28 Burst results for "Tata"

Fresh update on "tata" discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:40 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "tata" discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

"The rise fund You're thinking about certainly the climate the impact Companies and technologies that play to it So how do we think about that as an investor As an investor I think we're going to be encouraged to increasingly wade into industries that are undergoing cyclical and secular change whether it be content creation cybersecurity supply chains There is a whole variety of broad themes that are coming in the post COVID world And my advice would be get in the middle of them sort them out That's where you'll find alpha Well what specifically in terms of how we play it Because you could invest it in major oil company that is starting to look at alternative energies Maybe not your classic clean energy play But so how do you think about it You made the investment along with another in terms of Tata and their EV battery world So how do you think about that Specifically I think there's opportunities both in emerging technologies and companies and in helping existing companies change What you just saw is participate in at Tata is a fascinating case study Here's a major corporation that has a set of assets in EVs that EVs have a market leading position in India And yet in some ways the market didn't quite understand that position So the ability to drop those assets into a separate company bring in capital from investors like us who are dedicated to climate change and making a difference really has fundamentally changed how people are thinking about that business So this opportunity to both support young and growing companies something we learned in the tech revolution And help existing companies spotlight their climate assets is I think a quite extraordinary opportunity I'm wondering about spotlighting those climate assets What moves the company's stock is revenue It's the top line And it's the bottom line And I'm wondering if we need some other metric at least when we talk about publicly traded companies that holds them accountable from an ESG perspective that holds them accountable from a climate perspective because I don't think we're seeing investors really care about that Well I think you are And I think increasingly there is what I think of as a new era of business and perhaps we can get into that Where companies are going to be held accountable not just for what they do But for how they do it For example if you look deeply into the.

Tata India
"tata" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:17 min | 18 hrs ago

"tata" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You're thinking about certainly the climate the impact Companies and technologies that play to it So how do we think about that as an investor As an investor I think we're going to be encouraged to increasingly weighed into industries that are undergoing cyclical and secular change whether it be content creation cybersecurity supply chains There is a whole variety of broad themes that are coming in the post COVID world And my advice would be get in the middle of them sort them out That's where you'll find alpha Well what specifically in terms of how we play it Because you could invest it in major oil company that is starting to look at alternative energies Maybe not your classic clean energy play But so how do you think about it You made the investment along with another in terms of Tata and their EV battery world So how do you think about that specifically I think there's opportunities both in emerging technologies and companies and in helping existing companies change What you just saw is participate in at Tata is a fascinating case study Here's a major corporation that has a set of assets in EVs that EVs are the market leading position in India And yet in some ways the market didn't quite understand that position So the ability to drop those assets into a separate company bring in capital from investors like us who are dedicated to climate change and making a difference really has fundamentally changed how people are thinking about that business So this opportunity to both support young and growing companies something we learned in the tech revolution And help existing companies spotlight their climate assets is I think a quite extraordinary opportunity I'm wondering about spotlighting those climate assets What moves the company's stock is revenue it's the top line and it's the bottom line And I'm wondering if we need some other metric at least when we talk about publicly traded companies that holds them accountable from an ESG perspective that holds them accountable from a climate perspective because I don't think we're seeing investors really care about that Well I think you are And I think increasingly there is what I think of as a new era of business and perhaps we can get into that Where companies are going to be held accountable not just for what they do But for how they.

Tata India
"tata" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:18 min | 2 d ago

"tata" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Got the rise fund You're thinking about certainly the climate the impact companies and technologies that play to it So how do we think about that as an investor As an investor I think we're going to be encouraged to increasingly weighed into industries that are undergoing cyclical and secular change whether it be content creation cybersecurity supply chains There is a whole variety of broad themes that are coming in the post COVID world And my advice would be get in the middle of them sort them out That's where you'll find alpha Well what specifically in terms of how we play it Because you could invest it in major oil company that is starting to look at alternative energies Maybe not your classic clean energy play But so how do you think about it You made the investment along with another in terms of Tata and their EV battery world So how do you think about that Specifically I think there's opportunities both in emerging technologies and companies and in helping existing companies change You just saw us participate in at Tata as a fascinating case study Here's a major corporation that has a set of assets in EVs that EVs at a market leading position in India And yet in some ways the market didn't quite understand that position So the ability to drop those assets into a separate company bring in capital from investors like us who are dedicated to climate change and making a difference really has fundamentally changed how people are thinking about that business So this opportunity to both support young and growing companies something we learned in the tech revolution And help existing companies spotlight their climate assets is I think a quite extraordinary opportunity I'm wondering how spotlighting those climate assets what moves the company's stock is revenue It's the top line and it's the bottom line And I'm wondering if we need some other metric at least when we talk about publicly traded companies that holds them accountable from an ESG perspective that holds them accountable from a climate perspective because I don't think we're seeing investors really care about that Well I think you are And I think increasingly there is what I think of as a new era of business and perhaps we can get into that where companies are going to be held accountable not just for what they do But for how they do.

Tata India
"tata" Discussed on Messages & Methods: Livecast Life 2.0

Messages & Methods: Livecast Life 2.0

03:56 min | Last month

"tata" Discussed on Messages & Methods: Livecast Life 2.0

"How are you feeling about the interviews. Would we were presenting. But we're asking. Well you want to go back to full screen. One of the things that i've had to learn to do and it's not always easy for me because it doesn't fit in with my personality is especially when i worked really hard on the agenda for several weeks in advance and then i made those appointments and then You know we have the agenda. We went there and then we kept adding and adding more in the weed handout cards and say if you if you meet somebody or know somebody who wants to interview you know. Just let them call this number and wools add them on and so we kept adding and adding and so we got really really busy with interviews. And i had an agenda full of talks. We were gonna go to that. We didn't get to go to. But i had you know tata's find myself by saying we are going to get the videos of those talks. We can watch them later and this is an important use of our time. We're here live now. These people are here live. Now we need to get this these interviews done so that we have the content for that for the next year basically and in weaken. Then you know keep contact with these people have them back on talk more with them in have them. You know Recommend other people that we can talk to so it's it was an ideal way to grow our podcast over one weekend It's going to affect our next year. Growth in it was important. It was our top priority was to get those interviews so adding them into the agenda was a little bit. You know bit of a struggle for me but once we were there sat down doing those interviews then. I enjoyed the process of talking to everybody and getting to know their story and You know bringing that out in them And i think as we went along..

tata
"tata" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:58 min | Last month

"tata" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Were proud Air India's Maharaja logo became a symbol of elegance service modernity That was in the 20th century but in the 21st Air India has also become a symbol of the challenges plaguing this fast developing nation rising fuel prices competition never ending bureaucracy Air India went bankrupt The government has been trying to sell it for years Now they finally found a buyer Tata and sons one of India's biggest conglomerates They make steel cars hotels the tatas are like the rockefellers of India It is more of a romantic story than a business You know The reason this is a romantic story says business journalist girish Kubernetes is that that young daredevil from 1932 who got India's first pilot license his name was Tata JRD Tata the Tata family actually founded Tata airlines which later became Air India and then was nationalized When the $2.4 billion takeover was announced Friday the company's current chairman Ratan Tata tweeted welcome back Air India Now comes the hard part though Cooper says getting profits out of what over the decades became a pretty bloated government enterprise The issue will be the culture every day is completely laid back typical government own nonperformance oriented company He worries the Tata family's love of aviation may be clouding their business judgment here But anuradha ready the aviation historians as if anyone can help Air India it's the tatas Has chosen to take back this baby of this with all of its disadvantages because there are so many problems It just shows their commitment The question is whether a commitment to all this history will be enough to return India's national.

India Tata girish Kubernetes Tata JRD Tata Tata airlines Air India Ratan Tata Cooper anuradha
"tata" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:23 min | Last month

"tata" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For India The new government nationalized this fledgling airline Historian mircha rano says in a way Air India helped build a new country You see them connecting different parts of the subcontinent Providing the new nation as it's coming out of the colonial period providing it with an essential infrastructure and essential service Indians were proud Air India's Maharaja logo became a symbol of elegance service modernity That was in the 20th century but in the 21st Air India has also become a symbol of the challenges plaguing this fast developing nation rising fuel prices competition never ending bureaucracy Air India went bankrupt The government has been trying to sell it for years Now they finally found a buyer Tata and sons one of India's biggest conglomerates They make steel cars hotels the tatas are like the rockefellers of India It is more of a romantic story than a business You know The reason this is a romantic story says business journalist garish Kubernetes is that that young daredevil from 1932 who got India's first pilot license his name was Tata JRD Tata the Tata family actually founded Tata airlines which later became Air India and then was nationalized When the $2.4 billion takeover was announced Friday the company's current chairman Ratan Tata tweeted welcome back Air India Now comes the hard part though Cooper says getting profits out of what over the decades became a pretty bloated government enterprise It's completely laid back typical government own nonperformance oriented company He worries the Tata family's love of aviation may be clouding their business judgment here But anuradha ready the aviation historians says if anyone can help Air India it's the tatas And to take back this baby of this with all of its disadvantages because there are so many problems It just shows their commitment The question is whether a commitment to all this history will be enough to return India's national airline to its past.

India Air India mircha rano Tata garish Kubernetes Tata JRD Tata Tata airlines Ratan Tata Cooper anuradha
"tata" Discussed on The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

03:37 min | Last month

"tata" Discussed on The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

"Ui in headless utilities. As much as i want them to so some of it is just kinda parallel with like react query. I did have the mentality of like you know what i would really like to solve. A synchronous state management for everyone as many people. As i could and i also had that problem myself at nozzle and so when i built react query i built it internally i but as if i was building an open source package so candidate in both at the same time it kind of depends so he said that The open source libraries are are a lot of hard work. I i mean what about them is hard. I mean 'cause like i'm sure a lot of people think that you can just you write some code. You stick it in in to get hub and tata it's open. Mit license on it. Or something is open source. You're done right. What what all goes into having an open source library you know. It's like a drug like you said it's really easy to get going like. Yeah i can just slapped some code and your positive or you know take that. Take that first sip. It's really easy to do that. And you know once you get up there you're like ninety share it so you'll share it with people right and people like hey. This is cool but now you've already entered the world of sales right now. You have your convincing other developers to use some package that you have so we've already accumulated sales and probably a little bit of marketing. Just grows with the project over time. If you want your project kept popular you have to know how to do. Some sales marketing and By that point you're going to have some users and they're going to hate you if you don't provide some good documentation so now you are a writer and you have to write great documentation. That is not only informative but hopefully Entertaining to some extent too because documentations the worst thing to read on the planet so You know now you're a writer your salesman your marketer And we haven't even gotten into like. How do you manage sim version inning. And how do you have an effective. Ci pipeline Decisions like You know you could still be shipping just a module this council. Hello right you. We haven't even gotten into the aspects of what makes a software like a piece of software great there's so much goes into designing an api that is composed and small and simple and utilitarian. You know very hyperfocused. There's a lot that goes into testing that library and providing types And you know it. Just snowballs until there's just you basically are running a business. That's what an open source library as if it gets popular enough. It is a business that more often than not as not paying. Its maintainers to maintain itself right. So so what keeps you going. Why go through all that effort for something that you're not even getting you're not getting paid for it so why not you could just make it for you and then just have your thing right. That's a great question so in the beginning you know you're not probably going to get anything those projects but if you're in a situation where it's I would say synergistic to something else. You're working on now. It becomes a massive benefit. Let me give you a situation. You are a. I'll give you my situation. You are the only front end developer at your startup. You're in charge of everything from the from consuming the api in designing it helping design it down to the user.

tata
"tata" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

02:08 min | 5 months ago

"tata" Discussed on ESPN FC

"About it on this show. You've heard me talk about it on this show. When referring to the olympics you could only take eighteen players so that means for black landed off skew. The us manager when you get down to players. Let's say thirteen through eighteen. They almost have to be booty from channel. They have to have more than one role. Because you need to be able to use them in different ways. Most of what we've seen from purse at the international level has been as a right back and we saw that from her later in this game against jamaica but to start the game we saw effectively as a right wing and she gets the goal there in the twenty second minute so this is a player who can play in the attack. She does for nwa sell team. Gotham messy where. She's a teammate. Of carli lloyd and proving that she can play both of those two positions that are not even on the same line right. We're talking about a really super versatile player to me seeing not just that that she proved it but vlatko and off sqi asked that of her this close to the tournament to me. Says he's got big plans for purse. I think she's gonna make the olympic roster when it's all said and done looking to make history white water tough job right. Yes jump to pick two big this but the big the roster verde olympics. Hey savvy let me say put it. This way is great to have you on your own show. Please come back again anytime soon i will. I will amount. I'm eternally indebted to you. You have You've truly saved us a few times here on football. Because and i know you have to deal with her spanish. Bless you bless you for doing double duty and doing it in english brother. I get paid for this war. It's tight it's my job killing it into euros. Keep doing that if the senior vice abby thank you thanks boys appreciate it. We'll be back in thursday. A lot of action would back with her. And i'll be keeping sebastiana set aside a seat. Absolutely warm for her men here from new one game questions. Podcasts listened to the podcast is going to be just as good as the showed. I've promised we'll see your thursday football america. Thank you for joining us..

thursday carli lloyd eighteen players eighteen thirteen olympics twenty second minute two positions sebastiana more than one role both olympic one game two big verde vlatko football jamaica english Gotham
"tata" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

02:01 min | 5 months ago

"tata" Discussed on ESPN FC

"Their own. This is a this is a health problem. In a pandemic should forget about venezuela playing this match this went from colombian civil unrest out of columbia to. Let's take it of argentina because of the positive cases going around in the country in a country. That's just as bad when it comes to positive cases or cova cases in brazil that their own players the national team players in brazil. We're willing not to participate in this. In this event it baffles me that we're talking about this going on right now venezuela casualty who will be next same here. I feel the same way you do. And i would add just one more thing. Because we're we're asking suada do something about it right either. Bring players from your country that we're not called up. What about accountable is isn't exactly. That's why we have comforta- rations who are supposed to be decision. Makers because there were tests ran before the game you can also put perceive players at risk. I mean fortunately nothing other than that has happened. But why should be on venezuela's shoulders to make that decision. Shouldn't go notable take a step forward and say listen. It's not healthy. we have to. We have to be very very cautious on this topic. Why are we leaving the teams to make that decision not convoy because of the money because of the money this tournament hash paying and various various countries to try to get this going. Brazil ended up being the country. It says we will help out and make some money. We will do this. The us was also in consideration. And maybe the us could have pulled it up because of the infrastructure the stadiums that are already here. But you're talking about putting more congested schedule into what is already a tournament where you have gold cup going to happen and now cope american the same country and we're still in a pandemic people need to be mindful need to realize we're in a pandemic things are getting better but you can't just all of a sudden do something like this and expect to not be consequences.

brazil columbia suada gold cup american one more thing argentina Brazil colombian venezuela
"tata" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

05:28 min | 5 months ago

"tata" Discussed on ESPN FC

"So why don't why don't we get. Things started with the mexican national team playing against on buddha's on a friendly match up in front of seventy thousand fans erc just fyi. That's the largest grout for soccer match since the start of the pandemic scorn as draw on. You see the numbers right there. That's that that is the third willis gave in a row for the may be no. It's not looking good herk. So is it time to hit the panic button with the marino. Listen you know way better than all of us here with the mexican press is like you've lived. You are part of the mexican press this orbit this atmosphere that you always feel you know what it's gonna be like. It's panic button today. But don't panic if you're an elderly fan. There's no need to panic. I understand three games. Winless three goals. Four i'm sorry. Two for three goals against yes and we could say that. Costa rica united states. What is mexico and on dudas on. Paper are the four most difficult teams in this confederation in concha calf. Here's the worrying part that rotation those three rate their opponents we saw three goals against two goals for the us play against the same and they went winless. They had eight goals for two goals against picked up a trope in the process of absolutely fine with the younger team. So if you're a fan is a time to panic. No because at the end of this tunnel is i won't he meant is at the end of the tunnel may be what is the health of food is accepted. Accepted of the team will get better and right now on paper. You've got the most prime players the players in their prime and they're better moments in the consideration so no time to panic as of yet. Okay here here's why. I would at least start looking at the panic button piano. This was the first time in a long long time that he had the majority of his stars players available and it's not only the results. The lack of results is the bad performances. And i know against us. Ms national team. Mexico didn't play poorly bought. If you play game against a team. That's trying to find their personality. The rhythm still lose a game. It has to be worrisome. So okay i'm with you. I'm not ready to hit the panic button. But at least i got no. Where is that panic. Button sitting right now because he feels that gold cup. And i know both the us national team and mexico. They won't have their star players or or their idea roster but hey you know the the mexican media is will you put in mexico for many many years if things start going south if data martina is unable to deliver the trophy to mexico. You know people are going to start asking questions. Is this going to compromise his position. Maybe not but you don't want that kind of noise for the world cup qualifiers. Do you agree with me. That one hundred percent. Listen to win the gold cup. No time to press the panic button. But you know the mexican federation the handed over the button. They've been known for these impulse. Decisions victim to teach came in for chapel hill to fourteen in that failed campaign by cipolla tory. He was there a week. They pulled the plug and went to rada to get them over the hump to that two thousand fourteen world cup so they are known for making those rash decisions. I like you think mexico and have their eighteen if you will. Because they've made. What is the olympics. A priority and the us is going to let the european stars go off into their preseason. So it's going to be a majority. Mls gold cup squad if that's the context and mexico doesn't have a good outing against this. Us national team panic button time. Yeah i have one more thing on this topic and it actually plays on data martinez favor. There is no other manager head coach in mexican soccer right now. That can go like okay. If that does not that one. I am the one. There's no other candidate right now. So usually there's added pressure when there's another name in the lineup or at least waiting for his name to be called up so right now. There's no there's a ferret. The there was all like in other times cipolla authority only or even victim managua right now. There's no other coach that finish go on thing if things go south for me then. This guy comes up. There's no name right now for that kind of conversation. Lastly have one last question for you on the mexican national team performance. Is there anything in particular at that concerns. You the uc something specific. That makes you go. This is bad and that the martinez should really put attention on this. Besides the evident fact that they can't score goals that since ministers injury. They can't put the ball in the back of the net. Besides that i think for the first time in its history because that out of the no we haven't noticed but his team is very suspect in defending dead-balls especially it's teen that gives up lots of dangerous plays on. We saw weston mckennie in that cock-up nations league final time after time. Happy his way with whoever was there whether they went up one was a mic zone. Trying to put a pick and prevalent try put somebody to disrupt movement. He won every single time. What.

two goals concha calf Two olympics three games today three goals one hundred percent Four eight goals seventy thousand fans world cup Mexico willis first time eighteen third four both rica united states
"tata" Discussed on Insureblocks

Insureblocks

02:07 min | 9 months ago

"tata" Discussed on Insureblocks

"But the point as i say this all ecosystem that's point number one one current example that you know is under discussion is asset property data. Yes so you know. The insurance industry has loads of it in various formats and with reading quality of data. But right now. The banking and financial industry needs it for of complaints for example and i'm sure other industries acquired for that purpose. So how many. Basically property Setup property blockchain can exist if the insurance industry since it already has a data. There's a discussion about how we can leave it. As that data to clear to generate the positive then cleanse the data and then potentially monetize rita with the consent of the respective insured body so there is a democrat. There is some discussion on that on those lands. Where basically the insurance focused consortium could do something with other parties in other industries. So that's one one example of discussion going on then. There is another discussion and this is staged still moving in that direction. And this false moment though. But then there's another discussion where we may see the interaction between the care insurance End of consortium and an existing healthcare ecosystem. So that's another example on the agenda so decided to examples and some of the ones that you mentioned yes those are certainly possible and as of now Are discussions going on. Maybe i'm not gonna to them but the certainly you don't in in Strategist not on the cards. This episode is brought to you by our friends at our three in this digital first world now more than ever businesses need to modernize existing processes systems and models developed by our three. Cora is built to meet the stringent requirements of highly regulated industries. It can be used by firms of.

three Cora first world one one example point
"tata" Discussed on Insureblocks

Insureblocks

05:31 min | 9 months ago

"tata" Discussed on Insureblocks

"Pratap. Thank you for joining us today. Could you please give us our listeners. A quick introduction on yourself. Yeah but at optum quantify years of it expedience have been working in insurance commercial insurance primarily since twenty seven. And i've been working in blockchain's and insurance since Wouldn't be fifteen august. And i'm passionate about multiple editing and my expertise. Elliot's group at a stop modeling blockchain's insurance on morton's liberty and climate change anybody passionate about those are the key things about indeed. I think we also have common passions both on blockchain but also on on climate change. So it's great to have you with us on this show our top as you're quite familiar with the shows we're going to start off with our first question. Which is could you please explain our listeners. What is blockchain. And how does it work. Yeah so blockchain and the slightly order term and get used for. dlt's also. I really shared this particular simplified description which is more applicable to then a purist blockchain description since that is my focus so normally using a client create and propose transaction to one or more web servers run by one party. Typically one server validates that transaction and different. There's okay then process sincere in blockchain more. Dlt really using a client. We propose transaction to multiple servers run by different parties which validated on action. And if okay together consensus process and if the consensus was a succeeds then the process the transaction and save it and they typically the blockchain varies from here on that. It saves it in that particular blocks but in the deal. The doesn't necessarily so. That's basically how we how i would explain what blockchain us thank you for that so To continue as could you also give us an introduction to tata consultancy services. Yes oh pcs fifty already. Services company grand old. We are part of the group one of the largest and most espn. She conglomerates on the planet attack loop gets much more revenue from india then from insane india out of it stolen hundred and six billion dollars revenue. Tag group hasn't track record of enlightened policies for workers much more before they became common even in the west so We have Twenty two billion dollars revenue. Four hundred and seventy global professionals including thirty six point four percent women from an total of one hundred and forty seven nationalities. I have a personal relationship to the toddler group. My father worked in india and told me stories of title and todd in particular due to it's much more social purposive nature. I like working here. And is sir very much reflective of the group in general so i have my own dc s fifty watch and long. My father is one from the loop so that that's from india. So that's basically what. I like about the pieces group. This is fascinating because you're obviously there's a family history to it. But i i personally did not know you know about how important. Es g was to the tag group. So it's wonderful to hear that let's focus a little bit. You know regards to tag consultancy services itself because in in november of last year yet you partnered with d three i to design develop and launch ecosystems innovations based on distributed ledger technology. For the insurance industry. Could you please tell us what is partnership means to tcl s but also what it means to you personally. Yeah thanks so i was. The first globally to write about. Blockchain can be applied to commercial insurance and reinsurance in august twenty teen associated with many people and associations considering implementing blockchain's and insurance including some of the original or you know pretty old be ti people then so be initiated by the insurance industry for the industry this is the best and most feasible way of implementing blockchain's in insurance or for that matter in industry if it is something that the industry standard for itself. It's always easier having worked in the london insurance market since two thousand eleven. I'm sharply aware of how difficult collaboration between competencies. And i've seen that. Don't the difficult work. I have some friends. And i have discussed particularly with. They didn't offer good for example. How difficult it is but bt. I has got got all this correct. You know they have figured this out. They have Twenty one committed investors and lots of members to get a consortium blockchain of the ground. It is necessary to have afford. The industry by industry consortium like betray then. There is a key role for the product vision technology. Which in my view be theaa sorted out pretty well and there is a need for good. si partner that's what basically there's about as a pioneer of in the space. I understood early on that size late. Theseus have a key role to play in enabling consortium blockchain's to succeed. And that's basically why. I'm still in dc said not in a startup. We don't because. I think they said yeah.

Twenty two billion dollars four percent first question hundred and six billion dollar one thirty six point one hundred and forty seven na one party india d three one server both fifty watch Four hundred and seventy globa fifty november of last year group morton more web servers consultancy
Blockchain insurance innovation  insights from Tata Consultancy Services

Insureblocks

05:31 min | 9 months ago

Blockchain insurance innovation insights from Tata Consultancy Services

"Pratap. Thank you for joining us today. Could you please give us our listeners. A quick introduction on yourself. Yeah but at optum quantify years of it expedience have been working in insurance commercial insurance primarily since twenty seven. And i've been working in blockchain's and insurance since Wouldn't be fifteen august. And i'm passionate about multiple editing and my expertise. Elliot's group at a stop modeling blockchain's insurance on morton's liberty and climate change anybody passionate about those are the key things about indeed. I think we also have common passions both on blockchain but also on on climate change. So it's great to have you with us on this show our top as you're quite familiar with the shows we're going to start off with our first question. Which is could you please explain our listeners. What is blockchain. And how does it work. Yeah so blockchain and the slightly order term and get used for. dlt's also. I really shared this particular simplified description which is more applicable to then a purist blockchain description since that is my focus so normally using a client create and propose transaction to one or more web servers run by one party. Typically one server validates that transaction and different. There's okay then process sincere in blockchain more. Dlt really using a client. We propose transaction to multiple servers run by different parties which validated on action. And if okay together consensus process and if the consensus was a succeeds then the process the transaction and save it and they typically the blockchain varies from here on that. It saves it in that particular blocks but in the deal. The doesn't necessarily so. That's basically how we how i would explain what blockchain us thank you for that so To continue as could you also give us an introduction to tata consultancy services. Yes oh pcs fifty already. Services company grand old. We are part of the group one of the largest and most espn. She conglomerates on the planet attack loop gets much more revenue from india then from insane india out of it stolen hundred and six billion dollars revenue. Tag group hasn't track record of enlightened policies for workers much more before they became common even in the west so We have Twenty two billion dollars revenue. Four hundred and seventy global professionals including thirty six point four percent women from an total of one hundred and forty seven nationalities. I have a personal relationship to the toddler group. My father worked in india and told me stories of title and todd in particular due to it's much more social purposive nature. I like working here. And is sir very much reflective of the group in general so i have my own dc s fifty watch and long. My father is one from the loop so that that's from india. So that's basically what. I like about the pieces group. This is fascinating because you're obviously there's a family history to it. But i i personally did not know you know about how important. Es g was to the tag group. So it's wonderful to hear that let's focus a little bit. You know regards to tag consultancy services itself because in in november of last year yet you partnered with d three i to design develop and launch ecosystems innovations based on distributed ledger technology. For the insurance industry. Could you please tell us what is partnership means to tcl s but also what it means to you personally. Yeah thanks so i was. The first globally to write about. Blockchain can be applied to commercial insurance and reinsurance in august twenty teen associated with many people and associations considering implementing blockchain's and insurance including some of the original or you know pretty old be ti people then so be initiated by the insurance industry for the industry this is the best and most feasible way of implementing blockchain's in insurance or for that matter in industry if it is something that the industry standard for itself. It's always easier having worked in the london insurance market since two thousand eleven. I'm sharply aware of how difficult collaboration between competencies. And i've seen that. Don't the difficult work. I have some friends. And i have discussed particularly with. They didn't offer good for example. How difficult it is but bt. I has got got all this correct. You know they have figured this out. They have Twenty one committed investors and lots of members to get a consortium blockchain of the ground. It is necessary to have afford. The industry by industry consortium like betray then. There is a key role for the product vision technology. Which in my view be theaa sorted out pretty well and there is a need for good. si partner that's what basically there's about as a pioneer of in the space. I understood early on that size late. Theseus have a key role to play in enabling consortium blockchain's to succeed. And that's basically why. I'm still in dc said not in a startup. We don't because. I think they said yeah.

India Pratap Tag Group Blockchain Elliot Morton Tata Espn Todd TCL London Theseus DC
Becoming Part of the UK EV Supply Chain

Electronic Specifier Insights

04:52 min | 9 months ago

Becoming Part of the UK EV Supply Chain

"We'll be speaking about the company's production techniques the benefits of using wise products and of course have the company's been adapting an pivoting during the covid nineteen pandemic so flip welcome to electric specified herein sites Coup think to kick us off. I think what will be good for. Our listeners is if you can give us a bit of background about track. Wise more what. The company does not on your involvement in the company. If the is so truck wise we were founded in nineteen eighty-nine nine designs limitation started as a printed circuit design. Bureau mood soon. Enough to manufacture and in the mid nineteen nineties was asked to make a nine foot lem prince a second vote and this very large nuts circuit was one of the la gsm gsm nine hundred by station at tennis. Oh the company in fell specialized in the manufacture of them not really really conventional printed circuit boards but products using printed circuit technology. In this case would some in it was printing on tennis again. These very large Up to sell to two point eight meters length so really for the last twenty five years. Tuck wise as making provincial infrastructure. Tata's for Industry in that has been a big big business loris. So i joined the business and we but that the company had this set had this manufacturing capability which was dead. The manufacturer Bodes my feeling. Was that if we could sell it to one. Then one company we will be able to sell it to others and i joined net. She pulled business internet in two thousand on that basis remote keble. Oh i second customer office. New custom was based in melbourne. Seth australia and we ended up in shipping tons and tons of products. That to let and it to melvin. Indem ultimately go to queens exploit that Interesting journey and but yeah so that. That's that's where we started from. And what's what would you say differentiates the flex circuits the track manufacture for mother. Fpdc's yup in kosovo am flexible printed circuits. As as a not a not a new technology was people making ftc's long before trackways was ever ever involved. Am what what we did was. We took a our existing large large format manufacturing capability and really develop it to be linked limited so that is a fundamental proposition to the mockus normally flexible printed second Size are typically six. Ten minutes is twenty four inches in length. There's a handful of people on the worldwide macy's who can make make larger boats tip avail to a certain size but really check wise offering is is length unlimited. So awhile back. The longest product we made was twenty five meters. We've made fifty meter long products. I'm damn nici this week about to launch into To making seventeen eleven product. You know so linson. Limited is a real proposition of the market. Yes i think. The graph on the track wise websites of highlighting a kind of the lengths that you guys can manufacturer as i write the case Whether liberals are going to get on this something needs pulse. I we're pretty proud of this technical ability. And it's his set me of his has gained some interest on the worldwide that we keeps promote that so much space thorough menu image. Coming them in the press. Explain a little bit more about the use of. Iht's the wiring harnesses soup today. I'd like to say it was a minute my class to teach it thinking. That was actually a an approach. Were originally buy royce. Aero-engines who looking for place the why hanis inside the aero-engines with flexible printed circuits in order to excite white and decide space because the aero-engines bake roughly eight meters the from fight to oversee the flexible printed circuits with a big rolls royce at hud. We made them met made big Badges that the reason we colder to improve thomas. Technologies is is the same reason the was originally. I'm originally developed spec in the middle of the century so that they do wolf a significant improvements conventional lot hanis

Seth Australia Tennis Tata Linson Melvin Kosovo FTC Melbourne Nici Macy Hanis Royce Thomas
Exploring And engaging autism With Doctor Todd Peter Levine.

Wait What Really OK with Loren Weisman

05:57 min | 10 months ago

Exploring And engaging autism With Doctor Todd Peter Levine.

"This is when this is the brand messaging podcast. Wait what really okay today. I'm here with todd. Peter levin he happens to not be a serial killer. Actually we can make it four words. It could be a doctor. Todd peter levin Like would you like fava beans with that. Now we're now we're really going. Its silence of the. Todd's thing in all seriousness. Though because we we are going to start joking. Not todd for a while. I didn't talk to him for a while. But dr todd. Peter levin is here with me today again. This is loren wise and the title of today's episode is exploring in engaging autism with dr todd. Peter levin todd tatas is. We're not doing this. Dr stuff are we know. Please don't please call todd. Thank thanks so much for having me. No i go by todd all over the place professionally and personally so i appreciate that. That's cool and it's a little bit more laid back okay. So we met. Let's just breaking the ice or breaking back the history here. We met nine thousand nine hundred eighty five correct. That can't camp frank a day in west. Brookfield massachusetts in a yeah. It was. That was the summer that we both turned. Eleven that we're both i. Would i remember it myself. Because i can't speak for you. Awkward lanky looking for socialization may be interested in girls and Stumbling miserably over ourselves but a great place to do that. I thought you know camping canoeing. Linda cabin it was awesome. I look back. And i found one of those photos that my wife saw it was like bothers is really short shorts. Unlike not only was it. An awkward timing was nineteen eighty five. Yeah and don't forget. Don't forget the tall socks socks pulled up to your knees with stripes. You know along the top part of it. That was a big move for me. Absolutely now i before we dig into him and and he's here for autism. He is a doctor. We're going to talk about the otherness. Podcast his podcast. It's in the process of production. But were you there and this is not a rumor. A boat blew up one summer. I was there when it happened. I didn't see it but lightning struck the lake and struck the boat and there was an explosion. Was that we in the same camp that year was that a year before a year later. Do you remember that it might know because that is definitely something i remember and my because you were there a few summers before me. And then i what happened was are overlapping. Ear was the first year. I was there in the last year. You were there. So there wasn't a boat explosion but was something almost as exciting. The you know the the fireworks on the fourth of july someone you know had a roman candle you know the the the basically the two that shoots balls at out and nailed someone in the face. Where the counselors. And i have no idea. Yeah that was. That was the excitement of eighty five. I think maybe was. I don't know if it was summer. But that was the most explosive in terms of flames. And and that sort of thing. I do remember. I hadn't picked up the drums at that point but there was a cabin. I think two or one up from ours and it was a guy with the way i remember. It was a white drum set and a whole bunch of us were inside and he was drumming. And i don't know again a month necessarily gonna say it was camp david. I remember just being in awe of this. This guy in this drum said and loud and rock and roll and i don't know maybe it was that summer camp and start for me. Yeah no i do remember it. It was yeah two cabins down. I guess it was empty and the guy had a drum set and he reminded me of sort of every eighties rocker. You would have any developing eighties rocker. I remember long blonde hair. You know terminator sunglasses. Some sort of cutoff t shirt. And he's a good guy too. So yeah i remember standing watching him and or hearing from like you know two hundred yards away or more because it was loud of course so and here's a little bit more of the irony. I'm always the one in most of my podcasts. When i talk to people about podcast say you know what dig in. Don't go into crazy stories too often. Don't talk about things that people can't necessarily relate to you. But i rarely have guests much less guests that i haven't really seen and the better part of thirty five years so i'm breaking my own rule here but the leading a little bit forward here we you added me on facebook and i guess i just accepted and didn't even put two and two together a little back before we connected in the fall right so that was going back a few years. I remember the name loren wiseman and you know as as we caught up you sort of picked up. I do remember quite a few things over the years. So i remembered hearing the name. See well reading the name seeing the photo in. Of course i wasn't gonna put two and two together and say that was definitely the kid i went to camp with but i said hey in the spirit of connectedness let's do it and then what transpired from there was reading about your work in authentic messaging brand messaging and sort of putting important things out there in ways that are about the about the authenticity authority. Not about kind of gone with the fads and stuff too. So that moment. are those your post. Plus my transition in life from where i was living in rhode island to cenex were important. Wants to and as podcast idea came to me with a group of friends from college a few months earlier i reached out and the results were

Peter Levin Dr Todd Todd Todd Peter Levin Loren Wise Todd Tatas Linda Cabin Autism Brookfield Massachusetts Frank Loren Wiseman David Facebook Rhode Island
The True Cost of Sustainable Skincare with Tata Harper

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

05:48 min | 10 months ago

The True Cost of Sustainable Skincare with Tata Harper

"I feel like there's so many misconceptions in the beauty industry really in the luxury industry in general too. But you know Clean beauty is not elevated enough or clean. Beauty doesn't work as well. And i think what's interesting. Is that you kind of saw those challenges. Or you heard those misconceptions and you're like no. I'm gonna change this right like i love that i'm gonna i'm gonna give it a try because enough you know because i think that now what we need is a lot of consumer products that make our life better deal you know not just like superficially better but like really that they They elevate our quality of life. And from that lance. It's what really kept me motivated and really like we spent like five years creating the harper because the formulas didn't exist. No one knew how to use like natural ingredients to preserve or to a mall. Sify or to again or to stabilize those were not like raw materials were used just for like marketing and And there was not a lot of science around like the formulation aspect of natural skincare and took a really long time to make them happen and also formulate from a different point of view because a lot of natural skinner was always formulated with this idea of minimalism and and a lot of like the first gen natural products. They were created a lot. I by the low hus movement remember that movement that lifestyle movement that is being natural so the fact that the product was natural was actually more important than the even that the product worked ben and data no for skin care. Because you only buy skin care too because it works right exactly. Why you don't like by this moisturizer to save the planet like you buy this moisture is great moisturizer and then you have your charities and other things to do other things but But yeah no i was. I was really challenging. It was almost like with the creation of our company. We talent almost every aspect of being a maker of skin-care not only from the ingredients and the formulas but also by having our farm like what you were saying before the farm has been such a special place for us because a lot of skin care is outsource. The majority of the companies are outsource. They outsource almost every piece of their of their Of their business to third parties whether it's the formulation to labs that a lot of times abusing tons of basis and just you know the smell or the color or the incentive vitamin seen our. We're going to add. Hulo renege on jason or you know things like that but you find a lot of companies that have very unique products and formulas that are really unique so for us it was always very clear that we needed to have our own our end and our own formulation Our own chemists and our own lab so that we can really formulate products from scratch like we like doing and that every ingredient has a purpose and also every single one of our formulas doesn't rely on just one ingredient like we're not like on one ingredient type of company where company that by ingredients from all over the world and use them in the you know in different formulas in very high concentrations. So no i mean. I think it makes so much sense. And i love that you guys and your approach is truly like farm to beauty right. I feel like that's such a Sort of a marketing term that you hear thrown around alongside clean beauty etc. But you're literally you know harvesting in growing ingredients on your farm for some of your formulas So can you explain a little bit more about how that process works in terms of You know like organic farming and how you guys are actively working milan. I mean. I think that's fascinating kodaly so just to clarify one thing. We do bring ingredients from all over the world. Sure yeah we bring ingredients from like eighty four different countries. Okay we have like no self and post limit on like we're just gonna talk about vitamins where we are see company we really curate technologies from all over the world whether it's green tag or you know things from tradit- you know from a lot of tradition traditional chinese medicine you're also bringing a lot of and butters from amazon but anyway so we In the farm. There's a couple of things happening so number one. We have a garden where we grow a lot of Not even a lot. We grow specifically five herbs that grow really well in our soil in vermont in our farm which is a clay soil and those are calendar. La barra sweet alfalfa and kolenda and we grow them in our farm in in our organic farm and we make one ingredient that that That we produce at the farm every single month that basically captures all of the oil soluble nutrition from all of those herbs. And the and it's done in a very temperature controlled process that it's very specific and that ingredient that is called our farm beauty complex goes into almost every single one of our formulas but in the farm. We also have a lot of barnes because it was an old dairy farm converted into a skincare farm. Now i love

Sify Lance Skinner Harper BEN Jason Milan Amazon Vermont Barnes
Tensions simmer over Northern Cyprus' plan to reopen Varosha

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:01 min | 1 year ago

Tensions simmer over Northern Cyprus' plan to reopen Varosha

"In nineteen seventy, four intervention by Turkish military forces after Greek inspired coup in Cyprus the famous Borussia Resort region was shut down over one hundred hotels with a bed capacity of ten thousand has been empty. No forty six years United Nations Security Council resolution states that the ghost. Count Ghost town. Can only be resettled by its original inhabitants. But now the Turkish. Separate Prime Minister has announced that the beaches there will open today causing much consternation from Cyprus and Greece one, hundred Lucinda Smith. The eastern will correspondent for the Times joins me now Hannah. Thanks thanks for coming on. Can you remind us of the events leading up to the closing of the region? Show well, of course, Cyprus in Nineteen, seventy, four, a war broke out but really the tensions on the been going on for more than a decade already between the two communities. The Greek speaking community on the Turkish speaking community. Now, in nineteen seventy four, what happened was that backed by Greece the Greek Cypriots tend to do. In response to that the Turkish army INVADED IN THE NORTH And progress down to the South and actually the line that they take. Shami was planning to progress to stops just north of Rocha. Rocha shouldn't have been part of the part of the territory take. Mohtashami. But they did in fact, take it. Well, it didn't do was opening up again to the public. They kept originally kind of bargaining chip hyping to sort of extract some concessions from the Greek separate side using this kind of faulting chip of Rocha. But she what's happened is that for forty six years, it's remained behind barbed wire, its military zone, the only people who are allowed. That are Turkish military personnel I'm very occasionally U. N. personnel now. On the did kind few images that we've seen coming from. This is really kind of striking quite eerie. Once, very, very lavish resort place where people like Elizabeth Taylor and severe ran went on holiday. Now just completely crumbling to dust. So what are the latest developments? So actually totta are the north separate prime minister announced. August. That the Russia was going to be redeveloped and reopened. Now this is something entirely near this is who come up cyclically disgust every so often. And so in a way. You know again it's you know one of these ideas and they'll never come to fruition. But as you said on Tuesday nights totta made the announcement while he was nine crowd that is going to be open today, not the whole town, just the beachfront But the really significant thing about this is that that was just five days away from the presidential elections in no Cypress scheduled to be held on Sunday Ersan Tatars candidate in those elections and I think the really interesting thing you mentioned that it's this announcements is met with a huge amount of opposition from. A Greek Cypriots and from Greece is also met with quad loss of opposition from Turkey separates as well It says caused the government of North. Cyprus a coalition government collapsed to one junior partner said it was pulling out that coalition and so her fide by this kind of sudden announcement and submit Prank and I think you know lots of people that know Cypress particularly Essen Tatas political opponents thing. But he's really using this as a kind of political stunt to give him the edge in Sunday's elections but I mean it's illegal isn't it? How does Turkey justify it? It. Is Legal Yeah as you said, according to the UN if anyone's going to be resettled in Russia, they have to be the original residents, most of whom were Greek separates. Now thought present factors has recognized the ship of the proper does the commission up. To, look into how the original owners of properties in brochure could be compensated Most of those people wanted some kind of compensation. Some wanted their properties back. But yeah. The fact is you know if any redevelopment of that town is going take place, there's this two major issues in all Cyprus firstly is the town the for forty six years has just been crumbling into the ground. It's GonNa take music. You're going to have to be kind of a demolished and reconstructed which might work, and secondly that is an she is going to cost Cyprus huge amounts of money if they want to do this in the kind of legal and proper way, and let's not forget the no. Cypress's is a country this only recognized by Ankara, it's pretty widely embargoed eighty four. For its economic survival is much propped up by Ankara saying it's places kind of ready access to to the funds needed to do something like this. So I think the question amongst. People position or is this just an election stunt? Is The beach just going to be open for feed is a member. She was just going to be closing lucky walls before a finally Hannah. How this feed into Turkeys dispute with European Union members Cypress and Greece territorial rights in the eastern Mediterranean. Yes sure I mean I think it's coincidence that is nouncement was made in Ankara. The obviously, no cypresses almost entirely dependent on anchor for it survivor. Essen Tatars. I said is the is kind of anchors favored consciousness elections, but we'll see this is why dispute going on in Syria and Cyprus and in the eastern Mediterranean more broadly which she the tickets very much. The House of it's about the converged UNSEE gas. It's about maritime sovereign say on that those people down over the past few weeks rather still not been resolved and I. Think this is hugely emotional for for separates greek-cypriots particularly, and it's just another thing I. think no guide to sort of. Prolong this arguments this maritime arguments niece.

Cyprus Greece Rocha Cypress Turkey Ankara Hannah Turkish Army Russia United Nations Security Counci Borussia Resort Prime Minister Elizabeth Taylor Mediterranean Lucinda Smith
"tata" Discussed on Conversations with KidsPeace

Conversations with KidsPeace

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"tata" Discussed on Conversations with KidsPeace

"Migrating out of the group. Oh. Yes. What happened there so There there is an a number of players who who once a week just wasn't enough. and. So they created their own groups they went to local comic bookstores. So there's in So as a board certified behavior analysts, you know practicing applied behavior, analysis. You know we're always looking for you know skill building, but then generalization of those skills, right so they're not just doing it in group they're doing it in the real world and what better way to show that than them starting their own groups, and you know just playing out at at school clubs at a comic bookstores with their families with their friends running games on discord. it just became this. It just ballooned and you know it's just amazing how how social they can be in in in the right circumstance and yeah, it's just fantastic. I. There's one can I tell a quick story? You're absolutely great So this one young man that I that I worked with in in particular after the group had been going on for some time. and He loved it and having so much fun Before group the one day. I was standing in the lobby getting getting things around getting getting ready. And this this young man's father approached me and said, you know is kind of hard for me to say but it really need you to know that you know my my son is a teenager and you know throughout his life we've never had anything that we connected. Oh, we've never seen either I. we've never had a shared point said, but I played dungeons and dragons, and now we play dungeons and dragons together and this group gave us that in. No. So that was. An unintended like I had. You know who knew like I didn't even you know I wasn't even really a party to to they're they're kind of relationship. And it was it was just so powerful. You know but data that reached that just goes beyond the table starts at the table but so quickly goes throughout their whole life. TATA's fantastic. Wow that wouldn't what an inspiration point you get. You get an extra roll next time rob. Speaking of that, you know that we end all of our conversations will ask you for life today we're do something special..

TATA
The Trader Joe's Haul Episode

Hungry Girl: Chew The Right Thing!

04:56 min | 1 year ago

The Trader Joe's Haul Episode

"Okay. How do we feel about Colusa? Think! It's good i. mean it's tasty sweet. Okay, so the coffee flavored liquor is now available in to drink cold brew Kansas Okay so the drink contains real Arabica coffee with notes of Caramel chocolate and vanilla mixed with Colusa, even has the foam on top, and it's only eighty calories again. Wow So. That's because see. The thing is about Colusa. It's usually super calorie dense like leakers like the very very sweet, and so the fact that this says eighty calories a can you know I feel like I would try this and I would make some kind of fun recipes out of it so I'm excited to check that out. Put a little whip on top I. think it'll be good two hundred in a blender with some ice. From the recipe creations I smell a facebook live. Okay, so before we jump in. I do want to say that we haven't yet another fantastic sponsor for this week's episode, you guys. Are you excited about the sponsor, very? I know I am it's our old pals at enlightened first of all enlightened? Sorry, they make the best ice cream and frozen products in the Biz in addition to their incredibly delicious badeah being bought a boom snacking broad beans, which are to die for but today we are specifically talking about a new frozen product. They have you know. Enlightened started out with novelties. They had those ice cream bars originally before they got into pints and all the other great stuff that they do, but they have a new bar called enlightened fruit infusions that are low in sugar there, especially popular with the Kito audience because they're totally Kito, friendly, right? Very low in sugar, sixty ninety calories, hardly any fat. Three to seven grams of fiber, three to five grams of sugars and total, which is pretty incredible for a fruit bar, and they're real fruit frozen pops. They literally have seventy to eighty percent less sugar than most of the competition, and they are not made with any artificial sweeteners. I love these bars. They were nice enough to send them to me like during the pandemic freezer, they're really refreshing. Their infused with natural herbs and other feel good ingredients, but all you really taste. Is that fruity deliciousness now I love the flavors that they have with these because think about how cute and fund these are coconut plus immunity immunity. With elements like elderberry and high biscuits that support a healthy immune system have strawberry and chill. With like calming ingredients like Lavender Camomile and more. And like usually that stuff feels a little like I, don't know. Earthy crunchy a little bit out there to me, but I'm just telling you. The strawberry is my favorite flavor, the watermelon soothe. Has Tim. Rick and other anti inflammatory ingredients, and they have a pineapple and renew flavor with digestive benefits from Dandelions, root, Ginger, root, and more so have you tried these bars I have and I'm like blown away that you get all those benefits and it's just a delicious fruit bar. I was Kinda hoping that maybe you'd want to. Make it a little run down the hill and drop it off at our house. Maybe I should have done that I. I don't know what's left. There might just be sticks left like an ice cream truck. Will you like play some music while you pull up to our house amount, enlighten fruit infusions. Sure, but if by any chance you miss the ice cream, hungry girl as she drives by Your House, you can get these at whole foods. All right we might do that and. Everyone else could do that. We were definitely doing home for whole foods home delivery, so we'll definitely do that for sure. Okay. Well good work from the enlightened people. We Love Them I love everything they put out. This is just a new thing for them. And I say Kudos to them because they have really been doing so well with other Kito friendly products. Okay well onto the hall I am so excited. I have. Have to say we're going to jump in and start tasting. Some of the stuff that I found a trader Joe's. I'm not saying all of this is new, but I have to say it is all new to me so and that's what doesn't matter. Yeah, it doesn't and sometimes you know it's good to to pick up some foods that you hope will be around forever. Because Trader Joe's is known for like having all these. Products, and hopefully some of these will stick around for the long haul, but we are starting off with some savoury items. We've got an exciting egg for todd with Swiss cheese and cauliflower so I. I saw these in the freezer section. I know Aaron who works with US swears by these. She said Lisa. You need to try this. You put it in a flat bread. You make a rap out of it I think they're super cute and you. You can do a lot with them. It says the serving as to for Tatas, but I feel like you only need one especially. If you're creative with it, they have one hundred and thirty five calories, each seven and a half grams of fat twelve and a half grams of protein and their little egg pucks. They're cute. They're very fluffy to.

Colusa Trader Joe Kito United States Facebook Lavender Camomile Kansas Rick TIM Lisa Aaron
"tata" Discussed on On The Line with Estée Lalonde

On The Line with Estée Lalonde

24:49 min | 2 years ago

"tata" Discussed on On The Line with Estée Lalonde

"Ride and a conviction of manslaughter via text message the two part documentary explores the text sent leading up to conviction and raises a lot of questions I didn't want to become like a sales or marketing company like I wanted to have a real skin care company because I thought that when I bought skincare products that that's what the blinds that I was buying it out I'm GonNa like completely renovate them and I am going to have our own labs in years I see yeah in Vermont so I was like I wanna make every single month all of our products and by the time that we are done with all of our or no processes and testing and quality control is going to be like a month and a half so they will be in stores like in two three months from the making so super fresh as fresh as it can be really and our products last year and a half like completely fine so it's perfect it's perfect like I felt so much more comfortable and also I also a lot doing this also allowed me instead of giving money to subcontractors to do what I don't want to deal with I I mean all to invest that money back into my formulas into my packaging to make it to sustainable and also I feel that today it's not just about making amazing products it's really about also designing great systems and processes for making those products that you can be responsible back on carbon footprint I think about all these things right in a very responsible way instead of just like shipping goop from one side to the other without knowing you know without without knowing these things because we you know the tagline of the company's kind of next generation beauty it was really about alleging all of these things you know that it's not just about hey we're not it's about like hey were natural but you know what we're gonNA give you global technology from all over the World I just one ingredient like vitamin C. Vitamin A. that are ingredients from the eighties and that I don't get why we're still talking about them I love them but I mean the technology of skin care has got way past that you know in terms of like results that you can get and all of the technological advances that you see out there number two we are actually GonNa get you we're going to change the conversation a little bit I we're going to talk about like the difference of using something super fresh and super good for you and and also creating a company that it's transparent and that it's really meant for the consumers of the future that that you know that and that it's really building building into the company a lot of this values that we don't do for marketing rarely talk about the stuff it's like it's things we do just because that's how we need to do business in the future you know that's how we all need to think and especially as a luxury product where you know sure he rarely gives clients the opportunity to be sustainable you know and sometimes even hard as a customer it's like you know we put all this pressure like Oh my God how you know be responsible do the right thing but if the producers of products are doing the right things what you know we are very limited in what we actually can do and I feel that as a producer of a luxury product where you have a higher price point you can actually spend the money buying a lot of expensive raw materials like naturals Gannex or that you can use glass glasses something that it's hard for beauty beauty a lot of innovation if specifically for our treatments comes in plastics acrylics rarely in glass glasses typically use in beauty for fragrance so you have to invest a lot of money Google's because you have to do your own custom molds glass is a more expensive packaging to buy you know our boxes are made with like force certified woods or a hundred percent post consumer or you know all of the inserts are made from pulps instead of plastic so it's you know in this space we have the capability of being able to offer all of that both yeah right I mean I always thought that your brand was really at the forefront of not only formulas but it is was it the first kind of luxury green beauty brands the first the first first one before it natural beauty was really you know kind of like in dusty shelves of like supermarkets and and they were catering to to to a different clientele and they still cater to dot clientele and there's nothing wrong with that clientele by the way I don't Wanna sound like elitist or that I don't leave that they actually were the pioneers I what I realized is like hey that segment of the market doesn't cater for a woman that once super superior results or that once like the latest and anti-aging technology they catered told Barry White audience which is an audience that wants something I took that it's simple and that it's minimal but there's another big audience out there people that actually art want the exact opposite and we were able to actually make it happen for the very first time and think about all this things along the way and create the first completely natural super hi tech skincare range yeah do you as a brand spend a lot of time trying to educate consumers around all of these actives and things or do people who fire products already kind of know what they're buying I think that for me it's been I love educating clients and I've been doing beauty classes since launch the brand because I really am Kinda like addicted to that interaction with my clients of like teaching them about everything not only about how we take them how it's done Howard is it different but also about like hey how do you lay your products what are you use what's the difference between a Sierra Negra was the difference between a moisturizer or a toner and an essence like I love talking about beauty and teaching people about absolutely everything that I've learned We do talk about it ingredients but because we have so many ingredients in our products like we bring ingredients from like seventy eight countries like the last time we count that we stock like a total of almost five hundred raw materials in our farm so it's just like we don't have like a main ingredient you know like we just had a lot of things always with this idea like hey instead of buying so many different single active products by something that it's super hardworking that it's super concentrated so that you don't enough to buy ten different things but you end up buying one that works really really hard for you so it's hard to talk about I do talk about some of the ones that I love the most but it's hard like for example it looks survey that it's this collection the supernatural collection we just updated technology change the packaging basically change everything about it it has seventy two active so Mike Gosh Yeah like this guy here it's like a powerhouse this is your daily dose of injectables like it gives you it has technology available today topically to give you those the similar effects House as an injectable so you know people get injectables to get kind of like the bow talks effect so this has four of those neurotransmitters peptides that they work differently. They don't paralyze her muscle but they just help kind of like smooth out wrinkles within hours well I'm not GonNa lie I have never considered botox in my life and one day I woke up recently and I was like I have wrinkles on my forehead I need to get bowe talks so I before I get Bo tugs I am trying that yeah talking about the elixir detail as I say Yelich Survey Taseer has an ice hero was well okay the little baby sister so yeah so the whether it's someone like you that you're like you know what I'm never going to consider this stuff or someone that actually does them but she likes the of like do them less often enforcing those effects daily like as we age we lose a lot of fat pad and also our skin gets thinner so it has a lot of raw materials to help with that as well right so the backup a little bit so you decide I wanNA create this brand you've decided that you want to bring all of the labs to the farm what are the I products like that you that you created were you thinking in your head what am I going to do with this brand or did you always have a clear vision of what you wanted to harper skin care to be did you always know what products he wanted to create I wanted to come up with a line I didn't want to come up with just one or two products like for me I wanted to zest person that's is where young she's always been kind of like very ritualistic telling us about the power of consistency and using things every day morning and night eight so I was always like cleansing my skin doing an essence then after the essence I would always do like zero in an eye cream moisturizer I loved oils I love masks so I came out with twelve products and I did not launch until I had those twelve product so right away you launch with twelve products unheard of I hear most people kind of launch with around five but maybe that's not true that's just what a lot of brand founders tell me five million maybe it is true honestly I don't come from the beauty industry and I never looked at anything that the beauty in the street dead for something that I wanted to replicate other than I was clear the distribution channels right like that I was very clear like I need to be in a place where people buy high quality products and and that was it and in an also I- talented even like you know like when I launched there was like well you are in the apartment stores you can't be an spas because spas we have spas Pacific lines and I even challenged that and I started selling to spas I wanted to carry our products and the only thing that I was really that we knew is that I wanted to be in place where my customers were I didn't really look at anything else that the beauty industry was doing to us it's like okay I'm GonNa try to do that because it's like almost like when I hired a consultant to show me guys what do I do this Wanna become a beauty enterpreneur I wanna do this line I had this vision I had no idea how big how small how much you have no idea I just wanted to create the so I almost like look that a lot of the things that the beauty industry did as like exactly things that I did not want to do yeah I think that's a really interesting point is you know I think you can apply that to any industry why would you want to look at what everyone else in the industry is doing and replicate that I mean you're trying to do something different I am assuming I wanted to talk about that one time I was like with my partner in the Business Henry and I was like Henry all of the skin care lines are like wide or or black or you know the same colors and I feel that this is comes from our farm from the sake green like Vermont is I was so controversial I remember I had to like convince my branding agency at the time that I wanted that we want it to them green and they were like that.

two three months hundred percent one day
Israel Folau Debate: Freedom of Speech or Homophobia?

Between The Lines

09:51 min | 2 years ago

Israel Folau Debate: Freedom of Speech or Homophobia?

"Well, you don't have to be a rugby fan to know that Wallaby sti- Israel allow has been a big news story over the past few months, when I pretend he posted these woods on his personal social media accounts, quite warning drunks homosexuals adulterers, lies fornicated his thieves eighth assed, odometers hill. White, you repent. The fallout was a means rugby Australia won't allow that he had breached these plaid code of conduct by posting homophones combs on social media after examination of the event this happened. Well, he's roughly is football career to be TATA's right now, rugby Estrella saying is going to rip up his contract and no long matted that allow was one of the most talented players in the game. Hanes four million dollar contract will no longer together. Now, this story has ignited a discussion across the nation. That is polarized opinion really before. Why love invited to experts to navigate what all this means? Joining me in Sydney is paid a cookie. He's an eye junked associate professor of law at Notre dumb. He's also a senior research fellow at the center for independence studies as off started on this program before CIs. That's the thing tank. I hate it. Well, the guest is professor, Catherine Gilda, Catherine research, is freedom of speech, human rights in public discourse at the university of Queensland school of political science and international studies, and she's in Brisbane studio cath paid, welcome to the program. Thanks to be here. Now, let's stop hearing both of your opinions about what the exact issues are that we need to address a cookie. What's the hot of what's dividing public opinion? Well, I think Israel has done two things that run counter to the culture. The first thing is that he's stalked, very, clearly and openly about his religious beliefs, something that we're not really accustomed to doing in Australia. We just don't tend to. About God publicly, but the other thing that he's done is whereas straightens, generally very accepting of LGBT. I people there is a small, but very powerful group that wants to move the community beyond acceptance to endorsement, where dissent is not tolerated, and Israel allow refuses to go along with that. But it seems to be a difference between how people define freedom of speech religious freedom discrimination cath. What's the release you? He really show in my opinion, is that all human rights are not absolute and all human rights, stop at the point at which your exercise of your own right impairs, somebody else's exercise of their human rights. So what we have here is a difference of opinion of what the implications are for these Ralph last said, so in my view Israel now has engaged in discrimination occurs is not about religious freedom. It's about discrimination, pater, freedom, offense, discrimination, Joel on well agree with Catherine's assessment of human rights, and I think they are not absolute. I think that's very important. I don't think this is an issue really over religious freedom. I think it's gonna be on that. Now, I don't think that Israel has discriminated against in any more of a sense that he's just made a decision to he's chosen one group over another, he and he's not vilified not incited violence against this particular Cody should there, be limits to what freedom of speech allows people decide. Well, I think we have very careful about where we want to draw those limits. What what's wrong with him expressing an opinion? And remember that this opinion is, it's a conditional warning, as it were he saying, essentially, I love these sinners including homosexuals, and I want you to repent because in my religious belief you go to hell. If you don't so he's issued a warning out of love and Israel flowers, post vilifies more than one element of society. Cath gilda. What is it about homosexuality? That is really triggered the greatest response. Well, the answer to this question response directly, what pay to just sit? Absolutely. What is? Flouts said, Philipon homosexuals. And the reason that the issue with sexual was more important than liars or adulterers, or drunks is that there is no entrenched systemic discrimination, or bias in society against lies or against adulterers. There is entrenched systemic discrimination against time a sexual and by saying what he said, what is flour saying was that guy. People have no place on this earth. They must repent I ate Thiam must become not guy in order to be acceptable now. That's what crosses the line that is what is. But what is wrong with expressing that opinion? Again, I think Catherine's analysis is right ex-. I don't think is what have occasion. But if that's what you believe what's wrong with expressing it. Which is why I'm concerned that we've reached the point now in society where we simply cannot descend from certain positions that are laid down calculator. It is not just an expression of opinion to think that is to say that when. In your talking. All you're doing is expressing your thoughts, but we have decades of scholarship that tell us that words can do things worked can do good things and words can do bad things, and there is wise expressing yourself that constitute a form of discrimination, and that is why we recognize that law as height speech or vilification, or the Katherine disagree about whether or not to these this amounts vilification, because it seems to me that in Australia, at the moment that being gay is no bar to holding the highest office, highest officers in the land to holding commanding positions in business and in, in the academic world. So I wonder to what extent this discrimination, which certainly was very real. And I think very toxic early generation is is as prevalent today. Cather some commentators, they say that we're already over instructed by the nanny state governments, institutions. Are we headed towards becoming the nanny state? Many libertarians think we already are. Absolutely not. What we have in this country are very narrowly drone very carefully constructed laws that don't side that you can't talk about particular topic. So Israel Lau would have been free to say as he is in has infect said, don't support same sex relationships and audience put same sex marriage. And if that's all he'd said, we wouldn't be having this discussion go. Fund me has finally closed down. Fillets requests for money to becky's legal challenge, cath, is that fair? Yes. Guy fan me has a policy that is in sync with a and law in sync with international human rights law, and in sync with public opinion in strategy that we should to combat discrimination repeater fails, a millionaire. At least how is it moral to us, the public for money? He's using go fund me to correct what he perceives to be an injustice, and go on me is clearly, a barometer of public opinion because he's got tractor nearly two two million dollars of support even though the has taken over the funding. So whether or not he can afford it. I think is beside the point on Thomas. What's important is that he's attracting a great deal of public support through donations to the site, which suggests that there are many, many people who agree that not necessarily agree with flowers views about the destination of sinners, but they, they believe committed to his the freedom that he should have to express those views cath is Australia angry about censorship. I think there are lots of reasons why people are giving to fund. One of them is, of course, that he's a staff footballer. And so he has a lot of fans. Another one is that he has a particular religious community supporting him. So it's not possible to say that people are against since ship just because they giving him money. This issue has become much bigger than an issue of his religious freedom. And so people are giving money for all kinds of reasons, Catherine you've said that fillet himself is a victim. He why flower caught up in something that's much larger than himself. This is an orchestrated an organized campaign by conservatives who are evidently frustrated at the decades of progress that have been made. Human rights and anti-discrimination, particularly in law. But also in hearts and minds in terms of public opinion. And this movement is now somewhat clearly using the language of human rights at self to try and Hanis public support for Wanding back thighs protections. I don't think this is a push back in a sense. I think it's a reaction to the tyranny of tolerance that Torrence's demanded any dissent from what needs to be tolerated. What is required to be tolerated will not be tolerated. And I think that is what people are reacting to. They would say we've reached a tipping point where now you simply cannot express a dissenting point of view that departs from that, that's a certified by design guy says it were and Kath, how do you see this ending? I'm very, very concerned that paper light paid deny that discrimination still exists simply because there are one or two people in positions of power who may be, for example guy, and that therefore discrimination doesn't exist. Look at the research about what happened during the same sex marriage. So if I look at the research on what happens to young. Gay and lesbian people when role models like fil might comments like this incidence of suicide and self harm increase. It is absolutely the case, both in my research, and in lots of social science research. Discrimination is well, and truly alive and well, and we must not get to the point where we say, oh, discrimination is Ivan. Now. We can stop this fight. I hope that people Tyke from this, the message that we can need to maintain at posture. We need to maintain stance against discrimination, and bigotry, a lovely debate, Catherine Gilda, pita, Cody, thanks so much for being on our end today. Thanks to thanks. Tom Kettering, Gilda is a researcher of freedom of speech, human rights in public discourse at the university of Queensland's school of political science international studies and pay the cookie is a senior research, fellow at the center for independence. Studies also -ffiliated with Notre Dom, and he specializes in religious freedom. And if

Catherine Gilda Israel Australia Catherine Rugby Senior Research Fellow Sydney Cody Associate Professor Odometers Hill White Tata Thiam Israel Lau Football Estrella Brisbane
The fraying transatlantic alliance

FT World Weekly

12:39 min | 2 years ago

The fraying transatlantic alliance

"Hello and welcome to this edition of weld weekly from the financial times. I am answer venture Johnny the world news editor and this week, we're looking at transatlantic relations as the Trump administration appears to turn its back on its traditional European allies in a sign of Washington's shifting allegiances, the US president on Monday, welcomed Hungary's, illiberal leader, Victoria, Alban to the White House days, after his secretary of state abruptly cancelled a meeting with Germany's Angela Merkel joining me on the line from Washington DC is Dmitri, Sevastopol, oh, the F, Washington bureau chief and from Belene guy. Chaz on our between VERA chief my first question goes to you Dimitri. Donald Trump was fool of praises for Victoria ban on Monday. He congratulated him for his quote block up against refugees from Syria, and he's work to protect the Christian communities. Can you give us a bit of details and explain why this visit is so important and telling we'll, I think one of the things that we've learned about Donald Trump over the last two years. This is one of the things that many Europeans have concerns about is, he seems to want to solve up to leaders who are far -tarian strongmen, you know, very hard line. You know, there's a long list, whether it's early on in Turkey or on in Hungary Kim Jong on North Korea, who Donald Trump said he fell in love with or Vladimir Putin in Russia Trump when he meets these leaders at least publicly doesn't criticize them for some of the things that they're doing their own countries to threaten democracy on the other hand, he seems willing to criticize Anglo Myrtle, or Theresa May or president McConnell, France. So there's a kind of cost me come seems to like something to these strong, tough solitary leaders. And yet, he at the same time he seems to be dismissing some of the concern. Means pushing away, European allies of America who have helped maintain the kind of peace across the trans Atlantic now for seventy years. As you said, the relationship has fuss deteriorated since Donald Trump kimchi office. The US needs key. European is have diverge on a number of issues. Can you list them for us? I mean, it's really wide from climate change trade, Iran. Well, I mean, from the very beginning, it's a long list, one of the things that President Trump today early in his presence. He was he withdrew the US from the Paris climate accords which sent ripples across Europe and the rest of the world later on in his tenure, he withdrew America from the around nuclear deal that America and some of its European allies had signed with Tehran in twenty fifteen on that has led to convert more bellicose stomps on Iran. He also has been incredibly critical of NATO now in criticizing NATO. He's not the first president, President Obama and President Bush frequently said that NATO allies needed to pay more for their defense. I remember travelling to your puts on rump sell the Robert Gates and they were constantly sending this message of Europeans. But Donald Trump has done it in a much more aggressive way. And I think one of the most heading examples was last summer in Brussels out of NATO summit, he was very critical. Angela Merkel both in public meetings and in private meetings and he's shocked many of the leaders who were in the -tendance. So I mean, there are other issues there as well to do with hallway and five G telecom networks and other things. But I think there's some of the main ones that have really created a false lines in the transit onto relationship guy intending to, you know, defense. Secretary of state. Mike Pompeo cancelled a meeting with medical less tweak invoking rising tensions in the Middle East. What was the reaction in betting? I think those zoo Hora that it was seen very much as a snub, it was supposed to be his first trip to Berlin, since he became secretary of state, and it was very hotly awaited. And he just didn't turn up. And I think there was shock that he then went on to Britain. And even so they all Tricia Canterbury. So, you know, even just in Welby was more important to him as a priority. Angela Merkel those real dismay, lots of Coventry in the German press, basically saying that the US German relationship is now, basically in TATA's on, what are we going to do about this, this feeling of crisis really in a relationship, which has been one of the main pillars of Germany's post-war identity really for seventy years now. Why do you think that Mr. Trump targeted Gemini, in particular among its European on is what's your assessment of that? Well, they're personal reasons as well as political reasons. The chemistry between Angela Merkel and Donald Trump has never really worked. You know, she really comes across as associate professor, and he's like the naughty boy who didn't do his homework, he doesn't like being lectured, and Michael does have a tendency to lecture, one of the first thing she did when he was elected president. She sent him a message saying will look forward to working with you, but very much on the basis of our shed values of respect for human rights, and democracy, and so on that was perceived. As a real slight to Donald Trump. Basically a smackdown saying you're going to have to behave need didn't take Hymie to that. But there are other aspects. It's not just the chemistry America is very antagonist very exercise by Germany's failure to meet its commitment, which gave in two thousand fourteen to spend two percent of its GDP on defense. It's nowhere near that target and in fact recently published its budget estimates for the coming years, and it looks like it's actually going to go down as a percentage of GDP is spending on the military. So that was seen as a real red rag to Donald Trump's bull. And he's also, I mean, there's a very famous interview he did with playboy magazine from the ninety s where he complained about how many German cars that were on Fifth Avenue in New York, and he's had Macedo and BMW in his science for many, many years. So it didn't surprise the Germans a tool that he started talking about imposing. Import tariffs on European cars, and he's been complaining for longtime about the size of the German, current account surplus, which, of course, a lot of Germany's allies in Europe of also join attention to over the years. What do you think all the far reaching consequences for Germany? What are the Germans, what kind of lesson? They're drink from this facility longer term. Do you think there's a realization that Germany, and Europe must be more independent from a defense point of view, or, you know, foreign policy point of view? What is your sense? Absolutely. I was at a conference, whether we're talking about this and one speaker said Germany's success is built on three elements integration with the EU the transatlantic security guarantee on Germany's access to open Mockus worldwide and Trump threatens all of those three things. So there's a sense, here that there's, it's kind of existential threat posed by Trump's America first ideology tool. All those things that have made Germany, such a huge success over the last few decades. So that definitely is a feeling that they have to respond in some way. I mean it's very tentative at the moment, though, I mean, for example, that talking about developing much more of a kind of foreign policy. Competence in the EU and more of a sort of independent defense posture, and, you know, maybe getting rid of unanimity, and you decisions on foreign policy, so that they can have more qualified majority voting not come thing, but it's all relative tentative. And even when they do talk about building up their defense capabilities that gets them in hot water with the Americans. We wrote the story saying, how America was criticizing the latest initiatives for military cooperation between EU countries, the Pescara the permanent structured cooperation initiative, and EDF the European defence fund because they feel that it's not really compatible with NATO that it produces. Much duplication and diversion of scarce defense resources and it sets up a necessary competition between NATO in the EU. And so the sense of frustration in Europe over this is light. You tell us we need to do more far defense, and then we try and do it you complain. So the relationship has Radi scrunchy at the moment as we can see on the number of different fronts. Exactly. So they have this quantity move from the US. Do you want to jump in Dmitri? It's true that every time Europe speaks about more independence on the security from the US gets angry and gets a letter warning. But on the other hand, you know, you get a sense that the US is kind of retreating from Europe. What's your interpretation? Well stuffing element of Donald Trump getting a little bit of taste of his own medicine, sometimes when the European say that they want to their own defense capabilities. But I think it's also important to stress that this issue between the US and Europe on defense spending it really isn't just Donald Trump issue. And he is the one who is addressing it in a much more assertive, much more aggressive on some people would say overly aggressive way. But it's something that has stretched back now for more than a decade in the US the US than constantly saying to the European countries, particularly Germany because it is the biggest economy in Europe that they need to spend more. So I think it's an issue that's not going to go away, even if Donald Trump loses the election in twenty twenty I think a democratic president will be much friendlier to traditional US allies and I was just in New Hampshire on the campaign trail with Cory Booker and Beethoven, Joe Biden on all of them were talking about the need to rebuild on to strengthen American alliances with Europe. But notwithstanding that I still think. Whoever's president after twenty twenty is still going to put pressure on Europe to spend more money on defense, and if Germany and some of the other countries who haven't miss this two percent target haven't reached it, then I think you're still going to have tensions on that issue just to go back to one thing that guy said, I really do think the car issue is critical. I mean Donald Trump has how the being his bonnet about cars for a long time at the end of this week. He's going to potentially decide whether to put tariffs on imports of European cars. So this really is something that's a trade relationship is something that really gets him. And also when he was in Europe last year. Another thing that he criticized glimmer pool for is the Nord Stream two pipeline that will bring Russian gas into Europe and Donald Trump and some of his team are saying you want us to spend money to defend you against Russia, and yet, you're buying Russian gas on the other hand, the European say, hold on a second. You're the president who has criticized by the Putin, for orchestrating a campaign to interfere in the American elections. So there's a lot of things crossing the Atlantic and. It's very hard to see how any of this gets any better while Donald Trump is in office tensions, are escalating in the Middle East over Iran, with rising threat of war, and some echoes of cheese than three when the US in some European countries disagreed, on whether to war with Iraq. Dictates us Adam Hussain to meet you what all the broader security ramifications of this poor transatlantic relations. Are we entering a new testing phase? Well, the big question that's emerged in the last few days in Washington is are we returning to the early years of the Bush administration where it appears that there was a constant drum beat among Iran hawks for the US to take military action against Iran. Now, we know that on both in the national security advisor has asked the Pentagon to dust off its war plan for Iran. Not the caveat there is at the Pentagon has funds for everything, and there periodically dusting them off. But when a story comes out that they're dusting them off, Iran at a time when Mike Pompeo secretary of state. John Bolton and others are being very aggressive in the rhetoric towards around it raises questions as to whether the US is contemplating taking most reaction, and I think, not something that would be a huge divide across the transatlantic. I mean as much tension as two walls, when George W Bush invaded Iraq. You remember relations then between George W Bush Gertrude or Germany were extra very odd because since the war in Germany. But I think we would see something that will be exponentially worse. If the US did take any kind of military action in Iran. So people are watching very closely right now to see whether this is just on both in on the hawks making bellicose noises. Just too scary round or whether there's actually something fundamentally happening behind the scenes. My thanks to Dmitri and guy that was really fascinating. And that's it for this week till next week goodbye.

Donald Trump United States Germany Europe President Trump Angela Merkel Iran America Nato Mike Pompeo EU Vladimir Putin George W Bush Washington Russia Middle East Dmitri Syria
"tata" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

06:18 min | 2 years ago

"tata" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"John TATA's guests. They all right. Great. Thanks trap me. Happy new year. Happy new year you brought clower. I like that. Of course. There's a reason they did he's the owner and founder and CEO of the books company now books. It means. Okay. Right. It's okay. But simplified by and some say, folks, right? Someone say Bocquet or you say, boop, boop, Stott com. Guile away anyways books books, and they they organized clouds and cut the time in the red tape of getting a flower from the firemen in your house, right? Yeah. Exactly. You know, the traditional spy chain of flowers is very long convoluted sort of needless as yeah, you have ninety flowers sold the US coming out of Ecuador and Colombia those farms are selling to exporters within those countries who are then selling importers and Miami. Largely those importers are selling to wholesalers. You're moving around the country who are selling to florists or getting their orders from one hundred flowers, and so you end up with multiple layers and everyone along the line is taking margin, which means it's just more expensive than you taking time because they have to transport it from one player to the other. And all these things result in higher prices with less freshness. So we set out to try to fix that the joys wanted to be an entrepreneur. No. You know, I always wanted to I think careers are interesting things. I didn't always have a thing. I always wanted to be right. My my career is evolved over time. I moved out to LA to work in media and entertainment. I was a very very very amateur filmmaker when I was in high school and stuff I love. Kind of stuff. And I thought how go out there and get into that. And I worked for Disney for a while. And what I found was. I had this excitement is interested in building. Something new. I worked a lot in brand strategy. So I wanted to build a brand and friends who've started companies I started talking to him about that. And I thought I just need the right idea sort of the right opportunity, and it turns out that one of my best friends grew up on a rose farm and Ecuador and he had built this supply chain that we use today. And we started talking about it. We said let's start a company around. You gotta be a life or to move up that company. Right. Yeah. You know? I mean, there's certainly some folks to buck the trend, but largely speaking is the place where it's so massive the work your way up and it takes time on I'm just not that patient person. But I loved my time there love the people I worked with and I would go back there in a second. I got a chance to run something to run something. What was your first job? First job was at Bain and company. Graduates Notre Dame, not a bad. First job wasn't fad knows great. I worked on really big important cases for really big fortune. Fifty companies learned a lot about my best friends. There's a lot of people meet their best friends in high school or college. My best friends obtain worker the Mitt Romney stuff. I did not. No, no, no connection with my time. Kind of been around. I mean, you contribute to fast company. Forbes all that. So how did you? How did you can do? All this. Forget about books though. Yeah. Just sort of making things happen. You mean? Yeah. You know, I was at Disney. I remember I had this really great long conversation with my father in law who when I decided to quit corporate job and go try to do my own thing. Which is a scary thing, by the way. Yeah. I mean, I had a baby. Sure nine month old baby. I just bought a house and vanished wasn't cheap. My wife worked in education. So it's not like we were we were rolling in cash flow. And and so he asked me about this thing. Like, hey, like, this is a risky thing. Choosing to do. And I had this great conversation with a friend and mentor mine, Andy Dunn who started Begnaud, bows, which is a pants and men's clothing company in New York City, the end this great advice me, which was how risky really is. Like, let's take the state takes you six months to figure out whether it's gonna work or not if you give a one hundred percent of your salary, six months over the course of your lifetime. What percentage of your earnings? Did you just give up was after sent or nothing? It's rounding air like, wow. That's kind of amazing. He's like on the upside when you think of as an option, your upside is crazy and the learning you'll get even if it does. Completely fail will be amazing. You'll learn to love it. You wanna keep trying it or you'll learn your terrible at it. You're out of whatever might be. So he talked me into this idea that starting a company in sort of risking the short term isn't really that much of a risk. And once I got that. I felt it didn't feel like it was that big of a deep balances out. Yeah. We are here to inspire inform and connect community of entrepreneurs this Business Rockstars. I'm Pat O'Brien. John runs the books company. Boop. Sounds funny. When you don't say bouquet. Yeah. Short term for bouquet. It starts to make sense. What'd you studying college? I was a finance undergrad. Yeah. People ask, you know, young young people ask me, how did you figure out what you wanna do and stuff? How'd you how'd you decide your major? I literally I'm an ROI guy. I was like what's the easiest major for the most money average starting salary out of college. That was my entire decision-making. Most people tried that route it didn't really work out. And you know, what I got my SAT's same as the guy next kind of student. That was right. Yeah. At the end of the day. It was sort of one of those things where I picked something actually enjoyed it. I think it gave me a really good foundation. But in the course of my career that amount of finance. I've done has been very little pain. We did sort of just problem solving. And then I went to advertising or all about building brands that works for Gerber, baby. No finance work, separate, budgeting, maybe. And then at Disney where I worked on brand strategy stuff. Now running my own company, I certainly involved in the finance asset. But it was a really great start. And I love Notre Dame. So can't complain of one of the greatest fight songs ever. The by one. Title four. Abyss fifty how do you balance your life and work for the last couple of years? There's not been a lot of balanced to be very brutally honest about it. It's been pretty much company company company. We're at a stage now where I'm able to start stepping back in hiring really experienced people to do things. So, you know, for when we started the company there's four of us. I had a technologist which I couldn't do any of that at a marketing intern and my co-founder down in Ecuador that was the whole company at that point. I literally did everything except for building the technology source flowers and doing the marketing, but I still have your fingernails bags. So during those years as formative years, it's it's a nonstop ever ever going nonstop grind. I mean, literally.

Disney Ecuador Bain and company owner and founder John TATA LA Notre Dame Stott US Romney CEO New York City Andy Dunn Pat O'Brien Colombia Miami marketing intern Gerber
"tata" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"tata" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Tata? There is a group out of Australia, and they're called the pub choir. They get hundreds of strangers together for massive sing alongs and they've done them in several different cities. And then they post the deal the details about it online on how you can be a part of it. All right. So you just got to keep your eye out for where they're going to be next one of the videos that's making the rounds. Feature. Some fifteen hundred people singing the backstreet boys song. Oh, I want it that way. I did not like this song. In fact, I was just thinking about it yesterday goings is so stupid. And then I heard this this morning and went now, I love it. Really? It's so cool. It's like being at a concert where they just point the Mike at the crowd. I'm convinced that we could solve problems all across the world with United.

Tata Australia
"tata" Discussed on Breaking Beauty Podcast

Breaking Beauty Podcast

03:42 min | 3 years ago

"tata" Discussed on Breaking Beauty Podcast

"It is that it has an instant cosmetic effect to it. Okay. So I like that like hit me with the result right away. Yeah. So the main ingredients are like Hyler onic acid and also has lavender oil and buck bean extract, and those are overtime going to hydrate and lift and smooth. But it has this. Peachy Pearl tint to it. There's actual diamond dust in the price. So that's going to give you a highlighting affect? So, you know, those mornings when you wake up and you're like, oh my gosh. I went to bed too late or I had that third glass of wine, this is going to instantly brighten, and I just find it always have left over on my finger. So I always put it on my show on the top semi cheekbones. So I do find it kind of like I kind of stretched the purpose of it. And I think that's what makes this product really unique to me compared to. I mean, there's so many other creams out there. Oh my gosh. And I think that's something. We get asked about a lot. So it's nice to hear that you think this one is worth the money and at work. I do I. Yeah. Like, it's just distinct. Yeah. No, that's great. And if it's not evident. I mean, she's all natural. But her products are one hundred percent free from GMO's toxins, fillers artificial colors, artificial fragrances, and synthetic chemicals. So yeah. And you tried many more of her products. I when you were in Perez. This glam experience. I was in Paris back in November. And I got to lay down and be treated to a facial at the Totta Harper spa. It's inside liberal still hotel, which is very fancy five star hotel and jelly. Oh, it was so nice. I was thinking of you. You would have loved the cozy robe and the price point is definitely a splurge is two hundred euros for fifty five minutes. Hey, two hundred sixty euros for eighty five minutes. So it's a treat the spot itself at believe it's a Sisley spa, but the data Harper like they've got a private space in there. It's like a Totta Harper p editor in this spa. And so it's very cozy and beautiful and there's nods to her branding all over the place. There's plush green sofas goals shells where they display the product. And then the bean itself is like KAI design. Very quiet. I had del Fien do. My facial ahead. This sort of jet lag release. Deep cleansing brightening facial that was out of this world. Del mean is the person who does TATA's facials personally when she goes to Paris? So I was in very good hands. And she hit you with a French stone wash. I wish I could go back there right now, it was like her hands were kind of like when I was talking to tab at it was like she described her hands as being heavy and that was perfect. She like they lay on your face, and they feel like they can evaluate your whole face. And it's just lifting and pressure point massage, lymphatic drainage like, I was way less puffy afterwards. We're chubby fingers are a good. Oh my God. No. She was like, a strong feel it, and it's like getting into the sinus cavity almo- just some releasing my fingers releasing my jaw where I tend to launch my jot night and stuff, and you often don't walk away from a facial feeling like really relieved in that regard. And she totally did that I felt like I was less puffy and she used the resurfacing products, and I just felt very. Khloe afterwards. And yeah, Italy like I had been treated I'm a big believer in face massage. It's huge. And I think a lot of people are just waking up to it. Yeah. With the advent of like facial roars, and Necker needling and all of that. And I don't do it. I'm too lazy? I'm just saying you believe in it. I actually do it like at there's nothing feels better in that Clara Sonics smart profile, uplift, not me into it..

Totta Harper spa Paris Totta Harper Harper Clara Sonics Necker Perez TATA Italy Khloe editor eighty five minutes one hundred percent fifty five minutes
"tata" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"tata" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Just. Sure. If you got a big research bad now. I gotta work. No. Doc. Give me your own. Yeah. Call me Joe. May be on your sofa. March won't shop down Anita lack of volka. You don't. Yeah. Tata? That's. Good. I say, blah, blah, blah, a glass. Watts report is the no, yes. Matang down. This your. Research bad now. Misled me a canoe. Nyet? Get.

Tata Anita Joe
Market Live: Sensex trims gain, Nifty below 10,800; Tata Steel, ICICI Bank top losers

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:58 sec | 3 years ago

Market Live: Sensex trims gain, Nifty below 10,800; Tata Steel, ICICI Bank top losers

"Yeah sean always great to get your insights thanks so much for coming in showing dhabi chief global equity strategist jeffries in our hong kong studio alongside bryan curtis plenty more to come here on bloomberg daybreak asia of course here in singapore we're getting very excited by a some world leaders that have come to town we've got the singapore summit coverage all throughout the week and we'll keep you updated on markets here on bloomberg daybreak asia this is bloomberg this is a bloomberg market minute in the quest for ecommerce growth for traditional retailers it is often a case of darned if you do darned if you don't and according to their e commerce growth is not strong wall street is breathing down their neck asking how they're possibly going to catch up with amazon and then when you have a quarter like this one where gross margin takes a hit because of online fulfillment costs wall street is wanting more on the profitability france bloomberg's sarah halzack commenting on the most recent quarterly report from target as it has been investing heavily to ward off amazon and when it comes to investing paying workers more may.

Jeffries Asia Singapore Bloomberg Amazon Sarah Halzack Sean Hong Kong Bryan Curtis France
Sensex down 301 points, Nifty below 10,600; ICICI Bank, L&T, Tata Motors dip 3%

The Steve Cochran Show

00:52 sec | 3 years ago

Sensex down 301 points, Nifty below 10,600; ICICI Bank, L&T, Tata Motors dip 3%

"Dot org your money on wgn global stock markets are higher this morning as investors cheer on the outcome of negotiations between the us and china the country say they're putting the trade war on hold clearing any uncertainty futures are pointing toward opening gains on wall street later this morning dow futures right now up two hundred points us crude oil is up about seventy one fifty a barrel news involving fifth third bank buying chicago's mb financial for about four point seven billion dollars most of that in stock this morning nb financial shares are up almost thirteen percent before the opening bell shares of fifth third based in cincinnati are down about two percent and that is your money getting pretty busy on the roadways twenty six on the inbound edens inbound side of the kennedy about.

WGN United States Chicago Cincinnati Kennedy China Seven Billion Dollars Thirteen Percent Two Percent