2 Burst results for "Tasio Nuvolari"

"tazio nuvolari" Discussed on Past Gas

Past Gas

07:49 min | 2 weeks ago

"tazio nuvolari" Discussed on Past Gas

"Millimeters. I love cappuccino. Yeah, I had about 5 cup of Giannis in the morning. I'm freaking out. And I got diarrhea. He also won two Targa florios, two RAC tourist trophies. One laman 24 hour race and a European Championship in Grand Prix racing. This guy did a lot. I mean, just like even if you just think about the hours spent in races that he won, that's way more than you guys have talked discs. Into account the races that he lost too, because you lose more races than you win. So you guys, I want to see you huck and more in 2023. I mean, that's a goal of mine as well. I just broke my PR. I got a plus one stroke for 24 holes. That oak grove. That's pretty damn impressive. Disc golf has 24 holes. This one in particular does. Why? Because it's at a huge ass park. Okay, keep going. It's safe to say that tazio nuvolari knew what he was doing. But more importantly, he pioneered the technique that formed the foundation of what has become drifting. In 1935, tatsuo penetrated deep into the heartland of the rising Nazi empire and used this technique to defeat the Germans at the German Grand Prix at the Nurburgring, despite facing far superior cars like the Mercedes Benz W 25 B and the auto union type B both cars that we know very well. James, you have two of each. I have two of each. If anyone is interested in $1 million card. Yeah. Well talk to his P three was bored out to over three liters specifically for this race. The Germans were sporting four and 5 liter 8 and 16 cylinder engines respectively. But it was to his fearless approach and sliding style that propelled him to victory despite the power deficit, a feat that would leave a crowd of 300,000 Germans, including high ranking members of the Nazi Party stunned. It was such a novel approach to cornering that it was considered something of a trade secret. Even Enzo wanted to figure out why his driver was capable of these things that everyone else said was impossible. Back in a practice run for the 1931 circuito del tri Provence. Enzo observed and later described the technique quote. At the first corner, I was a certain that that's your taking it badly and that we were going to end up in a teacher. We were gonna lose. I braced myself for the shocker. Instead. We found ourselves at the beginning of a straight with the car pointing down it at the second bend, and again at the third, the same thing happened. At the fourth or 5th, I began to understand how a managed it. I discovered he's a secret. Went into the bend in an unusual way. With the throttle, why you open? He put the car into a controlled four Wheeler, skeet. He was I gonna win. Sound familiar? That same technique. That same technique would be used and perfected by the likes of Sterling moss in the 50s, roger Clark in the 60s, and finally, by the man who inspired the drift king himself, kunimitsu takahashi. It's terrifying going into a turn full throttle. We've been driving on race tracks way more than we ever did before. And I think I've said a bunch of times on the podcast because this is the only time I'm allowed to be myself. But I started filming videos sitting on a stool in a hallway. And now, being brave is part of my job. And if I'm not brave, it's potentially career limiting. And I don't know how that happened. I found a little clip here of Grand Prix race at Monza. And in this one clip in particular, two cars, two German cars, go around a bend here quite slow looking, and then behind them comes mister nuvolari in question. His rear end is sliding all over the place. It's not like a drift like we know today with just smoking tires and everything. But it's oversteer. It's a power slide. Tires actually have more grip when they're sliding a little bit. I'm not sure how it works, but that's like a technical thing. That's like a technical thing. Or is that like a slow is fast, fast as slow? No, it's like Adam was describing it to me when we were doing a track day with the Subarus, and that's why he's like, I wish the Subarus would slide a little more because we'd actually get a little more grip, but it's not when you're like totally crossed over, but just 5% slip gets you more. Sometimes a certain amount of energy put into a tire. And sometimes you're asking the tire to do too many things at the same time. So if you're asking a tire to stop, go or turn at the same time, it's going to do all poorly. Yeah, it's the defeating whatever, there's a percent, it's out of a hundred. So yeah, if you can eliminate one of the things that it has to do, then you have more grip. So if you slip enough that your tires can kind of move freely, you can point them in the direction you want to go and it probably gives you more control. It's very hard to explain. Yeah, I don't really understand it. But to understood this about his tires and was able to exploit it, better than anyone else because he was the only one doing it. And that's how he won. After those 5 Kappa chanos, my rear end is really sliding around. That entire time we were talking about that, I was waiting to say that. Oh, also to get back off the script and onto another tangent. Motorcycle riders can are good at racing. Yes. Because they're outside like Jeremiah is sometimes faster than Adam because he rides motorcycles and the way that they're able to look at a track is just like different. Yeah, Jerry's very fast. Have you seen old Jeremiah's at the track right now? Dirt track racing on motorcycles when there's constantly. Yeah. It's insane. That's so cool. Takahashi kuni mitsu was another motorcycle racer turned auto racing champion and the first Japanese rider to win a world Grand Prix, but an accident in 1962 led him to switch to four wheel racing. A move that led to a class win at Le Mans, four all Japan sports prototype championships as well as wins in Japanese top formula, JTC, and JG TC during a career that saw him competing until he was nearly 60 years old before finally calling it quits in 1999. Wow. Wow, imagine the advancement over the course of your life. Oh yeah, the difference in race cars that you drive? That's crazy. Do you think he likes electric nannies? Probably? I don't know. Do you think Jimmy Hilton knows who he is?

Giannis tazio nuvolari tatsuo Enzo Sterling moss roger Clark kunimitsu takahashi mister nuvolari diarrhea Nazi Party Benz Mercedes golf James Kappa chanos
"tazio nuvolari" Discussed on Past Gas

Past Gas

06:53 min | 2 weeks ago

"tazio nuvolari" Discussed on Past Gas

"Pastas podcast is the course it's not about sports. Do you guys hear that? What? Do you hear fat Nick on the roof? Oh, so we're recording this. This is the second last thing that we are making before we take a break for the holidays. Yes. And I think, yeah, I do. I hear the jingle jangle. A big fat Knicks and surprisingly dense clumps on the roof. Here's fat nigga. Here's fat Nick. He's got his dogs. They're pulling his chair. He's coming around. Big fat Nick. Oh shit, he dropped something down the chimney. Oh. What is this? Oh, wow. Let's see what it is. Wow. Dude, you got another distance. That's from disk craft zone. That's Santa Tommy. Santa Tommy, thank you Tommy. Hell yeah. We did a secret Santa with discs. This is slowly becoming a disc golf. Against my will because I don't play disc golf 'cause I don't like activities. You should come out with us sometime, James. I don't like activities. This one's got hearts. Yeah, I like doing. Eating dinner. That's an activity. That's the only thing I like doing. So if you, if you're my friend and you want to hang out with me, let's get dinner. How about this? Lunch or dinner after playing. Yeah. Maybe I'll meet up with you guys. Today we are discussing the drift king himself, kaichi, kichi, kichi. We've talked about this guy a lot. He comes up in a lot of stories. He's like a very Lee Iacocca, Carroll Shelby. Super influential. Guy who just is sort of involved in a lot of automotive history. He was a technical director on initial D there's a relatively confirmed rumor that takumi was based on except he didn't. He used to deliver car parts in his dad's car, but it wasn't tofu. Tofu is like more likeable. And you get a little jiggle. I pop up in this, but of him driving with like a cup of water or something. And not trying to spill it and be super smooth. Yeah, I mean, that's in the show. The first episode. If you go into the depths of YouTube and watch a lot of Japanese drifting videos, you probably have seen mister tsuchiya in his signature green jumpsuit. Yeah. That's the guy. He's also we talked about him in the Fast & Furious. Episode he was a little had a little cameo. That's right. He was the fisherman in Tokyo drift. That's right. Very influential guy. Yeah, basically. Some might say he meant to drifting. Some might say, he helped popularize it, of course, like really took it into helped bring it into the mainstream. As we'll get into the origins of drifting in this episode, it's pretty interesting. I'm excited to talk about this guy. It's been a while since we talked about Japan on the show. The fans demanded it. The JDM episodes do really well. We hear you loud and clear. We'll do some more in 2023. All right, hey, yeah, sorry, I got to introduce the show. My name is Nolan Sykes. I'm joined by my co hosts. We got Joe Weber across. Monumental week, wink wink nation signed a treaty with the state of Minneapolis. It was not in the talks I just signed off on it, but yeah, thanks for your time. We've also Wisconsin and Minnesota have shaken hands over this. Also joining us is James pumphrey. Nice. That's really mean of you to Puerto Rico. Okay. All 50 plus plus the territory is the shops to Guam just to PR. You mentioned American Samoa at all. So it's pretty crazy. I wasn't done. I mean, an entire video on our YouTube channel. If you want to see it, check it out on American Samoa. I'm also not sure how any of those places feel about our presence there. So if you guys aren't down with us, then I'm still down with you. You know what I mean? I don't imperialism, not my thing. Colonization, I don't do it. So if you don't, if you guys don't, rock with us then. You can still rock with me and I rock with you. Well said, well, where's succinct? All right. Yeah, so let's talk about some drifting here, all right? Yeah? We like drifting. We built two drift cars. Three, three now, yeah. All right, so drifting is so intrinsically linked to Japanese car culture. That's hard to imagine its roots being anywhere else. But if we peer past the 1980s, we can find evidence of drifting as early as the 1930s, guys. The 30s in the 30s. Back then, race cars, even those from top end manufacturers like Alfa Romeo, Ferrari and Mercedes Benz, simply didn't have a lot of horsepower. Even legendary cars like the Alfa Romeo P three, the first single seat Grand Prix race car sported a supercharged three liter inline 8 cylinder engine that could barely crack 200, though at the time I'll argue that was a lot. But compared to today, not a lot. So in order to maintain speed through the turns on the track, drivers would often allow their cars to slide, which kept their speed up without breaking and wasting precious seconds, albeit at the cost of tires. Those tires sucked back then. That was also part of the problem, I think. Yeah, they were using bias supply tires. It didn't have a lot of rubber compounds weren't super soft. Yeah. All that stuff. That's what I meant to say. Yeah. It has been argued by Enzo Ferrari himself that the inventor of the four wheel slide cornering technique was tazio nuvolari, a motorcycle racer turned auto racing champion who Ferdinand Porsche described as the greatest driver of the past present and the future. Never heard of him, not kidding. We've talked about we've mentioned nuvolari before. And if compliments from two automotive Titans like the founders of Ferrari and Porsche aren't enough to impress, let's take a look at tatsuya's legacy of wins. He had 24 Grand Prix victories. 5 Kappa giannos two

Santa Tommy Nick kaichi mister tsuchiya golf Nolan Sykes Joe Weber Lee Iacocca Carroll Shelby Knicks takumi American Samoa James pumphrey Tommy YouTube James Tokyo Guy Guam