic corporate image that could be p. Oil may have been literally the fuel which we built minority, but that's sticky. Crude river has never quite lost its rotten eggs smell as we walk through diesel fog into the horrors of climate change. It isn't going to get any cleaner and yet and yet a whole shoe American museums charitable foundations. Art galleries were all built on oil fortunes behind Getty Carnegie Rockefeller, mining smelting. Henry Ford's carved in on water. How far back? Do we go? No, one would defend pudgy farmer's actions over Oxycontin. But the Sackler family have been giving to the art world long before this scandal one of its biggest donors office chocolate died over thirty years ago should his name come off the boards. Should we give back the money as well? Fisheries? The Catholic church was the only global multinational in town. Was one of its central tools of propaganda advertising. You might call it and selling salvation was license to print money. All this is soaked into the fifteen chapel decorated by Michael Angelo, pope Sixers fourth after whom it is named Ron one of the most nepotistic papacy of the age. The building was financed by new taxes. The brainchild beset and cardinal Borgia and MichelAngelo's work with commissioned by two popes. Neither of whom let their valid fella Bassy get in the way of carnal pleasures. There's no doubt that without all of this lamb into corruption. We would not have many of the greatest works of the world has ever seen when faced with a loss. Judgment. My instinct is to listen to history the wonder of God's sparking life into Adam on that sublime ceiling can never be separated. From the fact that man lives on earth. Decidedly monkey down. Here. Always was. And I fear always will be Saraji. And you're listening to business daily from the BBC World Service with me at Butler. So there's some context what I wonder to super-rich philanthropists these days. Make of all of this debate Sarah mentioned donations from companies and individuals constitute an ever larger slice of funding used by arts institutions, but it's not necessarily always their purest generosity. That's behind it. Critics argue the firms and individuals get something in return using their gifts to burnish an otherwise tainted reputation oil companies drugs companies, for example, some of the largest charitable folios whilst enjoying some of the lowest public approval ratings as firms so what's going on. I ask James Chen. He's a Hong Kong businessman, and billionaire who now deploys a big slice of his wealth. Not in arts funding as it happens, but develop developing world charity, clearly which promotes better eyesight for. The poor most people practice what I would call patronage philanthropy, which is very much about being very generous with their checkbooks giving money, but really not understanding deeply about issues rather than the type of philanthropy that people like Bill Gates or myself trying to do which I would categorize a something different which is specifically development for Paul world, which is really focusing on on issues that affect either the society, we live in or the or the larger world, those who are marginalized, you know, and how to tackle those issues. Right. And I think the key there is to -bility to take risk in your philanthropy and able take risks right? You really have to develop this deep understanding right off the issues failing learning from failure. You know, that's a very different type of philanthropy than patronage that most people are practicing really change it. Chain move the dial right people talk about the phrase that some of us is something called moral licensing, which is basically they can do what they like him business specifically how you made your money, but they've done whatever they wanted in business, and then they are giving themselves sanction reputation reputational sanctioning by simply throwing a school. Subset of that money towards a good cause. Yes. That may or may not be the case. But I think there's an expectation in society that those who have done well, give back more taxes or by doing something that helps deeply to change society for the better. And so I think that unless the wealthy really get that and get behind that those who have more we can really do more do more. I mean, you're a Hong Kong businessman, you presumably a surrounded by many of those around you who you are involved in charitable activity, but some of them, I guess Joe look pretty cut throat today. They involve themselves perhaps in the types of business, not morally exactly transparent. Do you think any of them are involved in in giving money away in order to somehow cleanse reputations? I'm sure that that that would happen. But you know, there is one black and white line is around what's legal, and what's not legal, right. And then there is the issue of morality and that gets a little bit of morally ambiguous. And we do see this a lot in between China would say, you know, where people are using charitable giving as a way to buy insurance in a way. I really when they get into trouble. They can show you this happened historically happens. But if we can differentiate that kind of giving, right? It's fairly easy to see that. Right. What are you actually utilizing your philanthropy Ford? What kind of impact are you really achieving? Right. That's I think a deeper don't tar the whole sector of philanthropy there. Lots of wonderful people who deeply deeply care and really want to do something meaningful. Right. But unfortunately, they're often drowned out by the media others would kind of focus on the number of zeros rather than on. What is being accomplished the Hong Kong billionaire and philanthropist, James Chen? But let's get back to the arts then with which with liberal profile has for decades become a focus for activism, these days the protests when they're not about opioids targeting oil companies firms like BP, for example, which sponsors several of the UK's leading cultural institutions the British Museum national portrait gallery, Royal Shakespeare Company. And so on campaign has like just worth of the UK pressure group culture unstained say that his problem in the area of climate change. She reckons big oil should be exiled from the arts. But Claire FOX director of the UK's academy of odd is sit RAV differently. I put them together to debate this subject Jessica's, I coach will organize Asians doing when they choose to partner with BP or shell or whoever they are actually promoting the ongoing use of these fulfills at the moment when we really really need to be going in opposite direction Edinburgh. Science festival which has long been sponsored by variety of oil companies actually announced that it's dropped his soil says it's committing for no longer taking any fulfill many and its justification is and I quote with climate change over presence, and we feel increasingly compromised by the conflict between accepting sponsorship from fulfill companies programming events this tonight's the main causes of climate change. So this this increasing challenge to institution's legitimacy if the scene to be too close to or promoting oil companies in this way, folks, what do you think of that? I think that largely autistic organisation should take money from wherever they want from whoever they want as long as identifier in autistic freedom. What I think I'm most concerned about I understand that Justice activists on fossil fuels, and that's fine. But you could be having a conversation with an activist against big pharma or the recent Sackler controversy, which was in relation to in fact, whether they. They should be sponsoring the Tate because of that legislation with the legislation without code crisis. Exactly, I suppose my question is what is clean money, and who gets to decide should it be a group of activists who've kind of lobbied shamed. Organizations into not taking the money. Not in the end denies the public. Great way of just why are you setting a high of bar or your pay to be for cultural organisations than perhaps other parts of UK society? I think cultural organizations are sort of unique -ly trusted by the public play really important role as classes not just in sort of giving us access to one of the world, but will say in education in reflecting the big shifts going on in the world, and helping people engage with and understand them. So they really need to maintain public trust. Yes. So we're gonna do need money. But they also need to protect themselves from risks to their reputation, and that means doing what actually so we're gonna have already been doing for longtime which is having a robust ethical funding policy. That says, okay, where are red lines over the last maybe ten twenty years within three concerted shift away from tobacco sponsorship? They've increasingly been seen as inappropriate partners. I think the same can be said for the arms industry. So there's already red lines. I think what we're arguing is that the scale in urgency of the climate crisis. Now should also be beyond that red line. You talk about risks to reputation, but the risk to reputation actually don't come from that sponsorship that come from people who opposed that sponsorship light, you now people, for example in the public health world will say that Suga, for example is the new tobacco. So where do you stop any organization that wishes to sponsor the ours or a science festival or what? Have you as long as they don't interfere in the editor the artistic integrity of that oak. Nisaan don't pose a challenge to the reputation of arts organization just as there any evidence of these companies interfering with. Yes. There is actually, and I should say mention that a few years ago shells, bumps it, the science museums exhibition on climate change could atmosphere and more recently came to light that they actually watered down some of the language around pollution say that is direct interference in stick integrity. The British Museum BP is allowed to pick and choose which exhibitions it sponsors strings attached. I've already made the point that I don't think that's appropriate. But these are not evil organizations. You have a particular political problem with them without fossil fuels regardless of the row about it. You couldn't turn the lights on. We couldn't actually do this very interview. What you're saying is their reputation is enhanced by being associated with the ours. Why shouldn't it be because that giving money who you to decide whether they are morally pure enough or criteria that can actually. Decide whether that good enough to give money. Well, this isn't just coming from me that Edinburgh science festival of ready mentioned has dropped all of its fossil fuels says as Tate as has the international festival in terms of the science museum, which is currently sponsored by three oil companies recently forty-eight, incredibly well respected. Scientists put a formal complaint into the science museum arguing that its promotion of those three companies conflicts with scientific integrity. This is shift is happening across the whole sector. Sorry. That's very compelling with me. Would you have it that every arts institution and science festival would now say not take money from another big corporate big pharma big alcohol. I mean, where do you draw the line? That's my question. Really all the ready corporates that you think they should take money from big banks. They okay, I think the arts one of the great riches that we gain from having excess money made from prophets and. Even the state gets its money that it pays to also can is Asians from taxes that come from not only all of us, but guess what? Big corporations. Yes. Increasingly we're gonna is Asians and needing to look to the private sector in order to find that funding. But to me that makes it even more important that they have a strong, ethical fundraising policy. So that they don't find themselves being compromised by association with companies responsible for serious crises lightly climate crisis lightly opioid crisis. There you go. What do you think just worth of the pressure group culture? I'm staying before her Claire FOX the kademi of ideas on the row over art sponsorship. That's eight for today's business.

BP Hong Kong UK British Museum Guggenheim museum Claire FOX BBC James Chen National Gallery Costa Edinburgh Tate Gallery Sackler NAN Goldin science museum Nuys
"tate gallery" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"tate gallery" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"Shopping bags a budget do Sunday night and said that food delivery and carry on bags. Well, they would not be included in that. And the counties could also choose to add a five cent fee for plastic paper bags and three New York. State attorney general Letitia James suing the billionaire owners of the drug maker Purdue pharmaceuticals blaming them for the state's opioid crisis. Well, WCBS reporter Marla diamond covered this yesterday. Then talked about it with anchors. Michael Wallison Joab lar- on yesterday's afternoon roundup Marla, the owners of pretty pharma have been named in this lawsuit. What are they accused of eight members Michael of the Sackler family are named in this lawsuit? They've been in the news of late after Oklahoma's settlement with Purdue pharma, which makes the drug Oxycontin, the samplers are billionaires. And the lawsuit seeks to claw back funds that prosecutors allege were put in private family accounts to shield that money from litigation when it became. Clear that states and individuals harmed in the opioid epidemic would be seeking money from the manufacturers, these pain pills that so many got hooked on Marla. Do we have a number that they're trying to claw back? We don't Letitia James said that it is unspecified unspecified in the millions of dollars. The state is seeking to recover millions from four large drug distributors that the state works with for unnecessary prescriptions. This was filed the lawsuit in Suffolk County where thousands of unnecessary prescriptions were distributed and a written by pharmacies and doctors that were arrested in several stings and also they would seek damages as well in this lawsuit. That would be put in a fund to help prevent and treat opioid addiction. Have any other states sued the Sackler other families behind these drug companies? Well, this week Purdue pharma and the Sackler is agreed to pay two hundred seventy. Million dollars to settle that case in Oklahoma. But the move is unusual, but you know, that settlement in Oklahoma may open the floodgates for states over the past several weeks a number of cultural institutions, including the Guggenheim in the Tate Gallery in London have sought to separate themselves from the Sackler, they are one of the largest contributors to the arts in this country. Diamond. Thank you so much..

Marla diamond Purdue pharma Sackler Letitia James Oklahoma Michael Wallison Joab Purdue pharmaceuticals New York Tate Gallery reporter Suffolk County attorney London Million dollars
"tate gallery" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"tate gallery" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"Certainly hope the Mets don't let you doubt. It's it's so personal for you. I root for you. And I'm rooting for the Mets this year. Can I tell you something Joe, unbiased and impartial journalist? No, no routing year in the press box. Absolutely, peter. I know that but between you and me. Peter. Straight. Joe you're not gonna you're not going to twist my arm any other way. True pro Peter Haskell live and nationals park where the Mets lead the nets to nothing in the eighth inning. New York Attorney General Letitia James is suing the billionaire owners at the drug maker Purdue pharma blaming them for the state's opioid crisis. WCBS reporter Marla diamond joins us live Marlow, the owners of Purdue pharma have been named in this lawsuit. What are they accused of? Yeah. Eight members Michael of the Sackler family are named in this lawsuit. They've been in the news of late after Oklahoma's settlement with Purdue pharma, which makes the drug Oxycontin. The Sackler is are billionaires. And the lawsuit seeks to claw back funds that prosecutors allege were put in private family accounts to shield that money from litigation when it became clear that states and individuals harmed in the opioid epidemic would be seeking money from the manufacturers of these pain pills that so many got hooked on Marla. Do we have a number that they're trying to claw back? We don't Letitia James said that it is unspecified unspecified in the millions of dollars. The state is seeking to recover millions from four large drug distributors that the state works with for unnecessary prescriptions. This was filed the lawsuit in Suffolk County where thousands of unnecessary prescriptions were distributed and written by pharmacies and doctors that were arrested in several stings and also the they would seek damages as well in this lawsuit. That would be put in a fun to help prevent and treat opioid addiction. Marlow many other states have sued similar filed similar lawsuits against drugmakers. But have any other states sued the Sackler other families behind these drug companies? Well, this week Purdue pharma and the Sackler agreed to pay two hundred seventy million dollars to settle that case in Oklahoma. But the move is unusual. Wall. But you know, that settlement in Oklahoma may open the floodgates for states over the past several weeks a number of cultural institutions, including the Guggenheim in the Tate Gallery in London have sought to separate themselves from Sackler from the Sackler as they are one of the largest contributors to the arts in this country. But it's clear that the name is now persona non grata at least in the social circles that they participate in and it seems like. You know that the people who receive a lot of money from them are trying to distance themselves from this crisis diamond. Thank you so much WCBS news time.

Purdue pharma Sackler Mets Letitia James Oklahoma Peter Haskell Joe Marlow Marla diamond Tate Gallery Suffolk County Michael reporter New York Attorney London two hundred seventy million do
"tate gallery" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"tate gallery" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Few updates for you now on some stories. We've been tracking lately on the world last week. We told you about the national portrait gallery and the Tate gallery's in the UK. Both said they were done with money from the Sackler family, the Sackler zone Purdue pharma, which makes Oxycontin and critics say that side of the Sackler family is largely responsible for the opioid crisis. Well on Friday evening, the Guggenheim museum in New York City said it was following the lead of his British museums and announced it would also turn down philanthropic gifts from the Sackler family. We also reported recently about a bad sign for the road to peace on the Korean peninsula. The inter-korean liaison office was supposed to be a place for increasing dialogue between north and South Koreans the opposites close to the border between the two countries but last week Pyongyang abruptly recalled their North Korean staff from the office suggesting a backslide in negotiations. Then today the North Korean staff returned in the morning to the office as usual. It's weird. But at least they're still dialogue and in southern Africa more than a million and a half, people are reeling from cyclone. Isci. We reported on the storm and how it ripped through the region ten days ago, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Malawi all seriously impacted half of the people affected. Our children Mildred Macara is with mercy corps in Zimbabwe. She says the waters have started to recede, but the landscape is almost unrecognisable. They used to be hundreds of houses at it's now, it's such a challenge for people to even explain how it used to be on what it has become. We'll hear more from mercy cores Mildred Mkhori about the situation in Zimbabwe tomorrow.

Sackler family Zimbabwe Mildred Macara Mildred Mkhori Tate gallery Guggenheim museum Pyongyang Koreans New York City Purdue Mozambique Africa UK Malawi ten days
"tate gallery" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"tate gallery" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Be made from. Your natural hair. Researchers at MIT are currently developing three d printed hair. I wonder what Torah scholars would have to say about that. The one thing it seems they still can't do is to shield anyone from judgment for the world. This is a Lena Simone in New York. Sure. Just one say. Winter. We've got a few updates for you now on some stories. We've been tracking lately on the world last week. We told you about the national portrait gallery and the Tate gallery's in the UK. Both said they were done with money from the Sackler family, the Sackler zone Purdue pharma, which makes Oxycontin and critics say that side of the Sackler family is largely responsible for the opioid crisis. Well on Friday evening, the Guggenheim museum in New York City said it was following the lead of British museums and announced it would also turn down philanthropic gifts from the Sackler family. We also reported recently about a bad sign for the road to peace on the Korean peninsula. The inter-korean liaison office was supposed to be a place for increasing dialogue between north and South Koreans the opposites close to the border between the two countries but last week Pyongyang abruptly recalled their North Korean staff from the office suggesting a backside in negotiations than today. The North Korean staff returned in the morning to the office as usual. It's weird. But at least they're still dialogue and in southern Africa more than a million and a half, people are reeling from cyclone. Isci. We reported on the storm and how it ripped through the region ten days ago, Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Malawi all seriously impacted half of the people affected. Our children Mildred Macara is with mercy corps in Zimbabwe. She says the waters have started to recede, but the landscape is almost unrecognisable. They used to be hundreds of houses at it's now day lead. It's such a challenge for people to even explain how it used to be on what it has become. We'll hear more from mercy cores Mildred Mkhori about the situation in Zimbabwe tomorrow here on the world Brexit chaos. The words are practically synonymous here's a top line today. Prime Minister Theresa May's giving up.

Sackler family Zimbabwe Mildred Macara Mildred Mkhori Prime Minister Theresa May Lena Simone MIT Tate gallery Guggenheim museum New York Pyongyang New York City Koreans Mozambique Purdue Africa UK Malawi ten days
"tate gallery" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"tate gallery" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And this is the world good to have you here. This friday. The name Sackler makes a lot of people angry these days, the Sackler is are the family that's made billions from sales of the painkiller Oxycontin. The drug is a chief villain in the opioid epidemic. But the Sackler is are also major philanthropists who've given generously to institutions all around the globe. Those institutions are now under intense pressure to reject the family's money now to have both in Britain the national portrait gallery in London and the Tate gallery's Benjamin sauce. Cas focuses on philanthropy at the urban institute in Washington. So how big of a deal are these announcements by the state and national portrait gallery in London. Ben, I think they're a pretty big deal for all the controversy that surrounded the Sackler family of less. Couple of years. There hasn't been a single cultural or educational institution. At least that I'm aware of that has explicitly said they were going to not accept anymore Sackler money and puts a lot of pressure on other institutions to make similar decisions. Yeah. And there's been tons of pressure on American cultural institutions and universities to cut ties with the Sackler. Why do you think it was European institutions who came to this decision? I there's two possible explanations. One is the nature of decision making in these cultural institutions there which is slightly different than in American context. Perhaps the deeper question is whether or not American institutions all feel like they're in competition for Sackler money. Anyone who ops out is putting themselves at a major disadvantage and the pursuit of. Of of high sums in these institutions is fierce. And so I think there is a general reluctance not to be the first. Now, whoever the pressure really is on. So let's get down to the brass tacks. Just how important are the Sackler as philanthropies. They are one of the major philanthropic families of the late twentieth and early twenty first century with a real global reach. They have a major presence in British institutions, but they've also funded the Liuw Peking university. They funded a Jewish museum in Germany, their reach extends extremely far and in the US they have funded hundreds of millions of dollars through some of the major major research institutions in the country. Yeah. The other thing is that the Sackler family is vast how big and sprawling is his family. Well, so there were three patriarchs that took a small pharmaceutical company that was known generally for making laxatives and transformed it into a pharmaceutical giant in part through Oxycontin, one of them. Them died before the advent of Oxycontin, Arthur Sackler that leaves two patriarchs Richard and Mortimore, and they were the ones who help build the company through Oxycontin. So when you see the Sackler name on a museums wall. You can't automatically assume that the money came from the sale of this problematic opioid, and that's one reason why say the Metropolitan Museum in New York, has emphasized the fact that the money they received was from Arthur who did not have his hand in contin. I mean, some critics would say that the philanthropic side of the sack with family, basically, allow them to continue profiting from killer drug while garnering goodwill and cover through museums and galleries, do you think that's fair? It's unclear to me the extent to which their philanthropic profile, shielded them from public scrutiny. I think they just had very good lawyers. And to some extent we're able to hide behind the kind of corporation itself if they really wanted to avoid scrutiny they could have had a much lower. Profile both philanthropic. And otherwise, the problem is they wanted it both ways they wanted to avoid any type of acknowledgement of their role in Purdue pharma, but they wanted to have a major public profile as philanthropists, and I think what's happened is that contradiction just became too severe. And it sort of fell apart Benjamin us with the urban institute in Washington where he focuses on philanthropy. Thanks very much for talking about the sacrifice. My pleasure. Last year the national portrait gallery in London put together an exhibit called Michael Jackson on the wall. It looks at the late pop singer as a cultural phenomenon the exhibit has since been shown in Paris. And it was getting ready to open in Germany when HBO air this. He was one.

Sackler Arthur Sackler London Oxycontin urban institute Benjamin Washington Tate gallery Purdue pharma Germany Liuw Peking university Metropolitan Museum Ben Britain US Paris HBO
"tate gallery" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

ID10T with Chris Hardwick

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"tate gallery" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

"Do you miss those? I mean is it like when we were growing up? It seems like you could just be on one show, and then all the sudden boom career made. And now it just feels like you're just chasing audiences into the four core. The fifty corners of the internet to to reach people would you've would you? If are you glad that you're a performer in this era. Or is there another era that you think like really glad that I am managed to capitalize on my space. When in that, I'm just very happy. I started when I did and it took off from that. Because I think I got like the golden age of right of of will. And by the time, my space was done you had your audience, but that point. But I just I think about those days when it's like you can make one television appearance in the seventies. Because seventy percent of the country was watching one thing. It's like you appear on one thing. And then all the sudden, you know, but it's interesting though, because this is the thing like with with data and stuff is that, you know, previously. Before you could put you'll meet a couple to see how many plays something has somebody important my come to concert and Seaney play and MB like I was really affected by that performance. I would like this person to you know. Endorse these sneakers or whatever it is. But that now they'll come they weren't even come tool. They'll just be like we need to go to endorse him sneakers. Who's at the top of the charts? Right. Who's gonna give us? The most. Traffic's not people aren't really making decisions based on the things. Right. That making decisions based on the figure the figure which is possibly fake like, we don't even know. I think as a hundred percent. I don't know. I don't know. I don't know what I don't know. What to believe anymore? Veteran is successful. Think that's fake fell. Liberty feud. No, I'm joking. I'm being facetious. But I do. No, I think that these things are definitely manipulated fischel and say, it doesn't like the guy that owns one of others is this guy could Lambda Vanik and one is like I think fifty three percent market share of music worldwide. He's also one of the biggest donors the GOP. He's like just they've just named the. Oxford University school of government after him. He just liked donates it one hundred fifty million quit to them. They just named the new wing at the Tate Gallery off Tim, say's buying up like, politics, and culture and. When people talk about like marketing, digital marketing, budgets and stuff was to say that he isn't just like paying for off the books to be done somewhere else. You know what I mean? Like troth tro farms, but the office it boosting things right because I don't. Where we all politically at the moment, whereas the clash and the Sex Pistols, and was this whereas the resistance like it's not there, and I find that really really bizarre considering where we are. I wonder if it's just that there are two because that's that's a that's a really interesting point. And I think about that a lot with comedy as well where it's like where the massive comedy when I was growing up. There was like a comedy. And I think it's I honestly think the great thing that the internet has done has given everyone a platform to get out there. Whatever their art is the downside of that. Is there so much noise? And also everyone can go down such very specific rabbit holes that they're not actually coming. It's like there are large groups of people like it's sort of the Nisha firing of our culture. So it's like, you know, this this band that in nineteen eighty two might have had a shit on more followers. Now, they. Have a solid ten thousand followers, and this other one has twelve thousand followers, and this one has forty thousand. But there, but everyone is getting there they're very specific tastes met. So that they're not all kind of coming together. There's just there's not from Trump go in right because they fucked with Facebook and shit. Like, that's that's you know, how Brexit happened in in the UK. It was like trolls. And it was as we were talking about earlier this sort of like negativity online, and you sort of..

Tim Tate Gallery Facebook Oxford University school of go Lambda Vanik Seaney UK GOP Trump Brexit Nisha fifty three percent hundred percent seventy percent
"tate gallery" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:34 min | 2 years ago

"tate gallery" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"The forget about colors by Peter Blake and John Howarth the during the cover sergeant pepper Hamilton's response was to do a blank white cover. But there's a lot more to it than that later. I'll be speaking to the right of Harriet Viner about Robert Fraser, the art dealer who linked the art and music world in the sixties. But I I went to take Britain. To to to Andrew Wilson senior curator of Martin and contemporary art at the Tate and also the author of an essay in the new super deluxe edition of the white album. We spoke about Hamilton and how he approached this momentus task. Andrew I of who was Richard Hamilton, Richard hamsters, probably one of most significant parties in this country time in the in the sixties. But actually, he was the papa's. Didn't he define Papa? Sense. He did. Through through his work with the independent roof at the institute of contemporary arts London in the early fifties. Mid fifties, defines applause. As something popular in federal. But he didn't really define. He defined popular culture as a subject Messer for for for autists for nonsense work very much at the time. When subject matter was quite cool sense of fine, aunt, popular culture. But Blake ocher being quite derided and marginalizing note by autism object the every day, and he some of his contemporaries to convey, very different view, and it was very much about thinking about culture in using say, the tone, the critic Lawrence Alloway coins Vallone fronts of couch, and so everything existed on a continuum find out and will less popular culture, and the everyday all on the same level, and you wouldn't. Apply. A sense of aesthetic judgments to any of these. Categories along that continuum you'd rather appliance with critical judgments, it was about what things meant, and what they did rather than in the sense how they made you feel. This stage is well there's a really crucial connection with this emerging phenomenon which is conceptual. I mean, two years earlier Hamilton it reconstructed do shows large glass for an exhibition here in this building the Tate Gallery seems to me fairly crucial thing that conceptual. Lot was becoming very very significant development in. I mean, it is nothing conceptual often quite misunderstood that somehow being apart from ours. And actually conceptual was about making that connection with the every day that ought to closeness to life. And that closeness was something again that needed to be critically examined and do show was really key figure in all of that. Because in a sense his nomination of sessional Jake's as ready made. Is about engaging with the every day in a way, you know, in engaging with the unaesthetic as well. It was really really important which brings us very neatly onto a very anesthetic album cover or is it the white album. Can you can tell me what Hamilton's idea was for this record? I think in in the sense of ways that the store is often told it's it's. It's a design concept almost born ounce of fair the previous album for the Beatles. Nineteen sixty seven such Pat. Has an ovum covering the design concept was formed very much by Peter Blake and John house, and for many people to find the Beatles in in a maybe retro nostalgic kind of aim but very much of that period. Nineteen sixty seven some review of and this was the album and the album cover that defined. And so when the company first approached Richard Hamilton's, do this. I think his first response was I called talk. What what Peter and John have done in a it's it's like it's beyond fast com woke tonight, and then thinking well due to complete minimum do the complete opposite. But apparently the complete minimum. And let's do something really outrageous, which is to. Covered the album provide a jacket for the album, which should just white. It is the most absurd thing in mentionable when I thought to think about the the biggest band in the world at that time, the Beatles should have new album the double album is the first to be released by deriving labeled pull. Should be just in Weiss..

Richard Hamilton Peter Blake Beatles pepper Hamilton Blake ocher Hamilton Jake Richard hamsters Tate Gallery Harriet Viner John Howarth Andrew Wilson Britain senior curator Robert Fraser Lawrence Alloway institute of contemporary arts Martin Andrew I Messer
"tate gallery" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"tate gallery" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"It's time now for two story this week, we focused to London's millennium dome a bold urban project was designed us the UK into the third millennium. Some people though ended up cooling it the o. two, which is what we know at here, none London as but as Mandelson's fully than Henry Reese. Sheridan can explain why. On the eve of the millennium London and the UK was going through somewhat unexpected. Coach will remake zones, British music, fashion, and arts were globally prominent in a way they hadn't been since one thousand nine hundred sixty s and in nineteen Ninety-seven the country elected a new Prime Minister, Tony Blair with his relative youth and Chom Blair embodied a sense of optimism that was unfamiliar as it was welcome. This national confidence boost was also reflected in several ambitious urban projects set to Mark the millennium in London. The Tate Gallery was to open a knee, medium specializing in modern and contemporary arts in repurpose power plants, a giant ferris wheel called the London. I was being erected on the south Bank and a new footbridge across the Thames was planned the first to be built in over a century. But the biggest and most heralded to these projects was the millennium dome. In eighteen fifty one. The great exhibition was opened in Hyde Park. In one thousand nine hundred. The.

London UK Chom Blair Tony Blair Henry Reese Mandelson Prime Minister Hyde Park Tate Gallery Sheridan south Bank
"tate gallery" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"tate gallery" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"With famous tourist destinations although it is a very healthy vibrant interesting city kind of the place you would probably want to move if you're in your twenties or thirties now and he had to move to the uk it's a real cool place to be but just not packed with the kinds of things to see that london is now mind you it's only a couple of hours from by train from london so a lot of people will fly into london where they can find cheaper deals then to manchester where fewer flights go and so therefore the airfare tends to be a little higher but if you find a good deal into manchester of course she should you should grab it but there's lots to do around the city liverpool is less than an hour away by train in fact some people commute between the two and liverpool has really talk about a city that's come alive recently liverpool is so interesting now they've got their own tate gallery that completely updated the waterfront with museums and with other galleries and places to eat they've come such a long way since their industrial roots and they're very proud of the city and quite rightly on the other side of manchester now we're talking to the east you find the peak district nash national park great for for hikes for some incredibly beautiful views that you wouldn't even believe that report of the english countryside and south of town you find you know stratfordonavon which of course is the home of the bar is where people go to learn about the life of shakespeare and maybe spend a day or two seeing the royal shakespeare company do one of their many productions so there's a lot to do in that zone but on christmas you want to be careful because christmas will be dead boxing day which is after christmas will be dead so don't include those in any touring plans because a lot of things are going to be closed pauline do you have anything to throw into this mix no i really want to a second what you say make sure you have reservations for restaurants on those days because a lot of restaurants will close to britain chefs down over christmas so be careful or you're going to be an end up i don't know yeah yeah energy bar that's that's wonderful advice now would liverpool and i don't know if you're familiar with both.

uk london manchester liverpool tate gallery nash national park britain
"tate gallery" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"tate gallery" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Than four hundred dollars if proposals for a new laws to protect women a passed by the government across party group of mps is to advise on the broadening of a new criminal offence to cover a range of intimidating behaviour ot human is a new exhibition at the tate gallery in london which looks at the history of painting in britain over the past century much of the show features portrayed send out oscar responded vincent tout when to talk to to people who modelled for one of britain's best known painters i'm only you have the wrong if you have geraldo hatred among major art exhibitions often claim big first all to human just looks at what makes a great figurative painting including lucienne freud's nude portrait of his assistant david dawson how many sittings to that take it was four or five sittings of week of eighteen months done at night under electric light you never look to you're watching you never looked at the calendar too much the best and most exhilarating thing to do to watch him naked decision may put it on a mark paint over eight scrubbing up it was a fascinating process to launch going off my opinion over this from that in ukraine seat chile also posed for lucian freud she thinks future generations will still relish looking at a great portrait though perhaps not in an art gallery that in effect on the internet pages male whatever happens then all the graham's got an us i'm going to children so i'm kinda left behind anyway but some people think the age of painting but it's kind of past maybe because we want everything to be so quick these days to pay for paint saw that you need a lot of money to pay for the cgi pay for the pain everything processing claims demand nauseous sauntering some big oil submitted its oldest quick selfie on your iphone asked my faith at chunk of course save the fine curator elena crippa says our online.

tate gallery britain vincent tout lucienne freud david dawson chile graham elena crippa london oscar geraldo ukraine four hundred dollars eighteen months
"tate gallery" Discussed on Thinking Allowed

Thinking Allowed

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"tate gallery" Discussed on Thinking Allowed

"Redknapp iconic imbalance so that's a game with more challenges this the psychology because it involved in assessing all the peoples emotional snaked the psychology of the game this of uncertainty in the game you can't see the other people's cars there's a little more the more challenging what about this argument about creativity i mean we've just a mob just i've just prueher that little poem rubber artificially intelligent created perm in my introduction emme because it is impossible idea to imagine that the computers are going to be able to generate meaningful novel meaningful poetry what we usually roberto crea she work i believe it will happen it's an interesting idea because it goes back to the very beginning of the history of computing aided loveless who's working with babich in in the eighteenth century actually pro pros this as an objection let machines would never be able to be creative in their own right but we do have some small limited examples of machines that do understand the do that have created objects that have been exhibited at the tate gallery that have one two shortstory competitions still the beginnings of understanding the field this is the field of computational creativity the tries to understand what at the mechanisms water you can train yourself to be creative and people do there are tricks you could do to make us that'd be great if those are the tricks the baby we can train compete us today in this advance mimicry our eastern what's going on here is a computer recognising certain sorta partners and then reproducing these patten perhaps a novel way but it is a form of mimicry rodman creation what.

Redknapp tate gallery roberto crea loveless
"tate gallery" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"tate gallery" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

"I knew he was going to say efforts that that good he's good he's your dirty guy he's not you're saying oh man is he's he's not he's not he's not only the dirty giant team no it is was bradley who a piston now and crowder that's why you have a league jacqueline again but they got veins they got art they got raines out the branchville multiple pry of some toughness crutches what was he will you got out already earlier good what do you think he was on endo observed among i love it go ahead no i'm sorry go yeah no i i fate pains will provide mental toughness but i mean at yasser legit vest to this toughness item on isaiah at her last year but you know bradley and crowder aren't will prime bradley my tate gallery in berlin last year for his oddball defense but rao does not latin up lebrun so i'm not saying i mean i certainly don't i'm gonna say out crowder is now on laurent's are now now you ask you add kristen thompson thomas thompson you add crowder i mean you've got guys doing the dirty work guys that don't mind doing the dirty work and you need guys doing i already i agree with you i just i draymond green draymond green hate him him but he's one guy he does that there were already but you're already again all i was saying what what don't know now you guys again so upset and so worked up wait role as that would have the celtics are gonna be a i expect him to be a great day i expected occupies regularly they'd be the same thing as they were last year somebody who can compete with cleveland because there's not much else in the east washington's a team that's coming up was not much else in toronto there are okay but a guy i think the celtics have oh sabbath burger upside but again i think i really gonna be vista it need to make some moves they didn't do it they have not done anything grab are we just got work i i'm not gonna sit here and talk about you the pistons to pieman anybody but i think bradley leaders rallies really good and then we're replace who noone hobbled donna while the hope will you mean koa went out there i know i know.

thomas thompson vista toronto kristen thompson koa donna washington cleveland celtics bradley laurent rao berlin isaiah raines jacqueline crowder
"tate gallery" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"tate gallery" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"It is that is she what's happening okay now not she has pants on all right new york city folks new york city i'm high enough to see rooftops dmitry will be here in that woman is now going back into her penthouse apartment so what have i been up to the last week shows were both pre recorded before i left for a press junket in london england in now a london england is back in the news and it's horrible and my heart goes out to the people that was people and also to the people of the uk in in in a general ways walking on their uh terrorism wise in politically so so it's a tough time over there and i was there for three days i was there in between these two horrible events in heading there i was nervous and scared but when i got there i was astounded at the the sort of continuity of civil life that was going on in gwynn's a beautiful place one into beautiful city in in just west week last wednesday i was standing a on one bridge in front of the tate gallery which is one place i i make sure i go when i'm in england and i was looking at that london bridge wondering if i should get over there because it's sort of an astounding a beautiful a piece of architecture an engineering that's been around a long time and now it's a place where something awful as happened again in england in in a in a terribly sorry to hear that but uh but being an in london it was a pretty amazing thing for the three days i was there and i was happy to see that for the most part uh people were are seen to be a continuing life in the face of terror uh as we all are to some degree in different forms or another but that i am in new york i came to new york.

england uk gwynn tate gallery london bridge new york london three days