17 Burst results for "Taryn Winter"

"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Welcome to best seller TV. I'm Taryn Winter. Brill, We're here with Brian Hazel grin. He is the author of Positive People Make Things Happen. Exclamation Point. It's great to have you with us again. Thank uterine. Good to see you so This is your 16th book. It is. Wow. That's incredible beyond words. Congratulations. Thank you. How do you decide what to write about? Well, actually, we found out that there was a market need So I'm in the health and wellness business. Our company focuses on healthy products, healthy services. Even the color of the book is based on healthy colours, blue, green and orange. No kidding. Are literally according to science. Healthy colours make us feel better. So we found out that when we were talking to a lot of people in our system That there was a lot of negativity like over the top negativity. And so I thought, well, At the time I wrote started writing the book. I was having some challenges in my own personal life. And I started thinking Well, what makes me happy? What? Because happiness is really a choice. H. How do I get myself to that level of feeling happy? And then also, how do I Motivate myself to be positive. So I just started writing down positive affirmations. One thing led to another. All of a sudden we had over 100 positive affirmations, and we decided to write a book. The second thing on this one was Then we said, Well, the book is great, But is there a training system that we can actually Move people into and take them through sequences of actually finding that level of positivity that they actually have within them, But they may not know about right. So it's called How high is your PQ? That's kind of the companion guide to this. What do you mean by PQ? Positive quotient. So like, how high is your IQ? Your intelligence quotient. I looked at it from the standpoint of Well, Are we at a one or we had an eight and we had a 10. And the answer is we fluctuate all the time. What's the scale of 1 to 10? Okay, so 10 being the highest one being lowest. And in many cases will find even in our own personal lives that today I might be too sure why is that? Well, there might be many mitigating factors, too, that it could be our diet could be our exercise could be traumatic event or thing that happened in her life. But the point is at that point in life. We have to step back. Take a breath and literally think about well what? What makes me positive. What makes me happy? And there's a section in the study guide that talks more about having a gratitude list. That's one area. There's also a section about the type of supplements that actually helps reduce stress and exercise. How it helps reduce stress, So it's not just A Polyana type attitude of always trying to be the most positive person in the room. It's a combination of many different things that we looked at, and I started just Writing down things and trying to figure out moving from one element to the next. How can we get to that whole realm of positivity? And actually maintain that balance in our life instead of jumping from a two or even a one all the way up to a 10. How do we balance well is to try to keep some sort of kind of baseline. Yes. And Brian. The workbook has 10 attributes of a positive person, which is great. Just give us one or two. That kind of stick out. Probably the one that's easiest to talk about is trying to see the good in everything. Sometimes there are things that happen in our lives that we don't have control of. And we may look at that and say my life is completely utterly devastated right now. Yet there might be a bigger picture, which would be another attribute of a positive person. Let's look at the bigger picture. But let's also try to see the good in something even when we're dealing with people one on one They may be negative. They may even be completely selfish and only want everything focus. Field way of living with diabetes is a pain you've got to remember to do your testing, and you always need to be sticking your fingers. The new way To live your life with diabetes is with a continuous glucose monitor. You simply apply a discreet,.

Brian Hazel Taryn Winter Brian 10 uterine Positive People Make Things Ha eight today Brill 10 attributes 16th book 1 two over 100 positive affirmations second thing one element one One thing Point Polyana
"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Everybody and welcome to bestseller TV. I'm Taryn Winter Brill. We're here with Gary McGrath. He is the author of a CEO's journey. The seven steps of intentional leadership making good bosses into great leaders. It's great to have you with us. Thank you, Terry. Good to be here. I should say, Dr Gary, Dr Gary, I go by that because I got my doctor later in life. And when I finished my engineering degree in college, I said, I'm never going back to school was kind of burned out. And but I found out later on that I'm actually a lifelong learner. So I loved to go back to school. Got my master's Got my doctor fifties. Yeah, that's incredible. It's never never too late. A lot of number too late. This is your second book. It is great, great. And the first one was on leadership as well. The first was on sales leadership was kind of a how to book with this one is more all encompassing the leadership specifically. Yeah. Okay. Well, the title is the CEOs journey is this Your journey. Um, partly, yes, I think that every book has a part of the author in it, No matter what it is, Um, And this particular journey is because most CEOs are challenged in the work that they do every day and leading an organization. And the biggest thing I think, is there all alone there by themselves, so it's really hard for them to find people to confide in and work with, and we all I need somebody to talk to. This book is about CEO that really struggles and in that journey and hires a coach to help them and it's something that is becoming a lot more popular now. But it's been around a long time. Right? And I just think CEOs and executives should always consider and can understand how to heads are always better than one. We say that And then we don't live it right? Because we should say the book is sort of laid out in this scenario between Karen and Paul Mariners coach Karen's the coach somebody that Paul had worked for in the past. It's really interesting because its position where he's struggling with everything With his job with his family with his kids. He's struggling with everything and doesn't know where to turn and went back into his history. And Karen was somebody who had worked with in the past and somebody trusted. And called her up and said help? Yeah s O s. But that said you bring up a good point. How do you go about finding a coach? I mean, he'd worked with Karen in the past. But what if you've never worked with someone in the past, you trust where you began? There are coaches everywhere in our days, but typically, I think that if you just ask around and ask other CEOs who you're working with Um, those kinds of personal referrals are probably the best way to find a good coach right before we get into the seven steps. Tell us a little bit more about your background. Your professional background got an ROTC scholarship at the river's Connecticut got an engineering degree in mechanical and metallurgical engineering. And went right into the army. And, uh, when I was 25 years old, I had the first opportunity actually command a unit of 120 soldiers. Wow. So with three older brothers that were in the military All enlisted and I was the first that went into the military as an officer. They made it very clear to me. Listen to your non commissioned officers, So I kept my mouth shut, and I listened to these very experienced sergeants. And had a pretty successful career. But I learned in that experience that the culture of the army wasn't the right fit for me. My whole family was navy, My dad. My four brothers, my son. We're all navy. And we have 108 years of military service amongst us. And so that's where I began my journey and then went to manufacturing with my engineering degree and Procter and Gamble. It's got paper was Got a lot of really good management, leadership training. Uh, again. I just wasn't It didn't feel right to me yet. So I started my first business. I work for Stephen Covey for the Cover Leadership Center and Ken Blanchard teaching situation leadership. And my wife told me that I needed to get a real job. So went back into business. And I learned at that point that in order to really do something. The old way of living with diabetes is a pain you've got to remember.

Karen Terry Taryn Winter Brill Gary McGrath Paul Mariners Procter and Gamble Ken Blanchard Stephen Covey 108 years Gary Paul 120 soldiers second book Cover Leadership Center four brothers first first business first opportunity 25 years old fifties
"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"I'm Taryn Winter. Brill, We're here with NEEN. James. She is the author of Attention pays. It's great to have you with us. Thanks, giddy. It's so great to be with you. Good day. It's nice to have you with us. The book grabs you because immediately I'm thinking attention pays. How In what way? Does it pay off? Monitor early? Figuratively literally. What do you mean by that? Attention pays attention pays when you think about it. Attention is like a currency. They want to come back because you become top of mind for them. So there's obviously the items sell opportunity. There's the increased satisfaction schools that you get That intention pays. Also, really, I guess it's beneficial when you think about talent. If you're trying to attract and retain the top talent, what you can do is say this is the company to work for for these reasons, and when you're paying attention to your team to employees. They're happier. They're satisfaction scores go up as well and then personally think about it. When you actually pay attention to the people in your life and make them feel important, they stay around with you longer and I think that has some amazing benefits so attention Paises personally professionally and it's even globally, So it's across the board. Absolutely, and tell me about the genesis for writing this book in your personal experience in your background. Do you feel that? Attention in these three capacities really isn't being paid or it's not being paid enough. I think it's a combination of everything. I think we think we're paying attention. But we're not, and I've always been known for my work and productivity. And I always believed that that was important. But I do believe that you can't manage time 10 management at the window and that makes no sense to me. It's not that we have a time management crisis. We have an attention crisis. People aren't paying attention anymore. They're distracted by their devices. They're trying to be everything to everyone. They're trying to get everything done. They have never ending to do list, but they don't actually feel like they're getting anything done. Right. And what is he doing? Nothing is busy doing nothing Busy is not necessarily productive. You're you're in motion, but you're not accomplishing right? And I think we were busy. Like a badge of on that. Have you ever been in a van or a party or at work? And they're like, Oh, my God. I'm so busy trying how busy each other. It's three, right? Right. But what I do believe in is when you really gift someone your undivided attention, your relationships increase When you gift your.

Taryn Winter Brill three Attention pays NEEN James three capacities Attention pays attention attention pays Attention
"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Welcome to best seller TV. I'm Taryn Winter. Brill, We're here with Brian Hazel grin. He is the author of Positive People Make Things Happen. Exclamation Point. It's great to have you with us again. Thank you tearing good to see you so This is your 16th book. It is. Wow. That's incredible beyond words. Congratulations. Thank you. How do you decide what to write about? Well, actually, we found out that there was a market need. So I'm in the health and wellness business. Our company focuses on healthy products, healthy services. Even the color of the book is based on healthy colours, Blue, green and orange. Oh, kidding. Are literally according to science. Healthy colours make us feel better. So we found out that when we were talking to a lot of people in our system There was a lot of negativity like over the top negativity. And so I thought, well, At the time I wrote started writing the book. I was having some challenges in my own personal life, and I started thinking Well, what makes me happy one. This happiness is really a choice. Mhm. How do I get myself to that level of feeling happy? And then also, how do I motivate myself to be positive? So I just started writing down positive affirmations. One thing led to another. All of a sudden we had over 100, positive affirmations and We decided to write a book. The second thing on this one was Then we said, Well, the book is great, but is there a training system that we can actually move people into and take them through? Sequences of actually finding that level of positivity that they actually have within them, But they may not know about right. So it's called How high is your PQ? That's kind of the companion guide to this. What do you mean by PQ? Positive quotient. So like, how high is your I Q Your intelligence explosion? I looked at it from the standpoint of Well, Are we at a one or we had an eight or we had a 10 and the answer is we fluctuate all the time. What's the scale of 1 to 10? I understand. Okay, so 10 being the highest one being lowest. And in many cases will find even in our own personal lives that today I might be a too sure. Well, why is that? Well, there might be many mitigating factors, too, that it could be our diet could be our exercise could be traumatic event or thing that happened in her life. But the point is at that point in life. We have to step back. Take a breath and literally think about well what? What makes me positive. What makes me happy? And there's a section in the study guide that talks more about having a gratitude list. That's one area. Was also a section about the type of supplements that actually helps reduce stress and exercise how it helps reduce stress, So it's not just a Pollyanna type attitude of always trying to be the most positive person in the room. It's a combination of many different things that we looked at, and I started just writing down things and trying to figure out moving from one element to the next. How can we get to that whole? Realm of positivity. And actually maintain that balance in our life instead of jumping from a two or even a one all the way up to attend. How do we balance oil is to try to keep some sort of kind of baseline? Yes. And Brian. The workbook has 10 attributes of a positive person, which is great. Just give us one or two. That kind of stick out. Probably the one that's easiest to talk about is trying to see the good in everything. Sometimes there are things that happen in our lives that we don't have control of. And we may look at that and say my life is completely utterly devastated right now. Yet there might be a bigger picture, which would be another attribute of a positive person. Let's look at the bigger picture. But let's also try to see the good in something even when we're dealing with people one on one They may be negative. They may even be completely selfish and only want everything focused on them. But.

Brian Hazel Taryn Winter Brian 10 Positive People Make Things Ha today eight Brill 16th book 10 attributes 1 two second thing over 100 One thing one element one one area Point Pollyanna
"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"I'm Taryn Winter. Brill, We're here with Brian Hazel grin. He is the author of Positive People Make Things Happen. Exclamation Point. It's great to have you with us again. Thank you tearing good to see you here so This is your 16th book. It is. Wow, That's incredible Beyond words. Congratulations. How do you decide what to write about? Well, actually, we found out that there was a market need. So I'm in the health and wellness business. Our company focuses on healthy products, healthy services. Even the color of the book is based on healthy colours, blue, green and orange. No kidding. Are literally according to science. Healthy colours make us feel better. So we found out that when we were talking to a lot of people in our system There was a lot of negativity like over the top negativity. And so I thought, well, At the time I wrote started writing the book. I was having some challenges in my own personal life. And I started thinking Well, what makes me happy? What? Because happiness is really a choice. Mhm. How do I get myself to that level of feeling happy? And then also, how do I motivate myself to be positive? So I just started writing down positive affirmations. One thing led to another. All of a sudden we had over 100, positive affirmations and We decided to write a book the second thing on this one. Then we said, Well, the book is great, but is there a training system that we can actually move people into and take them through? Sequences of actually finding that level of positivity that they actually have within them, But they may not know about right. So it's called How high is your PQ? That's kind of the companion guide to this. What do you mean by PQ? Positive quotient. So like, how high is your I Q Your intelligence quotient? I looked at it from the standpoint of Well, Are we at a one? Or we had an eight We had a 10. And the answer is we fluctuate all the time. What's the scale of 1 to 10? Okay, so 10 being the highest one being lowest. And in many cases will find even in our own personal lives that today I might be a too sure. Well, why is that? Well, there might be many mitigating factors, too, that it could be our diet could be our exercise could be traumatic event or thing that happened in her life. But the point is at that point in life. We have to step back. Take a breath. And literally think about Well what? What makes me positive. What makes me happy? And there's a section in the study guide that talks more about having a gratitude list. That's one area. There's also a section about the type of supplements that actually helps reduce stress and exercise. How it helps reduce stress, So it's not just Polyana type attitude of always trying to be the most positive person in the room. It's a combination of many different things that we looked at, and I started just Writing down things and trying to figure out moving from one element to the next. How can we get to that whole? Realm of positivity and actually maintain that balance in our life instead of jumping from a two or even a one all the way up to attend. How do we find the oil is to try to keep some sort of kind of baseline? Yes. And Brian. The workbook has 10 attributes of a positive person, which is great. Just give us one or two. That kind of stick out. Probably the one that's easiest to talk about is trying to see the good in everything. Sometimes there are things that happen in our lives that we don't have control of, and we may look at that and say my life is completely utterly devastated right now. Yet there might be a bigger picture, which would be another attribute of a positive person. Let's look at the bigger picture. But let's also try to see the good in something even when we're dealing with people one on one They may be negative. They may even be completely selfish and only want everything focused on When kids need medical care, they will often face stressful and life changing experiences from complex treatments. Long hospital stays. These special patients miss out on the things that most kids take for granted.

Brian Hazel Taryn Winter Brian 10 eight Positive People Make Things Ha 10 attributes 16th book 1 today Brill one element second thing over 100 two one area One thing one
"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Seller TV. I'm Taryn Winter. Brill. We're here with Julie Cotino. She's the author of Twist How Fresh Perspectives Build Breakthrough Brands. It's Great to Have you With Us. Glad to Be Here, Terence. So first off to what does twist refer isn't a verb. Is it? A noun? Do tell. It's both. Actually. Okay. So twist is a noun like a plot twist writing, you know, new and exciting about your bank brand in your business, And it's also the verb to twist things to Not a category. Best practices brands that you love that had nothing to do with your brand. And then you twist those best practices with your business. Okay, So tell us about the genesis for putting this in writing. What did you find was missing. What was the mistake? People are making that you're trying to fix with the book. Yeah, I think it's so hard these days to stand out in any category. There's so much competition. Yeah, fact I just got back from teaching a class with Tyra Banks. Stanford at the Graduate School of his Yes, Wow. And tire always says that it's better to be different than to be better. And I think that's true. I don't guides enough anymore for business is just to be really good at what they do. Unfortunately, I think they have to be really good what they do, and they have to be unique and stand out. So that's why I wrote the book. I really want to help businesses of all sizes. Learned how to stand out breakthrough. Make the most of the tiny budgets that we have this day's entire bags. Probably say that it was applicable to her right in her time. She was different. Yeah, right. She broke through. She had to differentiate herself. And it's also about personal branding as well in the book. Sure, And I like you discussing the book. Sort of the moment. You know, this'd idea thing. Twist approach came to be involved in barrage. Please tell us a little bit about it story it is, Yeah. It was in the winter of 2002 and I was a branding consultant. I was traveling a lot, and I was at Newark Airport, having a very ho hum experience. You know, I really love to visit clients. But I don't really love to travel because I find that the whole process is kind of boring. You know, there isn't a twist, and in this particular day I was at Newark Airport, and I looked up and all of a sudden I saw these McDonald's golden arches on the tail fin of an airplane. And in that moment, I thought to myself, that's an air line that has a twist. You know that's going to be different. It's gonna have more friendly attitude, maybe a menu of options. You know, McDonald's likes to supersize things. So maybe I could order a regular economy. See, See, the plane was really crowded and then supersized my seat. So I actually start to get really excited about this airline experience. And then I looked up again and I realized it was a mirage. It was the reflection of the food court on the airplane window, and there happened to be a jet parked there. How serendipitous like I mean, the angles were you were sitting alive. A lot goes into that timing. It was crazy, and it really was only about 30 seconds. But it was 30 seconds. That changed my life. A lightbulb epiphany moment. Exactly what What did you do next? You said to yourself. I said, That's how you do it. You know, I was working on some clients and I went back and I said I was working with the cosmetics client. I said, Well, this is how we're going to innovate for this client. We're going to stop worrying about what all the competition does. You know it was Avon at the time is that we're not gonna look at Revlon or Loreal or Mary Kay. We're gonna look at brands that have great experiences, but in different categories and take those experiences and twist them back, and we did that, and we came up with one hour brainstorming tons of new idea. Is that we had never approached before, And from that moment on, I've been I've been twisting after the race and twisted. So can you give us some real life examples and twist stories that you mentioned Avon? How you know, putting this execution of the twist, so to speak. Well, I actually had the great fortune to work for Virgin for many years of is the head of brands Richard Branch, Richard Branson and one of the reasons I was so excited when they called me to go work there. Most of us like to be out.

Taryn Winter Julie Cotino Tyra Banks Revlon Avon Virgin Twist How Fresh Perspectives B 30 seconds Loreal Terence Mary Kay Branch McDonald's Brill both one hour one about 30 seconds Newark Airport Stanford
"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Hi, everybody. Welcome to best seller TV. I'm Taryn Winter. Brill. We're here with Shelly are shambo. She's the author of Unapologetically ambitious, Take risks, break barriers and create success on your own terms. Shelly, It's so great to have you with us. Oh, it's wonderful to be here, Taryn. Thank you so much. So first up. Tell us about this. This very powerful title. It really strikes you because before I opened the cover, or I thought to myself have you had to apologize up to this point, so to speak for your ambition throughout your life? You know, the answer is yes, but I was little little kid. You know, I've been being ambitious was actually okay. But then I found when I got into business, people would say, Oh, you're ambitious, and it was not meant as a compliment. Right? Uh, yeah, And that's ridiculous. That's what you do it. So when it came time to write this book and cup of the title, I knew I wanted the word ambition in it someplace because I'm like that's this is what it's really all about. And the whole unapologetic piece. Well, that got inspired because I was having a conversation with my friends talking about the importance of or how often if you will, women apologize, and I'm like, you know what? That's it? Unapologetically ambitious. Everyone deserves the right to be ambitious, and nobody should have to apologize for it. Yeah, I mean, you're so successful. I love the book because we really get such a personal portal into you know your your ambition and your success through life, but That said, I just want to bring up. What? What? You just referred to where you want to those women that actually apologize. Was that something? You you had to learn how not to do so. Absolutely. I remember when I first got married. Um, you know, my husband would step on my foot and I would apologize. There's obviously my foot was in his way, right? I mean, yes, I was definitely one of those over apologizes and I literally had to work on it not to apologize all the time because of business. Honestly, it makes us look weak. Women apologize not because we actually did something wrong when we do that, probably 5% of the time, but the other 95% is we use it like salt. It just makes everything better. Right? It's smooth feathers that makes let people know we care about them and that we empathize and, you know, we use it just to ease tensions. And we got to stop doing that. But that said, Why do you think men don't do that? I mean, don't they want to do all the things you just mentioned as well? I don't think so. I asked my husband I said I told him. I said, You never apologize. There's somebody talk about apologize, but I said No, you don't. He said Shelly, If I've done something wrong, that's completely my fault. I apologize. Did you hear that definition? Completely my fault. Wow. Talk about it definition for what An apology is needed. So Shelly, All that said, is that the reason why you wanted to put this in writing for our benefits is sort of discussed all these times where you feel you had to apologize and barriers you broke through. Hmm. It's interesting. It wasn't so much all my apologizing that made me want to write the book, but maybe want to write. The book is I knew the odds weren't in my favor, and I spent my entire career being intentional and trying to improve my odds to get what I wanted. And I want to be able to share with others how they can do the same thing. Whole unapologetically piece. Really. It just came through is the title kind of as the bonus piece because I talk about that, too. But the core message on the book is how to get what you want out of life. Professionally and personally by being intentional, and I share strategies approaches tactic. Stevenson hacks right for how to do that, because it's hard and people make it so easy and I wanted people so they don't know it's hard and just because it's our don't stop. I want to talk about than how you did it right that. That's the benefit of the book. You mean because who taught? You just said you want to teach others how to do it. So who taught you how to do it? I learned from so many people along the way, you know, there wasn't one that said, Okay, here's the past. It was literally just paying attention and watching people that were successful. It's like okay, What did they do? How did they do that? What was their path? What jobs did they have? And then taking that research and knowledge and building it into my own plan. It was listening. You know, I'm a really good listener. This actually a lot of advice that comes down if you actually listen for it, and then you know. Lastly, it's seeking out help. Nobody does this all by themselves. Talk about how do you go get help? You don't sit behind a desk every day to earn a living. You're out and about making it happen. And sometimes you get a little bit behind on your paperwork, You know, like bookkeeping and paying your taxes. It's easy to get behind and paying your taxes. It happens to the best of us. And you know what happens next. The big bad I rs comes knocking on your door. And when that happens, you need to call the good old boys at the tax doctor. Let them do what they do Best deal and negotiate with the I R s So you pay the lowest you can in backpack. Who's that? The law allows. We are a 100%, U. S based company and we've saved our clients millions over the years in back taxes. If you owe $10,000 or more in back taxes, call my friends right now at the tax doctor and learn more 800 to 801876.

Taryn Winter Taryn $10,000 5% 95% 100% Stevenson Shelly U. S Brill millions Unapologetically ambitious first Take risks one barriers 800 to 801876 rs
"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Taryn Winter. Brill, We're here with Jeff BRANDEIS. He is the author of becoming a rainmaker. A guide for accountants and CPS demonstrates. Have you with us? Thank you so much for having me great to be here. So the title really grabbed me because full disclosure My dad was a C P A. So I am the daughter of an accountant. So I get this world. It's a unique where world but putting it mildly. So it's nice to see a guy that my dad could have had back in the day in terms of the genesis of writing this book to guide out there or two guides exist out there rather or is this the first of its kind? Further books on have a cell without a doubt. I don't not sure that there's actually one geared towards CPS that I've saw or seen on. I just thought this would be such a great topic for CBS to have something that Dedicated to them, as opposed to taking something that you never book and having it make it work for them. Right. So let's dive into because, you know guide is a specific word. So it's a guide in terms of what one of the primary share that we're talking about. What do you What do you trying to guide readers through? I'm trying to guide readers through how they ashy Bill Better report and pastor report. With their what we call prospects in the cells roll or potential clients so that they can basically cut down that cell cycle. That they really don't understand how to go sell or that sells process if you would. So what we teach in the book is how to recognize people how people learn Let's help people by and when you're able to match your presentation They're running style. You build that report three times faster in one third the time and it makes so much easier for the counter C p a to be able to do that when they recognize how people learn. That's what teaching the book Very interesting. Yeah, we're gonna get to that in a second. It is very unique. How we learn, And there are different ways of learning. Everybody learns differently is sort of the conduit to how you buy on. Do you talk about the different kinds of, you know? People in terms of learning and buying, But just to back up for a moment, the title it's unique, you know, becoming a rainmaker. Tell us tell us in your own words, what a rainmaker is and why why you wanted to put it in the title. It means so much to be in when you were in the paper, and you have the aspirations and the desire to become a partner to become a ball partner. You need to bring business in the door. CH call that green making bringing review into the firm. You're a rainmaker, and that's how you get to go get them over there up through the ranks in the sea pay for to become a partner. Is that right? So is that a common term in the industry rainmaker? Yes, it is it Z. It's actually coming with the more common even in the other industries these days, as opposed to people say, Hey, you gotta go tell him or that you gotta go. You increase your quarter. We need to be more re maker. We need those sales coming in the door. So bring those dollars. Come raining in if you would, so I'm a rainmaker. So is that that's an unwritten rule that if I don't bring in business, I'm just going to stay where I am. I consult maintain, you know, being an accountant at the firm, but I'm never gonna I'm never gonna, you know, climb the ladder, so to speak. I would say it's an unwritten rule, but your chances are can really be coming up on our sharing in the revenues. He's in Annapolis. You happening review in the door? Likelihood of getting a percentage of the profits candle E media like slimmer and if you were bringing obviously money in becoming a rainmaker and their way that way you're contributing to the overall pool. Now, do you? Are you still an accountant? Did you When did When Did you see her off into cells? And was it Because of something you were naturally doing, Jeff or someone teach you what was the genesis of your path, and you're rude. Well, I actually got my degree in accounting in New York from medical college. I got my masters in taxation. So I continued my schooling and I worked with you behave firms for five years. And candy. I learned the power process in working is he paid for? And I got really friendly with a great friend of mine. Who called what the book a Burstein. I know David now for 30 odd years, and he he was working for a taxi company..

Jeff BRANDEIS Taryn Winter David New York Jeff Annapolis five years CBS Brill Bill 30 odd years two guides CPS one third first Burstein one second
"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"To best seller TV. I'm Taryn Winter. Brill, We're here with Mark Victor Hansen. He is the author of You Have a book in You Make money with your story, Mark. It's great to have you with us. There is the book in you and all of us. Look, everybody has got a book in him and, you know, traveled everyone around the world. Talk to 7007 Million people in 80 countries and people whisper I got a story and me And when we did the chicken soup thing every time Jack and I'd talk for three hours of three days. Your three minutes, somebody and say, Well, I got a story. Can I tell you my story and we writers fast We could. We didn't have transcription and telephone jet, But every one of us got a story and it needs to be told that needs to be shared. It needs to be preserved. That needs to be archived. It need to be all those things and it needs between the pages of the book because books will live based on I never said this before. But based on Alexandria, which I'm studying right now, the oldest library, the guy who you know, Alexander, the great created a brand new illumination. There you go. There you go. But I do want to say you. You kind of touched upon it for anybody out there who doesn't know we It's truly an honor to be chatting with you. Because if there's anyone to believe that, you know you have a book in You make money money with your story. You're the guy to talk to because you were the co author of the Chicken Soup for the Soul, Syriza. Um, over 500 million copies sold 254 books in print just related to the chicken soup for the soul. So quite an accomplishment. I mean, before we get into this book, I'm sure a lot of people want to know. Did you ever in your wildest dreams? Thank you Had that much chicken soup in you. This chicken soup empire would have come from what started with your co author Jack and I got together. We're talking the 6000 people at a conference called Mandala. He talked way in the morning and I'm talking late at night, and I'm putting everything away after I'd signed hundreds and hundreds of books are self published at the time. And so is Jack Dr Canfield and he comes up said I'm Jack Canfield. I said Dr Kimble, I'm a fan of yours. I read your book, 100 Ways Self Stephen Classroom. Well, we had a Vulcan mind meld. He said. I've never heard anyone tell stories like you do that. We don't do it. It's a look long story short after we wrote it for three years in a row, just cause we wear, really Stumbling to get the right formula and we said Ultimately, the formula had seven little recall discernment or the the curbs on our highway like a headache on instantaneous behavioral change it had caused goose bumps. Got bombs chilly months, I'd go over all of them. Yeah. And then I wrote all the goals. Objection. I don't know. We're gonna sell one or a million. I said that. Let me do it because I'm the gold setting Master here. I had everything I ever wanted. Written it. Seen it visualized it realized it. And and so we did a million and a half a year and a half. And then we wrote that we'll do five million, which we had 144 publishers also hit the road, Jack, if you know that old story and I said it's okay. I'm joking now. But if you don't like Jack, but I'm a nice guy. Jackson. What's wrong Mark? Right, 14 and easy one of the greatest guys in the world's. The point is Set those goals, not knowing whether we could do it and you know, then I kept expanding them because it really did work. And like you said, we did everything like we did Chicken soup for the teenage owner publisher that you guys have blown it this time. Nobody's gonna buy that. I got teenagers of my CDs, concert tickets and closed When I get my kids 50 bucks. I say when I get home what happened, he said the mall aid. It's good. We sold 19 million the first year and we bloodied up with Nickelodeon and had 12,000 kids read all this. Story. Jack and I wrote which we thought were all tens and the kids it now get that story out here. So we had on Lee stories that resonated with kids. We're talking about preteens and teens. Here's an important cove in 19 school system Update for your local area. If you're concerned about your child's education, please pay close attention to this message. The current school systems were not set up for at home learning. If you're worried that your child may not be getting the grades, they need to get ahead, maybe losing self confidence or you're worried about them getting into a good college because of their.

Taryn Winter Jack Canfield Mark Victor Hansen Jackson Nickelodeon 254 books 19 million Jack 50 bucks Chicken Soup for the Soul 144 publishers hundreds three years 12,000 kids five million 6000 people one 80 countries Brill three hours
"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Everybody. And welcome to best seller TV. I'm Taryn Winter. Brill, We're here with Danielle DiMartino Booth. She's the author of Fed up an insider's Take on Why The Federal Reserve is bad for America. Great to have you with us. Thank you for having me today. Love the title first off. We were just talking behind the scenes it It's amazing you were able to get that title. It's a study in subtlety, isn't it? It really is. Let's get right into it before we get into why you feel the Federal Reserve is bad for America. Tell us how you're an insider. How is this an insider's Take? Are you the insider? I was the insider I was, and I said for nearly nine years, but more importantly, If you go further back into my background just a little bit. I was also an insider on Wall Street. So I took a much different perspective into the federal Reserve. That of somebody who saw the world through the prism of the financial markets. Okay on then I ended up being there. Prior to the financial crisis kind of as the housing bubble was. Erupting and the great financial crisis was descending upon the economy in the country and the global economy, for that matter, so I was able to really have a bird's eye view. On the carnage of the financial crisis from ground zero. The front lines of the federals are on the frontlines. Absolutely, and tell us in what capacity did you work? The Federal Reserve. I started out as an analyst and I ended up becoming an adviser to Richard Fisher on monetary policy, and before he would go after Washington. I would brief him on Every matter that seemed to be as concerned with the financial markets as opposed to just economic data flow, GDP growth inflation, etcetera. I really briefed him on what was happening in commercial real estate. What was happening in the corporate bond market, which affects a lot of your readers, Obviously sure every aspect of the financial markets that you could possibly name Was my responsibility and Daniel, you know, looking back at the 2008 financial crisis. Bring us back. Did you see it coming? You know I did, And that's I think the reason that I came onto Richard Fisher's radar screen in the first place was that before I joined the Fed, I was predicting that the housing bubble would not just present itself if you will. That it would present systemic risk as well. It would become a threat to the entire global financial system, and there weren't very many people saying that in 2005 in 2006, but I was and that really, you know, I think a lot of people at the Fed, including Richard Fisher himself weren't convinced. That what was happening in the subprime housing market was going to become this mammoth issue. To face down for central bankers all around the world, but they brought me on. They brought me into this said just in case just in case I was right. And they said Thanks, but no, thanks. No, no, no, no. There was definitely a point of validation after I came into the fed, But it wasn't very It wasn't really a cause for celebration because you're not celebrating. Millions of people beginning to lose their homes. The economy descending in the worst recession since the Great Depression, right, But how come no one took the threat more seriously? Well, it had been since the 19 thirties since the Great Depression that we had seen the phenomenon of nationwide price declines. Residential real estate was always kind of the local phenomena. And yet here we were, Despite the fact that Alan Greenspan and subsequently Ben Bernanke assured the American public This could never happen on a nationwide scale. And yet it did. So let's talk a little bit about the book specifically why now, why write this book? Now? Has this been a labor of love is it's been many years in the making. It has. It's certainly been a reason to pull myself away from my my family and my young Children, But by the same token, I felt that I had a responsibility.

Federal Reserve Richard Fisher Fed America Taryn Winter Danielle DiMartino Brill Alan Greenspan analyst Ben Bernanke Washington Daniel
"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Welcome to best seller TV. I'm Taryn Winter. Brill, We're here with Brian Hazel grin. He is the author of Positive People Make Things Happen. Exclamation Point. It's great having with us again. Thank you, Terry. Good to see you so This is your 16th book. It is. Wow. That's incredible beyond where is congratulations. Thank you. How do you decide what to write about? Well, actually, we found out that there was a market need So I'm in the health and wellness business. Our company focuses on healthy products, healthy services. Even the color of the book is based on healthy colors blue, green and orange. No kidding. Are literally according to science. Healthy colors make us feel better. So we found out that when we were talking to a lot of people in our system There was a lot of negativity like over the top negativity. And so I thought, well, At the time I wrote started writing the book. I was having some challenges in my own personal life, and I started thinking Well, what makes me happy? What Happiness is really a choice. How do I get myself to that level of feeling happy? And then also, how do I Motivate myself to be positive. So I just started writing down positive affirmations. One thing led to another. All of a sudden we had over 100 positive affirmations, and we decided to write a book. The second thing on this one was Then we said, Well, the book is great, But is there a training system that we can actually Move people into and take them through sequences of actually finding that level of positivity that they actually have within them, But they may not know about right. So it's called How high is your peak? You? That's kind of the companion guide to this? What do you mean by PQ? Positive quotient. So like how How's your I Q Your intelligence quotient? I looked at it from the standpoint of Well are we had a one or we had an eight and we had a 10. And the answer is we fluctuate all the time. What's the scale of 1 to 10? Don't OK, so 10 being the highest one being lowest. And in many cases will find even in our own personal lives that today I might be a to check. Why is that? Well, there might be many mitigating factors to that It could be our diet could be our exercise could be traumatic event or things that happened in her life. But the point is at that point in life. We have to step back. Take a breath. Literally think about what makes me positive. What makes me happy? There's a section in the study guide that talks more about having a gratitude list. That's one area. Was also a section about the type of supplements that actually helped reduce stress and exercise how it helps reduce stress, So it's not just a poly Anna type attitude of always trying to be the most positive person in the room. It's a combination of many different things that we looked at, and I started just writing down things and trying to figure out moving from one element to the next. How can we get to that hole? Realm of positivity and actually maintain that balance in our life instead of jumping from a two or even a woman all the way up to a 10. How do we find that oil is to try to keep some sort of kind of baseline. And Brian? The workbook has 10 attributes of a positive person, which is great. Just give us one or two. That kind of stick out. Probably the one that's easiest to talk about is trying to see the good in everything. Sometimes there are things that happen in our lives that we don't have control of, and we may look at that and say my life is completely utterly devastated right now. Yet there might be a bigger picture, which would be another attribute of a positive person. Let's look What's your I r s problem Do you owe back taxes? Is there a lien placed on your property? Have your bank account's been frozen or seized? Have your wages been garnished? Are you being audited by the I R s? Are they sending you letters that demand actions and have urgent due dates? Well, solving your tax problems is as easy as calling taxes. 3 to 1 on the I r s is the largest collection agency in the world. You need the best representation to give you peace. Peace of mind. You need experienced professionals that can cut through the red tape and stop the collection process. If you have a serious.

Brill Brian Hazel Taryn Winter Terry PQ
"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"To best seller TV. I'm Taryn Winter. Brill, We're here with Brian Hazel grin. He is the author of Positive People Make Things Happen. Exclamation Point. It's great having you with us again. Thank you, Terry. Good to see you so This is your 16th book. It is. Wow. That's incredible beyond words. Congratulations. Thank you. How do you decide what to write about? Well, actually, we found out that there was a market need So I'm in the health and wellness business. Our company focuses on healthy products, healthy services. Even the color of the book is based on healthy colors blue, green and orange. No kidding. Are literally according to science. Healthy colors make us feel better. So we found out that when we were talking to a lot of people in our system There was a lot of negativity like over the top negativity. And so I thought, well, At the time I wrote started writing the book. I was having some challenges in my own personal life. And I started thinking Well, what makes me happy? What? Happiness is really a choice. How do I get myself to that level of feeling happy? And then also how dowe I motivate myself to be positive, So I just started writing down positive affirmations. One thing led to another of a sudden we had over 100 positive affirmations, and we decided to write a book. Second thing on this one was then we said, Well, the book is great. But is there a training system that we can actually move people into and take them through sequences of actually finding that level of positivity that they actually have within them? But they may not know about right. So it's called How high is your peak? You? That's kind of the companion guide to this? What do you mean by P. Q. Positive quotient. So like, how high is your I Q Your intelligence quotient. I looked at it from the standpoint of Well are we had a one or we had an eight and we had a 10. And the answer is we fluctuate all the time. What's the scale of 1 to 10? Don't OK, so 10 being the highest one being lowest. And in many cases will find even in our own personal lives that today I might be a to check. Why is that? Well, there might be many mitigating factors to that It could be our diet could be our exercise could be traumatic event or things that happened in her life. But the point is at that point in life. We have to step back. Take a breath. And literally think about what makes me positive. What makes me happy? There's a section in the study guide that talks more about having a gratitude list. That's one area. Was also a section about the type of supplements that actually helped reduce stress and exercise how it helps reduce stress, So it's not just a poly Anna type attitude of always trying to be the most positive person in the room. It's a combination of many different things that we looked at, and I started just writing down things and trying to figure out moving from one element to the next. How can we get to that hole? Realm of positivity and actually maintain that balance in our life instead of jumping from a two or even a war all the way up to a 10. How do we think that oil is to try to keep some sort of kind of baseline? And Brian? The workbook has 10 attributes of a positive person, which is great. Just give us one or two. That kind of stick out. Probably the one that's easiest to talk about is trying to see the good in everything. Sometimes there are things that happened in our lives that we don't have control of. And we may look at that and say my life is completely utterly devastated right now. Yet there might be a bigger picture, which would be another attribute of a positive person. Meathead movie buff, Animal lover, Safe driver. Five years of driving an ambulance teaches you a thing or two. If people knew what I know lives could be saved. When I see a car trying to rush past the turning bus. I get concerned, you see when big vehicles turn right. They have to swing wide to make the turn. And that's a lesson. You don't want to learn the hard way. In trucks and Buster turned, let's you and I wait. It's our roads. It's our safety. Visit www dot share the road safely dot gov. Now you can fly anywhere in the world and paid discount prices on your airline Tickets book A flight today to London, Paris, Madrid or anywhere else you want to go and pay a lot less guaranteed. Call the International Travel Department right now at low cost airlines 800 to 17. 5107 800 to 175107. That's 800 to 17 51 07. This'd business rock stars from the NASDAQ Marketsite in Times Square. I'm Jeannie German, and our guest today is Lindsay Boyd. She is the co founder of the Lawn. Driss. Great to see you. They ain't coming in. Thank you for having me so the longest.

Lindsay Boyd Brian Hazel Brill Taryn Winter Terry International Travel Departmen Jeannie German Times Square London Buster Paris
"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Welcome to best seller TV. I'm Taryn Winter. Brill, We're here with Brian Hazel grin. He is the author of Positive People Make Things Happen. Exclamation Point. It's great. Have you with us again? Thank you, Terry. Good to see you so This is your 16th book. It is. Wow. That's incredible beyond words. Congratulations. Thank you. Um, how do you decide what to write about? Well, actually, we found out that there was a market need So I'm in the health and wellness business. Our company focuses on healthy products, healthy services. Even the color of the book is based on healthy colors blue, green and orange. No kidding. Are literally according to science. Healthy colors make us feel better. So we found out that when we were talking to a lot of people in our system There was a lot of negativity like over the top negativity. And so I thought, well, At the time I wrote started writing the book. I was having some challenges in my own personal life, and I started thinking Well, what makes me happy? What Happiness is really a choice. How do I get myself to that level of feeling happy? And then also how dowe I motivate myself to be positive, So I just started writing down positive affirmations. One thing led to another. All the sudden we had over 100 positive affirmations, and we decided to write a book. Second thing on this one was then we said, Well, the book is great. But is there a training system that we can actually move people into and take them through sequences of actually finding that level of positivity that they actually have within them? But they may not know about right. So it's called How high is your peak? You? That's kind of the companion guide to this? What do you mean by P. Q. Positive quotient. So like, how high is your I Q Your intelligence quotient. I looked at it from the standpoint of Well are we had a one or we had an eight and we had a 10. And the answer is we fluctuate all the time. What's the scale of 1 to 10? Don't OK, so 10 being the highest one being lost? And in many cases will find even in our own personal lives that today I might be a to check. Why is that? Well, there might be many mitigating factors to that It could be our diet could be our exercise could be traumatic event or things that happened in her life. But the point is at that point in life. We have to step back. Take a breath. And literally think about what makes me positive. What makes me happy? There's a section in the study guide that talks more about having a gratitude list. That's one area. There's also a section about the type of supplements that actually helped reduce stress and exercise. How it helps reduce stress, So it's not just Polyana type attitude of always trying to be the most positive person in the room. It's a combination of many different things that we looked at, and I started just Writing down things and trying to figure out moving from one element to the next. How can we get to that hole? Realm of positivity and actually maintain that balance in our life instead of jumping from a two or even a war all the way up to a 10. How do we think that oil is to try to keep some sort of kind of baseline? And Brian? The workbook has 10 attributes of a positive person, which is great. Just give us one or two. That kind of stick out. Probably the one that's easiest to talk about is trying to see the good in everything. Sometimes there are things that happen in our lives that we don't have control of. And we may look at that and say my life is completely utterly devastated right now. Yeah, there might be a And now the Bitcoin Boomer Gary Leland. Welcome to the day's Bitcoin for boomer show, And I say this once I say this 1000 times this show is not just for boomers. I just happen to be a boomer and I have to talk about Bitcoin. So the title is Bitcoin for boomers.

"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Welcome to best seller TV. I'm Taryn Winter. Brill, We're here with Brian Hazel grin. He is the author of Positive People Make Things Happen. Exclamation Point. It's great to have you with us again. Thank you, Terry. Good to see you so This is your 16th book. It is. Wow. That's incredible beyond words. Congratulations. Thank you. How do you decide what to write about? Well, actually, we found out that there was a market need So I'm in the health and wellness business. Our company focuses on healthy products, healthy services. Even the color of the book is based on healthy colors blue, green and orange. No kidding. Are literally according to science. Healthy colors make us feel better. So we found out that when we were talking to a lot of people in our system There was a lot of negativity like over the top negativity. And so I thought, well, At the time I wrote started writing the book. I was having some challenges in my own personal life, and I started thinking Well, what makes me happy? What Happiness is really a choice. How do I get myself to that level of feeling happy? And then also how doe I motivate myself to be positive, So I just started writing down positive affirmations. One thing led to another. All the sudden we had over 100 positive affirmations, and we decided to write a book. Second thing on this one was then we said, Well, the book is great. But is there a training system that we can actually move people into and take them through sequences of actually finding that level of positivity that they actually have within them? But they may not know about right. So it's called How high is your peak? You? That's kind of a companion guide to this? What do you mean by P. Q. Positive quotient. So like, how high is your I Q Your intelligence quotient. I looked at it from the standpoint of Well are we had a one or we had an eight and we had a 10. And the answer is we fluctuate all the time. What's the scale of 1 to 10? Don't OK, so 10 being the highest one being lowest. And in many cases will find even in our own personal lives that today I might be a too cheerful. Why is that? Well, there might be many mitigating factors to that It could be our diet could be our exercise could be traumatic event or things that happened in her life. But the point is at that point in life. We have to step back. Take a breath. Literally think about what makes me positive. What makes me happy? There's a section in the study guide that talks more about having a gratitude list. That's one area. There's also a section about the type of supplements that actually helped reduce stress and exercise. How it helps reduce stress, So it's not just Polyana type attitude of always trying to be the most positive person in the room. It's a combination of many different things that we looked at, and I started just Writing down things and trying to figure out moving from one element to the next. How can we get to that hole? Realm of positivity and actually maintain that balance in our life instead of jumping from a two or even a woman all the way up to a 10. How do we find this oil is to try to keep some sort of kind of baseline. And Brian The workbook has 10 attributes of a positive person, which is great. Just give us one or two. That kind of stick out. Probably the one that's easiest to talk about is trying to see the good in everything. Sometimes there are things that happened in our lives that we don't have control of, and we may look at that and say my life is completely utterly devastated right now. Yet there might be a bigger picture, which would be another attribute of a book. Now, take two if you want for wanted to claim the players in the National Football League, er soft. Maybe now I've got a story that would let you do that. I love that for you next. Hey, I have rhythm. I love to.

Brill Taryn Winter Brian Hazel Terry National Football League Brian The
"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"I'm Taryn Winter. Brill. We're here with Bill Hamburg. He is the author of Employees. 5.0 Secrets of a successful job search in the New World Order. Well, it's wonderful to have you with us. Thank you. Cheering is so much fun to be here. All right. Well, the first thing that grabs me are the numbers involved 5.0. What does that mean? Exactly? How'd you come up with it? And was there an employee 1.2 points, three points and so on. Well, you know, there's always been that employees one point out and two and three. I just figured I needed to get up into into the front of the pack. And the problem for most employees is they treat their careers just like jellyfish floating in the currents of their current company, and whatever happens, happens, and usually what ends up happening at some point is they get laid off? So employees. 5.0 is a person who takes charge of their career. They're not floating there out there. What's the next step? I need to do? Well, I need to be doing to be successful here. And how do I get to the next step? And so that said, using your metaphor of the jellyfish. I'm curious about the impetus of the book where you just surrounded and you know, drowning and all these jellyfish and you said, I gotta help these guys and gals. You know, it's funny terror. What I've found over the years is these people are just they're floating and so they don't have direction. And when they come to see me to find a job, what I'm able to do is to help them determine their direction and then takes a solid steps forward. I guess from your perspective you said to yourself, all right? I want to help them and I know you wrote you have another book prior to this, So talk a little bit too. They are They continue waiting books or we're kind of you know, what was the genesis of this specifically is the compares to your first book. So my first book was written. It actually started as a number of blog's in 2009. So during that big recession, and I knew that people just just because I've worked with him so long, I knew that they didn't know how to go about finding a job. So I wrote Recruiter Guy's guide to finding a job which was a lot smaller, but I just want to get it out and get people. Engaged in finding a job. Employees. Five point no secrets of a successful job search in New World order, I wrote and put a lot more detail into it and then wrote it from the perspective. Hey, stop being a jellyfish Take charge of your career. And tell us a little bit more about this new world order before I read it. I thought I had an inkling into what you meant. But in your own words, how would you describe it? Well, it is a new world order, you know. Human resource is Employees, artificial intelligence or you see, it is a I everywhere nowadays. To screen candidates out. And the problem is, there are top talent in their applicant tracking system. But since that top talent in the resumes, they're not using the exact same words. As a poorly written job description used, they never get chosen. Right, right? Yeah. And you talk about you said that talent attraction mirrors What you call the sales process perfectly. So talk about sort of that overlap. Well, it zapresic matches. You go down through it, so the first step is to identify on the sales process identifying need on the recruiting or job search process. It's this is our need, you know, either the job or a new person. And you go down through it Step by step. And you'll find that 0 to 60. I'm Brian of such Flooded streets and fast moving water can bring any city to a standstill. But some motorists ignore the calls for caution and drive through the floodwaters anyway. Chevrolets James Bell says the best idea is to turn around. If you see a barricade, it's there for a reason. Don't drive around it. It's hard to tell how deep the water flooded street really is. The average vehicle could have swept away in his little 12 inches of water, and that includes pickups and SUV's. Over half of all flooded related drownings happen when a vehicle is driven into hazardous floodwater. These types of deaths are preventable. Drivers need to know that flooded roads can collapse underneath them, or they could be swept away by strong current after exiting a vehicle. If that happens, I was traveling downstream contract or even crush you. And what if you must drive driving through flooded areas is a bad idea. But if you have no choice, estimate the depth of the water based on the car's driving ahead of you and go to slow and steady pace. For more information, go to Chevrolet dot com that 0 to 60 from Chevrolet. I'm Brian..

Bill Hamburg Taryn Winter Chevrolet James Bell
"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Best seller TV. I'm Taryn Winter. Brill. We're here with Julie Cotino. She's the author of Twist. How Fresh Perspectives Bill Breakthrough Brands. It's Great to Have you With Us. Glad to Be Here, Terence. So first off to what does twist refer isn't a verb is that it now on do tell. It's both, actually. So twist is a noun like a plot twist writing, you know, new and exciting about your bat brand in your business, And it's also the verb to twist things together. Okay, so to what does it apply? So it applies to finding a fresh way to talk about your brand to stand out in the marketplace, And it also applies to the methodology that I've created where you look at a category best practices of brands that you love and nothing to do with your brand. Then you twist those best practices with your business. Okay, So tell us about the genesis for putting this in writing. What did you find was missing. What was the mistake? People are making that you're trying to fix with the book. Yeah, I think it's so hard these days to stand out in any category. There's so much competition. In fact, I just got back from teaching a class with Tyra Banks Stanford at the Graduate School of Business. Wow, Entire always says that it's better to be different than to be better. And I think that's true. I don't think it's enough anymore for business is just to be really good at what they do. Unfortunately, I think they have to be really good what they do, and they have to be unique and stand out. So that's why I wrote the book. I really want to help businesses of all sizes learned how to stand out breakthrough. Make the most of the tiny budgets that we have these days. Entire bags. Probably say that that was applicable to her right in her time. She was different yet, right? Yeah, she broke through. She had to differentiate herself. And it's also about personal branding as well in the book. Sure, And I like you discussing the book sort of the moment. You know that this idea this twist approach came to be involved in Mirage. Please tell us a little bit about it. True story. It is. So was in the winter of 2002. And I was a branding consultant. I was traveling a lot, and I was at Newark Airport, having a very ho home experience. You know, I really love to visit clients. But I don't really love to travel because I find that the whole process is kind of Boring. You know, there isn't a twist, and in this particular day I was at Newark Airport, and I looked up and all of a sudden I saw these McDonald's golden arches on the tail fin of an airplane. And in that moment, I thought to myself, that's an air line that has a twist. You know that's gonna be different. It's gonna have more friendly attitude, maybe a menu of options. McDonald's likes just super sized things. So maybe I could order a regular economy seats. See, the plane was really crowded and then supersized my seat. So I actually start to get really excited about this airline experience. And then I looked up again and I realized it was a mirage. It was the reflection of the food court on the airplane window, and there happened to be a jet parked there. How serendipitous. I know the angles were you were sitting a lot. A lot goes into that timing. Yeah, it was crazy. And it really was only about 30 seconds. But it was 30 seconds. That changed my life. A life old epiphany moment. Exactly what What did you do next? You said to yourself. I said, That's how you do it. You know, I was working on some clients and I went back and I said I was working with a cosmetics client. I said, Well, this is how we're going to innovate for this client. We're going to stop worrying about what all the competition does. You know it was Avon at the time is that we're not gonna look at Revlon or Loreal or Mary. Do.

Newark Airport Julie Cotino Mirage Taryn Winter Terence McDonald Tyra Banks Graduate School of Business Loreal consultant Avon
"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"taryn winter" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"To best seller TV. I'm Taryn Winter. Brill. We're here with Julie Cotino. She's the author of Twist How Fresh Perspectives Build Breakthrough Brands. It's Great to Have you With Us. Glad to Be Here, Terence. So first off to what does twist refer isn't a verb is that it now on do tell. It's both, actually. So twist is a noun like a plot twist writing, you know, new and exciting about your bat brand and your business, And it's also the verb to twist things together. Okay, so to what does it apply, so it applies to finding a fresh way to talk about your brand? To stand out in the marketplace, and it also applies to the methodology that I've created where you look at a category best practices brands that you love and nothing to do with your brand. Then you twist those best practices with your business. Okay, So tell us about the genesis for putting this in writing. What did you find was missing. What was the mistake? People are making that you're trying to fix with the book. Yeah, I think it's so hard these days to stand out in any category. There's so much competition. In fact, I just got back from teaching a class with Tyra Banks Stanford at the Graduate School of Business. Wow, Entire always says that it's better to be different than to be better. And I think that's true. I don't think it's enough anymore for business is just to be really good at what they do. Unfortunately, I think they have to be really good what they do, and they have to be unique and stand out. So that's why I wrote the book. I really want to help businesses of all sizes. Learn how to stand out breakthrough. Make the most of the tiny budgets that we have these days. Entire bags. Probably say that that was applicable to her, right, because in her time she was different yet, right? Yeah, she broke through. She had to differentiate herself. And it's also about personal branding as well in the book. Sure, And I like you discussing the book sort of the moment. You know that this idea this twist approach came to be involved in Mirage. Please tell us what this is A true story, and it So was in the winter of 2002. And I was a branding consultant. I was traveling a lot, and I was at Newark Airport, having a very ho home experience. You know, I really love to visit clients. But I don't really love to travel because I find that the whole process is kind of Boring. You know, there isn't a twist, and in this particular day I was at Newark Airport, and I looked up and all of a sudden I saw these McDonald's golden arches on the tail fin of an airplane. And in that moment, I thought to myself, that's an air line that has a twist. You know that's going to be different. It's gonna have more friendly attitude, maybe a menu of options. You know, McDonald's likes to supersize things. So maybe I could order a regular economy. See, See, the plane was really crowded and then supersized my seat. So I actually start to get really excited about this airline experience. And then I looked up again and I realized it was a mirage. It was the reflection of the food court on the airplane window, and there happened to be a jet parked there. How serendipitous. I know. I mean, the angles were you were sitting alive. A lot goes into that timing. Yeah, it was crazy. And it really was only about 30 seconds. But it was 30 seconds. That changed my life. A lightbulb epiphany moment. Exactly what What did you do next? You said to yourself. I said, That's how you do it. You know, I was working on some clients and I went back and I said I was working with a cosmetics client. I said, Well, this is how we're going to innovate for this client. We're going to stop worrying about what all the competition does. You know it was Avon at the time is that we're not gonna look at Revlon. Has someone in your family lost a job recently and now you can't afford your mortgage payment, or do you have a rental property And your tenants aren't paying you quick cash offer can come to the rescue and pay you cash for your home immediately. Yes..

Julie Cotino Mirage Newark Airport McDonald Taryn Winter Terence Tyra Banks Graduate School of Business Revlon consultant Avon