35 Burst results for "Tasmania"

Trans-Tasman Travel Bubble Opens

AFF on AIR Podcast

01:47 min | 3 weeks ago

Trans-Tasman Travel Bubble Opens

"Free flights between australia and new zealand will start from monday. The nineteenth of april win the long-awaited trans has been troubled by will finally becomes a reality. Qantas and jetstar will resume regular trans tasman flights from monday with quotas and zealand now selling an extensive range of trans tasman routes from destinations around australia to oakland. Wellington christ church and queenstown qantas even launching to brand new greats from cans and the goa coast oakland and any zealand plans to launch a new route of its from oakland to hyderabad and tasmania vegetate is not resuming any flights to new zealand for now but currently plans to retain new zealand starting from september with flights to queenstown in october last year as the sterling government had already removed. It's quarantaine requirement for travelers coming from new zealand on special quarantine free flights but the new zealand government hadn't reciprocated yet until now a few weeks ago in preparation for this announcement. The israeli government had already quietly removed the requirement for australian citizens to an Apply for an exemption to travel to new zealand and these sterling government has also now downgraded. Its travel advice. Zealand's to level two with the smart traveler website advising his trillion simply excise a high degree of cautioning new zealand junior to the ongoing risk of covid nineteen outbreaks. The official advice for all other countries remain to level four which is do not travel. So that's pretty good actually quarantaine free green zone. Flights across the tasman will be available only to travel as have not been in an overseas covid nineteen hotspot during the last fourteen days and the crew operating those Green zone flights will also be allowed to do that if they have not been to any hot spots around countries in the past fortnight

New Zealand Oakland Wellington Christ Church Queenstown Qantas Goa Coast Sterling Government Zealand Australia Jetstar Zealand Government Qantas Israeli Government Hyderabad Tasmania Queenstown
Childrens book helps to discuss the environment with children

The Science Show

05:34 min | 4 months ago

Childrens book helps to discuss the environment with children

"We begin briefly with a message from the moon from a dog. One you know. Yes i dog on the moon. A friend of johnson. Greens of blueprint fame. I orchestra and a graphic book called the carbon neutral adventures. The indefatigable enviro teens and it is a mixture of fun in fact. Isn't it dog. yes. I wanted to talk not just about what climate change is because i think a lot of people understand that over and this is a book for ten to fourteen year old so i did want to explain what climate changes but almost more importantly i wanted to talk about. Why climate changes and what happened. How it happened and why it's still going on and why it's so hard to do something about it because that if you think about it logically which clearly a lot of people. It doesn't make any sense at all. No you actually summit up marvelously on page one hundred eighty and you say in fact if you imagine the person talking to you. This dog is in fact. A sort of modern version of the mad towed in a speedboat saying the planet is being ruined so wealthy adults can have second jetski. I don't know whether to be scared or sad or angry or something else. I just wanted to the all. Does that sort of sum it up. Yes it does because we talk a lot about the legacy that we're leaving young people and we're very apologetic and for all the grades in the world but we do talk about how they're going to have to fix it and that's just simply outrageous. Not only that we've trashed the planet so badly but also that we're now starting to talk to young people in terms of how it's their job to take care of it and win. Of course i say we. I mean the vast majority of humans on the planet because a lot of the decisions are in the hands of regular folk. But we do have this kind of desperation expectation that people will come along and put together something that we haven't been able to do and that's not really fair now. It isn't but you see in the book your referring to someone who looks like greater but she has a different name what is the name. Cordelia pine kind with it or gardenia. Pine cone is one of them. And that's the most wonderful name. I've come across in a long time. I wanted to put greater in the book infected. I tried to contact her and say would you read my book and write a forward and she didn't get back to me and that's okay 'cause she gets four million emails a day. Yes exactly so. I totally understand that. She wasn't available but it was really about being able to say someone like greater is doing this and we can't all be greta but she's in fact just one person who's doing the same thing that we need. Millions of young people to do now. There are lots of really good scientific references there. But there's one puzzled me. It's fairly long so let me actually read. What's here in the book. It's about piece of technology and you understand very well so far that when it comes to technology. I haven't a clue what's going on anyway. It says the d. foof elisa solar powered vacuum matic vowel sucks up all the nearby poop. Poison foof and flange through the hyper magnetic recycling filter to remove all the bills. Then it's passed at light speed down the anti-gravitational spewed out to be flogged. Back ended home in front. That spits the remains out the plumping shoot into a bucket. All that's left behind is a few nuggets of nickelodeon and you won't believe this. All the bandicoot of the workshop thought. This was hilarious because nickelodeon is a previously unknown form of completely renewable energy that is hugely powerful and totally clean how. We laughed and laughed now in three words. Could you summarize what have just read letitia. The inventing warburg come up with no. I can't not three words there. That's one of the superheroes in the book is leticia who was a genius. Science one bet and she invents all sorts of different machines that do different things with the that work in the mic workshop underneath a headquarters of the environs and the default elisa machine that latisha invented and it removes what they call the poison off which is in fact the in the greenhouse gases. And we know that that carbon isn't infect poisonous. But you just wanted in the right places in the right quantities. The default removed the poison for from the atmosphere. And one of the things. I realize with this wonderful invention which they start trying to deploy around the world. Is that even if you do in fact remove the carbon from the atmosphere. There's still a lot of other problems and difficulties that are going to be solved and it really trying to talk about how chafe nickel solutions to. Climate change are important but they're not infect the answer indeed and where is the island on which this otx. it feels like tasmania. But it isn't is it. It's not a nickel knows. Island is one of the places. I visit with. Captain snoot hall. Who runs the secret. You refuge the and suggests that if they really want to understand what climate change is that need to go on a perilous journey across the waterfall. And are they need to go and talk to the great nipple and the great nipple is a creature who lives at the top of the haunted volcano and explains climate change to them in

Cordelia Pine Nickelodeon Johnson Greta Letitia Warburg Nuggets Leticia Captain Snoot Hall Tasmania
'New variant' of coronavirus identified in England

Coronacast

04:31 min | 5 months ago

'New variant' of coronavirus identified in England

"Another day another potential. New strain of coronavirus norman. In southern england the uk health secretary. Matt hancock says that there could be a new strain circulating there that seems to be growing faster than the existing variants and a papal get worried when we start talking that new strains but how much credence should we give. Today's climbs nor lot. You're one day that might be a strain. That's really muscular. Strain that's causing a lot of problems. the bars is mutating all the time there are selection processes that go on. You might remember that when the safest outbreak occurred there was a lot of fuss made about a possibly highly infectious strain people. Paint that and a lot of people pooh-poohed that in our community really not hair very much since people who were very quiet about the south australian strain with this one could be a strain that's a bit more infectious than others dominated. It's much more likely to be that. Somebody's arrived from europe. Brought this in. And that's the one that spread through clusters preferentially and if you look at it then you see that spread there. I mean it was really yesterday that the estimate that from one medical conference in boston the spread of that from when you look at the genetics of the spread that cluster has resulted in three hundred thirty thousand infections from a medical conference. That's ironic from a medical conference from one super spreading event. So just imagine if somebody happened to turn up at that super spreading event with a particular mutation of the virus and it spreading you think. Oh well let's taking over america. It's just happens to be the virus that you came to that medical conference with and picked somebody on the cheek and away you go. They call it the founder effect that it's not necessarily that it's it's better first spreading or it's more infectious. It's just that it's the one that got their first. Yes and the fundraiser's usually described as somebody arriving migrant arriving in a an isolated population and it's spreading from there so for example from memory there was a founder effect with a metabolic problem with Bone disease in quebec. If i remember rightly there's the founder effect of huntings tunes disease in tasmania and therefore you a lot more. Hunting season has meaning you otherwise we'd have just because somebody got off the board with that gene and it spread through the population. So so that's really what you normally call the finding effect but yeah you can get it with the virus as well and that's probably what's happened here in the uk that it's just somebody with that. Virus has been in a super spreading and spreading around and is not something to keep you up at night at least not yet and if you listen to corner cast. We'll tell you when you go to stay awake at night. that's right. So this mutation change the viruses behavior in any way or is there any concern about whether it will still be protect would still be protected against it by the vaccines in development. Well just talking to an australian researcher. Who's expert in this field. The british mutation has mutations on top of the vars that was seen for example in malvern. And so they're they're kind of mutations on mutations here simplifying. what is a very complicated message from its researcher. essentially there. It is possible that this variant in britain cooed evade vaccines. But but he. He doesn't really think that's the case. He thinks that's the vaccine. The vaccine should be brought enough to be able to cope with it. The question that is raised by this researchers informing us on this. Is that the mutation. That's buried in this in this virus in the uk suggests that could be a little reservoir. Which brings you back to the mink in other words that maybe there is another jump from animals to humans beyond wuhan and that. That's what spreading. Here i mean that's i mean that's a long bow to pool but that's one of the possibilities here and of course it's one of the reasons why they slaughtered these mink in northern europe. Because they were worried that you actually would get a second or however many you have no idea how many animal reservoirs have been transferred to humans over the last few months but this might be another one and so here is that this could be jump from an animal reservoir. Maybe maybe not but It it just shows that probably do the right thing by sacrificing these music.

Matt Hancock UK Bone Disease Europe Boston Tasmania Quebec America Malvern Britain
Tasmanian Devils May Overcome Transmissible Cancer That Nearly Wiped Them Out

Science Magazine Podcast

08:52 min | 5 months ago

Tasmanian Devils May Overcome Transmissible Cancer That Nearly Wiped Them Out

"You might have heard of the plight of the tasmanian devil. These carnivorous marsupials have been afflicted with a transmissible facial tumor a cancer that jumps from one devil to another when they bite each other in the face not as uncommon as you might think and as a result their populations have gone into steep decline despite these extreme population losses. The devils have been holding on and may even be turning a corner andrew store for and colleagues wrote about this potential turnaround in this week science. Hi andrew hi. Let's start with the downfall of the devils. This facial tumor disease. Dft when did arise and what has been. It's trend in it. Spread among the tasmanian devils. The devil facial tumor disease according to our new study originated. Probably in the late. Nineteen eighty s. It was actually discovered in the mid nineteen ninety s in far northeastern. Tasmania where people started discovering devils with large facial lesions that seem to grow. Initially that wasn't much of a concern because they've seen these types of lesions new places back since the nineteen seventies however when animals started dying in large numbers. People really started paying attention that this was some sort of transmissible disease shortly thereafter. A genetic study was done that showed that these lesions were actually a clone oil transmissible cancer. They were genetically close to identical so since its discovery the disease has actually swept across tasmania and sort of an east to west us. Fred and is now just reached. Some of the last uninfected populations on the west coast has media. Cancer is different from pathogens like bacteria or viruses. How's that affected our ability to understand the transmission of this disease in tasmanian devil. One of the big challenges has been its large genome size so studying. The genome of a virus is fairly straightforward because viruses like sars he'll be to only about eighteen to twenty eight thousand base pairs long. However the tasmanian devil genome is three point two billion bases about the size of the human genome so trying to track. The spread of the disease is much more challenging. In terms of computational power and genomic sequencing methods which weren't really available at the scale they are now when the disease was discovered. So in the study that we're talking about today. You apply to technique that has mainly in the past been used for viruses. What did you have to do differently to get this to work for transmissible cancer. We did complete genome sequencing of fifty one tumors than that being in our final analysis finding parts of the genome that are measurably evolving that is evolving at a regular rate or what we would call them. Killer clock is pretty challenging and in the end we screened about eleven thousand genes which took several months on the computer and found twenty that were measurably evolving clock like fashion. And the reason you want to do that is then you can look at how these or changing over time as the disease has spread and this allows you to estimate epidemiological parameters like the transmission rate and the proportion of the population. That gets infected overtime. So this is how you figured out that it came out in the eighties right. The disease likely originated in the eighties which is consistent with its discovery in the bid nineties because when a disease like this i started taking off. In a wildlife population it might be at fairly low prevalence and so people don't really notice it until it really takes off and our epidemiological parameter which is called our savvy which is equivalent to the transmission rate started to peak in our analysis just before the discovery which makes sense because the disease was rapidly increasing or exponentially increasing in the population. Let's talk a little bit about that transmission rate. That's something that you know using this analysis you're able to show it changed over time. Can you describe that trajectory we identify tumor lineages and in wanted around the mid nineteen ninety s in the other it peaked around two thousand and the really encouraging results of the study showed that in both major tumor lineages that seemed to be across. Tasmania now that the transmission rate declined to just about one at present and this indicates that the disease has reached some sort of stable state that is for every devil that's infected only one additional devil is infected and thus the main conclusion of the paper which is the disease is transitioning from an epidemic state in which it's exponentially moving across populations to an end state where it's just kind of at replacement is the kind of analysis you did hear able to tell you what has changed. Is something different about the tumor. Cells are the devils different. What's going on. We did find some mutations that seem to explain variation in transmission rates among the different tumor lineages and these are related to other types of cancer however these are candidates for downstream discovery at this point so they serve as good hypotheses for future research. And what's different about the devils. We have some other studies that show that also the devils seemed to be evolving in response to cancer. We see changes in the devil genome. That are also seem to be associated with possibly disease resistance. We've also seen spontaneous tumor regression in an increasing number of devils wild populations and we show that that might be related to regulatory changes in the in the devil so perhaps some jeans are up or down regulated in response to the tumor and we also found a mutation in the tumor. That seems to cause the tumor to shrink so a mutation actually when turning on a gene and this gene is implicated in human prostate and colon. Cancer the tumor growth actually slows in laboratory studies when we transact wild type tumors. Don't have this gene with the. Does this suggest that the disease will go away or that. It will coexist peacefully with tasmanian. Devils people really thought that tasmanian devils or on their way to extinction. I think this provides us cautious optimism about the future of the tasmanian devil. This transmissible cancer which is nearly one hundred percent lethal has caused a dramatic decline of this species of process. Entire range has me so they are certainly not out of the woods yet. However because this disease is socially transmitted early models predicted disease extinction because even if you have low densities of individuals the disease can still be transmitted because devils congregate and bite one another. Which is the way. The disease is transmitted for purposes of mayday or scavenging food however a growing number of studies from our group has shown through ecological modeling for example devils are predicted to persist on most scenarios. Some of those involve lower population densities than where they were initially but yet the devils will persist and in the subset of those cases. The tumor will also persist and we may see sort of endemic dynamics where there's populations like this study adds to the growing number of studies that the disease itself also seems to be evolving perhaps lower transmission rate because there may be evolutionary pressure on disease to be less lethal to the devils. Are people trying to figure out how to preserve the devils and will that strategy change with this understanding of the switch from epidemic too endemic. We certainly hope that our new study will help. Influence hearth rations strategy so when devil started declining there was captive breeding to maximize genetic variability in captive populations which are maintained in wildlife parks and some zoos and actually an island offshore from tasmania album. Riot island. where there's a free roaming population of not quite captive devils but devils were introduced there. These were referred to as captive insurance operations with the intent that if devils went extinct on the mainland they could be reintroduced or if devil population sizes or inbreeding reached really high levels. They could perhaps be introduced using a technique called genetic rescued increase genetic diversity in the wild populations

Tumor Disease Devils Transmissible Cancer Facial Tumor Andrew Hi Cancer Tasmanian Devils Tasmania Tumors Disease Resistance West Coast Fred Colon Riot Island
Contemporary public art: who is it for?

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:33 min | 5 months ago

Contemporary public art: who is it for?

"Louisa. When i look back over the newspaper dot com archive in in relation to christoph boucle. What i found was a lot of fierce debates mentioned in the articles about him often involving authorities as well as art world people. He wants to create this kind of control. He doesn't need so so tell us about this latest controversy. Why is it such conservancy. It starts off by the venice biennale in two thousand nine hundred nineteen when we will all of us walking through the arsenal and that was a vast rusting boat on the key side. Not in water. That's not an unusual thing to see. It looked kind of weirdly home amongst the other sort of naval paraphernalia around in the snarly but then of course there was no notice nothing to identify it. If diligent you look up in the catalog but unite was very mysterious but of course word of mouth soon came through this was indeed a work and art not a piece of rusting boatlift over by the navy it was balkan nostra it was cooled and it was actually the very boat which had been leaving libya for its louis laden with excess. Don't know how many of the thousands immigrants trying to get it collided with portuguese freighter. Got into trouble and sunk killing everybody. Pretty much on board. I mean it was an absolute atrocity slash disaster. The boat was then taken by the italian navy to sicily where there was an incredible detailed forensic investigation on all of the bodies of the victims many of whom were trapped in the hall of the boat. They'd be impacting. It was it was a trafficking boats. It was a horrific horrific scenario There was a forensic detailed investigations to who the identity of these people were many of their families traced and so they learn to the terrible fate of relatives now. I didn't quite know how this happened. But then time passes from two thousand fifteen. Somehow a deal is struck with the sicilian town of augusta where this both ended up in the naval base to bring it to the venice biennale as an exhibit. Christopher cal had signed a contract with the town of augusta that he could borrow the boat for yeah it would be exhibited has been and then he would return it a year later so the boats there everybody feels extremely conflicted about some people said it was a brilliant idea that shows how decadent the art world is how decadent our world is how uncaring we are. It was kind of appalling. I felt the boat was parked right by the cafe. So you start swinging europe roles and your and your cappuccinos. Perhaps not knowing there was in effect the site of mass atrocity a mass grave. Right beside you. So was it makes us think about our place. In the world on carrying thought about crises unfolding very close to us or was it. An exploitative opportunistic attention seeking Profile raising artwork by christopher. Koop and as you say he does have form in this respect. He's done other things. He's crushed landed a mosque in venice inside the catholic church for another being all for the icelandic pavilion. Several years ago he also set up community centers on controversial other things in tasmania. We'll probably talk about in a minute. So but this was a big one and yes it's very raw and the debate in the controversy still rages but the latest part of. This debate is a year on from the being ali. The boat is still. There is a dispute between the being early organization and bianco and he's gallery well absolutely yes. Because as i said he signed a deal with the city in town of augusta. Maybe you know. Maybe money exchanged hands. I don't know but anyway but the deal was that the boat would then come back to augusta where apparently it was intended to be the centerpiece for memorial park with the consent of the relatives. Also in all kinds of rumblings around the time in the been on it was stated apparently the families had given their permission for this boats to be used or some families are given their permission. I mean gardeners specific. But that will talk of permission. But now there's the boat the biennale a now say they have been hassling buco since november last year to bring this boat back to honor his agreement to honor the contract with cillian town of august. Gustave saying they want the boat back as well now sources close to buco say that because he never talks to the press which is another thing we can talk about minute They say apparently the boat was damaged in transit coming venice so it's going to be impossible until the cradle support is fixed for it to come back again to augusta so buco is now trying to get insurance to pay for this either from the benaroya. Who said no go away or probably problem rudely or indeed from the shipping company. But i mean. I would say that you know only ethics about whether you actually share bin ali or not. I felt squeamish. I think we're dead. People are concerned it starts to get very problematic. Any put all those ethics to one side. You honor the agreement to the families you on the agreement to the place from whence you lent it and if and if the cradle got caught up and pay for it or you make your gary who house involved not show for penny or two to cough up and pay for it you know. I draw lines more lines in the sand. Whatever want feels about artworks raising profile of terrible crises. Apparently there's talk about taking the boat to brussels to show how come the the eu have been ignoring the immigration crisis. I mean lofty motives. But you know this is a place where over thousand people died.

Christoph Boucle Augusta Christopher Cal Venice Biennale Venice Italian Navy Louisa Libya Sicily Biennale Navy Koop Bianco Tasmania Catholic Church Christopher Memorial Park Europe Cillian Gustave
Is COVID-19 seasonal after all?

Coronacast

06:48 min | 5 months ago

Is COVID-19 seasonal after all?

"Hello this is corona cost a daily podcast all about the corona virus. I'm health reported teigen tyler. I'm physician and journalist alter norman swan. It's tuesday the twenty four. Th of november cinnamon one of the questions that we've gotten a lot from people about over the course of this pandemic so far is whether it's seasonal and on one hand yes. The melbourne second wave happened in winter. But it's hard to really taes out. What's the difference between seasonality and a new virus in globe of susceptible people but in the states which is going into its wind up and also in in other parts of the northern hemisphere was seeing a really straight upwards curve a really scary looking curve. so what do we know about the season -ality or otherwise of coronavirus were joining the first wave. It was said that there was so much corona virus around swamped the effects of seasonality. Although most people expected this to be a winter virus a seasonal virus but they couldn't guarantee it and you just weren't necessarily seeing the effects of it on this week's health report podcast. I've been talking to chris maureen maher. Who's these of health metrics and evaluation in seattle and they've been doing global modeling now on the covid nineteen pandemic which has turned out to be pretty accurate so for the world for different countries and for the united states and they say that when they look at the big data they do find a seasonal effect and they. It's actually quite strong and the fascinating thing is that they predict that the virus in the united states will start to peak deaths from the coronavirus will peak roundabout inauguration day and tail off towards the end of january into february without any vaccine. You'll see a natural peaking and tailing off. We won't go down to zero but it will start to ebb away so in the joe biden was like trump. he would take four credits on day. Two of his presidency for turning around the pandemic. but it'll be natural. What's the driver for it to pay them. Is it that people interacting with a set number of people and you just kind of run out of context. How does how does that pay. Start to come down again. No it's obviously a little bit of an effect of natural museum that but even by january you still not going to see the majority of americans infected with the covid nineteen virus so a little bit of an effect because what they say. Is that even twenty percent coverage of immunity associated with some social distancing cooed tailing off. Now i think they it's simply how their virus response to temperature and although it's still in the middle of winter and pretty cold there are plenty of viruses that have most of their fates in autumn early winter and seem to die way in midwinter and influences a bit like that where influenza unistrokes tends to hit more in autumn than winter depths of winter. Not that we have much of winter. So yep they think it's seasonal tending often and if you are lucky with the vaccine the vaccine does prevent transmission then have an even more dramatic faked as the year goes through. Yeah i suppose they were some early nickname mention. It starts came out earlier in the saying that the virus survived longer at lower temperatures and in low humidity are. Maybe that's the season thing. But what does it mean for us australia. Coming into next year's winter if a vaccine isn't widely available by that time well if we've kept our international borders secure and we haven't had too many outbreaks and we're still social distancing to some extent when we need to enroll able to control then maybe not very much because the won't very much virus around but if there is a significant say outbreak from hotel quarantine for still doing it at that point. Then you could see a major takeoff and victoria. Tasmania parts of south. Australia would be vulnerable to that. So i'm trying to cross my mind that because we have talked about season on corona's before and i feel like we said that it wasn't safe no so will be wrong or is this just more information. I think you feel the wrong thing. T very different. I remember that people saying that probably was a season paper. You couldn't see it. In all the noise of an strength of the pandemic the pandemic was so strong it was masking a seasonal fake underneath the name what they thought was as the pandemic turned into an epidemic and the virus became endemic in other words. Steady in the community and keeping on recurring. Then you would see the effect of seasonality which might mean then you'd see a surge as the goats colder. I like that vision of memory. Yes yeah but no doubts kirk listeners. Who got a much better than either you. Army will fix us up. That's the lately and speaking of other research related things that we've talked about before and we now have more information about Antibodies on the only thing in our immune system and this nearly such out of monash university that shows that perhaps immunity to the coronavirus is long lasting than we feed. Yes so little bit of physiology. Here there are two elements to attack or threaten sweep elements to attacking a virus delicious. Talk of two of them for the moment. The first wave is really the antibody those chemicals in the bloodstream that attach to the spikes of the corona virus and stop it docking with tissues in our body and hopefully kill the virus as well and they're called neutralizing antibodies. now they'll come out of nowhere. They're produced by white blood cells white blood cells that produce antibodies b cells and some b cells have memory for the antibodies. They need to produce. It was a waste of energy then producing antibodies. All the time to a virus that they're not seeing but if avars enters the body they wake up and they say oh hello. I've seen this one before and they start manufacturing. Antibodies and this study identify found a way through using monoclonal. Antibodies to actually attach themselves to these b cells. Identify them they to twenty five people in march who had corona virus and follow them through to september looking at these b. memory cells and what they showed was that they maintain themselves in other words. You can still find b. Memory cells at the end of eight months so that suggests that the body retain the memory and the ability to produce antibodies to the coronavirus sars cov e to. This is not a peer reviewed study hasn't been published in a major journal yet but it is an interesting finding very sophisticated study and great needs to people who've had coronavirus but also for the quest for vaccine. That's absolutely right

Teigen Tyler Norman Swan Chris Maureen Maher United States Joe Biden Melbourne Seattle Australia Influenza Tasmania Corona Victoria Monash University Kirk Army
Ashleigh Rae on Your Voice and Accountability in Recovering from Sexual Violence

en(gender)ed

05:49 min | 6 months ago

Ashleigh Rae on Your Voice and Accountability in Recovering from Sexual Violence

"Welcome Melissa. Thank you so much for having me Teri. It's amazing. I want to start with the fact that you're you're conducting this interview under a stooge him because currently in Australia where you're based. There is a court situation where survivors of sexual violence are under a gag order essentially from speaking out publicly about their experience. So let's start there with this the law or the policy actually say, yeah. It's a birth of a situation for survivors. So basically what happened is our state government in Victoria was tinkering with one bit of our legislation around suppression orders and they cross you've got tunnel vision and didn't do their do diligence in terms of consultation and looking at who would actually be affected and what the outcomes of this would be and in trying to correct one bit of leads. Relation, that would make things a bit easier in one respect. They've ended up with this for lack of a better word. I'm this clusterfuck of a situation. Sorry for the swearing and it's now judicial proceedings Reporting Act which basically means that for a survivor of sexual violence to publicly speak out. They can't use their own name and you actually face up to 84 months in prison or jail and a fine or a combination of the two and if a media Outlet say like any of our television broadcasting Network's radio, what have you even if it's a podcast if they violate that and they publish a real name without a court order they're liable for a fairly Hefty fine as well. So that essentially means you don't have the right to your voice in Victoria in my state. You have to apply to the court for the right to tell your story if when and how you choose so we're currently going through that. Okay, so let me get off. Straight if you were to move to another province in Australia, would you have the right if you're outside of Victoria know so it applies to cases where there's a conviction secured in the same Victoria. So without going into too much more detail there that means I'm gagged from speaking because I have convictions within Victoria. And you said the intention was not to gag survivors of sexual violence, but now that this impact has happened. What are the people who propose this policy? What are they doing to rectify it? If anything that's a really good question. I wish I had a really good answer for you. It's been it's been a Survivor LED movement to hack the government to account here, which is been initiated by a journalist in Melbourne. Nina Finnell with the letters speak campaign, and it's been incredible. So we are really going hard at home. The government and saying you need to be more transparent and accountable personally. I've had several interactions with a Department of Justice. I met with them last week and we had a very long conversation about all of the areas not just in the law itself, but also in how they handled the public relations aspect of when it did come in out into the media and how awful that had Bane and letting them know that essentially the government had gas-lit survivors and knowing that young girls and boys and yet people were going to be watching this and feeling life. They couldn't come forward and Report because they were going to be gagged. What was the point really undermining all of the work that so many survivors and now police have done in encouraging people to actually come forward port. So what is the impact of this new legislation on the convicted perpetrators are they allowed to speak? Oh, it's a field die for them wage and part of the reason for that is because in the process of obtaining a court order somehow and we don't actually have transparent reasoning why this is something that we've demanded to know from our judges wage is that perpetrators have been notified and even asked for their views on this so it's it's fantastic for them. It really gives power back to them and takes away from the Survivor, which is really not. Okay. So as far as I'm aware perpetrators are free to speak to the media. There's very little holding them back except that Australia has really strong defamation laws, and that would be the only concern I'm aware of that they'd have so from an outsider's perspective the seems like blatant sex discrimination, especially if most wage Survivors of sexual assault are women and if those women aren't allowed to speak and the men who are convicted of these crimes are it seems like it's an issue that should be of national importance to fix. What is the, you know highest level of government doing about it if anything. That's such a good question. It's in in the context of Australia as a whole we've had amazing progress in terms of I'm gagging survivors. So it took several of our state's we actually had long-standing entrenched laws that prevented survivors from publicly speaking out and interpersonal actually run some really successful campaigns in the Northern Territory and also in Tasmania always in the last 18 months and she got those laws revoked amended. So that survivors could actually speak out. So they've had the right to speak before which

Victoria Australia Nina Finnell Teri Melissa Department Of Justice Bane Melbourne Tasmania
How can we safely reopen international borders?

Coronacast

05:02 min | 7 months ago

How can we safely reopen international borders?

"So there's been a lot of talk in the last couple of days about the international border and particularly from the Prime Minister says that international rivals from safe corona virus countries could avoid Herta quarantine and instead of going into Mandatory Hotel quarantaine people from those countries could go and do it in their own home. There's been quite a few questions about this coming through it. ABC. Dot Net dot edu slash corona cast including one from Kathy who says, what does Norman think of the PM suggestion about that Safe Countries Avoiding Hotel Quarantine? So this is an a nuanced, not easy problem to deal with. So there are some countries which do have very low prevalence of the virus. There's not many of them by the way, but there are some in which case you have people quarantining at home. You probably have large numbers quarantining. Technology rights even from paces with slightly higher prevalence. You only one person to get out by the way and spread the virus and you've got a major outbreak on your hands. So there is a risk they are, but you could have ankle bracelets which people could pay for, and that would be cheaper than hotel quarantine for two weeks you could have geo location on your phone you could. Have fines for giving you a phone to somebody else. But you've got to be able to know that the police whoever's going to administer canister this at huge scale, but it's possible to do that with modern technology. So it's not a bad idea and it could loosen top and it could listen up for international students particularly if you add rapid testing to the equation, but we don't ask that. Level of imposition from the government on ankle bracelets for people who are infected domestically and I selecting at Harmon we've we've spoken about this on chronic hospital four but also kathy also makes the point that one of the countries named was Japan which had more than four hundred cases on September twenty eighth alone, and she says as a Melbourne Ian in lockdown she's furious because as as you've noted, Norman that it only. Takes one case to to start another wife Yes. So you've just got to be very, very careful and this is not something you could turn on tomorrow. This is something that's got to have an infrastructure in place to make it manageable and to be as fail safe as it possibly can be. The Abbey's reported a couple of experts saying that it actually could work one was Robert and the other was paid calling. So. Do you think it's worthwhile though like if wages taking only a few countries admittedly with low A. numbers that it would help or is it just sort of opening up this slow step towards making it back to trying to get life back to normal? One way that you could do this is open it up to lure countries, get the system, right get a working with ankle bracelets or however you're going to do it get the systems in place and do it with relatively few travelers from Lewis places while Hotel Corentin is going on in parallel you could actually compare the two and see what the rate. Of positivity is you could combine it with rapid testing before you leave when you arrive and the middle of the of the quarantine periods, you could do this at scale with international students from Laura places like China one assumes that China at the moment Israel Risco that you can't be sure. So there are ways of dealing with this, which is not. That all of a sudden on the fifteenth of October hypothetically just starting to do this you might just ease your way into it learn how to do it in a safe way, and then you could scale up quite rapidly. Having said that you got to experts saying this is a good idea not not really a problem and you go professor Rhino, McIntyre Who's been pretty accurate predictions right through this Pandemic University of new, south Wales saying well, numbers would soon overwhelm you and you be able to cope. It does seem a bit strange talking about international arrivals to Australia win still many state borders are getting better but they're still closed. I mean you couldn't come down and visit me in Tasmania at the moment. But I'd have to quarantine. You'd have to come visit me through the window. You're right. But INTERNAL BORAS WE'LL start opening up your already. See a bit of relaxation in. Western. Australia with Corentin. NEW APP which they think is going to work in terms of how are monitoring people. Technology is the answer here, which would include I think rapid testing. So moving to Victoria, the numbers have been falling in recent days the average fourteen day data graph, which we all love looking at every single day continues to fall, but it does seem like healthcare workers are still getting infected. Yes and just today the updated healthcare worker numbers, and so the last week there have been twenty four H. Care Workers Nurses one doctor one, paramedic one allied health professional infected. So they're still comprising a fairly significant percentage of the. Total cases in Victoria and shows that there are still problems there and the thing is that there are catching up with numbers. So the numbers coming through very orgy complex cases you've got healthcare workers suddenly increasing you don't win there were infected the numbers from Victoria I'm sure they are trending down, but they are not as said this again and again they're not as transparent as they luke. Okay.

Kathy Norman Australia Victoria Mandatory Hotel China Hotel Corentin ABC Prime Minister H. Care Workers Nurses Government Abbey Israel Risco Tasmania Wales Harmon Pandemic University Of New Corentin
Tasmania pilot whales: Rescuers release 108 surviving animals

WBZ Afternoon News

00:36 sec | 8 months ago

Tasmania pilot whales: Rescuers release 108 surviving animals

"Don't know what was behind the beaching of 470 whales and has mania Australia 108 were rescued the remaining whales believed to be dead. Wildlife officials are now trying to dispose of the pilot whales. Carcasses. Juliana More is a lifesaving Tasmania volunteer and whale rescuer. He worked with the whales on the sandbar after the pod gotten trouble earlier this week, we could Tell that they were obviously communicating with each other marine mammal scientists as pilot whales form strong family bonds, and if one gets in trouble, they put out a distress call and come together as a group.

Juliana More Tasmania Australia
Tasmania Whale Rescue Ends With 108 Saved and Over 300 Dead

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:15 sec | 8 months ago

Tasmania Whale Rescue Ends With 108 Saved and Over 300 Dead

"Hundreds of dead whales or being disposed of in Australia Barnaby wild life officials who tried desperately to save them earlier this week nearly five hundred pilot whales were spotted on a sandbank in a harbor in Tasmania only about a hundred were

Tasmania Australia
70 stranded whales rescued in Australia after hundreds die

Morning Edition

00:20 sec | 8 months ago

70 stranded whales rescued in Australia after hundreds die

"Officials in Australia say they have been able to save 88 pilot whales that have been stranded on beaches on the island of Tasmania. Nearly 400 other whales have died. Officials don't know what caused a couple of pods of the pilot whales to swim to the beach, but about 500 whales were stranded this week.

Tasmania Australia
Hundreds of pilot whales stranded in Australia; 380 dead

Radio From Hell

01:05 min | 8 months ago

Hundreds of pilot whales stranded in Australia; 380 dead

"Set free about 25 whales on Tuesday that Meru that were marooned on a sandbar off the coast of Tasmania in one of Australia's worst beaching events ever. They hope to save Maurine the coming days, government scientists said about 90 of the 270 strong part of pilot whales have died since they were spotted from the air in shallow water. Off the rugged coastline. On Monday, footage showed large numbers of the animal's prone on a wide sandbar ah, northwest of the capital of Hobart, Others floundering in slightly deeper water. Rescuers had to get into the icy water and attach to attach the whales. Um Two slings and then guide them out into the open deeper water. We're trying to save as many as they can. But, you know, they find that sometimes they they do this. They put thumb they take them into deeper water, and they just turn around to go back in. And nobody is really quite sure What why Whales seem to do this.

Maurine Hobart Tasmania Australia Others
How to Not Have a Lost Decade

Money For the Rest of Us

04:13 min | 8 months ago

How to Not Have a Lost Decade

"Welcome money for the rest of this is a personal finance show on money how it works how to invest it and live without worrying about it. We host David Stein today's episode three, fourteen it's titled Don't have a lost decade. Recently, got an email from a new plus member. He says he's treating the material on the website like an online college course but he had a question he wrote that he's approaching a crossroad in his life and he would like to prepare himself for that crossroad. He works at one of the Best Public Gardens in us as a horticulturalist he's been there three years makes forty three thousand dollars per year has four weeks of vacation full healthcare and Hsa they have a four zero three. B. Defined contribution plan where he gets a six percent match his boss enjoy working with him and he enjoys his job. This member also has his own business, a lifestyle business providing premium horticulture services for high end properties. He started in two thousand nineteen gross four thousand dollars and anticipate grossing twelve thousand dollars this year he has no debt. The only thing he owns he says, that is worth. Any money is an old pickup truck that's worth about three thousand. Is roughly eighteen thousand, five hundred dollars in his defined contribution plan and using the online tools on money for the rest of US plus. That, he's on track to retire in his early sixties. y'All says about two thousand dollars in a savings account pays two percent and about fifteen hundred dollars in a wealth front Robo Advisor. Account. He's living on about eighteen to twenty thousand dollars a year. After contributing to is defined contribution plan and health savings account, he brings home about twenty, eight, thousand dollars but that doesn't include is overtime bonuses or the work in his business. After taxes and contribution he estimates that he's bringing home about thirty, five, thousand dollars with everything, which means potentially he could save fifteen to seventeen thousand dollars per year and certainly ten thousand dollars per year. He writes for the first time in my life I'm not living paycheck to paycheck am planning for the future. The business I own. Now as a hobby passion, I turned profitable. It has been a great space for me to learn and have done a lot of just that but it ultimately is a glorified landscaping business. What they really want to own is a retail nursery that one day will become an event, an education centre as well. I turned thirty two months. I thought at this point I would go beyond an entry level position. I thought I would own my own house and maybe own a business full-time. Those goals seem so far away. The question I want to pose to you is, how do I get from where I am today to owning a five to ten acre property that can use to develop into my next lifestyle business as soon as possible Had An additional investment question that address in a few minutes. I he's not in an entry level position. He is a master, her cultures he's studied it. He learned a lot of those skills working at an organic farm and Tasmania. Got, his university degree. He was admitted to a professional horticulture program at the Public Garden where he works, he is very, very skilled in all aspects of landscape design and gardening. and. There are a lot of people that would be very envious that he has his amazing job working in horticulture and one where he can listen to a lot of podcast which he does. In order to answer question I want to compare to couples I know I've known for about a decade. This particular members approaching thirty. He's looking out over the next decade. What has to happen so that he doesn't have a lost decade and can reach goals I'm positive he can reach his goals.

David Stein United States HSA Public Garden Advisor GOT Tasmania
NZ has eliminated COVID. Is Australia on track to do it too?

Coronacast

03:55 min | 11 months ago

NZ has eliminated COVID. Is Australia on track to do it too?

"So let's quickly start with New Zealand today. They've listed coronavirus restrictions after reporting active cases in the country. How confident can we be about it? Being a radical added there just to be clear what they're talking about. No community transition from its seventeen days. They say a reproductive cycle of the viruses fourteen days. So if you've read the virus, you would not expect to see any more. More within fourteen days, so it's really good news. We predicted on Corona Casta while ago that if we went for radicalization that sort of thing, you could expect to actually to lift restrictions quite considerably, because there's almost no chance of actually catching the virus. If you're sure, there's none left in the country and smaller states in Australia we're almost at that point so straight is lifting some restrictions Western Australia Queensland. Tasmania role in pretty good shape in terms of having almost eliminated the virus from those States New South Wales Victoria still a little. Little bit of communities spread, and you can't lift those restrictions such as you have in New Zealand in the two biggest states at the moment, and then you've got the issue necessarily of literal relaxing borders between states, and that's what they're reluctant to do. As long as some community transmission in Victoria and you south Wales, but we might get rid of that within a few weeks, in which case you might be in the startling situation where the whole nation can lift restrictions quite dramatically. Yeah I mean what's at a timeframe? Would we be looking? Looking for that, and how can we be sure that we continuing to have no virus in Australia you've got to wait so nor community transmission for at least fourteen days, but ideally maybe even a month so that you've gone food to reproductive cycles of the virus new. Zealand's waited for just a little bit over one reproductive cycle to say that they're pretty confident, but you've got to keep on testing and you've got to keep on testing people who any symptoms and you can't let down. Your guard doesn't deal with the situation overseas travel. and. People came in from overseas and relaxing those restrictions as soon as you do that then. Bets are off well like you say. We have seen a bit of community transmission in some states in Australia recently and so we're getting questions from people who attended the black lives, matter and indigenous deaths in custody rallies over the weekend Jessica asking for those who did attend the protests. When is a good time to get tested? Because we've talked before about the virus it of having an incubation period wins. Wins the most effective time to get tested, and there's a question for male along the same lines where hair. She said she had me saying that. If you get tested too early on infection, it's more likely you'll get a false negative. Well, listen to mail yet. We've been covering that and and on the health report. The recommendation from governments is absolutely right. You get tested at any time if any symptom. So any symptom it, oh, you're feeling lousy. You unexplained, even diarrhea. You've got call code loss of specially loss of taste or loss of smell. Then you need to be tested. It doesn't matter how many days will come pass since the protests. If you're a symptomatic and what to get tested then is, it's not clear exactly what you should do, but if you go on, that study quoted. Day One. It's not day one after the protests. We're already at day to day one. The test isn't very accurate because you don't have very much. If you've been infected dates, essentially becomes more and more accurate the more days after you've been infected. You're looking at the data. You'd probably say three or four days after the protests, you could get tested. That would be a day or two before symptoms would appear. Then that starts to be worth doing. And if you've still got no symptoms then day eight eight days after the protests, you'd have a second test. If, the first test was negative, and that's probably going in the evidence, the the most reliable regime still miss people. But if you WANNA get tested dramatic. It's a good thing to

New Zealand Australia Victoria Jessica Corona Casta Western Australia Queensland Diarrhea South Wales Tasmania
"tasmania" Discussed on Fore Play

Fore Play

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"tasmania" Discussed on Fore Play

"Don't listen over there doing like you. Listen to me. I'm like Holy Shit Thomas me run through a fucking wall. That's great yeah. Don't listen to that province trying to beat you on the pro nonstop chatter to nonstop. I was just trying to ignore them. And but he is nonstop like when you have a moment of weakness. He's talking so much that he gets you. In that moment I flip it on and when we were walking to the I T he was like. You're super nervous channels like I'm really really nervous like disarm them by agreeing to do kizer because otherwise you try to fight against it. You're just gonNa find yourself in a web. But if he's like you can't the be like I bet I probably can't either. It works pretty well actually so no one can get in your head more than you already in. You're absolutely not yeah. I know how bad I am if I'm self aware enough. You can't say anything to me that's GonNa Knock me off my game a good lesson. We're going forward. You know. There's nothing wrong with that. Just disarmed with honesty. Say what else are you gonNa tell me? Yeah like you're pro. I'm really haveN'T SWOLLEN CLUBS IN TASMANIA. Like what are you going to do to me since has made you? That's a fake life thing to say to Tasmania place. Yeah I sit on this podcast before but if someone asked me if I've been to Tasmania I'd say no just because it doesn't seem like Thomas was a hero he he to people probably couldn't see but we would spray three drives all over the place one down the middle and my time we walked up. He had all three ball sitting. Right are all four balls so I was match. We took twenty four hours..

Thomas TASMANIA
Is the Tasmanian Tiger Really Extinct?

BrainStuff

07:30 min | 1 year ago

Is the Tasmanian Tiger Really Extinct?

"You've no doubt heard of the Tasmanian Devil or seen an animated version the whirling dervish in looney tunes cartoons. But what about the Tasmanian Tiger? It's actually not even a tiger at all instead a marsupial known as the Thilo seen and it's thought to have gone extinct almost one hundred years ago but did it really. While many experts believed the last known thylacine died at. Australia's Hobart Zoo in nineteen thirty. Six others ardently claimed that the animals still exists because they've spotted one or more in the wild. We spoke by email with Kathryn medlock. Honorary Curator of vertebrate zoology the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery. She said the international Australian and state definition of an extinct species is that there has been no reliable evidence of the species for fifty years by this definition. They are officially extinct species although designated as officially extinct. It's difficult to prove that something is not there as opposed to proving it is. There are many cases of species being rediscovered. Many years after supposed- extinction we also spoke by email with Rick Schwartz an animal ambassador for California's San Diego Zoo. He explained that quote since the Nineteen Thirties. There have been a few claims Tasmanian. Tigers have been seen for brief moments in the wild however no substantial evidence has proven they exist at this time we also spoke by email with Neil waters of the thylacine awareness group of Australia. Who started disagrees a quote? Do I think the animals extinct? No because I've seen too and been coughed slash barked at by one in South Australia. In two thousand eighteen. There have been more than seven thousand documented sightings of Silas scenes or animals that appear to be Thilo scenes but the majority of those sightings on Mainland Australia. According to the scientific formula applied to mammals though it is extinct and has been since nineteen thirty six for fifty years. The animal was considered rare and endangered. This fact inconveniently keeps the animal as a recent extinction rather than an ancient one. We should lose hope over and forget about. Let's step back a bit. What exactly is Tasmanian. Tiger? Schwartz explained that it's not a big cat at all. He said the name. Tiger most likely was given to the animal by the European settlers due to the light stripes that went from the spine down each side on the hind end of the animal. Most people agree that the Tasmanian Tiger looks like a medium sized short haired dog with subtle stripes on hindquarters and the base of its tail. Tail was thick and muscular at the base. More like a kangaroo's tail than a dog's tail colorations were described as light brown and Yellow Brown with Darker Brown stripes. These animals weighed about forty five to seventy pounds. That's twenty to thirty kilos with a body length of forty to fifty inches or one hundred to one hundred and twenty five centimeters with that tail. Adding another twenty to twenty five inches or fifty to sixty centimeters most stood about two feet tall or two thirds of a meter at the shoulder. Schwartz said in our modern times we usually think of marsupials and Kangaroos however the Tasmanian Tiger had a number of unique characteristics being dog like medium sized carnivore. That's also Marsupial it. Size and features were more similar to that of a small wolf or large Fox. Combine that with the striped pattern on the hind end and thick muscular tail. Similar toy kangaroo. You've got a pretty unique animal and water said when you had a close look at the prince we find. You will see time and time again. The broad S- play of the toes and the Claude drag impressions from the massive fixed clause on the animals four feet. The reason they're split wide and not like a dog is because they don't have webbing between their toes their front feet also still acts similar to hands as they can both hop like a kangaroo or run on all fours as a result many of the prince appear that the front feet are literally grabbing the ground as they dig it on curves or high speed when pursuing prey when Europeans first colonized Australia. The Tasmanian Tiger was rarely seen the animals started to become increasingly blamed for tax on cheap however so private companies and the Tasmanian government attempted to curb population by establishing bounties exchange for dead violence scenes adding to their eventual extinction was the sad fact that Australia's colonisation eroded the thylacines habitat by the nineteen twenty s sightings of the Tasmanian Tiger in the wild became extremely rare and in nineteen thirty. A farmer shot and killed the second. To last known wild Tasmanian Tiger the final by Lesean was captured in the Florentine Valley in Nineteen thirty three and transferred to the Hobart Zoo on September seventh. Nineteen thirty six. The animal known as Benjamin died in captivity black and white footage recorded in nineteen thirty three would become historically significant as images of the final scene in nineteen thirty seven the Tasmanian animals and birds protection board a later to become the national park. Service launched a series to determine where thylacines still might be found. Medlock said unfortunately living animal was not discovered. The final search in the series was into the chain river area in Western. Tasmania on the search. Sometimes seen footprints were discovered and creek bed. The original plaster casts of these prints are lodged in the Tasmanian Museum. The Tasmanian Museum doesn't receive citing reports. And we don't have the expertise to assess them. This is done by the Department of Primary Industries Water and environment they continue to record reported sightings and take them seriously often however sightings films and photographs are released to the media through the people who are reporting them rather than a government body over the years. There have been several instances photographs and films purported to be thylacines in the wild but none have been verified as genuine evidence of an animal waters however contends that there have been dozens of credible sightings of Thilo scenes. He said actually hundreds of them too many to name one in particular was a bus load of tourists in Western Australia. Back in the nineteen eighties. Who All saw the animal at close range in broad daylight whilst on a wildflower tour the fact that we find headless Kangaroos. All over. His failure is a key piece of physical evidence that these animals still persist. But nobody to know about it. Because it's always blamed on either hunters or Satanists by. Ill informed people who don't understand how these animals feed waters has been working tirelessly to raise public awareness of this animals continued existence for the past five years meeting dozens of witnesses and collecting thousands of statements regarding sightings of this animal in. Tasmania and across mainland Australia. His work appears in the two thousand seventeen documentary living the thylacine dream which follows waters travels throughout mainland Australia. Collect evidence of predation as well as stories of sightings from witnesses who are adamant seen the thile seen both recently and historically

Australia Tigers Tasmanian Museum And Art Galle Rick Schwartz Tasmanian Museum Nineteen Thirties Tasmanian Government Hobart Zoo Kathryn Medlock Thilo Tasmania Mainland Australia South Australia San Diego Zoo California Neil Waters Western Australia Yellow Brown Silas Claude
"tasmania" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"tasmania" Discussed on The Signal

"Not <Speech_Music_Female> banning <Music> than some of those <Music> <Music> sort of shops <Speech_Music_Female> very little <Speech_Male> regard <SpeakerChange> to <Speech_Male> what the risk laws <Speech_Music_Male> and. How <Speech_Male> recently is that? You're talking <Speech_Music_Male> about like in the last <Speech_Music_Male> few days. <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I'm a racer <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And also <SpeakerChange> I think there was <Speech_Music_Male> mixed messaging <Speech_Male> going with people <Speech_Music_Male> who told me about <Speech_Music_Male> on such media <Speech_Female> signed <Speech_Music_Female> by check but I <Speech_Male> can still got Browning's <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> so I can say <Speech_Female> that was <Speech_Female> cuts on <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> advocacy <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> count. Go TO <Speech_Music_Female> JUST <Speech_Music_Female> START <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> OKAY. So it's a <Speech_Female> simpler and somewhat. <Speech_Female> Hasha message <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> potentially <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> to light. <Speech_Male> How worried are you <Speech_Male> about what might happen <Speech_Male> next? <hes> <Speech_Male> do do you think <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> the measures to <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the right wants to get on <Speech_Male> top of this. <Speech_Male> And how <Speech_Male> would you write <Speech_Male> the Tasmanian <Speech_Male> and the federal government's <Speech_Male> responses as <Speech_Male> as it's <SpeakerChange> affected your <Speech_Male> community in the northwest? <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I think the the <Speech_Female> design and government <Speech_Female> responses thing. <Speech_Female> Very good <Speech_Female> back them. All the while <Speech_Female> on this <Speech_Female> So <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Female> think the <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> might Tacos <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And it communicated <Speech_Female> them really well. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> Government SUPPORT <Speech_Male> FOR WORKERS. <Speech_Female> Swing very <Speech_Female> welcome. It's very <Speech_Female> much needed <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> to be done around <Speech_Female> that we might <Speech_Female> say <Speech_Female> more in the future <Speech_Female> tangibly <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> cabbage <Speech_Female> or besides <Silence> a longer than we think. <Speech_Female> Our <Speech_Male> government thinks <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> That bought <SpeakerChange> pots. <Speech_Male> I'm support <Speech_Male> and I mean <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> If you were going to <Speech_Male> peak region that <Speech_Male> you didn't want to have an <Speech_Male> outbreak it would probably <Speech_Male> look something like <Speech_Male> northwest. <SpeakerChange> Wouldn't <Speech_Female> it it would. <Speech_Female> It would <Speech_Female> yes. We've <Speech_Female> got an older <Speech_Female> population <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> Cornick disease <Speech_Female> we have high rights <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Intergenerational <Speech_Female> advantages <Speech_Female> ragent sadly <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> angle. Cyclops <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> cable <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> elevated. <SpeakerChange> Any <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> attack. <Speech_Female> Not Being <SpeakerChange> told what <Speech_Male> to do what they can't <Speech_Male> do. Reports <Speech_Male> he's flying will continue <Speech_Music_Male> to <Speech_Music_Female> saw. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> It is <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> worst crisis we <Speech_Music_Female> can have <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> all few people <Music>

"tasmania" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"tasmania" Discussed on KCRW

"Trees in Tasmania he won pond so the three thousand years old I have ninety five scouts on we have tropical rain forests burning you know the people was really it in the end elected this conservative government they rejected politicians pushing for climate change reforms has anything shifted it's an interesting question and there's a lot of the brightness tried it the public you screaming for action now are the it just seems to me that prime minister does not have its finger on the pulse of the nation because they saying things they've never seen before they frightened people in Sydney are coughing because with confidence Mike I'm striding cities of this year you can't say for more than two hundred jobs it's it's just horrific and I'm we've lost about one thousand five hundred times in New South Wales align center take a wiping out but it seems our government now prime minister or not so let's say Australia does turn a corner in the end it's a it's a continent with a tiny carbon footprint a country of some twenty six million people so if China India and the US are going to reduce emissions what difference does it make if Australia changes so that's been an argument the prime minister his use now to put it into perspective out of two hundred countries when number fifteen so we're not small in the scheme of things if you read in the call that we export one of the biggest exporters of coal oil and gas what number five and look astride his wise punched above its white internationally and one of mine by that is we've taken on issues like apartheid in South Africa nuclear disarmament we we've we've taken a moral stance as a nation we've always tried to do the right thing and I think a lot of a striving to looking at at government alignment and thinking where is the moral leadership how can out prime minister go to president trump or to other countries and say look you L. countries burning way doing abit union they today your big break we can't do that at the moment because we don't have the moral or ethical standing to be able to make those phone calls now you yourself are a firefighter and you're headed for the fires do you have a sense of of when they might be under control now we're done and look I'm sorry my most wildfire five fighting in the strategy is done by volunteers and the Evan fire departments from both sides instructing set five engines out to a system that we have forestry national parks such a United force I'm always sitting on use as a professional firefighter and ended up Schaefer thirteen years I've gone back to my roots where I started with my father as a volunteer the wild land firefighter sidewalk been funny quotes for forty seven years I've never seen anything like this week sort coming over twenty nine other ex shapes and I have seen this coming for the last twenty years the bad seasons becoming more frequent around the world everything's hating out we're getting wildfires in countries that never had them before like the U. chi grain land this is a worldwide problem this is climate change in action and everybody nights to sit up and take notice that was great minds former commissioner for fire and rescue for the Australian state of New South Wales you're listening to weekend edition from NPR news you know the feeling you took a photo of that amazing sunset or beach vacation or that perfect dessert you picked but now you can't find it did you save it on your computer your phone and the cloud was it just an Instagram story and then you see the better edited version somewhere how many photos do you have anyway for new years clean up of your or your family's photo collection we call tech guru and radio host can commando.

Tasmania
Wildfire disaster worsens as Australian Navy rescues evacuees stranded on a beach

Pacifica Evening News

05:54 min | 1 year ago

Wildfire disaster worsens as Australian Navy rescues evacuees stranded on a beach

"It's Saturday in Australia in the country was bracing for a furnace blast if he wins and raging wildfires in apocalyptic conditions deputy fire commissioner rob Rogers for the state of New South Wales said firefighters were under no illusion they would be able to halt the spread of the bush fires they were just hoping no more lives would be lost we're unfortunately very likely we will lose times tomorrow but will be very happy in local XSS if there's no lives lost that is S. single focus tomorrow latest news is two more people did die in the fires more than two hundred fires are burning and warnings of extreme danger to come prompted mass evacuations of tens of thousands of people in what may have been the largest such evacuation in Australian history the climate field wild fires are unprecedented traffic was gridlocked as people fled firefighters escorted convoys any evacuees's fires threaten to close roads navy ships were called in to pluck hundreds of people stranded on beaches the prime minister of Victoria declared a disaster across much of the eastern part of the state allowing the government to order evacuations in an area with as many as one hundred forty thousand permanent residence and tens of thousands more vacationers New South Wales declared a fire emergency Arthur Stevens a feature story news has more on the evacuations the evacuation of the communities and surrounds in the south of New South Wales and they know the studies to Victoria continues with potentially up to sixty thousand people like to be moved out the evacuations come as prime minister Scott Morrison who's a Tory devastated areas was jeered and tries out of cannot go with locals telling him he should be ashamed of himself after leaving the country to burn while she went on a Christmas holiday in Hawaii on Friday local firefighters were joined by thirty nine others and to lay eyes on officers from the U. S. one of the sixty one for the US the dead from Canada should be on the fire ground next week other Stevens Melbourne this week at least four hundred forty five homes were destroyed on the New South Wales southern coast and dozens of burned in Victoria ten deaths were confirmed in the two states this week Victoria authorities also said twenty eight people were missing fires also burning in Western Australia South Australia and Tasmania the navy evacuated about a thousand people from Malibu tell a coastal town in Victoria cut off for days by fires that forced as many as four thousand residents and tourists to shelter on beaches landing craft ferry people to a ship offshore evacuees waiting to board the ship to strive Smokin embers flying everywhere when the fires were at their worst prime minister Scott Morrison cut short a visit to co Bargo in New South Wales when locals yelled at him called him an idiot a scumbag and worse and criticized him for the lack of equipment to deal with the fires in town Morrison said he understood the anger of people affected by the fires Leslie to do was to provide the support of the calm of government and to assure them of of everything we are doing to support them in this time of night whether it's three direct assistance payments or whether it's the work of the strand defense force were getting in behind the emergency services if it here flying in fuel flying in supplies in an interview late in the day with the Australian broadcasting corporation Morrison was defensive about his handling of the crisis he did not I did you dig nor the warnings of fire chief said Australia was heading into a catastrophic fire season the prime minister repeatedly has asserted the fires are a natural disaster not the result of climate change experts though say global warming caused by burning fossil fuels has exacerbated the unprecedented wildfires in Australia and elsewhere around the world like California seven marks a feature story news spoke with the fire science professor who said eight thousand kilometer area of the Australian east coast about six hundred twenty miles a roughly the distance from you Rico telus Angelus likely will be affected this weekend the Australian prime minister Scott Morrison was forced out of one devastated town where residents of furious over his government's response the situation is beyond unprecedented wave sort of entering of scenarios that you couldn't Graeme out there if you want to tell you fire science professor David Bowman from the university of Tasmania the next activation but the weather conditions are going to deteriorate was this trial it will be impacted because then substrate has mine yeah and then the eastern part of the Korean something because you suck wiles expecting conditions possibly eclipsing what happened earlier this week it's going to be basically old huge thousand Cologne bottle on a full and that's gonna be driving up the age because and who knows what's going to get taken out by that smoke from the fires has now reached the shores of new Zealand's twelve hundred miles away I think yellow hazes descended on glaciers in the country's self island a popular tourist destination for No Way in Australasia is the crisis going to be resolved soon with FSN spotlight I'm Simon marks a Sydney university ecologist told the Sydney morning Herald that nearly five hundred million birds reptiles and mammals are likely to have perished in the state of New South Wales a lone frog bats and insects are excluded from his estimate making the toll on animals much

Australia
Magic Mushrooms: Can Their Mycelia Give Us Safer Plastic Replacements?

The Science Show

04:57 min | 1 year ago

Magic Mushrooms: Can Their Mycelia Give Us Safer Plastic Replacements?

"This film called the Kingdom you really must see it won so many international prizes and was made in Australia about fungi the half a kingdom of their own fungi just like the Animal Kingdom and the plant kingdom kingdom and it says in the film in the beginning we mammals had to be warm blooded otherwise fungi would have invaded us. Yes this is the side show. Today we come from Roy Mandalay an expert panel on the magic of mushrooms the I was talking to Brian about an extract from the film which you said amongst other things that none of you would be here if it weren't founder 'cause they were here first and they're so ubiquitous extraordinary that they would have been taking over your primitive body if it weren't for one important thing according to this superb film you have raised raised temperature and because you're warm-blooded these creatures do not infest you but this is highly significant and I find it really extraordinary that so little is known about my Celia other foundry living underground the gigantic now Brian. This is a leading question which the answer's. Yes do you think we've underestimated the importance of this kingdom yes go on very much so so my name's. Brian Pickles and I'm a lecturer in ecology at the University of Reading in the UK as the first guest to talk. I'm going to use the privilege witch of saying that. I'm a fun guy. Yeah that's right. Pun In there I mostly work call nut trees and their special relationship with fungi that link them all up ground incredible. They do all sorts of things. Introduce yourself similarly me and tell me how many my colleges there might be in the country. Does anybody know that's way too many. There's actually one fulltime microbiologist living at the ecology policy of fungi so I've got some medical ecologists agriculture microbiologists as compared to all other zoologists and botanists. We need a few more my collegues south the Ellison Awesome Pool Leo. I'm on a mission to fund infect you all by the end of today or perhaps finally infect your consciousness to try and get funding into our concepts tips of what biodiversity is of what nature is and how fungi actually underpinned the architecture of our soil's and draw the trees and funding other plants and indeed asked together and Gavin. I heard you on the radio with Brian. Yes today. I think it was Jonathon Greene was talking about all sorts of amazing things how you can use them. Where do you come. I'm from my organization. Economic Design is based in upstate New York and a little over a decade ago. We began growing alternatives for the conventional plastics mystics that are used in protective packaging and building construction using my Cillian the vegetative or root like structure of mushrooms so that these materials are compatible with our planet it at the end of their useful life fantastic on the scale you you just won't believe now. Mike now you connected to given his work on my Kornblau interdisciplinary artist and lecturer at the University of Tasmania and school of architecture and design and we're very lucky to have given cam over last week we did a talk as part of our design forum series and Moan System. We've been working on AH fabrication theme for the last year and a half where we're working with various biomaterials Kelp Scooby and now my Caelian to see how it can be scaled up to an architectural application by the way Mike. Have you seen Tim Flannery book about Kelp. No I haven't well obviously they grow on on a gigantic scale in the C- The oceans especially if it's not too hot but vast supply if you look after them especially around Tasmania okay now now bronze something. You hinted that would wide web. What is it so who in the audience has been thinking about fungi today understands what my see Liam Yeah Okay so did you all that you are currently on top of a whole. Shwak of my Celia attached to the roots of those grasses the roots of the trees that are extending out underneath his old and those roots are all connected up to fungi and fungi or interacting with the planets they're interacting with the soil and they form the foundation of

Brian Pickles Animal Kingdom Celia Lecturer Roy Mandalay Mike Tasmania Jonathon Greene Founder Australia University Of Reading Liam Ellison Gavin Tim Flannery University Of Tasmania And Sch UK Economic Design New York Kornblau
Measuring Performance Under Pressure Using Machine Learning

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

13:25 min | 1 year ago

Measuring Performance Under Pressure Using Machine Learning

"Lotto. Welcome to this week in machine learning and a._i. Thank you happy to be here yeah. I'm really looking forward to chatting with view. You are in the enviable position of having combined a couple of your life's passions. You've been playing soccer since the age of i five and now you get to study it and apply machine learning to <hes> the analysis of that sport and and others there's as well or are you permanently focused on soccer right now. I'm just focusing soak right now yeah. So how did this all come to be well. I she already mentioned conventions. I <hes> i place from home life. <hes> and i did a bachelor's in mathematics and while studying <hes> i find out of this company gold size i sports that will say oh using combining mathematics and the and soccer to get insights in a while what players clubs to buy i indicator the company in company bac dennis just to run by three students and just getting company surround five years ago and <hes> i kept in contact. I worked like one day a week and then i started doing masterson econometrics and at the end of a masters i could could could work at the company as a scientific research so in a total started and companies based in amsterdam. It's based in it started antedates. It's like in the in the east of the country. You're very small country so it's around two hours from amsterdam and we also have an office in amateur right now celek in the middle of <hes> of nelson's and from the time you started working there when it was just the three students <hes> it's grown to what now to around fifty people right now selling just six years big road talk a little bit about before we dive into the specific paper that will be <hes> speaking about talk a little bit about your general area of research. They're so so we are at size. We <hes> <hes> well. We hope multiple different lights with a main focus is on the recruitment part for clubs so <hes> both actually yeah oklahoma want to find new you knew players to <hes> for teams and that's where we help and in our team our data analytics team we built all new models many using machine learning earning to get insights from this data that we get <hes> and it's how we while we hope to clubs and we have like an online forum where <hes> while <music> our clients can find around nineteen ninety thousand nine zero <hes> players from all over the world and can find our strengths and weaknesses. Loda take away helped him okay at what are some of the main data sources that you have access to for the various <hes> analytics that you do now. We got the access to to match event data as scold though you get us from our partner why scouts and data is like many entertainments. It's like every action that occurs on the bitch so <hes> an boss dribble across an data to which player performance action from got to wear a what time in the match that's going to be revealed with the day okay and so the data is <hes> it kind of a set of time series events or or yeah yeah yeah okay and are there other data source providers that are doing things as with <hes> more imagery video based data or is that not <hes> prevalent in soccer yet it is we have a part of our accompanies working on now on that special team at school the ball games team and they don't working on a screamer system which currently hangs in three stadiums <hes> <hes> and it is like using the computer vision to attract the players in the boa to each moment each diamond game so that's also what we're doing so we're also collecting data with my team is primarily focused on event data for clips because well to scout players. You have to know a lot about all these players around the world and video data is not yet <hes> provided for a lot of leaks. That's why make sense make sense <hes> <hes> so the paper that we are going to dig into one that you presented <hes> earlier this year at the <hes> the sloan sports analytics conferences called coke or shine quantifying soccer players ability to perform under mental pressure. Tell us a little bit about the motivations for this paper super yeah so well. It's it's about quantifying. A shocker place. Ability to prefer momentum pressure and actually want to do is <unk>. <hes> what we sold a lot of research in natural granted extra currently it's growing fast but there's never any research wanted to flee done about a helpless as performance under pressure and now i've also as a soccer player myself <hes> i also feel the pressure sometimes to actually how we how who became a well with the topic so we wanted to measure the performance of display <unk> pressures getting high so we had extra data for this and that's actually how we started this research <unk> <hes> to <hes> to people from the laser the pizza and jesse another colleague of mine young we did the survey research and is applying some kind of machine learning or analytics to mental pressure i sure is that something that you've seen done in other fields as it you know prevalent in some other fields and it's something you're trying to bring to a soccer or is it something that we don't really do a lot of now. In sports. It is tasmania investigated in some other sports but not extensively yet so i think it's still a field that needs to be investigated more. We also want to do more in research this and spoken to quite so memento coaches that work different clubs ups and they always though is that there is like <hes> it's hard for them to to show improvement of certain players on wall certain aspects of the mental mental game gene and i think <hes> well <unk> its will in all sports <hes> from important that you demand <unk> correct sola well <hes> you can perform uninventive pressures. That's the point. Sarah are being mate sola yeah yeah and so. How were you in your research defining mental pressure. How're you characterizing it. In the games that you're looking at yeah so actually what we what we did we defined to expect with mental pressure so the pregame at pressure and in game pressure so you can imagine that before a game starts already some pressure on certain games for example when wanna <hes> <unk> playing game for championship like burger leaks like <hes> i think it was ten years ago something that's maybe less when the city and units <unk> united both could be the champions <hes> well then rushes getting high and we also so investigated in game pressure and it's based on an in game marine probability model so at each point in time we predict <hes> while the the <hes> the win for both the teams and when a change in go as being scored when this engaged impropriety would change a lot sack the pressure is high so for example when it's like a one one in las minutes then precious really high spring score a goal to mai- mainly mainly changed the winner of the game the finish <unk> three zero score on the board then it doesn't matter anymore and so you've kind of characterized is games <hes> by this low pressure high pressure or at least the the pre-game is the the the pressure is not the level of the game but the in game. That's <hes> an attribute. You're applying to the games. Is it minute by minute or event by event or i guess it's just whenever the score changes yeah so that's actually whenever detroit is actually manned by minutes so it's suv <unk> affected this model and it takes into account like the current score also like a red guards guards and the kind of stuff and also like <hes> vinaplast team is attacking a lot naples or comfort winner in game win probability model so yeah. That's that's <hes>. That's it for the pre-game show. It's like a fixed a set number burlingame yeah and those two combined make like active pressure at a certain event in a game okay and you're you've got the you've got the pressure on the one hand and you're trying brian use that to predict what so we actually have to pressure on one end and liotta and we have <hes> actually three performance metrics and so so e for every action that we have dispose a baltimore dribble we compute three things so contribution of this <hes> this action mm-hmm so by contribution we mean <hes> the increase in scoring a goal in the near future so actually from every action <unk> <hes> the failure of the game before the election and offered action and the difference in those two makes <hes> the contribution of an of an action and next to that we also <hes> <hes> decision won't if the titian and the quality of execution and those three for three we can see like how does it play perform infrastructures like a normal normal states when it's getting high getting lower and this more or less prescriptive display this contribution contribution element. It sounds like that saying that at a given time in the game given all of the player positions and some event that just happened. You're able to come up with some metric. That captures kind of the relative advantage of the the different teams that in and of itself sounds like a hard problem. Yeah it is yeah so it was actually how this all started so i think a year before his paper her <hes> we worked on a model to measure this contributions for other players so this was actually doses for each <hes> <hes> each game state <unk> hobby record of every game state is like <hes> characterized by <hes> old actions that have been played until abend position of the player with the ball the the diamond match the score difference an forever game state. We predict <hes> the jones had written. <hes> connections goals being scored by one team so it's actually like a binary <unk> education program and we also nope. We also a predictions. That's the older team will score with intonations and this way we can measure like for every action recommissioned offensive and the defensive contribution so for example when a player falls to bowl from his own through his striker. We'll have a very high contribution offensive offensive contribution without <unk> noland into -ceptable in your own box. You will also have a defensive contribution and that's what we <hes> well. I worked on and and this is also something that'd be already show to our to our clients in written they can find like players that have like for example high pulse contribution <hes> each each year spoke dylan's before their authors new with that original work on contribution of a couple of questions here one <hes> when you're looking at player position like do you quantify that in some way or is it kind of continuous position position in the field position where where the players with the ball or even look at where the players are that don't have the ball it. That's a that's a good point. That's one of the wall of the van data so <hes> it is event data. We only have old actions that the tape with so we have to pass dribbles but we don't know all the other will send you on players are so that's <hes> well that is good and advantage or a disadvantage this band advantage because it makes no problem easier. Well no no i would really lot this. Data's will guarantee don't have that <hes> but we also captured tried to capture this with by adding information about out your tax so <hes> we we add information about speed of the game so <hes>

Soccer Amsterdam Oklahoma Partner Masterson Tasmania Dylan Sarah Nelson Detroit Noland Jones Jesse Brian Liotta Baltimore Five Years Six Years Ten Years Two Hours
"tasmania" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"tasmania" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Then correlating those two. Earthquakes and weird weather, and he seems to be on to something. So you know, that there is a place where there are there's no concrete or buildings or anything just ocean. And they're they're getting these really weird changes. Well, that's what the satellite data is supposed to show. I haven't seen this this information. That stand does presenting. I'd like to see that. He's got it posted the the satellite data. I'm speaking of there's a website a direct link from my sight to it. This is from a person who has done an incredible amount of research. His name is John Daly, and he is a resident of Tasmania Tasmanian. Yes. And his his data is certainly different. He's got a huge website on. This is really done his homework on it. And he presents both sides. But when you get done looking at it, you have to or at least in my case, I said, well, doesn't doesn't look good for the global warming camp? Another words he concludes. He concludes want the name. His is called still waiting for greenhouse still waiting for greenhouse. Yes. He shows through many graphs, the diff a comparison between the surface temperature data and the satellite data, and he shows no significant warming. He also compares this to the solar cycle data. He compares it to El Nino, LA, Nina. He gets into the CO two models.

John Daly Tasmania Tasmanian Nina LA
"tasmania" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"tasmania" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Me sitting in for Tasmania moose last hour. We did a little bench cut start Christmas movie style. We've discussed the MBA at length especially LeBron James injuring his groin last night while the Lakers roll the warriors in their own building. And Marco balletti plainy some Kevin Durant. Clips by why everybody hates him. Boy. Does it certainly feel like this isn't the same old same old NBA season where you could just assume the warriors are gonna wall stairway in to another NBA final. They may end up hitting their, but there's gonna be their toughest road to date. And last segment we just did a little college football playoff ahead of Clemson Notre Dame, and obviously a head of Alabama. Oklahoma. I believe that Ohio State had college football fans, a favor by knocking off Michigan and setting us up for Oklahoma and Alabama Saturday night, the only way to beat tied in my mind is to just outscore them because you can't hope to slow down to and company the best offense Nick Sabin has had since he's gotten Obama. And is there any team better prime to do that then Keiler Murray and the Oklahoma Sooners? By Lincoln Riley. I don't think so I- Kennedy Brooks has big arch bowl as well. So we've Herman more coming up former NFL wide receiver Detroit lion ahead of the lane bowl. Minnesota and Georgia Tech in Detroit at the top of the hour. We'll do little NFL maybe some college with Herman as well. Get his thoughts, especially on Herman Moore played the majority of his career with Barry Sanders as well. And watching a great running back inevitably not go win the big one because your team was built around the great running back. We're seeing a lot of teams trend that way. The Cowboys Zeke the giants and saquon Barkley his thoughts on that. And if that's the way to go if that's the mode ago, or if her more wishes, quite frankly, he had a young great quarterback the play within his career if things would have been a little different but Lee yesterday Christmas day as I started with the NBA the NBA took full and front center stage in the last couple of years. Because of Christmas holiday falling between Saturday Sunday Monday. The NFL schedule invaded the NBA space on Christmas day, the NBA stayed with their quintuplet Abbott that for another big word of games. But now yesterday there was no NFL to be had. It was all NBA from noon eastern nine AM Pacific until I guess blazers jazz ended at approximately one AM eastern ten PM Pacific. If my math on time zones is correct. That's a lot of NBA and for NBA fans. Well, the diehard MBA fantas- I mentioned at the top will sink their teeth into their local team they will because we're always excited to watch your local team. But from a national NBA perspective really yesterday was the unofficial opener to wash care and following and getting caught up at the standings and and seeing premier match ups and premier stars. And really figuring. Out what you wanna do is an NBA fan the rest of the way. Okay. When when football ends in the NFL colleges over how invested are you going to be in the NBA regular season considering that the last couple years just lead to a seeing LeBron versus the warriors in the finals, but LeBron has gone east now and LeBron stepped up and brought his Lakers into oracle last night. And they put on a clinic when LeBron with DAL with a hurt growing the warriors made a quick rally, but in the fourth quarter, it was the young Lakers led by Kyle Kuzma who put a beating on the warriors. And for those who wanna point and say, well, it's hard to really judge the warriors in a game enga- came out business because while they could turn the switch at any moment. I get that..

NBA Oklahoma Sooners NFL LeBron James Lakers Herman Moore Detroit Clemson Notre Dame football Kevin Durant Tasmania giants Oklahoma Alabama Marco balletti Barkley Keiler Murray Barry Sanders Lincoln Riley
"tasmania" Discussed on The Astrology Podcast

The Astrology Podcast

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"tasmania" Discussed on The Astrology Podcast

"And so I ended up writing them or writing the summoned Sach piece in a notebook by hand, which is thing I've had to do during other mercury retrograde 's. And it was not at all what I'm normally doing with the monthlies, usually they're pretty structured and forecast with like, you know, some metaphor and hopefully some insight, but they're, you know, more collegial, whereas this one was not even trying to do that. I was taking a single fem- and going off on it. And it was a piece that people many people told me to absolutely loved, and that's happened to me before during murky retrograde where I I literally I was gonna say go off book, but off keyboard and up needing to write in a book. And it's a, you know, it's not what I'm normally doing piece wise, but it ends up being something that really hits home. So that that that's one example of one of the one of the things that happens during mercury retrograde where it works better. If you abandon the standard plan, but you know, I opt to stay flexible. Yeah. But you know, so we spent a week in Melbourne a week north of Auckland in New Zealand, and then a week on a farm in southern Tasmania, and I actually have still have a farmer's tan. Oh my gosh. I got I got absolutely fried. In tasmania. I didn't know about the lack of ours iron. Yeah. And so I was just sitting on the porch with Gordon, we we recorded a podcast, maybe two and a half hours. And I got I just got absolutely fried in my right arm. The whole thing peeled. It was it was kind of on the way back. Again. You got a lot of time to think on the plane it occurred to me so one the this trip was, you know, impart business in the sense that there is an event down there that we set up which went beautifully, by the way, we ended up sticking, you know, maybe fifty percent astrologers fifty percent wizards in the same room made them listen to us for a couple hours, and then gave them all the wine and beer and food that they could handle for the next four or five. And I think that there was some some gelling that that happened that we hoped would happen. But I am anyway. So. Obviously, I went down there for that. But I also went to the quick the recordings of which are available on Gordon's website, Rune soup dot com. Right. Well, so we we kept the recording as a treat for his premium members and my patriots, and we've got a audio-video full recording for anybody who's, you know, decides to be among the privileged few. And I saw on Twitter and stuff that you got you met a lot of astrology podcast listeners that I recognize from seeing like online or from Twitter, Facebook or other places that you actually got to meet him person. Yeah. Yeah. Well, it was I got to see some few few old friends. Shoutout to Cassandra. I got to meet a podcast listeners. Also got to meet one of my students in my yearly class of shutout to scarlet who's been waking up for my eleven thirty AM Pacific time class in. Australia, which is that's a depending on the time zone or depending on daylight savings. That was either a five thirty or six thirty AM class. I had no idea, but she's been waking up in tending all year round. That was great to meet her lies yet, quite dedication, who who doesn't respect quiet, dedication, right? But yeah, I got I met so many people it was such a whirlwind. What does he say? So I would I had a point with my horrible farmer's tan is that you know, I went down there. As partially a reward for making it through the absolutely shit transit's that I've had this year, which have been nailing perfected planet which ended like two days before I was due to fly down.

Gordon Twitter Tasmania Sach Melbourne Auckland New Zealand scarlet Australia Facebook fifty percent two days
"tasmania" Discussed on Science... sort of

Science... sort of

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"tasmania" Discussed on Science... sort of

"Never been to California. You might notice that there are a preponderance of these very tall statuesque trees. Kind of a very flaky papery bark, and they have a very distinctive smell, which to me is the smell of northern California. And what you may not know is that those trees are eucalyptus trees, or if you've heard of them referred to as eucalyptus trees, you may not realize that those are not native to northern California eucalyptus is a genus that exclusively is from Australia Tasmania that area and the eucalyptus that exists in northern California is introduced invasive species and that has led to some debate aim at. Yeah, I was actually relatively unaware about this today. And it's I think from an outsider's perspective of someone that doesn't have stake in, you know, actually living in that area. It's a weird debate to be having because I think it seems easy. Easier and make a decision on it as an outsider than it. Does these on this living here, but I'm happy? This has been brought to my attention totally. So we're talking about an article in the Atlantic called the great eucalyptus debate. It was written by Emma Miraz as part of the last word on nothing series article about a little while ago. But eucalyptus have been there since the eighteen fifties. So you think about when people were actually settling San Francisco as a city in the eighteen fifties. Like, San Francisco was barely a town collection of huts at tents and ships that were taken apart to build some of the first rudimentary structures that existed on the peninsula, so really a complete world away from the major metropolitan area. We think of San Francisco as today, I mean eighteen fifties. You'll notice is one year after eighteen forty nine which we think of as the gold rush here. And that's when everyone moved there. So these trees are as old as the city itself, but they're still new in a deep. Time by diversity sense. And and so we have this interesting situation where there is old as the western European memory of this place. But are they actually supposed to be there? Yeah. Yeah. And that's a tough one because you know, science can never give us the should it can give us a lot of information. Let us make up our minds. And and what you've got to think about is. The reason it is a debate is because people are bringing a lot of different avenues into the discussion about what should be done with these trees, and in one side, you have sort of the ecological biological one that you had to into that in saying that, you know, from geological standpoint, they're a new species on the landscape. There's really good arguments to be made that they are rising to be pretty invasive and a lot of areas, and they've replaced a very valuable habitat type in San Francisco hill areas, and from that standpoint, I could see why people would want to remove them. But as you mentioned, if these had been the backdrop to your entire experience, you know in the city, and this is what you know. I can understand also why people want to kind of protect the aesthetic. But again as an outsider not raised on that. I can definitely see where I would side in the argument from simple biological standpoint. So it's funny. Australia's known for having unique flora and fauna as well as New Zealand these trees also grow in parts of New Zealand and islands in that region..

San Francisco California Australia Tasmania New Zealand Emma Miraz Atlantic Australia one year
"tasmania" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"tasmania" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"December seventeenth two thousand fourteen Ascari episode Fifty-seven Gary takes a question from a vineyard owner and Tasmania about how to sell wine if you own a vineyard. Gary. I haven't asked Gary the question on here in Tasmania at the opening of a brand new philadel- winery and always to it's a small three hectares Vania seven is now on an ask you question. You had a seven I- Vignon, and it didn't have these wonderful views that we have here. How would you sell lots of won-? How would you do things different to all the ads there at chase? Love you. Thank you. It's nice to see the wine stuff show up in the ask Gary v show. I really appreciate the question for small been to Tasmania an incredible place making some of the most interesting sparkling and Pena Nawar based wines that I think are coming out of the world yet. So many Americans don't know. And it's really sad. Think about how many of you. When you hear Tasmania thought about the Tasmanian devil cartoon character. And that's all you got which is really too bad considering how incredible the places. Look, I think that we've addressed to my twenty we made a movie Dirac crushed it. Let's link it. Right. You know, because I can do that in YouTube world, the clouds and the dirt and the answer to your question are really clouds and dirt or ways that I used to say to my dad big and small the way I would sell a lot of wind is would be big and small. Let me explain you've got a small parcel. You're not making that much wine. And so the small would be hand selling IB flying over to Australia. I would be going into the big cities within New Zealand. I would probably pick one or two markets in Asia. And I would literally fly in and hustle, literally knock on doors walk around with sommeliers and sales people from the companies that represented my wine and one by one restaurant by restaurant retailer by retailer fell the product tastes themselves, taste and.

Tasmania Gary philadel- winery Pena Nawar New Zealand YouTube chase Australia Dirac Asia three hectares
"tasmania" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"tasmania" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Eating a. Bug in the middle of, Tasmania you have choices Your factor Fear, factor, Tasmania bet threat Cratia got. For you this is the best they. Could do you're gonna, love. It though you're gonna be a. Big star I gotta go Could a real. Star online too By coleens online too I gotta go Hey Mandra it's, growing maybe Serbia. Idea now it's one of. Them you better hope it. John Which one was in. The, World Cup, is the other one anyway I. Guess. There's no there's I don't understand I you know. I, guess it in that. Fantasy sweet there's less than what. We think, goes on that. Yeah I don't think it's. I think it's for show Weird it's okay you to go, in and we're going to, be outside here. Waiting hopefully it goes well for you guys. You. Know it's like going to, the bathroom, and probably, somebody waiting outside the right while you're in the bathroom and I, can't do this I, everything is totally shut. Down, in here, and then you tell them you. Just. Go I'll go after you because I can't go. Right, all the guys are. Like you go you go Because up. Until that point everything between the two of you all correspondence has. Been videotaped right well but then again. Yeah amber, have been together for so long so they have kind of pent up energy so maybe maybe things, do happen in the fantasy. Suite for jeez I mean how long is, filming like a while or, remember the situation. In one of these was Eddie was the. Bachelor? Franchise where something bad happened, in the, pool right China Yes that's. Right and then the next thing know the connubial ended up in lose. Wet I didn't realize what was going on and Bom something. Happened I don't remember remember. That and that was like a hold that became a big. Deal Well right because the guy got in trouble right Got in trouble for, not intervening, so if you in the fantasy suite I mean do you have? To. Sign paperwork before we go on the fantasies everything do your life sign here here in these other five hundred pages and you guys can head on and whatever it. Is, and we're not responsible for anything that happens Is there get tested I don't even understand what goes on what if called comes out and just like yeah I did it along That's a good way to go I mean if you're going. To, be virgin for such a long time that's on. National television it's a? Really good way to get your next relationship is go yeah I just lost virginity, on, a reality dating show Yep The last guy to go in a pretty good. Catch Okay all, right I remember. That Aaron Rodgers brother who's with, Joe Joe fresh Fletcher remember they were on the show and then she went for the hometown visit and all It's going to be there is Aaron here To do to get on one of these shows Hey Yeah Had, listen I'll go with the virgin. Angle it makes everybody star apparently Colton on where it's going to run with. It I'll do whatever it takes Got, you, got. You I'm bachelor Sierra Leone The. Bachelor of. Sierra Leone, season eighteen The I. Seventeen got beheaded I hope it's okay All right let's check in now Judy? What's coming up at the. Bottom of the hour MGM resorts suing hundreds of Las Vegas shooting, victims will explain here is traffic is recovering but inbound travel time's still heavy right now.

Tasmania Aaron Rodgers Sierra Leone Joe Joe fresh Fletcher Serbia Colton John MGM amber Eddie Las Vegas China Judy
"tasmania" Discussed on If I Were You

If I Were You

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"tasmania" Discussed on If I Were You

"All cable yeah shit on your lips oh no that was from someone else that you did that yeah we all do it is so strongly but often due to you it's regarded as a team go on the motorcycle here it's true i did i screamed in your butthole where are you from sir the west part of stralia everywhere but i'm from tasmania that's south i know he gets the geography of nobody knows what we sound like i'm flying back into the sun the smallest part noise at the end have you ever screamed into a part i as joke i've screamed into vagina lead you scream echo screamed right back in it was like that scene in ghostbusters no it didn't scream back at me but it did a couple giggles girl and everybody sanctum jay had a ball going intervals she was she couldn't say like you are a riot do me do me do me and for only fifty nine dollars you can be a riot to fiftynine grand sanctum you think for that much money they could buy vowel nice have you ever screamed on a penis stub asking us if screamed on because you listen your brother fully clothed one time did you i want to use the dick flute but i would never scream into its retha we asked the last question what's the that's trying to get your lips around that you re throwing flowing heart as you can't yeah oh yeah of capri suns draw and you're like what are you doing i'm doing i'm giving it's not going to make a soundless you can get a read in there yeah you gotta slam read yeah oh come on grow up when i have read yeah when i was a boy when i was a boy hanging out with another friend of mine and i it's.

tasmania jay fifty nine dollars
"tasmania" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"tasmania" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"Welcome to the war no matz podcast delivered by wore norma's the trouble lifestyle and insurance brand is not your usual trouble podcast it's everything for the adventurous independent traveler who jimbo everyone are you speaking sway healy women actually that is hello insult healy of done some research and a bit of a hint as to which distillation we've featuring in this podcast ville which is number fourteen and we're off to tens aena we're off to tanzania getting into that yeah it gets that in a minute now this is not to be confused with tasmania which is my home state and they are often quite often mix ups like a pakistani cricketer who flame to tens aning when he was supposed to be in hobart tasmania so to make cleo tasmania is a strategy southern island state ten zainy oh tens of the you when they said he's in africa and tasmania has kangaroos and dibble's in tanzania has risen lions up but you don't say ted's mugniyah so it's has mania so why isn't it ten tiny what's growing on me since we've been doing this change the will you'll do it one pronunciation at the time so it is ten ten in eighteen africa well no four mount kilimanjaro of course and the plains of the seren giddy national park in this episode mark is going to tell us about the wildebeest migration which is described as one of the world's most spectacular natural events wouldn't it be amazing to say that i've seen the film but we comes back all the time it's like oh so what would it be.

tasmania cleo tasmania dibble tanzania matz norma healy aena africa ted
"tasmania" Discussed on The Basketball Friends

The Basketball Friends

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"tasmania" Discussed on The Basketball Friends

"Get along out your glory in australia matt you're outside a canberra oh i used to living kendra about a year ago i decided to move to rural tasmaniasouth moved from a sort of a mediumsized city uh which is the capital most people think sydney's the capital but actually canberra is the capital down to a very quiet rural place cold critic and you've decided to start a far right yeah basically um firsttime enlargement growing vegetables to james without myrvang ivo actually now the rba question about tasmania oh excellent morning nice morning it the faro top us banou bar and restaurant located inside the museum of old and new in tasmania australia as a margarita that is garnished with what animal body part as million dead she's that's good i reckon chopping up tasmanian devils might be a problem unthinking now look in peru the animal i'm looking for the body part old on him a lot of the animal aircooled that ex that's a good guess i reckon dea let's go 'this to use our data told me to multiple choice let's do a turbo be genitals c liver the eyeball i feel like this because i was those choices that has to be platelet matt ahead let man sir well you know mina is has a big a great sense of humor so i think marianna is right i think it's got to be genitals my my sense of humor the eyeball make solent oh i want i wonder what the animal is what is the animal i'd either either a cow or a pig.

canberra sydney peru mina marianna australia rba tasmania museum of old
"tasmania" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"tasmania" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

"Would for decades be associated with tasmania so they thought in a way homosexuality was born of tasmania yeah which is amazing because if you look at tasmania in the shape of tasmania that's very funny what is it look like in eighteen sixty seven what does has mania look like so the first i think i know that's the first funny thing someone sent on this truly truly well usually it usually somebody else something out and there is a horrible awkward silence and we got good and the guy and we look at the guy and we go see you should and were than it bro yeah so that's actually will in out there well done on the show but he turned up in the audience wellplayed will in eighteen sixty seven tasmania was the last place in the british empire to hang someone for being gay gay people continue to be persecuted on the island over the next century tasmania had the highest per capita rate of imprisonment for consenting male sex anywhere in the world uh though until uh 1949 the death penalty will still on the books for sodomy in victoria holy graduations to you melbourne in the late 1980's premier robin gray said that homosexuals were unwelcome in tasmania police would record vehicle plates of people who attended gay community meetings like it's not quite as funny when you get closer to the time now hundreds of years ago you would really think that we would have become more comfortable with by up our fucked remember america trying not to things were not great things are not great at this point in america there reagan in 1988 the ceylon.

tasmania robin gray america reagan ceylon per capita melbourne
"tasmania" Discussed on KSKA 91.1 FM

KSKA 91.1 FM

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"tasmania" Discussed on KSKA 91.1 FM

"Here on the island of tasmania and about half on the australian mainland interestingly there's only one place outside of australia where you can see alive has manian devil in that in denmark because a young woman from tasmania married the prince of denmark and as a gift tasmania sent to devils there's no place else in the world other than here in australia for you can see one oh you're something rtd devil suddenly scampered away an incomes another one of the very few predatory marsupial animals in the world call the spotted tale quah the body lawn and muscular and our tale almost as long as it's body our guest this animal is may be almost three feet long rich rusty brown colour big spots all over its body but the size of fifty cent pieces comes into the same road kill art has he devil has been working on looks into the light seems not to like it at all and we had goes now i can see our little tasmanian devil three emerging from the underbrush coming right hannekat wow this is a night for animal adventures well efforts to save the tasmanian devil i should say are based not just aesthetics not just love for nature of fascination with this most extraordinary little animal but also on some practical reasons for example tasmanian devils have a great practical value as scavengers because the clean up dead animals helping to prevent the spread of livestock disease particularly one disease that affects sheep also when the tasmanian devils are greatly diminished or disappeared from some areas this leaves an abundance of a road kill's what happens pharaoh house cats that have gone wild feed on those road kill's and the cat population increases the cat as considered by some biologists here in australia to be the single worst invasive species pausing the greatest impact on native animals this may threaten species of animals found nowhere else in the world now one a few years ago released red fox's here in tasmania it's another potential catastrophic event for native animals it had happened before red fox's were released here but they never were able to establish themselves and the biologists think.

tasmania australia denmark devils red fox three feet
"tasmania" Discussed on KSKA 91.1 FM

KSKA 91.1 FM

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"tasmania" Discussed on KSKA 91.1 FM

"That's the noise that must have free doubt those early settlers when they heard tasmanian devils feuding may be over chickens but maybe also over the remains of a dead kangaroo would dead wallaby which is like a smaller version of a kangaroo or some other carrion that they were scavenging tasmanian devils are solitary by nature so what we're seeing right now would be the usual thing a single animal but they are drawn into close quarters when they're around food they're like a tiny bunch of wolves crammed in around a kill and trying to decide who gets to have most of it and they're arguments over food give rise to their reputation for in tense and volatile grumpiness in eighteen eighty a popular author named luisa an meredith here tasmania wrote this about the tasmanian devil if anyone desires to see a blacker uglier more savage more tmobile beast than arden devil he must be difficult to please i suppose those who bestowed such a name on him had pretty good reasons for it and knew that they gave the devil his due well i'll tell you what if you were looking at our tasmanian devil right now you would wonder where in the world somebody could find the judgment to describe this animal as ugly or savage of course there's no trouble going on right now so our tasmanian devil is in a sort of a benign and placid mood but in fact despite all that arguing in growling that they do has manian devils competing for food are much more like professional television wrestlers aggressively facing off acting as if they're ready to tear each other apart and fits of uncontained anger but actually that's ritualized posturing that big racket the mouths gaping the tales up the teeth gnashing it's like those television wrestlers they might make a big show a things but they sell them actually hurt each other now i have to say that some tasmanian devil have visible scars on their behind that happens usually when they're bitten using their stern push others away from food and they'll bite at each other then they'll often have tug awards over food it looks like big battles but actually when one is on one side and there's another on.

luisa tasmania
"tasmania" Discussed on Ctrl Alt Delete

Ctrl Alt Delete

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"tasmania" Discussed on Ctrl Alt Delete

"I just not getting out jeff some pathetic at regulatory i like that because i she sometimes when i talk interview other writers i it's very in seal at the point that i could stammer hospital times a lot of people if i that balance glen haege villain rain at all as well i shall judge the curtains and host the possum as got special knock so unno's just in or greg and and but then i just showed curtains and ado hideaway because she have to to get now will to rise but i love dancing chicago violence of today i love public transport com unethical transport comes with its own associated problems thrown i do know public transport music in peru transbalkan them's tools usual news in the blast is affection for me and be coming on trains tommy horton more trained is no trains in tasmania so yet so yeah i am mike sometimes i people say all paul you go three hour train like that a my no is peace and quiet looking out the window lotta go sate and notebook and not part an owner hangar needed and leave me alone elena ticket i have i i'll thank you so very wires craig i really quick i thought my long term health for the reds i favour also doak shock to which i'm john gone worried now well it all friends beautiful hunting don't guy was beautiful to narrow there is there is one thing to macy for bus route is jill solloway.

peru tommy horton tasmania mike jill solloway jeff unno greg chicago elena doak john macy three hour
"tasmania" Discussed on Le Show

Le Show

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"tasmania" Discussed on Le Show

"Not talking about malania now december 2015 data released by the state department's office of the chief of protocol revealed saudi arabia accounted for seventy five percent of the value of all official gift you have given to the united states in the previous year during that year saudi arabia gave the u s gifts valued at two million five hundred sixty six thousand five hundred twenty five dollars thank you while they must really like us and speaking of like newest of the godly and guess what their removing in australia now it's not a statue of a confederate figure because they didn't have a confederacy yet but it's a controversial plaque on saint mary's cathedral in hobart tasmania featuring well it a plaque honoring a former catholic priest convicted of sex offenses his all victims of child abuse called for it to be taken down it now will the artwork dates from the nineteen 80s but that was another time attached to an external wall the cathedral it depicts the late phillip green he held the title of months in your barely that's not all he held old you stop in two thousand four he pleaded guilty to indecently assaulting a former altar boy and for his trouble was given he was sentenced to a threemonth suspended sentence the wheels of justice latest german needs him oil the archerd isis of hobart said this week it had no immediate plans to remove the plaque which all too also honors for archbishop sir gilford young but.

saudi arabia united states saint mary hobart tasmania phillip green hobart official australia two million five hundred sixty seventy five percent threemonth